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Article: Aloe mite: The hidden scourge of the Mediterranean succulent garden: Adept(tm) gets rid of Aloe Mites

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jeffmerkey
Albuquerque, NM

April 17, 2012
11:53 PM

Post #9087086

An insect growth regulator called Adept works well on infected aloes and gets rid of the mites systemically. The product states its not effective on mites, but this refers to spider mites, it kills aloe mites dead because they have development stages must like instars seen in insects, and are vulnerable to this compound. It prevents all arthropods from creating chitin by blocking the enzymes used to make it, and triggers them to molt early. When they molt early, they have no exoskeleton, and are just a membrane that ruptures and they die during the molting process. It is very deadly to all arthropods, but harmless to plants and people. It has long duration toxic effects to all insects, spiders, etc. and is applied by watering the soil. The plants absorb it and become poisonous to athropods for about 6 weeks per application. Mites be gone.

Jeff Merkey

palmbob

palmbob
Acton, CA
(Zone 8b)


April 18, 2012
8:11 AM

Post #9087424

Seems odd. Not sure where you are getting your information. Diflubenzuron is specifically formulated for use in greenhouse situations and for fungus gnats. Even the package insert claims it has no effect on mites and minimal on beneficial insects (not sure how that claim is made). Most IGRs that I am familiar with have been shown to have not effect whatsoever on mites or other arachnids at any life stage... in fact, using them can sometimes cause mite population explosions thanks to killing off natural predators in greenhouse situations. How can a product that is designed for indoor use, and targets specific insects be safe to use outdoors in a scale of acres without danger to native insect populations if it is applied at such a large volume to affect creatures outside its normal spectrum of activity? This particular product is also injurious to several succulents, such as Euphorbias... I have no information if it is safe to use on aloes, but I would very reluctant to use it around my plants or in a botanical garden that has a lot of Euphorbias.
jeffmerkey
Albuquerque, NM

April 19, 2012
7:49 PM

Post #9089610

palmbob wrote:Seems odd. Not sure where you are getting your information. Diflubenzuron is specifically formulated for use in greenhouse situations and for fungus gnats. Even the package insert claims it has no effect on mites and minimal on beneficial insects (not sure how that claim is made). Most IGRs that I am familiar with have been shown to have not effect whatsoever on mites or other arachnids at any life stage... in fact, using them can sometimes cause mite population explosions thanks to killing off natural predators in greenhouse situations. How can a product that is designed for indoor use, and targets specific insects be safe to use outdoors in a scale of acres without danger to native insect populations if it is applied at such a large volume to affect creatures outside its normal spectrum of activity? This particular product is also injurious to several succulents, such as Euphorbias... I have no information if it is safe to use on aloes, but I would very reluctant to use it around my plants or in a botanical garden that has a lot of Euphorbias.


We have a collection of Aloes of just about every species, most of them 25-30 years old grown out from seed. We tried everything and finally tried this on them. It has taken about a year, but the mites have almost been eliminated. This product is very effective when dealing with MONOCOTS, and its mostly used by orchid growers, which is where I started using it to control gnats on my draculas and bulbophyllum. Aloe mites produce growth stages much like instars seen in insects in the genus diptera, and for whatever reason this seems to work on them. The plants also develop vibrant red colors and they like the treatments, and respond with vigorous growth.

Our treatment schedule is to water with it every 6 weeks when the plants are in active growth. It was pleasing to watch these tumors shrivel on their own and slough off the plants when the new seasons leaves replaces the tops each year, with no sign of mites or their damage.

jeffmerkey
Albuquerque, NM

April 19, 2012
7:59 PM

Post #9089619

jeffmerkey wrote:

We have a collection of Aloes of just about every species, most of them 25-30 years old grown out from seed. We tried everything and finally tried this on them. It has taken about a year, but the mites have almost been eliminated. This product is very effective when dealing with MONOCOTS, and its mostly used by orchid growers, which is where I started using it to control gnats on my draculas and bulbophyllum. Aloe mites produce growth stages much like instars seen in insects in the genus diptera, and for whatever reason this seems to work on them. The plants also develop vibrant red colors and they like the treatments, and respond with vigorous growth.

Our treatment schedule is to water with it every 6 weeks when the plants are in active growth. It was pleasing to watch these tumors shrivel on their own and slough off the plants when the new seasons leaves replaces the tops each year, with no sign of mites or their damage.



And this nonsense it does not work on arachnids is bull. They put this on the label so they can sell it without EPA liablity -- this stuff is the deadliest compound I have ever seen. When you use it kills EVERYTHING for weeks. I find insects, spiders, and millipedes laying around the greenhouse complexes with their guts gooing out of them partly molted and dead. I have also observed this stuff is LETHAL to any aquatic arthropods, including crayfish. I am pretty certain they put this huey on the label to get people like you to quote it who have never personally used it so they can evade any environmental issues if someone is irresponsible with it. I can tell you this, if you use this stuff, you don't need to use any insecticides at all -- it does the job. The only thing I see it have trouble with is ants who go underground and haul mealy around the greenhouses, but it seems to reduce this to almost nothing with only light outbeaks.
jeffmerkey
Albuquerque, NM

April 21, 2012
6:35 AM

Post #9091369

palmbob wrote:Seems odd. Not sure where you are getting your information. Diflubenzuron is specifically formulated for use in greenhouse situations and for fungus gnats. Even the package insert claims it has no effect on mites and minimal on beneficial insects (not sure how that claim is made). Most IGRs that I am familiar with have been shown to have not effect whatsoever on mites or other arachnids at any life stage... in fact, using them can sometimes cause mite population explosions thanks to killing off natural predators in greenhouse situations. How can a product that is designed for indoor use, and targets specific insects be safe to use outdoors in a scale of acres without danger to native insect populations if it is applied at such a large volume to affect creatures outside its normal spectrum of activity? This particular product is also injurious to several succulents, such as Euphorbias... I have no information if it is safe to use on aloes, but I would very reluctant to use it around my plants or in a botanical garden that has a lot of Euphorbias.


We have over 200 Euphorbias, some of them trees, in the greenhouse treated the most with Adept, they turned a beautiful green after being relieved of being chewed on by mites (Aloe mites attack EVERYTHING not just aloes -- they prefer them for nesting, but they will feed on ANYTHING) and were covered with flowers. got lots of seeds. Huey!
Mandebvu
Harare
Zimbabwe

September 23, 2012
5:35 AM

Post #9283716

What is the active ingredient in Adept? Is it Diflubenzuron? Almost all plant/insect chemicals in my part of the world -- southern Africa -- go by different names, so it is hard to track something down using a trade name.

In all the posts I have read on Aloe mite, I have yet to find one where someone mentions the critical importance of alternating mitecides from one year to the next. Although it has been noted that Aloe mites succumb easily to all sorts of things, they evidently also adapt alarmingly quickly to whatever you use. Hence the importance of rotating.

This was stressed particularly at this year's international Aloe conference in Blyde River Canyon in South Africa.

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Other Article: Aloe mite: The hidden scourge of the Mediterranean succulent garden Threads you might be interested in:

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