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Recipes: What's for dinner? (Part 31)

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Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


April 27, 2012
7:12 AM

Post #9099803

We came from here in case you want to backtrack: http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1250180/

I shouldn't kick off a new thread on Fridays, because that is typically not a night when I cook much if anything. (If it's not spring and summer and I'm tuckered out from late afternoon gardening adventures, then it's fall and I'm a football widow. I don't know what my excuse is in winter :-)

But tonight *might* be different because I have ground chicken for lettuce wraps. I haven't made them in over a year, so it's high time I pull out the wok and take another stab at 'em. If not tonight, then tomorrow night (because the chicken isn't a good candidate for sitting in the fridge for too long.)

Thumbnail by Terry
Click the image for an enlarged view.

SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

April 27, 2012
9:08 AM

Post #9099936

Glad tohear SG is better and you are getting out.

There is another reason to give up nitrates. A resent studied showed a correlation between nitrates and Alzheimer’s disease.

Dinner is chicken cooked in a blackberry, Dijon mustard, onion, soy sauce, ginger, and red pepper flake sauce. Looks like veggie will be broccoli and fruit a honeydew melon.

Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

April 27, 2012
3:02 PM

Post #9100355

Thanks for the new thread.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

April 28, 2012
4:49 PM

Post #9101627

Dinner is chicken, broccoli, and a melon.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 28, 2012
4:51 PM

Post #9101630

Cleaning up leftovers. Woo hoo! lol
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

April 28, 2012
4:53 PM

Post #9101635

Yes. It is leftovers and very good!

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 28, 2012
5:06 PM

Post #9101648

I had leftover salad with marinated cucumbers, mac and cheese, and broccoli. DH is eating weird stuff. Leftover Chinese. Peanut butter and crackers. Bowl of cereal. Ugh.
Debsroots
Northwest, MO
(Zone 5a)

April 28, 2012
5:55 PM

Post #9101712

Baked potatoes, BBQ chicken, Salad, fresh radishes from the garden, three bean salad, and lemon cake for dessert.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

April 28, 2012
6:31 PM

Post #9101760

We had a salad with gorgonzola cheese and a rice and veggie stew.. The veggie stew was not vegetarian because the stock was from a leftover base of various crock potted chicken and beef dishes. It was very rich.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


April 28, 2012
8:18 PM

Post #9101957

Between planting stints, I marinated chicken breasts in "my" terikyaki marinade and put together a potato salad. Then I left to attend a "girls" function and the family grilled and ate without me. I heard it was good.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

April 29, 2012
3:49 PM

Post #9102872

Dinner is chicken spagetti sauce (Home made tomato based with veggies) on barley.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

April 29, 2012
4:35 PM

Post #9102919

We had duck confit heated and crisped in the oven, along with some kale a friend gave us cooked with white beans and some of the confit fat and juices. Very good!
Debsroots
Northwest, MO
(Zone 5a)

April 29, 2012
4:43 PM

Post #9102927

Chicken Fried Rice is our meal for tonight.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 29, 2012
4:48 PM

Post #9102933

I have some kale I need to cook. Mixing it with white beans sounds good, Leslie.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

April 29, 2012
5:23 PM

Post #9102978

A favorite here is kale and cannellini beans. Make sure to drizzle good olive oil on top and fried sage leaves if you have fresh ones. I like this with an egg cracked on top and coddled.

Chicken sauce over barley sounds really good. I don't cook barley enough.

We are having lamburgers on tortas, grilled asparagus and salad. SO brought me a gift...four and a half pounds of leg of lamb. It's too hot to turn on the oven and too cool to turn on the air conditioning so it went through the KitchenAid grinder. Two one pound portions were packed for future use, some was reserved for tonight and the rest made into meatballs with fresh breadcrumbs, garlic, and oregano and then frozen.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

April 29, 2012
5:58 PM

Post #9103020

Laurel, that lamb sounds good. We're about out of that. I didn't drizzle olive oil on the top; I used the juices and fat from the duck confit, along with a bit of garlic. And I used cannellini beans; they're my favorites. I do have fresh sage leaves but I've never thought of frying them!

Darius, I also have a recipe for gnocchi with chard and white beans, but you can use kale or spinach instead. That's really good; it calls for a small can of diced tomatoes and a lot of mozzarella and parmesan on the top - it's a skillet dish.

We have some broccoli raab that I have to use, too. We love it sautéed with garlic in olive oil and a bit of lemon juice as a side, or added to scrambled eggs, or cooked with sausages over pasta.
Edens_Gardener
Clay Center, KS
(Zone 5b)

April 29, 2012
6:03 PM

Post #9103034

Chilly and damp here this evening, our furnace was kicked on for a short time. High carb supper, beef stroganoff (sp?) and noodles, left over "clean up the veggies". Some meals seem simply weather/temperature related. Will reserve the baby back ribs for a warmer evening and grilling!

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

April 29, 2012
6:09 PM

Post #9103038

I lost you guys!

I'm home and enjoying my kitchen. :-) Salmon w/garden fresh asparagus last night & chicken saagwala for dinner tonight. happiness is... home cooking.

I got a lot done in the veggie garden this weekend. I've hauled in a lot compost & dug it in. Planted my kale, onions, shallots, kohlrabi, and a couple tomatoes. We just need some rain now. :-)

Tam

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 29, 2012
7:31 PM

Post #9103178

Tam, what is chicken saagwala?

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

April 30, 2012
5:17 AM

Post #9103522

Its an indian dish - chicken in a spinach sauce, with onions, garlic & tomato. I made it once before and really enjoy it. A good thing to try when you have a lot of extra spinach. :-)

Tam
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

April 30, 2012
6:18 AM

Post #9103607

My partner at the restaurant harvested his garden - now I have about 3# of carrots and tops (mostly tops, as the carrots are the short ones), and another 2+# if beets an tops.

I think tonight will be beets and greens and a couple of pork ribeyes.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

April 30, 2012
9:10 AM

Post #9103866

Curried cauliflower soup and a salad. Meatless Monday! (Every day is meatless for me, but not DH)
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

April 30, 2012
11:53 AM

Post #9104074

Dinner is some version of pork loin.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

April 30, 2012
1:03 PM

Post #9104164

We're going out for Tex-Mex, so no cooking for me!
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

April 30, 2012
3:18 PM

Post #9104371

We're staying in for TexMex so SO better help. I've been up since a quarter to five and in the garden since six thirty. Made it into the house for a salad at lunch time. I've managed to limp in for a margarita.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


April 30, 2012
3:44 PM

Post #9104408

Tacos and a chlies rellenos casserole. Guess that probably makes us more tex than mex, huh? Garden got watered around 7 this morning, while it was still tolerable out there. Planted a few seeds on my lunch break then showered away the sweat and grime. I'll probably saunter back out after dinner is underway.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

April 30, 2012
4:11 PM

Post #9104456

Everybody's gearing up for Cinco de Mayo or what?? I just picked up 2 dozen home made tamales from a friend! one doz green corn, one doz chicken. Yum Yum...

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

April 30, 2012
5:52 PM

Post #9104613

Just fried eggs & toast for me tonight. Work sucked me in 'til it was way too late for much else.

Tam
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

May 1, 2012
3:54 AM

Post #9105049

Dinner tonight is a chai tea brined pork loin. For some reason DH bought two pork loins this weekend and left them both in the fridge. There is a apple chutney that goes with the recipe. I'll see if Ihave time to get to it today or not.

I am missing all that garden work right now. I'm still trying to get done with the final project.
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

May 1, 2012
6:05 AM

Post #9105211

Partner at the restaurant pulled all of his beets - I got the majority. Cleaned and rough cut the tops, then peeled and cut into quarters or eights all if the beets.
Steamed the tops and boiled the beets separately - served with pork ribeyes and a garden fresh tomato (mostly green) 1/2" slices, added to the grill pan when I poped it in the oven for the last 5 minutes.

Wonderful!!

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


May 1, 2012
6:39 AM

Post #9105261

Bubba good for you. Confession: I just can't do beets. I think they taste like dirt. I try. Really, I do. I just can't get past *that* taste.

Tonight's dinner is either tilapia or salmon filets with a creamy Dijon sauce. (And that reminds me I need to check the freezer and see what I have on hand before dinnertime), with some veggies and new potatoes with a light herb sauce.

MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

May 1, 2012
7:34 PM

Post #9106452

I love everything beets. The earthy flavor is appealing. There are certain veggies that can't be compared to others. Black eyed peas, beets and collards are in a class of their own. Black eyed peas have that earthy "dirt" taste too. So do cow peas (crowders) like Purple Hulls. Asparagus is unlike any veggie I can think of. I can understand why some might not like these vegetables but I've never understood why so many people don't like broccoli which is relatively bland.

We had veggie fried rice and meatloaf for dinner.

This message was edited May 1, 2012 9:35 PM

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

May 1, 2012
11:48 PM

Post #9106662

I thought I did not like beets for the longest time, and it turns out that what I disliked was overcooked, watery boiled beets. Roasted beets with balsamic--fantastic!

DH had a sandwich and potato salad, I had a quesadilla. Not a motivated cook today.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

May 2, 2012
5:28 AM

Post #9106821

I tried roasted beets last summer and they were OK but not something I wanted again. But I need to try them again. They are just so good for you. Now I have not have black eyed peas & collards. Ever as far as I know. So why don't you wonderful ladies share your favorite ways to eat those & I will give them a try this year.

I had a tooth prepped for a crown yesterday afternoon so was happy to have left over saagwala w/pasta.
Tam

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

May 2, 2012
5:36 AM

Post #9106835

I posted a beets recipe on the Recipe Forum many years ago, and it's great for those who don't like beets. Basically it's sautéing onions (in butter), then adding shredded fresh beets and fresh orange juice and pulp, cover and lightly steam until tender.
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

May 2, 2012
5:48 AM

Post #9106856

Right on, darius!

Steaming is so much quicker and keeps the color and flavor in any vegetable.

When boiling, I have leaned to use as little liquid as possible, and check for doneness often. Want some of the original texture not mushy, soggy #$%^.

Remember spending summers in MO and IA, and many of the farm wives would boil green beans for hours. Did not know how good green beans could be till getting some at a Chinese restaurant - definately not overcooked.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

May 2, 2012
6:01 AM

Post #9106872

Here's the recipe
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/387446/

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


May 2, 2012
6:03 AM

Post #9106877

I've tried beets every which way, from raw to steamed to pickled, sweet, roasted, and everything in between. Nope. I can do black eyed peas in a heart beat. Collards, tentatively. But beets are just not my thing - unless they're in granulated into that bag of sugar.

Dinner last night turned into "let's slip out for a bite" since it was only me and Swimmer Girl. And she doesn't like fish. Mr. Official had month-end closing and Middle Son is in the midst of finals week, so neither of them turned up anywhere near dinner time. Some days are like that.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

May 2, 2012
6:11 AM

Post #9106884

Darius, I've made that recipe and they're really delicious. 100% better with fresh orange juice.

For BEP or any bean, I encourage you to cook your own. A fraction of the sodium and a far more appealing texture than canned. I freeze the cooked beans in 2 cup containers, they freeze very well. Cheaper, way better texture, better flavor, and dead easy.

My favorite BEP recipe is a salsa...two cups of BEP, about the same amount of chopped tomato, 1/4 cup finely chopped onion, chopped jalapeno or other pepper to taste, 1/2 cup cooked, cooled corn or thawed frozen corn, chopped cilantro to taste, and season with a touch of light oil--just enough to give a gloss to the veg, maybe 1 teaspoon, salt, pepper and lime juice. You can add a chopped, firm avocado if you like them. I use this as a lighter, cooler side dish than refried beans or hot, cooked black or pinto beans. Nice with grilled meats.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 2, 2012
6:21 AM

Post #9106899

So many great recipes on here. How to try them all? Mary - on a mission to cook it all!

Tonight I'm trying a chicken thighs recipe with mushroom sauce. Real Simple mag had a two page spread of chicken thigh recipes, some look great.

I've a bunch of garden beets to use, may try darius' recipe - if I remember to buy some oranges.

The BEP salsa goes on the bucket list. Celene, how about using frozen BEP's? In that case I could make that tonight to go with the chx.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

May 2, 2012
6:25 AM

Post #9106905

Speaking of peas... I'm trying to grow a new (to me) cowpea this year, Cowpea Rice Peas. They are about the size of a grain of glutinous rice, and the dried peas cook in about 30 minutes. My seeds came from Baker Creek.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

May 2, 2012
7:43 AM

Post #9107001

I use frozen BEP all the time for that salsa. I use them when they're a little icy, and they chill everything nicely.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 2, 2012
8:26 AM

Post #9107066

Good. I may try it tonight. Will let you know. thanks!

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

May 2, 2012
9:21 AM

Post #9107143

Here's a BEP hummus...

Hillbilly Hummus
http://eatingfloyd.blogspot.com/2012/04/cooking-floyd-michael-does-dinner.html

2 cups well-cooked black-eyed peas, drained, at least 1/2 cup of the liquid reserved
3-5 tablespoons of peanut butter
2 cloves of peeled garlic
1/2 teaspoon dried sage or 1 1/2 teaspoon fresh, minced
dash of cayenne or to taste
2 teaspoons - 2 tablespoons cider vinegar to taste
salt and pepper

Combine the black-eyed peas, peanut butter, garlic, sage, cayenne, 2 teaspoons vinegar and s&p to taste. Whirl until smooth. Begin adding reserved bean liquid, more peanut butter and vinegar until the texture is smooth and the seasoning is to taste.

Refrigerate in an airtight container for up to 2 days. Bring to room temperature to serve.

from Crescent Dragonwagon's Bean by Bean: A Cookbook
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

May 2, 2012
10:21 AM

Post #9107237

Mary, I'm still envying your homemade tamale source. Can't remember the last time we ate tamales. Better get cookin'; you will like the black eyed pea recipes offered above.

Darius, Cindy from Eatonton, GA and I (and our guys) met up for an annual garlic festival held at nearby Loganberry Farm last year. Cindy bought a ton of huge podded, large crowders. I'd never seen such big beansfor crowders. Perhaps they are Mississippi Silver (?). Anyway, she shared a fat handful for seed saving. I usually grow purple hulls but am going to try these this year. Also have some pink eyed peas and Steubens, aka yellow eyed peas. P.S. Crescent Dragonwagon's recipes are so fun. I've got "Dairy Hollow House Cookbook".

We are practicing for Cinco de Mayo. I made a chuck roast with tomatoes and onions the other day for burrito filling and a separate pot of red beans. We have cilantro in the garden for salsa, and Greek yogurt and an avocado in the fridge. I got out in the garden early because of the heat. It would be a good time to do a little dinner prep before putting in more garden time when it cools of later.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 2, 2012
11:08 AM

Post #9107290

Yes Laurel, I'm very fortunate that my friend's sister is a stay-at-home mom and supplements her income with tamale making and sales. They are $15/doz. Not sure what shipping would set you back, we could freeze them and send your way!! I have a small styrofoam cooler that's perfect for it!!!

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


May 2, 2012
1:15 PM

Post #9107430

Lucky you, Mary! And she earns every bit of that $15 per dozen - I made about 6 dozen a couple months ago, and they are a labor of love, to be sure!
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 2, 2012
1:32 PM

Post #9107448

It's an all day deal for sure. I think if you have an assembly line set up (kids, aunties, mom, gram...you get the picture) which is how a lot of the latino families function, it goes pretty easily. In my childhood Irish/Lithuanian home, we'd be throwing corn husks at each other in no time!! :-|

I have the chile verde already made and in the freezer...if I ever get my work done today and get to the kitchen I'll cook up some pinto beans, margarita fixin's always on hand. We'll have company for dinner Saturday eve.
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 2, 2012
4:20 PM

Post #9107632

[quote="darius"]Speaking of peas... I'm trying to grow a new (to me) cowpea this year, Cowpea Rice Peas. They are about the size of a grain of glutinous rice, and the dried peas cook in about 30 minutes. My seeds came from Baker Creek.[/quote]

Darius ~ I'm trying a rice bean this year. Would they be the same?
http://store.underwoodgardens.com/Vining-Rice-Bean-Phaseolus-vulgaris/productinfo/V1019/
Guess I need to go to Baker Creek and look.

edited to add... I'm guessing they are different. Sorry!
http://rareseeds.com/rice-pea-cowpea.html

This message was edited May 2, 2012 6:24 PM
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

May 2, 2012
5:45 PM

Post #9107744

Whoa, Kristi, great to see you here. The multipliers are gorgeous (Kristi sent me these onions to grow). I tasted a few leaves yesterday. I was assuming the scapes were not to be cut?

Mary, I'd love to talk about tamales another year if shipping is a reality. This is why...

We are juggling what all needs to be done for hosting our third annual GA RU, come June 23rd, and preparing for a weekend of post nuptial country wedding celebration the end of July with three separate events scheduled. I am catering two of them. Though we love Maypop and acknowledge it is the real us it would never have been our first choice to celebrate on the land spot we affectionately refer to as our "dump in the country". We have reluctantly accommodated the wishes of DD and her SO who think a retro-hippie revival weekend will be the bomb. I have more than a few concerns about pole beans, heirloom tomatoes and peppers stacking up, soiree-wise, compared to the usual family events at various Ritz hotels and landmarks around the country. Maybe our collection of possum skulls will impress. Do you think contra dancing with the Georgia Mudcats will stand up to more usual family wedding fare of on site sushi chefs preparing eels and tuna cheeks behind sushi/saki boats or oyster/vodka tasting bars carved out of solid ice in Miami in July? One of my cousins called the other day and asked if we have bugs here 'cause she's allergic. Honest. I'm dealing with that and family flying in who want to know where the nearest private airport is.

Okay, now my nerves are showing. I planted radicchio and broccoli Calabrese today and some sexy sounding beans and peppers also became grounded.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


May 2, 2012
7:44 PM

Post #9107905

Dinner was fast, easy and relatively edible or a fast/easy weeknight meal. I came home tonight to find the upright freezer kicked the bucket. Triaged the contents, which meant moving all the "doesn't have to be frozen for the next few days" baking stuff from the refrigerator's freezer section and stowed the still-frozen meat. Everything else is gone or going...guess I'll be freezer shopping soon.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

May 3, 2012
4:49 AM

Post #9108160

Oh, poor Terry! It couldn't have happened in the winter, of course, when you could just have put everything outside!

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

May 3, 2012
4:52 AM

Post #9108164

Podster, I've seen those rice beans mentioned and wondered about trying them. What will you do with them?

I grew white coco beans once, with the idea of using them for cassoulets, but out of a long double row I only got enough dried beans for a quart, which wasn't even enough for a single cassoulet. I had to add cannellinis...Never tried that again!

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


May 3, 2012
4:57 AM

Post #9108171

GG, around here, you can't count on winter temps to help you out. We have had months that we didn't get north of freezing (day or night) but most winters are fairly mild. However, the freezer would have stayed much colder at least overnight if it had been winter. Ah well...at least the poor thing didn't suffer long :-)

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

May 3, 2012
5:03 AM

Post #9108178

Glad your freezer didn't suffer ;) When DH left ours unplugged once, we ate a lot of the same food for a couple of weeks. That pretty much cured him of inattention to behavior of that nature in the future.

I'm making pork inspired by this recipe: http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Pork-Chops-with-Mango-Pineapple-Sauce-106056, but nudging it to make it more healthy. Fresh fruit, oil not butter and less of it, and no mango nectar--it is loaded with sugar. I'm using slices of pork tenderloin rather than chops. Rice pilaf with cilantro, dried goji berries, and pistachios, and a side of broccoli.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

May 3, 2012
8:33 AM

Post #9108494

I have cooked chicken breasts and garbanzos from dry beans. Was thinking maybe a curry with tomatoes and peppers. Maybe coconut milk or not. Basmati rice. Kale would be nice in the curry but is too small to pick. Instead I think there are peas in the freezer. Our peas are now flowering. French bkfst. radishes got thinned this morning. We'll enjoy them in a salad.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

May 3, 2012
2:12 PM

Post #9109039

I was getting in the car because you mentioned contra dancing with Georgia Mudcats. Unfortunately, I read the part about family before leaving the driveway and started unpacking instead. I think being a contra dancer and not being family probably disqualifies me for any opinion I have on the retro-hippie revival. So here is it anyway. Two thumbs up on the retro-hippie revival and a basket of bugspray at the door. Give the relative a can of bug spray and tell her to take antihistamines before she gets there. She can also bring an eppie pen or whatever they call the emergency shots.

I'm almost done. My numbers on the finicial statement are still off but I'm not sure how much I care at this point. I've been spending so much time at the homework that the DH went shopping with me for his anniversary card.

Not sure what dinner is but it may be out.
Debsroots
Northwest, MO
(Zone 5a)

May 3, 2012
3:30 PM

Post #9109127

Dinner tonight is Grilled Chicken Sausage, Baked Potatoes, and Spinach Salad.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

May 3, 2012
3:39 PM

Post #9109137

Deb, that sounds good. I have some frozen homemade chicken and feta sausage patties... maybe tomorrow!
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 3, 2012
5:32 PM

Post #9109273

[quote="greenhouse_gal"]Podster, I've seen those rice beans mentioned and wondered about trying them. What will you do with them?

[/quote]


My first hope is to be successful in harvesting ample seed for the next growing season.

We eat a lot of seasoned bean and rice dishes and I will either use these and/or supplement other beans with these.

I really haven't researched recipes yet although the catalogue description indicated even using for candy.

What drew me was the beans nutrition and ease of growth. I'll know more in a few months, I guess. Kristi
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

May 3, 2012
5:47 PM

Post #9109292

Susan, I think being a contra dancer and not being family totally qualifies you. Thanks for the support (have you finished unpacking...maybe reconsider?). I love the idea of a bug spray basket at the door. Let me know if you can think of a nifty response to "Is it hot? I get rashes when it's hot." I'm calmer tonight because the garden is starting to fall into place. I think it will be a good one.

Debs, I like the sound of that dinner.

Darius are you too pooped to cook?

Kristi, I'm interested in hearing about the peas though shelling tiny peas sounds like a super pain. Are you wanting to have them fresh or for for storing?

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

May 3, 2012
5:55 PM

Post #9109301

My husband ate the tofu version of the pork recipe I posted (as well as the pork) so I'm making some Israeli salad. lol I guess that means he liked it?

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

May 3, 2012
5:58 PM

Post #9109303

Laurel, yes, I'm too pooped to cook, and will be for a few more days. Tonight was tuna salad, heavy emphasis on the salad part.

My niece is moving away on Monday to live with her fiancé in Elmira, NY, and I've promised to freezer-dive for some venison for her to take. She loves my venison sausage, and it happens I had a bottle and a half of juniper berries so I gave her the half-bottle, along with the recipe. She should be able to get lots of venison in upstate NY... I remember seeing hordes of deer along the interstate on my way to Canada.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

May 4, 2012
4:06 AM

Post #9109720

Make the bug spray basket(s) a variety of commercial (Off, Deet, Avon-Skin-So-Soft, fabric softener sheets) and organic. I would just visit a Whole Foods or some other organic store and see what they recommend. I also would keep the two types in seperate baskets since contra dancers tend towards organic. Also make sure you don't have anything has a strong smell or as you'll hate it during meals.

I don't remember when the wedding is. It does sound like a what should I wear question. So the response to if it's hot is that if she is planning on contra dancing she needs to wear something light weight or that is a summer fabric. Typically contra dancers wear something where the skirt twirls. Any length of skirt is works as long as it doesn't float up too high. I would also cover what type of dress (black tie, business casual, nice summer wear, etc) is required for the other places,general temps, and if there is ac at any location. An appropriate answer is that since the mountains are cooler no one uses ac there.

I'm assuming you are in the mountains so she may need a light weight jacket to throw over her arms later in the night.



This message was edited May 4, 2012 5:33 AM
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

May 4, 2012
4:34 AM

Post #9109732

On the flying in. I would ask what services they need (including car rental or pickup), call the local airport and just ask if they have that. Or just give them the number of the local airport so they can talk with them.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


May 4, 2012
4:48 AM

Post #9109744

Too hot? Provide good ol' funeral parlor fans printed for the occasion :-)

We had tilapia with a dijon sauce last night. It was only two of us (again), but this time my dining companion was my husband who likes fish. And since the tilapia were among the rescued items from the fallen freezer, it seemed prudent to use them up ASAP.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 4, 2012
5:09 AM

Post #9109765

Laurel, I'm just catching up to this thread and I'm with Susan and your DD - a retro-hippie revival theme sounds like a good time. And Terry's idea of hand fans, printed for the occassion is ingenious! and has a duel purpose - keeps the bugs away and provides some air circulation.

Last night was pizza delivered, not sure what tonight is but there will be mushroom gravey involved. Have a recipe to try. Probably some potatoes and the left-over chicken thighs from the other night. Definately not impressed with chicken thighs. By the time I had removed all the fat, there was not too much chicken left. The meat was packaged so that all that fat was hidden - tucked under so it looked like nice thick cuts - NOT. Scheesch!

Edited for a typo

This message was edited May 4, 2012 6:07 AM

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

May 4, 2012
5:48 AM

Post #9109801

I am having Israeli salad and feta on pita for dinner. DH is working, Barack Obama is speaking at Ohio State tomorrow, he's tremendously busy.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

May 4, 2012
5:58 AM

Post #9109820

Will your DH get to meet the President Celene?

We had omelet's last night. My girls give us more eggs than we can eat. But they are good & my friends are very happy about the excess!

I'm off to Ca on Sun for another week. I'm in a hotel w/microwave & refridgerator again. In two weeks from next, I'll be in a Residence Inn so I can do a little cooking for myself.

Tam

PS: I love a retro/hippie revival theme It took me a bit to figure out what Susan & Laurel were talking about. Somehow lost the beginning of the discussion. Was very puzzled over the bug spray discussion for a while there. lol

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

May 4, 2012
5:58 AM

Post #9109822

Celene, is your DH working for the campaign, or for the media, or what?

We went out for dinner to a dockside restaurant - DH had a shrimp and oyster po'-boy and I had a crabcake sandwich. Not the best crabcake I've ever had, but the ambiance made up for it. And yesterday we went to the garden store about forty minutes away, so I could pick up a bunch of bedding plants and hanging baskets, and ended up going to the Indian restaurant nearby, where they have a lunch buffet. Tonight I have to cook something that a two-year-old will eat, so I took chicken out. Maybe with polenta...

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

May 4, 2012
6:05 AM

Post #9109846

I love the idea of old-fashioned hand fans printed with the occasion!

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

May 4, 2012
7:05 AM

Post #9109920

My husband is law enforcement. It's a real goat rodeo there right now.

Now I'm hungry for polenta. Grilled, with gorgonola, tomatoes, and basil. lol

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

May 4, 2012
7:13 AM

Post #9109931

I read a yummy sounding recipe a few days ago that called for Brie, so I picked up a wedge yesterday. Unfortunately, I don't remember what the recipe was!

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

May 4, 2012
7:18 AM

Post #9109940

I love brie with caramel and pecans, way more than I should.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 4, 2012
8:15 AM

Post #9110035

Brie? I can eat that stuff with a spoon...hah!

Law enforcement when the president in town can't be any fun at all. Yikes, hope it's a quick and uneventful trip for Obama.

Here's a brie recipe I have not tried yet but looks promising. Try it and let us know Darius...

Boozy Campfire Cheese

Time/Servings:
Total: About 20 minutes
Active: About 10 minumtes
Makes: 4 to 6 servings

Ingredients:
1 7-8 ounce wheel of soft-ripened, bloomy-rind cheese, such as Camembert or Brie
1 tablespoon pear eau de vie or brandy
1 loaf crusty bread, such as pain au levain, baguette or sourdough

Instructions:
1. Unwrap cheese and set in the center of a large piece of heavy duty foil, about 12 by 12 inches. Perforate cheese by pricking it a few times with a fork, then sprinkle liquor over the holes.

2. Close the foil by wrapping the sides up around the cheese and sealing it at the top. Place wheel in the embers of the campfire, at the edge of the fire where the logs are smoldering and covered with a layer of gray ash (not in a direct flame). Cook, turning wheel occassionally with tongs so all sides spend some time near the embers, until cheese is soft and melted, about 10 to 12 minutes.

3. Remove from the fire and place on a plate. Open foil packet and scoop out cheese with hunks of crusty bread.

Note: You can make this dish indoors by preparing the cheese for cooking as outlined above, then placing the foil packet on a baking sheet inside a 450° oven for about 10 minutes.

Recipe courtesy of:
Chow.com
Submitted by:
Kate Ramos
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

May 4, 2012
9:02 AM

Post #9110118

Lots of great ideas for our July 27-29 events as well as kitchen inspiration. We are returning to Atlanta today. Busy picking and closing up. I'll ponder these creative solutions and get back with you. Lots of potential. The fans are especially intriguing. A cousin who will be attending hosted her daughter's wedding at the Dupont Circle Hotel in D.C.. The theme was "Night In Madrid". There were mini abanicos (Spanish fans), made of wood and lace, opened across the plates at each seating. We can tell my cousin we were inspired by their event and wanted to use the idea.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


May 4, 2012
9:17 AM

Post #9110145

Laurel, I'm pretty sure there are some boutique stationers and other printing companies that can do the fans with whatever printing you want on them. Personally I think it'd be a kick to hand 'em out (and they come in handy when it's sweltering...I've used them at outdoor events and was grateful to have one. Sometimes it's hard to improve upon a design, no matter how primitive or antiquated it might seem by today's standards.)

Celene, is a goat rodeo akin to herding cats? Seriously, that does NOT sound like a fun job.

Tonight's dinner is TBD, depending on who will be here to sup with me. Husband is headed over to check on his mama (she got roped into buying a security system from some door-to-door salesman and it's dreadfully expensive. He's going to look at the contract she signed and try to get it canceled, then try to find her a legit one that doesn't cost what this one does since these guys will know she doesn't have a system. Boo, hiss, pox on schemers. I really think there's a special place in the afterlife for people who prey on elderly people like that.)

Anyway, I suspect my late afternoon/evening will be spent sweltering outside unless nature surprises us with a long-overdue rain.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

May 4, 2012
3:24 PM

Post #9110528

Many women contra dancers here come with their own fans so they would be thrilled to have another. Agree with Terry that there are companies that make them. Also a light breeze (5 mph) from a fan (mechanical) supposedly keeps misquitoes away. On the bugs, I'm going to back track a little and suggest that you ask which ones she is specifically alergic to and what the reaction is. Depending on the answer, it maybe that outside seating with netting involved might also be a good idea.

Last class is over. All I have to do is finish the rewrite, print, and hand it in. I've enjoyed the class and am also glad it's over.

I think dinner is out tonight.

Here is a couple of photos from our wedding dance including one of the barn.

Thumbnail by SusanKC   Thumbnail by SusanKC   Thumbnail by SusanKC
Click an image for an enlarged view.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

May 4, 2012
3:25 PM

Post #9110531

Strawberries.

Well, the local ones are being picked and sold now, and I've sampled quite a few in different spots along my road trip today. I probably would have bought some, EXCEPT my strawberry plants that were languishing under a canopy of too-tall and too-crowded shade plants when I first moved finally here got moved last summer. One lone berry was hiding under a herb plant and escaped the recent frosts, to grow to fruition a couple of days ago. I have to say it was the sweetest strawberry I've eaten in maybe 30 years. I'd pay $20 for a single quart of them!!! I truly had forgotten what a real strawberry tastes like.

Too bad I have no clue what variety it is, but they do put out a few runners so I can increase my planting. I hope to have a few more berries soon, from the scant few plants that survived transplanting.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 4, 2012
3:41 PM

Post #9110559

I need to grow some strawberries!

Susan, love the barn and everyone looks to be having a great time dancing. So is that you and your betrothed in the middle pic? Thanks for sharing, it's fun to see what we all look like. Darius I've seen from her blog (and maybe her home page here), Terry has a nice pic now on her home page, I don't think she did before. I posted on a Veggie Gardening thread (or Tomatoes) asking for photos of folks and only a couple posted. Laurel has posted one or two as well. Congrats on getting through the class, time for a break.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

May 4, 2012
4:03 PM

Post #9110616

Celene, hope you and your SO get through the weekend without stress. The Prez was in our neighborhood recently for a private fund raising party. The neighborhood was all but shut down.

Terry, maybe a boutique stationer would be antithetical to DD's and FSL's (future son-in-law's) goals of a retro-hippie post nuptial party. They think of tree huggers in a positive light and us as role models up there in the trees. DD will convince her beau we will make the paper to create fans. Besides, it might disappoint family who recall our Haight Ashbury/Coconut Grove days. Family will poke fun and yet have high expectations of a Deliverance experience. What's the point of going to a destination event in southern Appalachia if it's within your comfort zone? Our intention is to shake some trees this time. It will give them something to talk about for years...bugs, snakes, hounds, weather, dirt, boiled peanuts and pimento cheese. Who could ask for anything more? Maybe some grappa labeled "moonshine". We already wined and dined them a dozen years ago in Atlanta for the B'nai Mitzvah of the two youngest. That was a three day event. We repeated the experience eleven years earlier with the oldest. On to something new! But back to the fans...maybe they should say something like "Far Out Ya'll". We discussed the fan idea on the drive back to Atlanta. Of course there was a design disagreement already. I want to print them using a sunflower shape and motif on one side and the photo of the two of them on the other side. http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/fp.php?pid=9029458&extraimg=2 The disagreement came in as to whether to use sticks from our woods or lattice trimmed to short lengths. SO wants to go uptown with the lattice.

Regarding the bug spray, I have a collection of quirky bottles and am thinking homemade labels with assorted old time bug deterrent remedies would be most suitable.

Mary, this month's Sauveur has a major section dedicated to bread, including pain au levain.

Susan, thanks so much for sharing your wedding photos. It looks like so much fun! Is that you and your SO? Though we are not regular contra dancers we are not without experience. I have a fall back twirly skirt if I don't find a mother-of-the-bride new edition. My cousin's husband, an internationally known fiddler, will join in at some point and several of the kid's friends will be arriving with instruments to jam. Once we are done in from the dancing we can listen to strains of old time 'til whenever.

We are having over sized spinach tortillas stuffed with cheesy eggs, onions, peppers and mushrooms and a salad.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

May 4, 2012
4:29 PM

Post #9110654

"boiled peanuts and pimento cheese"...LOL! Same for "Haight Ashbury/Coconut Grove days"... I remember them.

Hey Laurel... you can still get real 'shine if you ask around in the right places in N. GA. Plus, most liquor stores carry a legitimate moonshine (labeled as such), sans contamination hazards but probably sans the total kick, too.

If you make that paper for the fans (it's easy), be sure to include some plant fibers from Maypop. Nostalgia.

Ditch the sunflower idea on one side even though you are using it throughout, and use something radical and regional... ramps or ginseng? A copper still?

Look for a real common/traditional Appalachian saying, not "Far Out Ya'll". There must be some connected to weddings.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


May 4, 2012
4:32 PM

Post #9110660

Hey if you're going all Martha Stewartish and making your own paper to make your fans...my (paper) hat is off to you *grin*

I just trudged in from sweating and planting (more) hostas (don't tell anybody...I'm hiding the evidence) and find everyone is here and wanting dinner. Hmmm. I'm not up for carryout pizza, so I think they need to put their heads together and come up with a game plan that does not involve me taking another shower before I eat.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 4, 2012
5:28 PM

Post #9110756

Thanks for the heads up Laurel. I wandered over there (Sauveur) and got lost in "15 Classic Cocktails for Cinco de Mayo"...we're having friends over for those tamales etc and we'll try one or more of the cocktails...lime juice, worcestershire, pepper and tabasco. Fill glass with ice and beer...or lemon wedge, tom juice hot sauce and beer. Shot of tequila on the side.

Oh yeah, I found and marked the bread recipe. Now, where's my shot glass?

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

May 4, 2012
6:05 PM

Post #9110818

Had to pick the two-year-old up from the sitter's today and keep her until DS came for dinner a few hours later. Had a lot of fun with "down on the farm" activities - tractor ride, feeding the chickens, patting the gosling, releasing some goldfish into the pond, playing in the little house by the river. Dinner was chicken parts browned in my Le Creuset braiser and then simmered with a little tomato paste, some mushrooms, some white wine, some spinach, and some olives, with a bit of garlic and rosemary. I just made it up because I wanted to have polenta and away to use up the mushrooms, that seemed to work. The two-year-old ate most of two thighs! And some polenta.

I have some Mara des bois strawberries coming along. This will be their second year and they're just scrumptious. I had heard about them and about how good they were and wondered what they were like, and then when we were in France that fall a woman was selling them in the outdoor market so I got to try them. Came home and ordered some plants. Along with those, which are everbearers, I ordered some Cabot June-bearers; they're supposed to be good, too, although not as special as the others. The Mara des bois gave me some fruit last year but this will be the first year for the Cabots, since I had to pick off all the flowers last spring. I'm seeing some really large berries on those. Now to keep the turtles away...

Laurel, it's fun reading about all the wedding plans. And Celene, I'll bet your husband will be glad when the Prez's visit is over!
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

May 4, 2012
8:35 PM

Post #9110977

I was envisioning something tie dye as it is a retro hippie. There were a couple of tie dye designs on the web but the sources looked like it was out of country. However if you are doing Georgia hound dogs and moonshine then you need a different kind of fan decoration. You might go for more of a wildwood hippie theme.

That is us 12 years ago. We just celebrated our 12 anniversary. DH is the only one of us holding on to his same weight. His mullet went a long time ago though.

A photo from the formal wedding.

Thumbnail by SusanKC
Click the image for an enlarged view.

MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 5, 2012
5:16 AM

Post #9111192

Lovely Susan. Weddings are such happy times!

gg- sounds like fun on the farm and anything with polenta works for me too.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

May 5, 2012
5:18 AM

Post #9111197

Susan, you are a beautiful bride, that's for sure!

Tonight, I am not cooking. I will either scrounge from the refrig or get some Szechuan takeout. Or maybe Mexican, it is Cinco de Mayo.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

May 5, 2012
6:14 AM

Post #9111268

Pretty bride, handsome groom!

I'm off to the farmer's market since I'm out of any meats in the freezer. It's rainy and chilly so maybe the market won't be packed. I hope to find some good salad stuff too, since I haven't planted any.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

May 5, 2012
7:52 AM

Post #9111347

Thanks. Weddings are fun. So are wedding dances.

Celene Your DH has my sympathy. We usually have political candidates come to Independence, Mo to give a political speech on the square in front of the Truman statue. The first time we went to a speech there, all the extra things going on where more entertaining than what was said. Having lived in a number of rural areas, I'd never heard of a city getting shut down for anything other than a disaster nor witnessed any of the drama that goes on when the pres comes to town.

Strawberries and the market sounds nice. We may head there later. DH is trying to get a bed in and it's suppose to get to 90 today.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

May 5, 2012
8:31 AM

Post #9111368

The freeways shut down from the airport to wherever he goes, police cruisers line the overpasses, there are security people of one kind or another everywhere.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 5, 2012
8:57 AM

Post #9111404

Joe Biden was here recently...DH and I enjoy our hot tub early mornings, 5am or so, and watch the day brighten...birds galore. We're sitting there with our coffee and a large plane is coming in, very low and certainly off the normal flight pattern. I believe the folks in the window seats could look down and see us in the tub. Five minutes later, another one. What is going on I ask? Butch says Biden is coming in today so the regular airport traffic is probably diverted as a result. Harrruummmpphhh.

And don't even try to drive anywhere near where they are speaking. I cancelled a lunch date that day because it was close to his 'venue'.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

May 5, 2012
10:03 AM

Post #9111457

Yup, I'm staying home. I have to make up some last-minute product for my first market of the year tomorrow.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

May 5, 2012
10:37 AM

Post #9111491

I scored some fresh trout this morning, so that's the foundation for supper tonight. I'll probably just pan-fry it. Once The Kid leaves for good on Monday, I'll stake a claim to using the oven again. I prefer my trout broiled.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


May 5, 2012
4:04 PM

Post #9111790

Susan I failed to mention it early, but that's a great pic - you were a beautiful bride!

I'm thinking steaks on the grill tonight. More search-and-rescue foodstuffs from the freezer debacle.

I just need to decide on side dishes.

In other news, I planted a container herb garden yesterday and today. Six herbs (unless I decide one basil isn't enough...which might be the case), on the deck:

parsley
apple mint
chives, which were a stowaway on a clump of ornamental oregano last year
cilantro
dill
basil

The ornate holders were abandoned by the tenants who lived here before they got ousted and we bought the place. There's another long one which could come in handy if I decide to expand the herb "garden."

I figure them leaving them is karma; everyone leaves a few things behind when they go. I know we left good stuff when we moved - aside from countless hostas, daylilies and other perennials, I manage to leave an outdoor fireplace that I really should go get, but the renters are using it so maybe I'll let them have it.

Thumbnail by Terry
Click the image for an enlarged view.

MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

May 5, 2012
5:20 PM

Post #9111897

Oh wow, Susan. Thanks for sharing. Bet you are still pretty. Looks like you could use a few pounds though so it's a good thing if you found them. :)

Mary, I'll not repeat the entire story of our wedding but a few years of therapy wouldn't have helped me recover. It was a traumatic experience. It's also why we are open to DD's alternative plan. We had a formal morning wedding with groom's attendants in morning coats and bride's attendants in long floral skirts with cummerbunds and silk blouses. My two BILs were glassy eyed along with the best man (they all drove together), my mom had a row ( major understatement) with the chef about the Dover sole that could be heard throughout the dining room and my only sibling sister, the flower girl, sat down on the floor and cried because people were laughing at her dramatics as she flung rose petals all over the room. The photographer's studio burned down a few weeks after the wedding so the only photos we have are the proofs with huge crayon marks on them. I think something could be done to eliminate those on Photo Shop but every time I look at them I could start crying all over again. We have been married for forty one years and I say our secret is we'd never do it again. Never!

Terry, do I recall you don't like cilantro? Yet you planted it? The herbs look great. Thanks for sharing a photo. Gee, everything at your place looks so spanking new! We grow lots of apple mint if you want more. Ours is now over two feet tall. If you cut and dry it it will last for a year of more and be great for teas.

We are having goat cheese and veggie pizzas and a salad for dinner. SO is cooking. Guess by now you realize I'm a salad nut. I usually eat one or more a day. Salad for breakfast is typical and then a switch to soup in cooler months.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


May 5, 2012
6:46 PM

Post #9111996

Laurel, that is traumatic. Perhaps it's best there are no pics? Yeah, I can see why you'd say the key to staying together was the threat of having to go through that again..my guess is there are a few other positive reasons too :-) We'll celebrate our 30th this December, but our wedding had no meltdowns that I am aware of and I do have our photos to show for it. But I wouldn't want to endure the 1400 mile drive from Colorado to Tennessee that we endured a week after we got married. It involved a puppy, a puppy mess in my only shoes (everything else was in a trailer we were hauling), and a poor decision to drive straight through. That which does not kill us (or cause us to kill our spouses) makes us stronger and all that.

I am not a big cilantro fan, but I do put it in my salsa. So I"m willing to grow it in a pot where it cannot escape and grow everywhere. That's what turned me on the stuff was pulling it out and having my hands smell like cilantro for days. Weeks maybe. I'm prone to exaggeration, so take your pick.

Dinner was grilled steaks, a side of pasta salad and cauliflower gratin.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

May 6, 2012
4:54 PM

Post #9113022

I suffered PTSS reading the last day's threads and then woke up in the middle of the night in a cold sweat (okay maybe it was a hot sweat) when added memories returned like the national moving company that was supposed to pick up furniture from my apartment the Friday morning before the wedding and had not shown up by late afternoon. When I called to inquire they told me not to worry, they'd be there first thing Monday. My lease was up after Sunday and a new tenant was moving in on Monday. I heatedly explained the situation. Their response was to tell me what I could do with my furniture. SO and Dad rented a UHaul truck and loaded the furniture that Saturday morning. I slept on the floor the night before my wedding. Somewhere in there the hotel called to say the planned space had suffered a major air conditioning break down and resulting flood. The venue was being moved to another, better place in the hotel to make up for the inconvenience. So sorry. There would be no extra charge. Unfortunately the decor and colors of the new space blatantly clashed with the linens, flowers and table settings already selected.

Aside from Mom's run in with the chef in the kitchen over the sole there was a another incident. At some point guests started anxiously shuffling while awaiting dessert. It was going to be a spectacular and original piece designed by my food professional mom and created by their pastry chef... a multi-tiered, 3' tall torte, each layer a compilation of exotic tropical fruits piled with vanilla chantilly cream. The hotel searched high and low but the torte had gone missing. A creative kitchen genius decided to surprise us and our anxious guests by locating enough cupcakes to roll out a cart, each cupcake with a cheesy plastic bride and groom stuck on top. I can best describe my mother's reaction like Three Mile Island. Apoplexy. Thank goodness my family does not own weapons. The torte arrived the next day. They called my parents and offered to deliver it. At that point Mom found her inner Ahab and ripped the house phone out of the wall. Due to the absence of a house phone, I was unable to say farewell to my parents.

We enlisted one of the glassy eyed BILs to drive the truck full of furniture from S. FL to Atlanta following the day of the wedding. He spent the night in the adjoining Holiday Inn room, headboard to headboard, and the following morning backed the truck into the fake stucco column that held up the overhang of the entry. We couldn't move the truck until they found a temporary way to hold up the overhang which was delaying our journey. We had to leave a credit card # to repair the overhang. We had a $250 credit limit. Besides BIL was nineteen and not supposed to be driving the truck. (: So we arrived in Atlanta later than planned and BIL missed his plane because of the delay in Gainesville, FL.. We ended up housing him for more than a week because flights were not easily come by in those days. We also paid for both tickets though but mere students with part time minimum wage jobs. Looking back, I think these events made three natural births seem easy and realized life rarely goes as planned. It was a good lesson to start out with.

We are having a three bean chili, the last from a Fall canning, with smoked chicken thighs, also from a previous food preparation, and fresh jalapeno/cheddar cornbread.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

May 6, 2012
5:10 PM

Post #9113051

Laurel, I'm sure none of that was pleasant at the time, but the telling many years afterward is really a funny tale. I can see how resurrecting the event gave you a cold sweat in the middle of the night!

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

May 6, 2012
5:34 PM

Post #9113086

Laurel, it truly sounds like the wedding from hell. I don't even think it's very funny now; I just can't imagine having to go through all that along with the huge adjustment of a brand-new marriage!

We had crockpot ribs tonight with some frozen cucumbers as a salad and some of our last sweet potatoes. I hadn't realized I had that many packages of frozen cucumbers in the freezer until I did some digging for DH's roasted long hots, which he wanted to add to today's lunch of sautéed peppers and provolone on Italian rolls. I had been taking out a package of cucumbers at a time for salads, but then I thought I had come to the end of them. Apparently not... So I thawed three packages and they were great by themselves as a side dish.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

May 6, 2012
6:45 PM

Post #9113205

I had no idea you could freeze cucumbers...what is the texture like?
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

May 6, 2012
7:27 PM

Post #9113281

What a nightmare of a time. The planets must have been in retrograde.

One formal wedding is enough for both of us also. The only reason we had a formal first is that DH wanted one. I would have been happy getting married in jeans in the backyard. We had issues that came up also not anything like that. The cake and caterer started calling the hall rental person evil and were complaining to me about her. If it hadn't been so close to the wedding I would have fired both of them.

Dinner last night was pizza. Dinner tonight was kababs at an new local El Salvadorian Restaurant. The food was very good so we'll be back another time.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

May 7, 2012
4:30 AM

Post #9113609

Celene, the texture is about what you'd expect from cucumbers that were salted and placed in vinegar for a while; they are still somewhat crunchy, and amazingly decent. If you have a glut of cucumbers in the summer it's a great way to save them for winter. Last night I just thawed them and put them in a bowl, first draining off the liquid that accumulated as they warmed. They were delicious; we finished the bowl. Here're the instructions:

Freezing Cucumbers
Slice them thinly, mix them with salt (about a tablespoon per large cucumber), and put them in the refrigerator for a day. Then rinse them really well and press them as dry as you can.
Mix them with sugar and vinegar, 50/50, enough to cover them.
Refrigerate for another day, then put them in freezer containers and
freeze. When you thaw them later, they're still crisp and good in
salads, gazpacho, etc.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

May 7, 2012
5:11 AM

Post #9113640

I'm definitely going to try that. Thank you!
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

May 7, 2012
5:34 AM

Post #9113665

My mom froze cabbage that way also. Called it freezer slaw.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

May 7, 2012
5:53 AM

Post #9113683

Do you freeze them in the vinegar/sugar liquid?
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 7, 2012
6:12 AM

Post #9113712

Laurel, by the end of your second post on the wedding I was beginning to laugh. At some point that's about all you can do. And this says it all: [quote] Looking back, I ...realized life rarely goes as planned. It was a good lesson to start out with.[/quote]

My wedding to my now ex had an event: His mother was mortified that I ordered a coconut macaroon cake. What will people say when you cut it? Said with much angst and hand wringing. They will probably say, oh goodie, a moist and tasty cake! Current SO and I will celebrate 34 in August. We have not bothered with nuptials. Oh well.

Dinner last night was leftover pork chops in sauerkraut, roasted garden beets, and pinto beans from the Cinco de Mayo dinner. Yummy.

Terry, love the herb garden and its holders. One person's trash and all that...

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

May 7, 2012
6:32 AM

Post #9113753

Yes, I do freeze them with some of the liquid. I scoop them out of the bowl and put them in freezer bags. I was so tickled to find this method because I can't seem to make decent pickles and I had all those excess cukes!

We married with only two witnesses, since we did the deed on an island in Washington State where we lived while I was attending grad school. Parents were just happy we were married, and because of the money saved on the wedding my mother gave us a set of sterling silver flatware. Made sense to me!

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


May 7, 2012
7:54 AM

Post #9113863

GG, thanks for the tip on freezing cukes. I've never tried it but - assuming I have a working freezer and cukes to freeze - I'll give your method a whirl.

Larkie

Larkie
Camilla, GA
(Zone 8a)

May 7, 2012
8:05 AM

Post #9113893

Freezer cukes are delicious. I add a few sliced onions to mine also..

Larkie

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

May 7, 2012
12:51 PM

Post #9114233

Larkie, when you freeze them or after they're thawed?
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

May 7, 2012
2:39 PM

Post #9114412

If we had kids either money or wedding would be fine. I once went to a wedding where the wedding cake was chocolate cake with chocolate frosting. Looked very cool. The groom's cake was Devil's chocolate. I thought it was fun.

Dinner is cashew chicken, rice, and a rhubarb-lavender pie. First pie crust in years so we'll see how it goes.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

May 7, 2012
3:57 PM

Post #9114527

Thanks for all the positive and supportive comments. Things are swiftly falling into place. The guest list is expanding. That's reassuring. After all, what are best laid plans if no one comes? The venue is so out of the way quirky, plus the expense to access us by either driving in or flying to Atlanta and renting cars to travel to N. GA, we are frankly surprised (and thrilled) the RSVPS are pouring in.

I'm really interested in these freezer cukes. Can't wait to try them. I'd like them with onions, the way Larkie does them.

Susan, comment on the pie, okay? I can't imagine it. Do love making pie crust. It seems so many are intimidated by it. Very cold water and a light hand is key. I put ice in the bowl with the water before adding to the dough. As for money or a wedding...it wasn't really an option here. We would have been fine with writing a check but the children hold us to a higher standard and more extended family thinks we are an experience on wheels. It would dissapoint our biggest audience.

Larkie

Larkie
Camilla, GA
(Zone 8a)

May 7, 2012
4:07 PM

Post #9114545

When I freeze them..
Debsroots
Northwest, MO
(Zone 5a)

May 8, 2012
3:00 PM

Post #9116110

Dinner tonight Pork Enchiladas, and Spanish Rice.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

May 8, 2012
4:52 PM

Post #9116262

We had linguine with white clam sauce, the clams being from the freezer, a result of one of DH's clamming expeditions. Along with that I made some of our lima beans. I simmered them with the drippings from barbecued pork ribs; boy were they good!
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

May 8, 2012
4:52 PM

Post #9116264

Big salad with feta, hard boiled eggs, and homemade croutons.
Edens_Gardener
Clay Center, KS
(Zone 5b)

May 8, 2012
5:44 PM

Post #9116331

Shrimps, three cheese Italian sausage, Alfredo sauce, linguini, tricolor sweet corn, sliced tomatoes.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

May 8, 2012
6:26 PM

Post #9116405

Dinner was a McDonald's burger. Long day. Neighbor issues again. This time the I called the police.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


May 8, 2012
7:30 PM

Post #9116514

I spent most of the day trying to make an iPad's hot spot keep me connected until Comcast could come replace our modem.

Dinner was meatloaf, scalloped potatoes au gratin, Italian green beans. For dessert, a Margherita cake/torte with fresh strawberries and vanilla ice cream.

Susan, sorry about the neighbor issues. That's no fun at all.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

May 8, 2012
7:50 PM

Post #9116553

Ditto the neighbor issues. We have a good 'ol boy on a trust fund issue next door. 3 a.m. hot tub parties, a speed boat that gets its engines reamed Thursday late to be ready for a weekend at the lake and shreiking innebriated females on the lawn at all hours and any day of the week. I called over there a while back and asked him to tone it down. He now makes a point of loud, crude phone conversations or foul talk with his dogs when we are outside. I was stymied until I found the cure. Classical music and opera, full tilt, whenever I am outside and bothered by his obnoxiousness. It works great!

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

May 8, 2012
7:57 PM

Post #9116564

We have sedate neighbors, thankfully.

I had noodles with butter, garlic, and a chiffonade of basil.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 8, 2012
8:26 PM

Post #9116612

In our current set up, a cul-de-sac, we are *very* fortunate in our neighbors. I just HATE the kinds of issues Susan and Laurel express. So hard to make progress...that old saying about "It's hard to soar with eagles when you [are around] turkeys"...something like that. My sympathies, in spades.

Dinner was leftovers...the last of the cinco de mayo tamales. More in the freezer, tonight's were not consumed Saturday night and got re-heated. Didn't seem to hurt them any.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


May 9, 2012
3:55 AM

Post #9116765

Now I remember why I love being surrounded by emus and ducks and cows and horses. We have a couple donkeys in the neighborhood, and I'll take them and their braying over the human variety any day.

I think I found a new go-to recipe with the Margherita Torta (or - as I like to call it - an Italian Daisy Cake :-) as a shortcake for berries. It's made with potato flour and has the best texture - just sturdy enough but moist and light.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

May 9, 2012
4:44 AM

Post #9116801

Love the opera and classical music solution! Two can play the same game. Aren't there any noise ordinances where you are, though, Laurel? The opera still doesn't address the 3 a.m. parties and the engine reaming, etc.

Susan, did you get any satisfaction from the police?
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

May 9, 2012
6:48 AM

Post #9116969

Yes. Somewhat. He said she can be at our curb and say anything she wants as long she is not cussing or commits a crime. He told her that we had requested that she stay off of our property and she agreed it would be best not to talk with us again. He also gave her an explaination of the capability of the camera and it's lack of ability to see into houses.

I understand that the owners are headed home today. I can't say that after the last discussion with them that I am looking forward to having them across the street. There seems to be a run of bad behavior associated with that property since last June.

Laural - The opera was a creative solution on your part.

Terry would you post the daisy cake recipe?

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

May 9, 2012
9:02 AM

Post #9117187

Was this one of the kids who were so disruptive before, Susan? What was the deal with the camera? - I don't think you mentioned that issue before.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

May 9, 2012
9:21 AM

Post #9117203

Same house. We put up a security camera when we had the fourth time dog attack on us and someone also show up at the front door around 3-4am. I saw the guy running off and it's not one of the kid's friend. It was someone in his 40-50s.

After the security camera went up there has been a lot of noise that went away in the front yard. So we think someone has been in the yard at night. If it was a dog or cat then there would not have been that coincedental noise reduction. The police have looked at the camera location and the type when we had the security check done. They've also checked with the prosecuting attorney to see what the statues are. The just of the legal is that as long as there is something going on either off or on our property that affects us on the property we can record whatever we want. We were told to turn the audio on by the security review policeman. Have been resistant to do that since it seems an esculation but I now can see why. I've got a call into the electricain. We had discussed installing additional cameras based on location recommendations by the police. So we're going to go ahead with that as planned.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 9, 2012
9:59 AM

Post #9117247

What a pain for some peace. Phoenix has a noise ordinance and I've been able to stop barking dogs - that is, dogs that bark for hours and hours on end, non-stop. But I only had to speak with the owner's and they, fortunately, understood and took the necessary steps. It is so difficult when you are dealing with harsh personalities that just want to fight. Good luck, I'm sorry for your hassles.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

May 9, 2012
10:25 AM

Post #9117289

Good for you for taking those steps, but what a shame to have to live under siege like that!

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


May 9, 2012
10:28 AM

Post #9117294

Margherita Torta

Ingredients:
4 eggs
2/3 cup caster or superfine sugar*
zest of one lemon
3/4 cup potato flour (I used Bob’s Red Mill potato starch)

(* I used regular sugar and just pulled back a tad on the amount I used – closer to 1/2 than 2/3 cup.)

Directions:
Preheat oven to 320 F. Grease a 9-inch pan (I used a springform pan but you can use a standard cake pan if it’s deep enough – the cake will rise considerably as it bakes.) Place a circle of parchment paper over the buttered bottom.

In a mixing bowl, combine eggs and sugar. Beat on medium speed until doubled in volume – approximately 5 minutes. While it’s mixing, use a micro-planer to zest a lemon; add to the sugar/egg mixture and beat for another 5 minutes. Creating that volume by beating the eggs and sugar is key to this cake rising properly, so don’t try to shortcut this step.)


Gently scoop 3/4 cup of potato starch into a sifter and sift, then add to batter. Mix briefly to combine; whip at a high speed for 5-10 seconds to ensure it is evenly distributed through.

Pour into prepared pan and bake for 30-35 minutes or until top is lightly golden and a cake tester inserted comes out clean. Top will spring back, but use a gentle touch.

Allow to cool; run a knife around the edge of pan to loosen and remove springform band or invert onto cooling rack. Cut into wedges and serve.

Thumbnail by Terry
Click the image for an enlarged view.

SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

May 9, 2012
11:00 AM

Post #9117346

Yes. It has been a pain. We've had several if we were going to move what do we want to move to discussions. Screened in porch is one of the items on the list. Bigger yard is another.

Thank for the recipe. Cake looks very nice esp the strawberries.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

May 9, 2012
4:57 PM

Post #9117716

Well, it's later than I like for supper (because I've been busy with seeds) but it's cooking. "Chicken sausage patties made with Feta and spinach" and a side of fresh zukes sautéed in coconut oil with shredded unsweetened coconut.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

May 9, 2012
5:05 PM

Post #9117724

Have just been lurking lately and Darius already saw these. My DD and I did a Pasty marathon this afternoon. Made 28, plus one in a small pie pan because we ran out of sufficient pastry to wrap the last one. Overshot potatoes by about one.

My back and feet are complaining but this will hold us for quite a long while.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

May 9, 2012
5:10 PM

Post #9117729

Y'know, I am really going to have to try those one of these days...
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

May 9, 2012
5:14 PM

Post #9117731

That sounds so delicious, Darius.

I am pressed for time. The house in Miami is getting a lot of interest in a terrible market. Lot's of wedding guests calling for info even though there is a web site and then there is the RU and garden to get in. We have a buyer on the table for the Miami house but I dread to think I might have to make a trip to Miami in the next few weeks. Help!

We do have noise ordinances but it allows for neighbors to be ridiculously loud until very late and then we can't hear him in our bedroom. But I know what's going on if I get up in the middle of the night because oddly the noise travels through the skylights in my dressing room and bath. The people on the other side are renting their three million dollar home and I don't think they are Americans so perhaps they are reluctant to complain. Weare all on lots around two acres in the middle of the city. It's not as if the space is tight. You have to be really loud to be annoying. My neighbor calls me to complain about the noise and I tell her to call and complain. BTW, did I mention the illegal tree cutting or the building that goes on all the time with no permits? We are in a registered wildlife and watershed neighborhood.

Okay, steaks on the grill, a single shared potato with steamed carrots and lots of leftover salad for dinner. We are to the left of carb center tonight.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

May 9, 2012
6:18 PM

Post #9117819

Sheila - what is a pastry marathan and did you mean to post a picture?

No issues with being in a wildlife or watershed neighborhood. Although they are suppose to take out a tree removal permit if the homeowner is taking down a tree by themselves. There is a reason for that. One of my freinds had his car crushed by homeowner taking down their own tree.

Dinner was out at a mexican restaurant. I had mahi mahi tacos with corn tortillas and mango salsa.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

May 9, 2012
6:28 PM

Post #9117836

Our neighbor took out our power for six hours this past year after backing front end loader into the power pole on the street. Daddy is a shopping center center developer and sonny boy takes the company toys, aka heavy equipment, home on weekends to play. This is when the city offices are closed for complaints.

Meezers, sounds like you make pasties the way I make empanadas. How do you reheat them?

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

May 9, 2012
7:44 PM

Post #9117927

Oh, oops I did mean to post a photo...haha, that's what happens when your brain gets old and your mouth continues to operate. And the term is Pasty (pass-tee) not Pastry.

Pasties are a meat pie wrapped in a pastry crust. In the early 1900s. Cornish miners used to carry them to work for their lunches. My home territory is northern Wisconsin and Upper Michigan, where a lot of Cornish immigrants came to work the mines and brought their family recipes with them. Everyone in the northern WI and MI area is familiar with them. Original recipes called for rutabaga (rootmaas), potatos, diced meat, onion and s/p. I hardly ever see rutabaga and am not overly fond of it, so I don't put it in.

The old time pasty shops are slowly going out of existance, and restaurants that carry them, who don't specialize in pasties, use a lot of icky stuff like dehydrated potato, ground beef, and something bearing no resemblance to real pastry.

Thumbnail by meezersfive
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


May 9, 2012
7:48 PM

Post #9117931

Dinner was catch-as-catch can. Swimmer Girl went to her HS soccer game (semi-finals; they lost, unfortunately): I didn't get dinner started until it was too late to start anything before I headed out the door. So Mr. Official and I nibbled and noshed when we got home this evening just before 9. Middle Son saw the writing on the wall around 6:30 and scooted off to a friend's house to forage for some supper and catch a hockey game.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


May 9, 2012
7:51 PM

Post #9117933

Pasties and pierogies are two things I've never made...but I want to. (I admit I did a double-take the first time, and thought you said pastry with an "r" but then I figured I misread it...and I was right :-)
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

May 10, 2012
3:25 AM

Post #9118109

Looks like a lot of work. There is a german version of the pasties that I used to get when I lived in ND. The restaurants used to sell them but then they used to sell the fish soaked in lye also.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

May 10, 2012
3:32 AM

Post #9118118

Laurel - Video is a wonderful thing. It takes out all the he said she said issues out of the complaint process. There is something about visual with audio that is to the point. So I would recommend that you record for when the office is open.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

May 10, 2012
4:12 AM

Post #9118140

Ahhhh Lutefisk!! We cheerfully ate it as children, but I don't think I'd want to have a meal of it now. My Swedish grandmother used to make it in a white sauce, or bechamel, and serve it over boiled potatos.

When we do this "mass production" (I can only face it about every ten years or so..) I either prebake them until almost done, about 30 minutes, or bake them thoroughly, and freeze them. They freeze well. You can also freeze them with no baking at all, but that can make your bottom crust soggy. These turned out very well, I made five batches of pastry dough in the food processor...11 pounds of potatos, 3 pounds of Vidalias, and a just under 5 pound sirloin tip roast.

Doesn't every ethnicity have something wrapped in dough?? Empanadas, burritos,ravioli, egg rolls, runzas, the list goes on...

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

May 10, 2012
5:52 AM

Post #9118232

I do think every culture has a dumpling-ish sort of comfort food.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

May 10, 2012
5:54 AM

Post #9118235

Kreplach...

I've never made them but my grandmother used to. After she died I remember my mother taking some remaining kreplach out of our freezer and throwing them away. She probably felt that it would be too painful emotionally to eat them, but it upset me and I kept thinking of how horrified my grandmother would have been to see that good food and all of that work wasted.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

May 10, 2012
2:50 PM

Post #9118881

Dinner is a ham steak and salad fresh from the garden.
Debsroots
Northwest, MO
(Zone 5a)

May 10, 2012
3:01 PM

Post #9118901

BBQ Pork sandwiches, french fries, fresh radishes from the garden, three bean salad, and shortcake with fresh strawberries from the garden. Life is good.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

May 10, 2012
3:05 PM

Post #9118910

If I had any booze in the house, I'd have a couple of martinis and call it "dinner". I'm really pooped from a hard day digging/transplanting big things in the yard.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


May 10, 2012
4:52 PM

Post #9119036

We (well, mostly middle son) moved the big lilac bush today from its shady spot to a much more open, sunnier, location. Yay! Swimmer Girl had her training/orientation today at Kroger. Dinner is sweet and spicy penne alla vodka, a tossed salad - I'm leaving off the bread tonight to whittle away a few carbs. So far, it's just me cooking dinner with the cat and dog eying me hopefully. I've got enough for a crowd, so the rest of them better come on home soon :-)

And in better news, a new freezer has been ordered; I'm waiting to hear from them to set up a delivery time.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

May 10, 2012
5:37 PM

Post #9119119

I made barbecue chicken breast, vinegar-style potato salad, grilled veg, and a tossed salad.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

May 11, 2012
1:22 PM

Post #9120038

I made two mac 'n cheese casseroles at Maypop last week and froze both for fast fare. Defrosted one when we came in last night. We are having that and grilled portabellas that have been marinating in olive oil, garlic and balsamic vinegar. Cabbage steamed in chicken stock is also on the menu.

It's crazy busy in the garden. Don't know which way to run. The garlic is going over and needs to get pulled, beans are running and need strings and lots of seedlings still need to get planted. We had a dump truck load of mulch delivered a few hours ago. I get one every year for Mother's Day. He must love me extra this year because he got me an extra scoop. :)
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

May 11, 2012
2:44 PM

Post #9120141

LOL on the extra love! Dh digs in bulbs every year in the fall for me. I'll have to ask for the spring mulch delivery.

Dinner is proably out tonight. We'll see what the DH is feeling like when he gets back.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

May 11, 2012
3:40 PM

Post #9120207

I went up to Roanoke today to meet a DG friend for lunch. I picked up a small slab of Copper River Sockeye, and If I'm careful in cutting it, I think I can make 3 meals out of it. I also scored FOUR of the nicest mangoes I've seen ever in a store (not counting Miami roadside stands!). Plus they had cantaloupes that smelled real, won't know until I cut one in the morning. All I've had for years have been wet, pastel-orange colored, and tasteless nothings.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

May 11, 2012
3:41 PM

Post #9120209

Mulch has been great the past few years. The love is for certain so how can I complain?
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 12, 2012
5:10 AM

Post #9120687

A truckload of mulch for Mother's Day - that guy knows the way to your heart!!

Happy Mother's Day to all the mom's out there.

Last night was quick and easy turkey burgers on the grill with some vinegar style coleslaw [for the mayo obsessed in the house] on the side. We ate them open face on lettuce - no bun. I had sent DH to the store since I was working all day. Asked him first, Do you know what romaine lettuce is? Sure says he. Catching up on emails and stuff late yesterday, I'm looking at the reciept he left on the desk and ask why he bought red leaf lettuce. It's a type of romaine he says. Funny guy...
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

May 12, 2012
1:25 PM

Post #9121146

Dinner is ham, aspargaus, garlic scapes (from the garden!), and a rice or pasta dish.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

May 12, 2012
2:26 PM

Post #9121192

I'm planning a broiled piece of Copper River Sockeye Salmon, fresh asparagus on garden greens (haven't decided on the dressing), and steaming some tiny haricot verts from the Fresh Market yesterday. YUM!

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

May 12, 2012
3:50 PM

Post #9121257

Set a place for me, I'll be right there... I'm reheating chicken enchiladas, with some fresh greens and guacamole because I've been baking all afternoon. Taking the easy way out. They were good the first time, so they'll do fine. Tomorrow being Mother's Day, I am expecting kinder and I hope they aren't expecting me to throw together a meal because they will be disappointed.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

May 12, 2012
3:54 PM

Post #9121261

M5, I'd love to have you for a dinner guest, anytime! (With advance notice, of course. LOL)

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

May 12, 2012
3:59 PM

Post #9121269

OK but I'm putting my order in ahead of time and I want biscotti for dessert and fresh asparagus and some of your belgian endive stuffed with goodies and ..and...and...You can be sure if I ever hit your neighborhood I will be knocking on your door.

Oh, yeah, and cheese and some of your charcuterie...and and and...

LOL

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

May 12, 2012
4:16 PM

Post #9121278

LOL
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

May 12, 2012
4:20 PM

Post #9121284

Mmmm. Sounds like an event in the planning.

Garlic scapes, asparagus, and carmelized onions with verjus turned out very good. Best scapes we've harvested so far.

Pasta ended up as a not. Instead, I made a whole wheat, yogurt, and tart cherries cornbread that also turned out very good.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

May 12, 2012
5:15 PM

Post #9121333

I am happily at home tonight. Well fed with wild-caught alaskan salmon & garden-fresh asparagus sauted with garlic in olive oil. Simple and just fabulous!

I had a wonderful meal at an Indian restaurant in Ca. Oh so good - a dal. Lentils in creamy tomato sauce. So fresh & spiced to perfection. Otherwise it was a week of frozen "Amy's Organics" and supermarket salads.

Tomorrow I'll be planting my peppers and bush beans.

So nice to be home!
Tam

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


May 12, 2012
7:29 PM

Post #9121495

Back home after an overnight at a lodge with 20-some high school juniors & seniors and college students. Lovely weekend but glad to be home in time to pull a few weeds, admire our new fountain and help torch a towering heap of tree limbs. Dinner was out - Bang Bang Shrimp. Tomorrow I'm planning on pulled pork (easy; can cook all morning and we can eat mid-afternoon.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

May 12, 2012
8:20 PM

Post #9121612

I detect a theme here. We had dinner at our friends' house before going to a concert together, and he cooked salmon, asparagus, broccoli and risotto. With fresh pineapple and strawberries for dessert. Lovely springtime meal, huh?

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

May 13, 2012
7:26 AM

Post #9121951

I did the fastest zip-through ever of my favorite nursery in Lancaster yesterday. Got a few herbs - trying margorum for the first time plus all the standbys (basil, parsely sage, oregano etc). I got a big basil so I won't have to wait too long for my first pesto. I've been craving it for a few months now.

Tam

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

May 13, 2012
9:48 AM

Post #9122116

I used to put all my herbs right in the garden but have since decided that flat leaf parsley, sage and marjoram do better on the deck in a big pot. Basil grows large enough to fend for itself in a big bed, plus I plant a lot of it. On the deck it's a few steps through the dinette and onto the deck to clip what I need. It's also got a shade cloth over the pergola so it doesn't fry in the hot afternoon sun.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

May 13, 2012
9:50 AM

Post #9122121

I came to the same conclusion M5! My garden is a good walk away too. So I have three planters on my deck for herbs. So convenient!

Tam
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

May 13, 2012
2:37 PM

Post #9122324

Maypop has a kitchen garden. It's right out the back door. Herbs are closest. We start spring salad greens close too because there is a big old oak tree nearby and spring lettuces, radishes and peas appreciate a little shade once the weather ramps up. Veggies and fruits range over the remaining space. There are some old fashioned perennial and annual flowers for cutting. They fit themselves between the cracks and crevices of what is not dedicated to food.

I may be mistaken ('cause maybe there's a squash or two in Atlanta) but think we are having the last of our butternuts as a curried onion and squash soup for dinner. Five mini ones. We are also having BBQ brisket, mushroom and Swiss tortas. I had the option of a Mother's Day indulgence in Atlanta but opted out to plant like crazy and then schlump in comfy clothes on our rainy, foggy mountain. I'll collect later. It was good to hear from the kids today.

I have a friend who has one adopted child and calls every Mother's Day because she said I was the best mother she ever knew. I am humbled by her opinion though saddened that her thirty-nine-year-old son never calls her. She still partially supports him.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

May 13, 2012
2:45 PM

Post #9122328

Forgot to mention I am adding fresh sage leaves and blobs of goat cheese to the curried squash soup. SO has volunteered to reconnoiter garden sage in the deluge. He gets a kitchen Bronze Star. The man loves his food.
Debsroots
Northwest, MO
(Zone 5a)

May 13, 2012
3:43 PM

Post #9122377

Potato salad, chicken sausage with fried onions and green peppers, fresh garden radishes, and walnut chocolate chip cookies.

Hope all had a wonderful day,

Debbie
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 13, 2012
3:59 PM

Post #9122394

I've started an herb garden off the kitchen (more or less) too. Put the oregano in the ground hoping it will become a ground cover.

I've some garden beets to use up so will make a beet/cabbage borscht. it's a bit hot for soup but it's good stuff and we can eat on it all week.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

May 13, 2012
4:14 PM

Post #9122406

Growing up in s. FL. I never had borscht as a hot meat until adulthood. We always ate it as a cold soup with a fat dollop of full fat sour cream and freshly chopped chives or, more commonly, dill. At best, the borscht was vaguely warmed but then there was that cold blob of sour cream. It was the bomb. Today I do the same but blob on non fat Greek yogurt.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 13, 2012
4:21 PM

Post #9122416

So are you saying the soup was cooked one day, then allowed to cool and eaten the next day? Thanks for the tip, I'll try it cold tomorrow. I have sour cream (left over from the cinco de mayo meal) I may even still have a spring or two of fresh dill. Bread on the side?
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

May 13, 2012
5:03 PM

Post #9122465

Yes, I actually knew borscht as a cold, vegetable based, summer soup first. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Borscht

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

May 13, 2012
5:38 PM

Post #9122504

We had butternut squash with lentils for dinner. Oh it was good!

Tam

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

May 13, 2012
6:00 PM

Post #9122533

Hmmmm, I think I still have 4-5 butternuts in the root cellar; I should check.

I had sardines for supper. A couple of times a year I get a yen for sardines... just plain sardines in olive oil, mashed on saltines. Nothing else, just sardines. I might be hungry later, but they hit the spot.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

May 13, 2012
6:14 PM

Post #9122551

Funny, SO has been on a sardine kick the last few weeks too.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


May 13, 2012
7:25 PM

Post #9122654

Dinner was what I figured it would be: pulled pork sandwiches with sides of macaroni salad and/or potato salad.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

May 14, 2012
5:52 AM

Post #9122969

Dinner last night was out. Afternoon graduation party for a relative of DH's and followed up by a mother's day dinner for DH's mother at a local restaurant.

Most herbs are all in one bed at the bottom of the deck. Veggie garden is across the yard. We have a pineapple sage, mexican sage, and a something to be determined yet in self watering planters on the deck. I bought a horseradish plant yesterday to go into the herb bed. New item so we'll see how it goes. Any one harvested horseradish and have pointers on what to do?

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

May 14, 2012
5:57 AM

Post #9122976

Stand upwind when you grind it outdoors. Don't even think of doing it inside.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

May 14, 2012
6:17 AM

Post #9123002

I do grind mine indoors, in the food processor. Don't look down the chute while you do this.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

May 14, 2012
6:18 AM

Post #9123003

Plant the horseradish in it's own deep pot. It takes a couple of years for it to develop roots large enough to grind. Mine are now 3 years old and I'll harvest some this fall. They do spread. Don't even think of planting it in the ground unless you use a bottomless container.

You can never get rid of it in the ground, even if you dig to China; I've been trying to get rid of the roots I first started in a stone/concrete bed against the house. That bed even has a concrete bottom and I'm still never able to get ALL the rootlets out.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

May 14, 2012
6:38 AM

Post #9123034

Thanks for all the tips. That will help. BTW - Do you think it is worth the effort in growing and harvesting?

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

May 14, 2012
6:50 AM

Post #9123057

I don't know any other way to get fresh (non-processed) horseradish. I used to buy it in the big market in downtown Baltimore when I lived there, watching as they grated it, but those kind of markets are a thing of the past. My grocery store sometimes has roots, sealed in wax, but they look VERY aged.

I use some of the leaves in fermented pickles, they add flavor and a touch of crispness.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

May 14, 2012
6:51 AM

Post #9123058

I like it, but I can grow it at my parents' farm in an old watering trough. If I had to grow it in my yard, the roots they sell at the food co-op would start looking good. As a plant, I hate it.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 14, 2012
8:18 AM

Post #9123218

[quote]an old watering trough[/quote]
hmmmm, I have a 55-gal drum we cut in half length-wise. Maybe this would work. If I drill holes in the bottom for drainage, will that allow the roots to escape? Should I just bury the cylinder and plant without holes?
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

May 14, 2012
8:42 AM

Post #9123257

If it's like bamboo then what I've been told by the extension agent is he has never yet seen an inground container that bamboo didn't escape from.

I've moved the horseradish to a pot. We'll see how it goes. We have problems with buying grated horseradish as it is either in citric acid or cream. Both of which eliminates it from our being able to use the commercial brand.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

May 14, 2012
5:39 PM

Post #9123952

Meijer carries horseradish root here.

IME, the roots are at least 2' long. The horse trough I am using is about 3' deep.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 15, 2012
6:33 AM

Post #9124503

Guess I better just get horseradish root at the store. :-\

The cold borscht was great, thanks for the tip Laurel.

Tonight I'm roasted a bunch of garden fresh tomatoe with basil and thyme (also from the garden) over ww penne pasta, big salad, garlic bread!! yum yum

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

May 15, 2012
6:37 AM

Post #9124504

Does anyone use Poha (flattened rice)? It's unfamiliar to me, but I saw it in a recipe and I'm curious.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


May 15, 2012
6:46 AM

Post #9124518

Dinner last night was homemade buttermilk biscuits and sausage gravy, plus bacon and eggs. All because it was national buttermilk biscuit day :-)

Tonight is probably going to be a crockpot chicken recipe with lime and cilantro. Everyone is scattershot at mealtime: Mr. Official has a scrimmage to see to, Swimmer Girl is working until 9. Middle Son may or may not be here for dinner; I haven't checked with him yet. But this particular recipe is fairly versatile and I recently saw someone use it to make a chopped salad into a full-fledged meal, so I figure I'll give it a whirl.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

May 15, 2012
7:01 AM

Post #9124537

Last night we had a fresh baby spinach salad with toasted pine nuts, mostacioli, black olives, shaved parmesan, and broiled grouper with butter and lemon pepper. Mmmmm.

And cake.
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

May 15, 2012
7:02 AM

Post #9124540

I steam horseradish leaves along with other greens - adds a nice "bite". Also good in enchaladas.

Darius, you are correct - almost impossible to really kill.
Made the mistake of planting in an over-rich nitrogen area of the garden - MANY roots, not just one, and just for kicks, dug one out - over 4' long - under the fence and well into the yard.
There are all pencil thick, but HOT!



This message was edited May 15, 2012 9:03 AM

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

May 15, 2012
7:02 AM

Post #9124542

Grilled turkey smoked sausage, mac and cheese, fresh corn salad.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

May 15, 2012
7:11 AM

Post #9124557

I may have second thoughts about it being in a pot on the patio.

Last night was DH's 50 birthday. We had hamburgers on a pretzel bun; pear, pecan and lettuce salad; steamed rabe and garlic scapes; fennel and onion stirfry; and Berry Chantilly Cake. All greens, rabe, and scapes came from the garden.
TX_gardener
Brady, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 15, 2012
7:19 AM

Post #9124575

[quote="SusanKC"]steamed rabe and garlic scapes; [/quote]

Please tell me about the garlic scapes. I currently have a few garlic starting to grow so maybe that's something I can do some experimenting with.

TIA, Mary

SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

May 15, 2012
9:39 AM

Post #9124781

Garlic scapes are only on hardneck garlic varieties. Cut the scapes when they are young. If you wait too long they get woody in texture. Some notes on cooking. Steaming makes the garlic flavor stronger. Stirfry/saute makes it not so strong. Supposedly you can blanch or steam woody scapes and it will make it more tender. I've not tried that last one. We used the scapes like we would asparagus. Best taste so far was carmelizing onion, throwing in chopped asparagus and scapes, sauting until cool starts to change, putting in a small amount of verjus (or vinegar), then dising out to serve.

Here's a picture of what the scapes look like plus some other ideas on what to do with them. http://awaytogarden.com/garlic-scapes-out-of-the-garden-onto-the-menu
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

May 15, 2012
1:33 PM

Post #9125036

Maybe once or twice a year I make spicy fried chicken. Tonight's the night. Smashed potatoes and a salad.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

May 15, 2012
1:34 PM

Post #9125037

So, no one knows anything about Poha (flattened rice)?
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

May 15, 2012
1:39 PM

Post #9125041

Sorry. Never heard about Poha. Looked in the grains cookbook and it's not listed there.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

May 15, 2012
3:15 PM

Post #9125148

Dinner is spinach and chickpeas with ham over farro

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

May 15, 2012
6:38 PM

Post #9125337

Reheated squash w/lentils for dinner here. Never heard of poha... I'm sure you must have googled it. A dehusked rice eaten in india. Wiki has a lot on it.
Tam
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

May 15, 2012
8:04 PM

Post #9125427

Darius, I know mochi, but never heard of poha until you mentioned it.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

May 16, 2012
5:04 AM

Post #9125651

Here's where I read it:
http://herbivoracious.com/2012/03/poha-flattened-rice-with-coconut-and-cashews-recipe.html

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

May 16, 2012
5:34 AM

Post #9125694

That recipe looks wonderful! I'm not familiar with lime pickle either. I found a recipe for this... I'm gonna keep my eyes open for poha and try that recipe Darius. Let us know if you do!

Tam
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

May 16, 2012
7:23 AM

Post #9125831

Recipe looks interesting.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

May 16, 2012
10:26 AM

Post #9126053

Fish tacos.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


May 16, 2012
12:13 PM

Post #9126143

Time for a new thread, so here we go: http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1258535/

You cannot post until you register, login and subscribe.


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