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Article: Tater Totes: DIY fabric pots for potatoes & other plants: Alternate Fabric?

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Forum: Article: Tater Totes: DIY fabric pots for potatoes & other plantsReplies: 5, Views: 27
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DesertRattess
Phelan, CA
(Zone 8b)

April 23, 2012
11:04 AM

Post #9094494

Hi. I watched your video and your Instructables lesson as well as reading this article. Sounds like a great idea! Is there any other fabric you think might work? Landscape fabric is fairly expensive around here, and I don't have any lying around. I was thinking maybe cotton/poly sheets?

Sundownr

Sundownr
(Bev) Wytheville, VA
(Zone 6a)

April 23, 2012
11:40 AM

Post #9094545

DesertRattess, I'd go with a man-made fabric like the poly-blend that would last longer than a natural fiber like cotton. Some feed sacks (like some dog food) have a plastic-like coating over woven threads that others have used with success, and you wouldn't have to do any sewing. You might check at your local farmer's grain & supply places for empty sacks, or refer you to someone who might.

Thanks for posting your comment, as I'm sure others may have the same issue.
Have a great gardening season,
--
Bev
DesertRattess
Phelan, CA
(Zone 8b)

April 24, 2012
6:49 PM

Post #9096509

I have chickens so I have my own empty feed bags. I will check them out to see if they have the woven threads. I would still have to cut a hole in the bottom to put the plant in the ground, right?

Sundownr

Sundownr
(Bev) Wytheville, VA
(Zone 6a)

April 24, 2012
7:17 PM

Post #9096535

No, you do not have to cut the hole in the bottom of the bag! The video demonstrated the first prototype of Tater Totes, but I found out later that the plants did just as well in a closed bottomed Tote. Just put a little soil in the bottom of the bags, then your seed potatoes, and cover them with a little more soil and manure. You can apply the mulch as the sprouts grow. The smaller plant roots will grow through the fabric and into the ground to help steady the Tote and gather additional nutrients.

Having a hole in the bottom of the bag won't hurt anything, but isn't necessary. I'm sorry to have confused a few folks with conflicting design info between the article and the video. I hope I've cleared it up for you. Please let me know if I didn't!
--
Bev
DesertRattess
Phelan, CA
(Zone 8b)

April 25, 2012
6:02 PM

Post #9097789

Your info is fine and much appreciated! Since my feed bags are not nearly as porous as landscape cloth, I think I would cut a hole in the bottom anyway to be sure the plants don't get waterlogged. Thanks for the great idea! I'm definitely doing it this year.

Sundownr

Sundownr
(Bev) Wytheville, VA
(Zone 6a)

April 25, 2012
8:07 PM

Post #9097967

I wish you much success with the Totes, and think you'll like them! I need to make more myself to try other veggies.
Let me know how it works out for you!!

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Other Article: Tater Totes: DIY fabric pots for potatoes & other plants Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Oh, nice one, Bev Cville_Gardener 14 Apr 23, 2012 9:55 AM
Other plants? martyR 1 Apr 23, 2012 7:36 AM
Terrific! thatswho 1 Apr 23, 2012 7:44 AM
Pests? quiltygirl 5 Apr 26, 2012 8:48 AM
very intriguing . . . plantkiller46 3 May 2, 2012 4:14 PM


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