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Clematis: Clematis in shrubs

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Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 21, 2012
12:49 AM

Post #9091162

I've read that to have a clematis clamber up through a shrub it should be planted 12" from the shrub root ball. But on which side?! Is the north side too dark? South side too hot? East? West? I realize that the vines will grow toward the south, which will place the flowers perfectly to be seen from the house. But where should the roots be?

I love Clem's, but there are already so many features in the main area that to add trellises or obelisks seems too much. I think there are plenty of opportunities to use them creatively, but of course want to get it right.

Thanks for any and all suggestions.

Pam

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pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

April 21, 2012
6:11 AM

Post #9091337

Ideally the clematis would face south, receive all the amendments needed as well as perfect sunshine but few of us can accommodate all the plants want (per articles and books). While many of mine do face south I do have many facing east that do very well.

You have such gorgeous gardens that I'm sure you could find many clematises to fit the exposures you have. There are several that do very well in limited sun, like Nelly Moser. On this site you'll find a list of clem's that perform well in shade (scroll down more than halfway for the list): http://www.clematisinternational.com/growing.html#pg5

When I had the clem's planted with roses I did plant a foot away but the bare legs of the roses allowed sunshine to get through.

My concern would be pruning. If you need to prune the shrub you'd automatically prune the clem unless you're exceptionally careful with each one.

Also, there are short trellises you could use that wouldn't be an eyesore. This trellis had an akebia when I took the photo but now it has two clem's.

Another alternative to trellises would be a large, sturdy branch that you could anchor in the ground. The clem will cover it quickly.

Let us know how you work out the issue. We'd love to see photos.

The second photo is of Nelly Moser in morning and late afternoon sun but no sun from the south.

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pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

April 21, 2012
6:17 AM

Post #9091347

Here's a photo by vossner showing a lovely trellis that wouldn't interfere with the look of your garden:
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/fp.php?pid=9091334
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 21, 2012
4:39 PM

Post #9092035

Thanks, Pirl. I've been admiring your gardens for a long time.

As it happens, at our place planting toward the south and east are the most advantageous for the best viewing. I thought I'd use the ones that get cut back hard, the ones that bloom on new wood, for at least 2 of the big box shrubs. They get pruned only once in the season, in the spring, so that should work out all right.

I love a pretty trellis-Pirl, yours is gorgeous! Arbors are wonderful, we actually have one near the entrance, and I have plans for it. There is also a south facing house wall I can use. Unfortunately it's the least noticed area in the whole place. The main part of our garden is an extension of the house from the inside. I love working on that picture, and have been slowly finding my way with it. I do also love it that when you turn the corner to the big view it takes your breath away. I can't imagine trying to breaking that up, but in a way it is limiting. We have so much going on already with the different levels, stone walls, the big barrel, and now there's a birdbath I put in the middle of the smaller daylily bed last fall (pic 1).

So I guess the dilemma is, if I start collecting clematis, I want to see them, I want them to be admired by people who will notice them more from inside the house than out. I want them to get more attention than they will on the short walk from the driveway to the house. Once the greetings are done with, the first glass of wine poured, someone drifts to the window to get another look at the view, and says, wow! What is that amazing flower? So it's a tall order, I think.

I've been looking at lots of pictures on this forum and elsewhere, and realize that there are many ways to use Clem's as part of the borders. There are lots of places where I'd like a little height in the garden. Some of the less vigorous types could be perfect. So please keep the ideas coming!

Is there one that would drape down from the barrel in pic 2? Or would it rather grow up into the trees? There's no room for the roots on the ledge it sits on, so I can't have one climbing up. The Virginia Creeper manages, but I have no idea how!

Pam

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pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

April 21, 2012
5:38 PM

Post #9092120

Such lovely views and photos!

Jackmanii would be noticed and it does get cut to the ground (or 12") each year. This one went over the 9'9" trellis and then over the three compost bins behind it so I'd guess it reached 18'. It does back up to the compost and I'm sure that's the secret for its size.

I'm trying to think of one that would fall and Helsingborg (purple) is the only one I can think of now but perhaps Rooguchi (also purple) would droop down but in the shade purple won't be noticed. At some point they will stop trying to go upwards so select your color and go hunting. Just don't allow it to get into the shrubs. A simple twist tie (not too tight) tied to a stake that leans forward should be all the encouragement it needs to droop.

Helsingborg does not get cut back so be sure to look at group 3's. Try Brushwood for looking and buying. They really are terrific plants. Here's the link: http://www.brushwoodnursery.com/clematis_jackmanii.htm Other clem's can be found by using the left side of the link and selecting what you'd like to have...small flowered, large flowered, etc. There are many companies that sell clematis but I've had the best from Brushwood.

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koshki
Grosse Pointe Shores, MI
(Zone 6a)

April 22, 2012
6:14 AM

Post #9092554

Wow, what a great thread!

Pfg and Pirl, you both have such lovely gardens. I can't get over that jackmanii...all that growth in one season???!!! I have a jackmanii superba on its way to me now. Getting to 8' would be more than enough for me!

I'm already an orchid addict, but I foresee an expanding clem collection in my future!
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

April 22, 2012
6:22 AM

Post #9092566

Thanks! Use all the compost and manure you can for the clem's and add in some Epsom salt (1 TBSP to a gallon of lukewarm water) and then you can use either rose or tomato food, which I've never done and that Jackmanii doesn't seem to mind missing out on the extra food.

Every year I cut it back short (12" in February) and it goes the whole length without a problem. We do cut it back in the summer when we need to use the compost for other plants.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 22, 2012
11:25 AM

Post #9092912

I'm so excited- I just got my clematis shipment from a co-op! They're all settled in for the short term on the city windowsill, waiting until Friday for the trip to the country. Hopefully by then the rain (2-5" expected) will have saturated our very dry soil and planting conditions will be good.
Here's the list:
Isago, a white double; Veronica's Choice, lavender double; Blue Light, lavender-blue; Will Goodwin, true blue; Viticella purpurea Plena elegans- which came by mistake but I'll find a place for it, never fear!; and on its way my original request, Violacea venosa. Yippee!

I'd like to put Isago on the box shrub behind Endless Summer Hydrangea. There are a lot of white flowers and silver foliage on the falling-down wall in front of it -not the clover in the grass, lol! That area was wiped out two years ago-reclaimed from major weed/thug/volunteer invasion- but is really beginning to fill in now. I realize Isago is Group 2, but that box only gets a light trim in the spring, so it should be ok. It will be facing south, with the Hydrangea in front of it.

One or two of the shade lovers are going on the north-facing wall of the house behind where the picture was taken from. There's a not-very-nice wrought iron railing by the entrance I'd like to camouflage. There's also not much root room because of the stone foundation and stair going down to the next level, so I'll have to figure that out.

There's another box opposite for another Clem or two, haven't worked that out yet... I guess this is the year of the clematis for me! I'm so thrilled to finally be able to add old favorites from another time in my gardening life to this project. And to be planting instead of spraying roundup... Aaah, life is good!

Thanks for all the advice and suggestions... Please keep them coming!

Pam


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pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

April 22, 2012
2:10 PM

Post #9093113

Have fun planting and be sure to post lots of photos as they bloom!
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

April 22, 2012
6:53 PM

Post #9093484

Pam - I don't know how far away from United Housewrecking you are but it could be worth a trip there (or a phone call) to see if they have any old cast iron gates for your clematises. It's a nice addition to the garden and would fit right in with the look of your garden. Just as nice in winter as when the clem's bloom.

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Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 22, 2012
8:24 PM

Post #9093640

Where are they? That's a great idea! You're right, old wrought iron would fit right in.

I just googled, they are in Stamford, which is not impossible but might not happen right away. But is that crazy salvage place still there on the Flanders road? I still get to the east end on my own from time to time, and would be able to make that detour. There used to be a place in Southampton, too, right near where I lived, but it's all cleaned up now.
Carolyn22
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

April 23, 2012
1:42 AM

Post #9093770

Pam

I have some clematis growing through shrubs. I started doing that when I started running out of room for the clematis I was buying. The only thing you really have to worry about it is that the clematis gets enough water and the pruning group. There isn't anything you cannot do with clematis. They would look so beautiful in your lovely gardens.

Co op clems are going to be small, so you will need to baby them the first year or so. Are they liner pots? If so, plant them into 1 gallon containers and wait to plant them about your shrubbery when the roots start to come out of the bottom of the pots. You and I are in the same zone and I have found that this could mean the pots will have to be heeled in for the winter and planted out next spring.

Arlene - love the idea about the gates for trellises.

Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 23, 2012
2:31 AM

Post #9093779

My co-op clems are fairly mature, they have great root systems. At the moment I have them stuffed into quart pots in the city, but Friday I'll get them to the house and pot them up to at least gallon if I can't plant them right away. I'll give them all the amendments Pirl recommended and dose of SuperThrive as well. I've been using that on all my seedlings and house plants this season and getting great results. Then when they go in the garden, Root Blast will help them settle in. I used it last fall, dividing and moving what seemed like thousands of plants, and I can already see that they've done very well.

It's a good tip to wait until I see roots out the bottom of the pot, thanks. What about the ones that come from Brushwood? Are they generally mature enough to plant right away, or is it better to pot them up and wait?

In the past I've dug up and moved established clems, and the root systems seemed fairly compact and near the surface. I always thought that's why they need some protection from direct sun. I'm surprised that they need such a big planting hole. Is it because they're such heavy feeders?

Pam
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 23, 2012
5:21 AM

Post #9093899

I just read the thread, 'Pinching Belle of Woking." Should I pinch my new co-op plants? The pic a couple of posts above shows how much top growth they arrived with. In most cases there are at least a couple of stems, but bushier is always good. And they'd be so much easier to transport if I did it now. They are in MG potting mix with fertilizer, and I used 10:1 water/peroxide and SuperThrive to pot them. I wouldn't fert again now, wait until potting up but that's only a few days away. What do you all think?

Pam
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

April 23, 2012
6:10 AM

Post #9093975

While I don't know the name of the road that United Housewrecking is on, a phone call would be worth it. Just specify you don't want "estate" garden gates or they'll shock you with prices.

You can pinch yours, then wait for two more leafsets to develop, pinch again and then let it grow.

Here are the roots on a typical Brushwood clematis that I waited awhile to plant. You can compare yours to Brushwood's and if they aren't similar in size then follow Carolyn's advice about repotting for the entire first year. Typically Brushwood's plants are at least a foot tall and all have done well for me.

Walmart sells plastic self-watering pots and my experiment with Japanese irises was exceptionally successful (second photo) so I'd give it a try with the young co-op clem's. The collage shows the difference from June 1, 2011 to April 22, 2012. Now I have two Venosa Violacea clem's from Walmart in one of those pots in the kitchen. They are at least 3' tall already.

I'd leave the contents of the pots to just bone meal, compost, manure and mulch them well. Giving them too much food is not always a good idea since their roots can absorb a limited amount.

Brushwood plants can be planted immediately but, as with all clematises, plant them deeply. Remove any leaves that would be underground and plant them two to three inches deep. Add a stake to direct the growth where you want it. Mulch very well: three inches is good. You don't want the mulch crowding the stems so try for pine needles. They aren't suffocating when wet as some mulches can be.

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pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

April 23, 2012
6:56 AM

Post #9094059

As for the roots...here is a photo of Rooguchi (a gift from Louise, another DG clem lover) and you can clearly see the enormous size of the roots. Hers are grown with her own compost, aged sheep manure from her brother, bone meal and we both use reconstituted water crystals in the mix to insure each clem has access to water.

What we should all strive for is "Louise's roots".

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koshki
Grosse Pointe Shores, MI
(Zone 6a)

April 23, 2012
8:33 AM

Post #9094266

OMG on those roots!

Pam, in one photo, I see a very large and beautiful rhododendron...are you planning on a clem growing on/in it?

I have a mature rhodo that might make a nice shrub for a clem, but I was worried about causing some trouble with the rhodo buds and issues of pruning. Any thoughts?
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 23, 2012
9:27 AM

Post #9094373

Pirl, I will follow all your advice! This weekend I will be sifting the compost, I have bags of manure from the fall, and will pick up bonemeal. I have a good supply of water crystals. Root Blast is a rooting hormone, only used once in a growing season. I got the tip on DG, from SchickenLady I think, and it's a good one. Last fall I used it while chopping up and moving tons of plants, some quite small, and they did fantastically well. I do rhink it's probably safest to pot up most of the co-op plants, even though they look a pretty good size, just to be on the safe side. The more control, the better. Also, I'd like to see some of them bloom and move them around some before deciding on their final (is it ever final?!) home.
Koshki, I had been planning using on the box shrub at the top of the Rhodie, which is taller than me (5'8") but is dwarfed in the pic. But now that you mention it, why not?! The Rhodie never gets pruned, would shade the roots and give the blooms very full sun. What's a nice vigorous clem that could take the light without fading? Isn't it too much for a Jackmanii?

Pam
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 23, 2012
10:26 AM

Post #9094443

I was just looking through old photos and came across this one from 2008.
In 2009 I took no garden pictures at all. That year I did a lot more wiping out, and anything I planted was tiny and seemed insignificant next to all the devastation. The tradescantia was about the worst, huge, tough root systems that were buried deep in between the rocks and in the middle of plants I wanted to save. They kept coming back over and over again. I still keep a sharp eye out and have to remove new ones very often. Ferns were second worst, still are,mthough I love them in other places. Then there were the raspberries, goldenrod, grass, and soooo many weeds! Ugh!!
The second is from last fall after moving things around quite a bit. The white baptisia was there, a huge clump surrounded by mess, and I managed to keep most of it. Sadly I lost the stand of white Physostegia behind it, but hope to be able to get some going there again. I think it must once have been a white garden, and am trying to work with that idea without perhaps being so strict about it. I plan to replace the anemone with the white Honorine Jobert. She can ramble as much as she wants, also the Physostegia, I welcome it there. I wonder where they'll want to go. I'm expecting more height this year over all, finally. It's been a long haul, but worth it. This is now the fun part.

Pam

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pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

April 23, 2012
10:53 AM

Post #9094486

Koshki - I agree about Louise's roots!

Pam - you may want to make a photo folder for Clematis Planning. When you select the shrubs where you want blooms add photos of the rhodies in bloom to make sure they won't have fading flowers while the clem is in full bloom. It's fine if the clem blooms first since their flowers disappear soon enough (for the most part).

Same issue with tradescantia here. Tough roots and ever so persistent. Last week I must have removed 30 babies in a square foot and saw, on Saturday, there are at least 30 more to be plucked.

If you post a photo with the color of the rhodie we can all give you our thoughts on a good vigorous clem for it. Do not fear if you get a group 3 clem. Just clip the stems at a foot tall and don't even try to get the rest of the clem out of the rhodie. You can trim the hanging stems until you reach the point where they get into the rhodie stems. They turn brittle and you can snap them off if they bother you. Generally the foliage of the rhodie will cover the leftover old stems of the clem.

I did notice your lavender Munstead. Mine got unbelievably large so be prepared.

You can do a search for ClematisGuru (a former DG person) and her threads to get her planting methods and her advice.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 23, 2012
11:29 AM

Post #9094531

There she is... And are you ever right about noticing the time of bloom. This was early June last year. No Clem could compete with that! I'm thinking the late fall bloomer would be one choice. It used to be called paniculata, then it was changed to something beginning with W that was long and unpronounceable, now I don't know. But it could be nice to have something in the summer, too. Or earlier spring...
In the long view, the other blooms are another matching Rhodie and most else is Dame Rocket (I pull it out after bloom, there's always more next year) and some volunteer Bleeding Hearts that have been there for years.

I'm glad to hear about the Munstead. There used to be much more heft in the shapes in that area and I miss it. You can see in these pics that the lower plantings are quite robust by comparison. Can you believe those hosta?! They put themselves there, who knows how long ago!

I hope my clematis roots are even half as happy as the ones from Louise... But it does seem as if I have that chocolate cake Martha Stewart soil here, too, so if I add all that other good stuff they should do pretty well. Planting them deeply is something I hadn't known about before, but makes perfect sense once you explained it.

Pam

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pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

April 23, 2012
11:56 AM

Post #9094565

Beautiful, Pam!

I thought of you a dozen times today as I drove to and from Riverhead for a doctor's appointment and then hit a few stores, Home Good being the primary target du jour. How about a chair, either rattan or steel mesh, painted the color you want, with clematises growing over, under and through it? Urns were another thought but not the garish ones often seen. More like the muted dark colors and please have drainage holes drilled! You could move them as you please until you settle on the ideal spot for each one.

Also, hunt antique, junk and offbeat shops, garage and yard sales, for some unusual thoughts on structures for clematises to grow.

I did spot a low retaining wall, just about 6' wide and 2' high. It looked ideal for some low clematises.
Here's Raymond Evison's site for his patio collection of clem's:
http://www.raymondevisonclematis.com/main/catalogue-home.asp
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 23, 2012
12:18 PM

Post #9094610

Unfortunately my garden shopping time is limited, except on line. When I'm on my own I can meander as much as I want, but that doesn't happen so often in CT. Also, I begrudge the time spent away from the garden since we're not there all the time. But I will certainly keep all that in mind for when I do get to wander.

We have a few self-watering pots I've never used, stuck away somewhere. I'll dig them out and use them. I also have self-watering trays with platforms and capillary matting that I use inside and out for all 'nursery' seedlings and plants. As a weekend gardener I couldn't manage without them. But the individual pots would be perfect for the Clem's I want to hold for a while. I could even put them where I think I might like the permanent home to be and see how they look in bloom.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

April 23, 2012
12:27 PM

Post #9094622

It would be ideal to use the self-watering pots as you describe.

You may want to check out the site for Walpole Woodworkers. Their mailbox posts (sans the mailbox), painted a mossy green, might be ideal for the side of some shrubs so you can add netting and grow clematises and their obelisks are interesting but not in white for your landscaping. They do have an East Moriches location!
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

April 23, 2012
12:28 PM

Post #9094623

A link would be helpful! Sorry!

http://www.walpolewoodworkers.com/garden-decor.aspx
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 23, 2012
1:42 PM

Post #9094733

You are reminding me...

There is an old barn which still contains relics from the past, especially thanks to the previous owner who gardened here from the mid 1930's until 1970. He also scavenged. We (not just me in the last 6 years, but also prior) have utilized many objects already- chains, like the one in pic 2 hanging from the eave, rusty iron wheels, the huge pot planter, etc. There are also fence posts, beams, all sort of things in there to be found and creatively re-invented for the garden. A couple of years ago we had some old split-rail fencing used to separate a utility area under the overhang. I tried a Clem on the corner there, but there wasn't enough root room or light, so I moved it by the old front walk to the left which is never used now, that entrance has been sealed for years. It's doing fairly well, but now that I know what it needs it will have a much better season this year!

J, who's been here since 1978, thinks there may be some wrought iron fence or post pieces in the barn. You can be sure I'll follow that up!

BTW, we welcome visitors!

Pam

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pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

April 23, 2012
2:02 PM

Post #9094757

Oh, yes! Anything from the past would be ideal!
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

April 23, 2012
2:25 PM

Post #9094779

Just remembered our visit to another (gorgeous) Southold garden and the owner has lots of lilies, clematis and roses. As I recall it was over 200 clematises and 1500 roses. Anyhow, I love how he incorporated bird houses into his landscaping and thought you might like the idea. You could put wire around the poles and grow clem's for each one or more than one clem to each pole.

I thought the second photo, showing a bird house atop a tall tree stump, was neat.

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Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 24, 2012
12:09 PM

Post #9096063

So many ideas! I can't wait to get back there and get to work! Today I'm pinching the co-op clems and seeing if they'll root, following directions from another thread. I'm using coir, my new favorite seed-starting medium, and 10:1 water/ peroxide and Superthrive. I don't have any rooting powder- don't even know where to get it in the city. But why not...

One idea: for the big barrel I could plant in the garden below behind the pennials, maybe drape bird netting or chicken wire up the big rock so it could get to the barrel. To the left the ferns rule, to the right the ledge ends. Below are ferns and I think that's where the Virginia Creeper originates. It's a no-man's land there, under and behind a I'm slowly editing...
I did order a white integrifolia from Brushwood, to plant in the barrel and hope it would spill forward and down... Maybe I'd better wait and see if that works...

Sigh...

Pam

Pam

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pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

April 24, 2012
1:27 PM

Post #9096119

I'll be your ideas for the mesh to the rock will work. Have fun...Pam...Pam!
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

May 4, 2012
11:44 AM

Post #9110291

All my orders are in now. The Brushwood plants look great, and packaged beautifully. One co-op plant that had arrived dry and wilty, seemed to recover, then succumbed, has been replaced. So now I'm up to 10 new clematis to play with, and 5 others which have somehow survived so far, although in one case, just barely. I'll have quite a nursery this year!

Two good ones are both autumn-blooming. One, C Paniculata, has already been moved and planted correctly. The other, C virginiana, is planted under a box hedge on the lower level, and i was hoping it would come to the top and flower there, but it didn't bloom. However it did put on good growth, so I'm leaving it alone for now.





This message was edited May 4, 2012 2:04 PM
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

May 4, 2012
11:46 AM

Post #9110293

Grrrr... Pics didn't post!

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pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

May 4, 2012
12:20 PM

Post #9110322

You'll have blooms galore in time. You can add an unobtrusive trellis even in the middle of some shrubs (if you wish) for added interest.

So glad you got the bad co-op plant replaced. Nursing one back to health is a major job especially after it's been growing and then wilted. You did the right thing.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

May 4, 2012
2:20 PM

Post #9110447

Thanks! There's still a chance the other one will come back from the root, but she replaced it immediately. There was a new person helping with the packing, and the plants were quite dry when I got them. The new one arrived just moist enough.

I'm keeping my eye out for supports that will fit in, especially your thoughts about wrought iron, vintage posts, etc. Right now everything is very weathered and authentic, and I like that a lot, but as things fill in inspiration may move in another direction... Who knows??

This noid may be a Montana, but I'm not sure. It had been under a small evergreen for a year and didn't do much. Last year I decided it was probably too dark and weedy there, so I brought it out into more light. It's a south- facing wall, but there are a lot of tall trees and shrubs which filter the sun quite a bit. There was a good clump of Saponaria in front of it which I thought would shield the roots, and I gave it a good layer of mulch. This spring I decided to put a climbing rose there too, New Dawn, and it went in last week. The rose was planted with granulated manure, compost and mulch, and I spread some around the whole area as well. There's an old chain that goes up, along the top of the whole wall and down again. I'd like to really use it, so if the Clem is a Montana, that would be great.

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pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

May 4, 2012
2:25 PM

Post #9110456

Here are the leaves of montana Grandiflora so you can take a close-up of your leaves and compare them:

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koshki
Grosse Pointe Shores, MI
(Zone 6a)

May 4, 2012
2:29 PM

Post #9110458

Such a wonderful garden you have! I'm looking forward to seeing photos of it through the season.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

May 4, 2012
2:35 PM

Post #9110466

Thanks, Pirl. So many buds! You're going to have quite a display. Is this an older plant?

Koshki, you've been shopping up a storm too - I'll be looking for your pictures as well!
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

May 4, 2012
3:46 PM

Post #9110566

It is older, Pam. I bought a package of five from BJ's back in '95 and all were supposed to be Duchess of Edinburgh. I lucked out by planting this montana Grandiflora at the dog's fence and it took off quickly. Three of the four Duchess are thriving.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

May 23, 2012
8:31 PM

Post #9136042

My noid has put on some new growth, but no buds yet. It doesn't look like a Montana after all, I think, at least not compared to yours, Pirl. I have no idea what to expect... and I love surprises, as long as they don't clash, lol. It's hard to imagine what might clash with New Dawn though, so I think I'm safe.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

May 23, 2012
8:32 PM

Post #9136043

Here's the latest pic...
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

May 23, 2012
8:35 PM

Post #9136045

One more try...

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pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

May 24, 2012
5:18 AM

Post #9136273

New growth is good news. Now the waiting begins but I'd guess it will be next year before you see flowers.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

May 25, 2012
9:49 PM

Post #9138909

Pirl, I have a question about the self-watering pots. I have one that's about 10" in diameter that I used for Hagley Hybrid. I put a generous handful of reconstituted water crystal mixed with a little soil in the bottom, then filled with roughly 1/3 potting soil, 1/3 manure and 1/3 compost. I planted it deeply, on a slant, mulched heavily, and watered it in with Epsom Salts and a little Superthrive. So... Is the pot big enough to last the whole summer? How big are the ones you use? What happens when we get a lot of rain? Doesn't the pot become waterlogged? There is no way to empty mine.

I followed your tip about using a branch as a trellis for the Venosa Violacea. The Azaleas next to the house were way overgrown and were swamping everything in that bed. There are some very old peonies there that still bloom, I have no idea how. The group in front just finished blooming, so I cut those and the lavender ones waaaay back today. The group in front of the bay window is about to pop so I'll wait until they're done to bring them down a foot or so.

Now there's a big hole right in front, so I put the venosa in a 12" green plastic pot, stuck in a branch for it to climb on until it reaches the Azalas and wrapped euonymus branches around the pot to camouflage it. There's a Samobor geranium nearby which helps mask the bare stems until they leaf out, and I'm on the hunt for one or two more now that there's room for them. The summer color in that area is mainly blue and lavender flowers with some varied foliage accents, so I think the deeper Clem will be nice.

I'll post pics tomorrow of the after, this is the before.

Pam

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pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

May 26, 2012
5:21 AM

Post #9139056

The sturdy branch method worked well for me this year. I put one at the side of our obelisk and now the clem has grown to cover it. You can barely see the branch in this photo taken two weeks ago.

The self-watering pot should have an open lip to allow excess water to drain. Is this the type you bought? I wouldn't use one that you can't empty, if needed. Please post a photo of your pot. The second photo here shows some Japanese irises in the Walmart self-watering pot and excess water just drips out of the side lip. Just for clarity - I use the pots to get maximum growth on plants. The stone says 'Jocasta' but the company sent the wrong JI so it's been sent off to grow in another DG garden.

I use the 11.5" for two clematises (same variety), third photo.

A ten inch pot should handle the growth on Hagley for the entire summer.


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Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

May 26, 2012
2:30 PM

Post #9139574

THis is the pot with Hagley Hybrid in it. I went out today and drilled 1/4" holes a few inches apart about 1" up from the bottom. Water spurted out each time I broke through the pot. That should take care of the drainage. The pot is actually smaller than I thought, more like 8" but it should still be ok for a while.

I haven't figured out the best place for it yet. The DL's are pale yellow/white, the Heuchera is white autumn blooming, the astilbes are pink, the rose is the Fairy. There will be Butter and Cream Nasturtiums across the front, and lime and white Nicotianas.

I thought the pale pink of HH could be lovely climbing into the peonies and DLs on top of the wall, and maybe drifting into the low hedge next to them. There is also a barrel which will be planted with mainly white and blues. Ideally I would put HH on the lower level in the corner behind the astilbes, but I'm afraid it might be too dark there. In the past I've made the mistake of planting in too much shade, expecting the plant to reach for the light, but instead it sulks. Or maybe I expected too much too soon?

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pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

May 26, 2012
2:44 PM

Post #9139585

Glad you drilled the holes and I'm sure Hagley is happier now.

As a general rule of thumb, if astilbe is happy then the clematis would like more sunshine.

Maybe most of us are guilty of expecting too much too soon but we seem to dwell on one plant and want it to be instantly lush and gorgeous but each clematis needs time to develop good roots and then it should flourish.

I dug up a pitcheri clematis today and felt rather guilty about the small roots. It was all my fault for putting it in too much shade. From now on it will have much more sunshine.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

May 26, 2012
3:08 PM

Post #9139612

Good rule of thumb. Maybe eventually HH can go between the plants on top of the wall, or in an opening in the box hedge where the roots will get more light.

You're right, I'm fixated on these Clem's now. But once they're all in somewhere, I have to move on... Soooo much to do! I know it's the same for all of us... Of course I did see a blooming Rooguchi I today when I nt to pick up more manure. I may just have to have ONE!

So now, back to the Azalea area... I decided to have Venosa Violacea climb up the Pieris. It turns out there are huge slabs of rock where I thought it would look good, so it may have to stay in a container of some sort forever. For the time being, though, the one it's in is big enough. I draped euonymus over the pot until you can barely see it. To fill the hole in the shrubbery I put Johnson's blue geranium, will go with Rozanne already nearby but be taller, and added Sizaja Ptitsa. A work in progress...

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pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

May 26, 2012
6:04 PM

Post #9139805

You've done an excellent job of hiding it in the shrubs.

I do love the look of clem's and large rocks. The clem's are so soft looking and the rocks are a great counterpoint

The pitcheri I mentioned earlier was planted next to a boxwood. Never again. It really limited the root growth. In the last two weeks I cut back both boxwoods and today we managed to get one out and to the dump. Just one to go. Hard physical work is good to release the anguish on the day after a Rainbow Bridge event that broke out hearts.

Here's the now late Harry (next to the boxwood we removed today) watching as Jack planted the windowboxes a few years ago. He never even tried to run away. Guess he knew how good life was here. He'd have been 15 on June 1st.

He loved sitting on the bench at the kitchen window watching people, snow plows or trying to attack the UPS guy.

Most of all he loved his rides with Jack.

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koshki
Grosse Pointe Shores, MI
(Zone 6a)

May 26, 2012
7:16 PM

Post #9139885

What a good dog.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

May 26, 2012
7:22 PM

Post #9139894

So very special, Katherine.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

May 26, 2012
8:02 PM

Post #9139940

Oh Pirl, I'm so sorry... What a sweet looking dog.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

May 27, 2012
3:58 AM

Post #9140119

Thanks, Pam. He was such a joy.
Carolyn22
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

May 27, 2012
7:25 AM

Post #9140299

Oh Arlene - I am so very sorry for the loss of Harry. It is so hard to loose those we love.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

May 27, 2012
9:10 AM

Post #9140411

Carolyn - thank you. It all happened so fast. We never have enough time to love them all we can.

Harry went from his usual three walks a day with Jack, last weekend, to slower walks on Monday and Tuesday. By Thursday he couldn't walk and stopped eating. At least he did give us warning. Thanks, Harry.
bananna18
Colleyville, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 28, 2012
9:30 AM

Post #9141719

It is so hard to lose a loyal friend. It looks like he had an exceptionally good long life. Is he to be buried in your garden?
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

May 28, 2012
10:57 AM

Post #9141904

Yes, Anna, it's a heart breaker for both of us but Jack is taking it very hard without his loyal walking companion.

I've ripped out (by hand) the last of the boxwoods adjoining the "dog's pen", where he kept watch for Jack's return on shopping day, and created a Harry's Garden. We haven't yet talked about where his ashes will be buried.
bananna18
Colleyville, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 28, 2012
11:50 AM

Post #9141975

It is very therapeutic to rip, dig and stomp when dealing with loss. It is wonderful to have a memorial garden
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

May 28, 2012
6:08 PM

Post #9142410

It certainly helps with sleeping! I've dug, ripped out, moved a big, heavy Mexican pot, planted, watered, fed, put down a lot more pine needle mulch, and will do more tomorrow.

The Roguchi that I moved from the side of the first boxwood has grown at least 8" in a week. It really wanted relief from the roots of the boxwood and now it will perform much better.

If anyone is having problems with a clematis by a shrub I'd urge you to consider digging it up and moving it. Cut it back (if required) before moving it. Just makes it easier to handle and more growth should begin pronto.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

May 28, 2012
9:04 PM

Post #9142599

Hmmm... I guess I won't be adorning my big boxwoods with Clematis! I've just spent the better part of the weekend weeding a couple of particularly messy areas, and noticed how dense the roots are around one that I had had plans for. Maybe I'll do MG's and Moonflowers instead.

Meanwhile we went to Ocean Job Lot today and I bought several basic green wire trellises for $5. They are only about 3' or so tall, so can fit right into the flower beds and will work just fine for now. They will also fit into the 12" pots I'm using for the time being, which will give me lots of flexibility on placement.

I'm looking forward to seeing Harry's garden as it develops. I know he's sadly missed. What a lovely way to remember him.

pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

May 29, 2012
4:53 AM

Post #9142801

When I first decided to put the pitcheri clematis next to the boxwood I dug a good hole but not close to 18" or even 12" deep. It was the tiny roots of the boxwood that grew so well in the amended area. They went right for the goodies.

If you do the MG's or Moonflowers you do know that you'll have them forever, right? I've only had the MG but we're still removing seedlings after seven years. Their seeds remain viable 80 years so they'll outlive us.

The inexpensive trellises will work just fine. You can add a piece of rebar in the back for reinforcement when you do plant them in your garden. They are also so easy to move when the mood dictates.

I'll post photos when I get the placement of plants that I want. Thank you for asking.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

May 29, 2012
5:07 AM

Post #9142819

I just realized that I potted up the Pinky that was next to the Hinoki cypress last week. It will eventually be in my daughter's garden. The more I move away from shrubs the more I realize they do have issues if they're too close. Another Pinky that was nearby didn't survive. I enjoy them more and they grow better on trees - not even big trees - like the Tardiva hydrangea and the Limelight hydrangeas.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

May 29, 2012
5:12 AM

Post #9142824

Do you think sinking a bottomless pot would work to keep the boxwood roots out of the Clem?

I know you're right about the MGs. I'm hesitant about putting them in areas where I think they'd take hold, keep mulling over where they might not become a problem if/when they re-seed.

So far, I haven't seen any Moonflower volunteers here. I've only grown them a couple of times so far, but have several starts this year ready to go in. They are so amazing when they bloom, and since I'm not really expecting Clem flowers this year, it would be nice to have something!

Of course, I still could break down one of these days and buy one that's blooming already. I came really close the other day when the local nursery had a beautiful Rooguchi flowering its head off. What stopped me was that it was in an enormous container and very expensive.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

May 29, 2012
6:16 AM

Post #9142906

It would have to be a very deep bottomless pot, Pam, or those boxwood roots will find the compost and manure and invade the pot.

MG's are glorious in bloom but the downside is the self-seeding. Even the cultivars with a minimum of seeding, it's an issue to pull every unwanted one and do it weekly.

My friend has had the Moonflower and no self-seeding but that would only give you night blooms, which is still better than no blooms.

I've seen my share of clem's whose prices are extreme and I do avoid them. Here's one that was on Cape Cod that I didn't buy!

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Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

May 29, 2012
2:01 PM

Post #9143650

Wow, pricey! But it's a beauty- talk about instant gratification! I'm glad I saw the Rooguchi. It really is very special. I will end up with one sooner or later. But no more until more of the ones I have find homes!

Nelly Moser is in. I was able to move a huge stone out from the wall and found that there is lots of root room between the stones underneath. I put a few cranesbills around to shield the stems from inadvertant disturbance, as that area is a corridor. On one side there is a narrow pass through up to the patio, and on the other stairs lead down next to the house to the lower level. My only concern is that she gets enough sun. It's direct in the morning for a while, then none, then filtered in late afternoon. Somewhere I read- maybe on a grower's website?- that if she's on a north facing wall it should be painted white. That's not possible here, but it's more easterly than north. Also there may be a way to lift her up some by using rocks to make a small raised bed. I'll keep thinking about it, and see what happens meanwhile. If she doesn't seem to be growing I'll have to do something.

Night blooms could be amazing on those boxes, certainly worth a try.

This weekend was a killer in the garden, way too hot and humid. I couldn't stay out in the sun for long without a break. I have so many annuals to get in, and tomatoes and herbs. I thought I'd have plenty of time between Friday afternoon and today, but just couldn't finish all I'd planned. I did get a fair amount done in the shady areas- hanging baskets, the pruning and 3 more Clem's done, for instance. But this morning I thought I would get all ten tomatoes in before we left at 1, but had to give up after 6. And there are still a couple of flats worth of annuals I didn't get to either. C'est la vie...



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pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

May 29, 2012
3:39 PM

Post #9143824

That "no more until more of the ones I have find homes". I must have said that quite a few times. This year I did better at resisting than ever before.

Nelly will enjoy her new spot. She's not fond of the mid-day sun and many of us aren't fond of it either. Give her a month to six weeks before you take any more action with her. She needs time to get settled.

Yes, night blooms would be beautiful and so unexpected.

Ditto to 90% of your last paragraph. We gardeners always run out of time, energy or both. The heat had me nuts yesterday but the breezes today made it much more tolerable.
kiseta
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)

May 29, 2012
4:13 PM

Post #9143858

Pirl, your little dog must be a Lhasa apso or so. I had a female in Pensylvania and she was a nicest dog, the only one I ever let to sleep on my bed. She was four years old when I had to move to a new apartment and they told me strait thet no kids no dogs. So finnaly the landlord agreed to have my son, but I had to give Chuli away. She went to a nice young family and was very happy there. I guess if I had to get a new inside dog, it would be a Lhasa Apso. (spelling ?) They don't shed and no alergies from them. Now I have a outside Brownie and she is a good dog, but she loves it outside. In the back she is not diging in the garden . All my clematises are in the front yard. We had a good rain for a day and a half and hoping the new clems will be happy.Tomorow is my last day of cooking and I will be free till September to play in the dirt.

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pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

May 29, 2012
6:56 PM

Post #9144107

Etelka - Harry was a Lhasa Apso and such a smart and happy little boy. Your Brownie looks special, too. How nicely he sits on that chair!

I'm guessing the rain is headed our way. The day was hot but when the breezes began they really got impressive. I planted all but one variety of annuals by 8:45 tonight. If I can just work for an hour or two in the morning I'd be happy.

Your last day of cooking and then freedom until September! How delightful. Enjoy every minute in the garden.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

June 12, 2012
7:45 PM

Post #9162935

Pam - just found this, which should be ideal for your garden since from a distance it wouldn't be noticed at all. Free shipping!

http://www.simplytrellises.com/garden-trellises/wall-trellis/jeweledvinetrellis.cfm
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

June 15, 2012
6:29 AM

Post #9165992

If you'd like to see some gorgeous roses and clematises grown with roses, go see this thread. It's pure delight.

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1264641/#new
kiseta
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)

June 15, 2012
7:18 AM

Post #9166051

I can't belive one person can grow that many different kind of roses. I will order one of James Galway and Dark Lady roses in ln the fall. Greetings , Pirl. Etelka
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

June 15, 2012
7:48 AM

Post #9166087

His roses and clematis are so amazing, Etelka. Zuzu, from Sebastapol, CA, used to be the rose queen here at DG and she has well over a thousand roses and hundreds of clematises.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

June 15, 2012
8:13 AM

Post #9166138

Thanks, Pirl, that's a great suggestion - and a great source! I love the $5 shipping! There's a secret staircase on a lower level, near the denuded azalea, where is like to put a simple arbor. I'm thinking something like this:
http://www.simplytrellises.com/garden-arbors/arbors/rosearch.cfm

I'm thinking even simpler, without the embellishment on the sides. I also wonder how sturdy this one could be for such a low price.

And...Tada!!! ... I have a bud! Osaja Ptitsa is about to bloom! I'll post a picture as soon as it begins to open. I'm so excited, didn't expect anything this year. And Nellie Moser has some new growth, so she's happy where she is. Yay!

Pam
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

June 15, 2012
8:45 AM

Post #9166173

The one you selected even has free shipping! It is hard to make a judgement without knowing the quality or seeing it. I didn't look for any guarantee but think it would be the wise thing to do.

The embellishment on the sides probably adds to the strength and stability, don't you think so?

Hurray for Osaja Ptitsa and for good old reliable Nelly Moser.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

June 15, 2012
3:46 PM

Post #9166723

Soooooo... today we stopped at a local nursery to pick up a few last minute fillers. Jerry got into a discussion about arbors with the owner, who is now quite friendly with us, and next thing I knew he was asking me to pick something from a catalogue. So I did, I'm not stupid! It's coming Friday. It's 4 times the price of the one on line, and I have no idea if it's that much more substantial. But there was another design by the same company at the nursery and it looked OK, so it should be fine. Even better, next weekend we're having guests who say they want to help in the garden. Teehee... They'll think twice before they say that to me again!

pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

June 15, 2012
5:47 PM

Post #9166845

Good work! Make sure to take Jerry along on all your gardening trips.

The guests will love helping out and assisting you.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

June 18, 2012
7:42 PM

Post #9170890

First, the good news: Sizaja Ptitsa's bud kept growing, but no sign of opening before I left today.
The bad news: Blue Light had a bud before it wilted :(. I'm pretty sure it didn't like it when the sun came out after a couple of weeks of rain nearly every day. I think it wants to be in a shadier area. Should I just put up a screen for now? I hate to move it at this point. The lowest set of leaves still looked green, so I left them, just pruned of what was completely dead.


Edited to correct name

This message was edited Jun 19, 2012 4:45 AM

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Carolyn22
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

June 19, 2012
2:24 AM

Post #9171133

Pam

The pruning group 2's are notorious for this. Half of my Dr. Ruppel wilted and died back after flowering earlier this year. Seems like he did that last year as well... Your blue light should come back. Just prune back the dead on your vine.


pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

June 19, 2012
5:21 AM

Post #9171239

I agree with Carolyn.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

June 19, 2012
8:48 AM

Post #9171495

So I won't worry. I did give Epsom salts to all yesterday before I left. They've been getting it once a week. I think it was you, Pirl, who has Blue Light facing south? And your zone is much hotter than mine. I guess it just needs to acclimate itself.

On the whole, of the ten new clems and the 2 I moved this spring, all are doing well except for these 2. And a Veronica's Choice that arrived dry and soon wilted was replaced, and the wilted one is growing again. So I really don't have much to complain about.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

June 27, 2012
11:06 PM

Post #9184276

Tadaaaaa...

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pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

June 28, 2012
4:10 AM

Post #9184348

Looking good, Pam!
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

August 10, 2012
10:32 PM

Post #9237389

So sweet, Hagley Hybrid bloomed! She climbed up a peony and gave me 3 lovely flowers, on the last weekend I'll be at the garden until mid-September.

The other nice surprise is that C integrifolia Alba has a few buds. Sadly I'll miss the actual display, but I'm very happy that it's happy in the big barrel with the lilies, and that it's growing the way I hoped it would when I bought it.

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Carolyn22
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

August 11, 2012
4:06 AM

Post #9237463

Pam

So pretty and I love the way Alba trails over the barrel. I wanted that type of look with my whiskey barrels and they did not do well. I think they are in an area that does not get enough light. At this point in time, I will heel them in for the winter along with a couple other that I bought. It has been too hot and too hectic to try to figure out where to put them.

I finally put coleus into my barrels with some dahlias and the barrels look good now. I have decided that I want to put coleus in them every year.

pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

August 11, 2012
4:54 AM

Post #9237481

Very nice, Pam. Like Carolyn, I love the trailing habit of Alba.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

August 11, 2012
5:13 AM

Post #9237507

Carolyn, I got the idea from you last spring. At first the Euonymus Alata on either side of the barrel were shading everything too much. They were huge and out of control. The landscape guy was supposed to prune them into globes like he did last year, but instead made them flat-topped and left them just as wide, so they still seemed right on top of the barrel. I had a young kid help me for a day, and had him really thin the shrubs out so now they look woody and ugly. Sigh... But the barrel gets much more light now. Next spring I'll take one more good whack at them and hope to get them into a size and shape that will work.

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Carolyn22
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

August 11, 2012
6:04 PM

Post #9238366

Pam

Your whiskey barrel looks far better than mine did. ^_^

Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

August 11, 2012
8:44 PM

Post #9238536

Thanks! We'll see what happens next year...

The other funny thing is that this weekend I've been in the Hamptons for a job and had the occasion to go to the north fork. I've looked on line at WalMart for the self-watering pots you, Pirl, raved about but they were not available.. So tonight I decided to check out your store in Riverhead and -viola!- there they were! So now I have 9 11" and 2 16". I hope I like them when I get them home!
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

August 12, 2012
8:25 AM

Post #9238800

Pam - we're due to get a Walmart Super Store near the LIE but still on Route 58 but it may be another year or two. Right now the Riverhead store is 22 miles from us. Maybe it's good because I'm not so tempted to run in on a whim.

My point with those self-watering pots is NOT for the beauty of the pot but to get the clematises off to a great start. I check the water level almost every day. Some have roots coming out the bottom already! I don't care how unattractive or boring the color of those pots are - my object is to get the strongest, healthiest root system possible. It's all temporary anyhow since the clem's will get planted in the garden.

As I looked up Bill's caladium site to be sure of the spelling of Grey Ghost, I ran across another site that said Grey Ghost is not good for containers. Oh, really! It's terrific, full, beautiful and great for hiding clematis stems. They love the self-watering pots!

For anyone who hasn't seen these pots, here is a photo of the label. An 11.5" pot can easily hold two clem's or 2 or 3 Japanese irises.

Thumbnail by pirl   Thumbnail by pirl
Click an image for an enlarged view.

Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

September 22, 2012
8:20 PM

Post #9283525

The pots and I finally made it back to the garden after weeks spent traveling hither and yon... 6 1/2 weeks, to be precise. When I was last here, August 6, many things were just getting started: tomatoes, various phlox, a clematis or two, to name just a few... Now they are finished. Even some of the sedums are done. It's fall. Very sad.

There was one lovely surprise, C Jackmanii is blooming its head off. And a few others are still present: the Colocasia is huuuuuuge. Verbena bonariensis is exuberant, and the Monarchs are loving it.

Thumbnail by Pfg   Thumbnail by Pfg   Thumbnail by Pfg   Thumbnail by Pfg   
Click an image for an enlarged view.

Carolyn22
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

September 23, 2012
5:18 AM

Post #9283706

Pam

It is a nice surprise. I can feel Fall in the air, can't you?

Right now, I have Star of India blooming and a Huldine that I put in last year. I was going to cut everything back this year to see if I could get more flushes - I never got that far. It has been one thing after the next since July with DH's health.

Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

September 23, 2012
6:05 AM

Post #9283755

Sorry about your DH. I hope he is OK...
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

September 23, 2012
6:18 AM

Post #9283766

Pam - sorry you missed so much but glad for Jackmanii's blooms for you. It's an "old reliable" for a reason. Late spring and autumn it is glorious.

Carolyn - fall is in the air! It's 58 right now and I love the breeze coming in the window as I sit here. Sorry to hear of your husband's health issues and hope he'll be better very soon.

Carolyn22
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

September 23, 2012
9:13 AM

Post #9283901

Thank you both. I appreciate it.

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