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Voting Booth: Your biggest garden problem is...

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Forum: Voting BoothReplies: 80, Views: 685
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Schenectady, NY


April 30, 2012
9:50 AM

Post #9103929

There are a total of 112 votes:


Volunteer seedlings. (which ones?)
(6 votes, 5%)
Red dot


An aggressive plant that someone mistakenly planted. (what kind?)
(10 votes, 8%)
Red dot


Poor soil. (clay, sand, rocky?)
(18 votes, 16%)
Red dot


Weather. (too wet, dry, cold or hot?..tell us!)
(11 votes, 9%)
Red dot


Creeping lawn grass or weeds.
(24 votes, 21%)
Red dot


Insect pests (which ones?)
(9 votes, 8%)
Red dot


Annoying critters. (2 or 4 legged?)
(17 votes, 15%)
Red dot


Other. (tell us!)
(17 votes, 15%)
Red dot


Previous Polls

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 30, 2012
10:21 AM

Post #9103977

I am not sure this is my SINGLE BIGGEST GARDENING PROBLEM, but oh my, those Norway Maple seedlings...they are EVERYWHERE! And my area (New England) is not known for rampant fertility, overgrowth, or lush anything. We grow onions, potatoes, and cranberries! But those Norway maples will sprout out of concrete. If I don't pull them up all spring, I will have a forest of saplings by summer.

NancySLAZ

NancySLAZ
Sun Lakes, AZ
(Zone 9a)

April 30, 2012
11:03 AM

Post #9104021

I live in the Phoenix area and definitely my biggest challenge is summer weather ... too hot (especially at night). All plants really struggle, especially if the heat is combined with no rain. But, hey, it's a desert. It's just being what it is!!!! The plants adapt or they are gone.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

April 30, 2012
11:20 AM

Post #9104041

Since I'm installing raised beds (RB), the soil doesn't much matter. But, last summer's drought did a number on my lawn, that I'm bringing back, slowly, but surely. There are still bare patches and some patches of weeds. Trying to decide which weed killer to spray. I'm tending to shy away from RoundUp, and may look into that new Bayer spray. Roundup is such big guns around my veggies. I have natural, crosswind tunnels in my yard, so there'd most assuredly be drift from anything I spray.

Better do it soon, though, before the fall/wtr season when my yard will be full of brand new brassica seedlings!
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 30, 2012
12:10 PM

Post #9104093

Who couldn't say all of the above... LOL
This year for me, it is oak seedlings. The drought last summer triggered a phenomenal reproduction cycle on these oaks (that didn't die after all). I will be pulling oak seeds for a while! Kristi

This message was edited Apr 30, 2012 5:53 PM
momoftwo607
Nineveh, NY
(Zone 5a)

April 30, 2012
12:29 PM

Post #9104112

Planted maximillian sunflower tubers about 3-4 years ago. Now trying to dig them all out. Very aggressive where I have them. I wouldn't mind them in one spot but they have taken over my garden.
Beach_Barbie
Kure Beach, NC
(Zone 9a)

April 30, 2012
1:10 PM

Post #9104176

A few years ago, I would have said soil is my biggest problem, but I've been amending it with compost, and as the hardwood mulch decays, that helps too.
The heat and lack of rain during the summer is my biggest problem, even for plants in the ground. Thank goodness for soaker hoses.
The plants in pots (I have 27 tropical hibiscus in pots) really hate it!
In a few weeks though, morning glory volunteers may be right up there on the list.
Barb
bonehead
Cedarhome, WA
(Zone 8b)

April 30, 2012
4:37 PM

Post #9104497

Eyes bigger than my hands - cannot keep up with the beds I plant, yet I continue to expand existing beds and dig in more. Weather can be iffy, but our soil is great. No aggressive seedling problems, although I do regularly battle with buttercups. I've rather given up on trying to eradicate them, and try to co-exist with them as a jolly yellow flower. Bugs are bugs, some years worse than others. It's all good.
dawnsharon2001
New York, NY
(Zone 7a)

April 30, 2012
4:58 PM

Post #9104520

Insects! Just when I think my plants are thriving, a new pest appears. My iris leaves are gloriously full this year, but some of the flower stalks were coming up bent, and in that position they're easily broken. When I took apart a broken stalk, I found these ugly gray aphids -- pale gray and possibly a bit fuzzy, like a mold -- being tended by ants. I had never seen these aphids before last fall, when they killed off a morning glory that was spindly from too much shade. Green, black, and red aphids I'm familiar with, and sometimes the black ones huddle in the folds of iris leaves, but they don't mess up flower stalks just when I've spent a year building the fans to produce them. Maybe the pale gray ones carry a fungus disease or virus that infects the stalks? In which case I change my vote to plant viruses and fungi!
rampbrat
Abilene, TX
(Zone 7b)

April 30, 2012
6:03 PM

Post #9104630

I can add compost to my soil. I can water ,within reason. Can't control the heat, but except for last year, most of the things I plant can tolerate what we have. But I've got these little white spiders that are making webs all over the place. Then there are these little black bugs, just bigger than aphids that are klling my artemesia. And something got my coneflowers last summer, but I couldn't figure out what. And did I mention fire ants? I hate to spray because of the butterflies, but I've got to control them some way.
nifty413
Garland, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 30, 2012
6:37 PM

Post #9104685

By far, I am my biggest garden problem!
marti001
Somerset, KY
(Zone 6b)

April 30, 2012
6:40 PM

Post #9104690

My problem is morning glories all over the place and nastimums.
pepper23
KC Metro area, MO
(Zone 6a)

April 30, 2012
7:04 PM

Post #9104713

Poor soil. It's not as bad as when we moved in but I still have bad spots. When I first started to garden here I couldn't grow anything. Marigolds and Silver Dust would just burn up. Finally got some weedy plants growing and it slowly started improving from there. Weedy plants are gone now but I have a ton of different plants all around now. Still struggle but am starting to get a better idea of what thrives here.

cececoogan

cececoogan
Waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

April 30, 2012
8:57 PM

Post #9104908

my other is really ALL of the above...

onewish1

onewish1
Denville, NJ
(Zone 6b)

May 1, 2012
3:50 AM

Post #9105045

chipmunks are a huge problem here.. there are other digging / plant eating critters.. but chipmunks are my biggest problem
tlm1
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 9a)

May 1, 2012
4:48 AM

Post #9105109

I voted lawn grasses/weeds, but I could also have voted, Hot and humid summers, and Sand,sand, and more sand!
luciee
Hanceville, AL
(Zone 7a)

May 1, 2012
4:53 AM

Post #9105117

Insect critters and annoying pests. We have a creek near our garden area and gnats just love to multiply there. So when we garden, they get on our skin and in our eyes. If we can face the wind they are not so bad until they start to bite. Annoying pests include deer, possums, raccoons, snakes, fire ants, armadillos, bean beetles, dogs, coyotes, ticks, etc, etc. Luciee {;^) Thanks, Tim, I forgot about the hot and humid summers. L

This message was edited May 1, 2012 5:55 AM

Resin

Resin
Northumberland
United Kingdom
(Zone 9a)

May 1, 2012
6:03 AM

Post #9105206

Annoying critters: neighbours' cats, lots of them, cra**ing everywhere and killing all the birds :-((

Resin
Procrastinator
Havelock
Canada

May 1, 2012
6:31 AM

Post #9105246

Although I voted creeping lawn grass and weeds, I also had issues with several insects last year. I lost count of all the different bugs. I tried to identify several of them and finally gave up. My peonies got ravished last year and that was the start of the insects. I graduated from being afraid to touch them to squishing them with my bare fingers and dropping as many as I could find into soapy water.

Lily beetles were another huge problem. I finally got some concoction (diatomaceous earth and a recipe) at the Garden Show this year and I am hoping that my neem oil added to diatomaceous earth, soap and water will stop these nasty bugs in their tracks. Now is the time to start so better get busy in the next week. The lilies are starting to pop out of the ground. I am hoping the birds and toads will do their job this year and help with the bugs. Time will tell.

Elaine and Otis
frogymon
Lisle, IL
(Zone 5a)

May 1, 2012
6:40 AM

Post #9105263

Bermuda grass and weeds a plenty; plus the heat makes it a challenge to grow things, but I use shade fabric and have moved my veggie garden to the east side of the house where it gets afternoon shade.
kosk0025
Salem, OR
(Zone 8b)

May 1, 2012
7:11 AM

Post #9105320

Goutweed that came with my house.

Also aphids all over brussel sprouts. I've given up on brussel sprouts. I'm not that crazy about them anyway. Unless they are slow roasted with some caramelization. Yum. But not with a "side" serving of aphids.

jenhillphoto

jenhillphoto
Danbury, CT
(Zone 6a)

May 1, 2012
7:32 AM

Post #9105353

My biggest problem, fungus. We have fungi of all type bother all types of plants. Must be our humidity in the summer.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

May 1, 2012
7:46 AM

Post #9105383

I'm changing my vote to roaming cats! Good thing I'm going with Raised Beds for my veggies. At least I can cover the soil to avoid a giant "kitty litter" box!
CLScott
Calgary
Canada

May 1, 2012
10:10 AM

Post #9105616

Quack grass is my first annoyance, and critters are the second.
The squirrels dig, and the birds, when nesting, like the mud from the pots.
I now cover seeded pots with clear plastic bags (vented).
And I am putting up ugly little fences to keep the dogs (of irresponsible owners)
from urinating on the peonies.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

May 1, 2012
10:26 AM

Post #9105639

I had a hard time deciding which problem to choose, but I settled on: "An aggressive plant that someone mistakenly planted".

We have running bamboo invading the south end of our garden. Getting rid of it, and keeping it out will be an ongoing challenge.

vitrsna

vitrsna
Colima
Mexico
(Zone 11)

May 1, 2012
12:17 PM

Post #9105822

Nifty413 that is hilarious!!! :-D I suspect that is true of many of us (uuummmm like moi), but i voted for insects and particularly ants and parasitic wasps. We have every kind of ant imaginable here in the neotropics...all colors and all sizes. Some of them roam the streets at night and can strip a tree of foliage literally overnight. The problem in the garden is much less severe now than when i started it 4 years ago. I have a butterfly garden and so organic bug solutions are a must and I need to be very careful and inventive about how i get rid of the unwanted pests without harming the butterflies, caterpillars, hummingbirds, bees, lady beetles, etc. On the ants i have been using a solution of water, a bit of dish washing liquid and a few drops of cinnamon oil in a spray and the ants drop dead on the spot. because the ants are crawlers and not flyers, and because they often travel in groups, i can wipe out a few hundred of them as they come over the garden wall. I've also found a drop of honey and some duct tape works well too. so i'd say the ant/aphid problem is 90% better than it used to be. the lady beetles are a great help. i read somewhere that a lady beetle can eat over 5000 aphids in a lifetime. this of course discourages the ants. i know ants are sweet and smart little creatures, but they do need some predators, at least where i live. i would like to start a new international fad..."please, everybody start eating ants!" they are very nutritious and the supply is unlimited! Just fry some up and sprinkle them on your post toasties or something. Of course, the parasitic wasps are now tuned in to where the nice chubby caterpillars are and there are a couple of times a year when they are particularly bad and do a lot of damage. To control the populations, i capture them in glass or clear plastic containers and this is having good results.
nifty413
Garland, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 1, 2012
3:36 PM

Post #9106096

Vitrsna, I'm in... as long as chocolate is involved, I'm in... Perhaps with a fine wine & some good cheese... I'm there! Gimme some dark chocolate-dipped ants!!

I know we're not supposed to link directly to companies, so, everyone search the Web for recipe sites & companies to get that ball rolling!

Cheers!
-Nick
ericabelle
West Plains, MO
(Zone 6b)

May 1, 2012
8:07 PM

Post #9106507

Rocky clay soil. Plus humidity that makes growing roses very difficult.
Ithiel
Detroit, MI
(Zone 6b)

May 1, 2012
8:21 PM

Post #9106526

My biggest issue right now is that stray cats keep wreaking havoc on my flower beds.

vitrsna

vitrsna
Colima
Mexico
(Zone 11)

May 1, 2012
8:46 PM

Post #9106559

o bravo nifty!!! i can feel this taking off..."the international movement to eat ants three times a day"...all the protein one needs. at some time in the distant past i did have chocolate covered toasted ants with champagne. and yes! recipies, creative ones! i can see toasted ants, for example being used in the same way people use salt and pepper. i must tell you that my hero and inspiration is a small 6 year old Mexicana girl named Isabel. Isabel's parents are young, progressive, smart, and thinking about the future of Mexico, the planet, and their family. now Isabel is a very girlie girl whose favorite color is pink, wears pink ribbons in her hair and pink tights, and loves to sing and dance. Isabel is also smart as a whip. from time to time, Isabel and her father go for walks together...just the two of them. Isabel's father taught her how to eat live ants right off the sidewalk! and so, during their walks both Isabel and her father will bend down, pick up an ant, and pop it into their mouths. well, they pick up the ant from the rear end and rip off the heads (some of these ants have very hurtful bites) and then pop them into their mouths... just walking, talking, and snacking. this is why Isabel is both my hero and inspiration in this regard. this is an activity in which i, myself, have not been able to participate...at least not to date, but my admiration knows no bounds. i expect within the year that the organization will rate some coverage on CNN. hooray!!!

greenbrain

greenbrain
Madison, IL
(Zone 6b)

May 2, 2012
12:33 AM

Post #9106667

I selected "creeping lawn grass or weeds". I could also answer "invasive exotic plants". After 23 years, I'm still fighting the bermuda grass that creeps in from neighboring lawns. I just have to stay on top of it during the growing season or it will creep into the veggie garden and take over. 2nd would be the Japanese Honeysuckle. Just when I thought that it had been eradicated, some creeped in over my neighbor's fence. At least, she allows me to come into her yard and dig up the source. 3rd would be sweet autumn clematis. All of the above were growing on our property when we moved in 23 years ago, and the war continues! When the 2 pre-existing silver maple trees drop their seeds, another war begins.

palmbob

palmbob
Acton, CA
(Zone 8b)


May 2, 2012
2:38 AM

Post #9106722

too little room

Sheila_FW

Sheila_FW
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 2, 2012
5:28 AM

Post #9106820

Volunteer seedlings. Privet, and hackberry tree seedlings for me. The neighbors on all three sides insist on making privets into trees! The birds do the rest.

This message was edited May 2, 2012 6:28 AM
Mego27
Louisville, KY

May 2, 2012
7:39 AM

Post #9106993

Squirrels destroy my tomatoes every year. But this year I have a big stray tomcat and he hates all rodents (decapitates them and leaves them by the garbage can)
I hate his "mo" on this but, I am hoping that I won't have any squirrel problems this year.

gardenergal17

gardenergal17
Canton (Pro Football, OH
(Zone 6a)

May 2, 2012
9:21 AM

Post #9107144

The silver maple whirlybirds are more abundant than ever! Since our Spring has been very mild from the beginning, this year, they started falling off the trees super early, and some of them broke off in clumps! I'll be getting the blower vac out!

Domehomedee

Domehomedee
Arroyo Grande, CA
(Zone 9a)

May 2, 2012
9:03 PM

Post #9107993

Gophers, nuf said.
Hemlock and thistle, both are miserable to weed.
Palmbob . . . I have lots of extra space for any of your plants needing a new home LOL. I checked out your landscape pictures, wow.

growin

growin
Vancouver, BC
(Zone 8b)


May 3, 2012
1:07 AM

Post #9108084

The person in the neighbourhood who sprays my garden with herbicide at night. There's another person who has been targeted and has been hit about 6 times. Targeted hits.

onewish1

onewish1
Denville, NJ
(Zone 6b)

May 3, 2012
2:50 AM

Post #9108108

time for a security camera
Ithiel
Detroit, MI
(Zone 6b)

May 3, 2012
4:38 AM

Post #9108154

growin wrote:The person in the neighbourhood who sprays my garden with herbicide at night. There's another person who has been targeted and has been hit about 6 times. Targeted hits.

Wow. What in the world is the purpose behind such a thing? That's terrible.

Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
Middle TN
United States
(Zone 7a)

May 3, 2012
7:12 AM

Post #9108348

I agree. Although I think my neighbor may have killed the Tangerine Crossvine I planted on the fence between us. :-<

Poison ivy is my biggest garden problem right now ... along with ticks. Other times it's Bermuda grass. And it's sometimes too dry in July and August especially.
bonehead
Cedarhome, WA
(Zone 8b)

May 3, 2012
7:24 AM

Post #9108366

Why would anyone poison their own garden, let alone others? Sounds like a neighborhood pow-wow might be in order. Perhaps there are unresolved issue(s) that needs to be aired. Or maybe you just have a wacko...

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 3, 2012
7:45 AM

Post #9108407

Other my vote- never enuff time to even be home gettin dirt on my hands, sigh
Katlian
Carson City, NV
(Zone 6b)

May 3, 2012
12:59 PM

Post #9108961

My worst pests right now are black vine weevils. The adults do a fair amount of damage chewing on leaves but the worst are the larvae that eat the roots of my plants. They kill at least half of my strawberries each year and I suspect they are contributing to a decline in the asparagus. Last summer we launched a nightly campaign to catch the little monsters when they come out to feed and we must have squashed and drowned thousands of them but they are back in force this year.
We don't want to spray for them because we don't want to harm the beneficial bugs but they are a serious issue and I'm sure the neighbor's yards are just as infested as ours so there will always be new ones to take the place of the ones we kill. We tried beneficial nematodes that are supposed to attack the larvae but they don't seem to have done any good. Anyone know of a good weevil bait?
LhasaLover
(Tammie) Odessa, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 3, 2012
3:49 PM

Post #9109148

Lack of rain. We are only allowed to water one day a week and my front yard is almost gone now. I noticed actual dirt spots yesterday. I have worked so hard on this yard since 1989 and it kills me to see my yard die. The bushes are doing OK but the grass is about a total loss already.. temps have already broken 100 this year ... can't imagine what the summer is going to be like.

flowAjen

flowAjen
central, NJ
(Zone 6b)

May 3, 2012
5:39 PM

Post #9109281

Probably weeds but the most annoying to me is my dog, I can't have anything in the backyard that he can get to, I can't have any containers because he pulls the plants out and plays with the pot. If he wants to bad enough he'll just jump over any fence up to 3 feet(probably more), I finally had to do a double row of bamboo fencing around my 1 garden, so far so good, but it's not the most attractive

Thumbnail by flowAjen
Click the image for an enlarged view.

vitrsna

vitrsna
Colima
Mexico
(Zone 11)

May 3, 2012
8:01 PM

Post #9109487

o LhasaLover, i do feel your pain. 23 years is alot of time and work and care. but all of us gardeners know that gardens are always a work in progress. maybe you can think about changing over the front yard into an exotic cactus and other plants garden that needs little to no water...these gardens can be quite beautiful as well...then you can save the water for the plants you really care about that need it? you could put gravel or bark or other ground cover in between the cacti and drought tolerant plants that will keep down the dust. i do see the possibility for a beautiful and intriguing front yard...what do you think? all of us gardeners are always having to start over in one way or another. we all experience loss but we are resilient...aren't we? best wishes.

Tallulah_B

Tallulah_B
(Susan) Calgary, AB
(Zone 3b)

May 3, 2012
10:58 PM

Post #9109642

CLScott - HI fellow Calgarian!
I think my biggest problem is the weather - TOO DRY with the Chinook winds. And the summer is Way too short here. Just east of us in Manitoba the season is about a month longer... and hotter!
It's true that we can (and have) gotten snow every month of the year - in 1969 it Did just that. Didn't stay and was only in the air in August, but there nonetheless...
The other thing is the soil - Clay. Has definitely to be augmented. Guess I haven't gotten over not having Manitoba Gumbo which is really rich soil.

This year I'm going to see about making a Keyhole garden, shown on the DG home page today. Wow - what a concept! And self-watering/fertilizing?!?! Yikes, do I need THAT!!!

growin

growin
Vancouver, BC
(Zone 8b)


May 3, 2012
11:20 PM

Post #9109651

onewish1, you're right. Anyone know of how to setup a night camera that is motion activated? Street light behind. Good thing that it is quite close to my apartment. I'd like to sue the person spraying the garden with herbicide for property damage & a whole new garden.

Tallulah_B

Tallulah_B
(Susan) Calgary, AB
(Zone 3b)

May 4, 2012
2:09 AM

Post #9109684

But WHY are they doing it? Weird behaviour...

onewish1

onewish1
Denville, NJ
(Zone 6b)

May 4, 2012
2:43 AM

Post #9109694

costco has a very nice camera setup with a dvr.. around $300 or so... depending on how many cameras you want.. I know it's not cheap but always a good investment
frogymon
Lisle, IL
(Zone 5a)

May 4, 2012
7:27 AM

Post #9109946

growin, you could look into game trail cameras at your local sporting goods store.

growin

growin
Vancouver, BC
(Zone 8b)


May 4, 2012
9:08 AM

Post #9110129

Great ideas - Thanks! Looks like the Costco down the street has the unit available. Now to find someone with a card. :-)

Tallulah_B - just a continuation of bullying. Some people enjoy this sorta thing so need to catch them in the act and sue them. Most people know the garden is close to my heart.

Tallulah_B

Tallulah_B
(Susan) Calgary, AB
(Zone 3b)

May 4, 2012
9:15 AM

Post #9110140

Here's hoping the garden isn't permanently damage and is retrievable...
Get Them Suchkahs!!

Susan

growin

growin
Vancouver, BC
(Zone 8b)


May 4, 2012
9:35 AM

Post #9110164

Tallulah_B - most of what you see in the first image has died except for the large cedar trees. Moving forward, I'm trying to keep in mind what to plant where I'm not going to get upset if it gets sprayed again. What is heartbreaking is to see my neighbour have her garden sprayed repeatedly after putting so much work into it. It was a nice garden (second pic - nothing alive there now). Only our 2 gardens are heavily sprayed. We both know this is "political" in nature. Time to think like this criminal and catch them.

Thumbnail by growin   Thumbnail by growin
Click an image for an enlarged view.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

May 4, 2012
10:55 AM

Post #9110249

growin - I don't understand why someone would destroy something that looks so beautiful.

Tallulah_B

Tallulah_B
(Susan) Calgary, AB
(Zone 3b)

May 4, 2012
11:03 AM

Post #9110255

I agree - you have to think like a criminal to catch one... it's a shame that in our society it's what's necessary - to be brought down to their level
Beautiful "before" shots!

Tallulah_B

Tallulah_B
(Susan) Calgary, AB
(Zone 3b)

May 4, 2012
11:04 AM

Post #9110256

Honeybee - I think part of it is jealousy - They can't produce something so beautiful, and partly it's as Growin said - Political, and the other part is that it's what Growin and the neighbour love, so they're going to "hit where it hurts most". Nasty things...
plant_it
Valparaiso, IN

May 4, 2012
11:46 AM

Post #9110294

Garlic mustard! It's an invasive non-native here and it's gotten everywhere. Oh, how I detest it.

Thumbnail by plant_it
Click the image for an enlarged view.

plant_it
Valparaiso, IN

May 4, 2012
12:22 PM

Post #9110323

Oh my gosh, growin, I just read your posts. What a horrible crime. Both gardens were strikingly beautiful. You get this jerk! Someone might have a beef with another person but you talk it out, you don't take criminal action. How spineless of them.

Property damage, trespassing...can u go to your local authorities? Give the police a heads up to keep an eye out for this guy. Tell them you want to press charges. I'd show them your before and after pictures so they can get a sense for how serious this is.

This message was edited May 4, 2012 2:24 PM
sugarweed
Jacksonville & Okeec, FL
(Zone 9a)

May 4, 2012
12:22 PM

Post #9110324

Install that camera very quietly. They are most effective when used in secret. Otherwise your crooks will just get longer sprayer nozzles.

growin

growin
Vancouver, BC
(Zone 8b)


May 4, 2012
12:37 PM

Post #9110339

The title of this voting poll is, "Your biggest garden problem is..." and indeed it is a problem for me. I'm moving forward and my mother just dropped off a large load of mushroom manure and her extra plants including hostas, ferns, lonicera, etc. Considering how busy this sidewalk is in the centre of the city, it'll take some work to sift through video if I do capture it on film. From a positive perspective, I have a fresh palette to work on but it's unfortunate I can't put rare or interesting stuff in the front garden.

sugarweed, you're right. I need to install it discreetly. plant_it, the police, City of Vancouver city Councillors and the city itself don't care which is odd considering it's mostly on city property.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

May 4, 2012
1:17 PM

Post #9110378

Could it be the CITY that doesn't want planting there? Some of their hired landscapers who are thwarting your efforts?

growin

growin
Vancouver, BC
(Zone 8b)


May 4, 2012
1:27 PM

Post #9110394

No, the city workers are not permitted to use chemicals in any situation anywhere within the municipality. http://vancouver.ca/engsvcs/solidwaste/grownatural/pesticideUseBylaw.htm

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 4, 2012
3:11 PM

Post #9110510

Actually the cameras are really light sensitive- camouflage it by hiding it in a birdbox, or a hanging planter...

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 4, 2012
3:16 PM

Post #9110515

Or the grill of a car, and good luck

onewish1

onewish1
Denville, NJ
(Zone 6b)

May 4, 2012
4:17 PM

Post #9110646

I am the other way around.. would rather them see it... and not do the damage (hopefully).. I put the stickers on my windows
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 4, 2012
5:32 PM

Post #9110764

On the camera, game cameras will use a flash or infrared beam if at night.
It will be noticeable to the human eye as I understand.
If so, that will be one more thing to vandalize.
Tread softly but keep your big stick handy! Good luck. Kristi

onewish1

onewish1
Denville, NJ
(Zone 6b)

May 5, 2012
4:03 AM

Post #9111130

something like this might be an option.. although I haven't used one .. the ratings look good

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003JLPWAK/ref=oh_details_o00_s00_i00

greenbrain

greenbrain
Madison, IL
(Zone 6b)

May 5, 2012
5:34 AM

Post #9111213

flowAjen: I know about the dog problem. My oldest daughter's male dog has killed roses urinating on them. I purchased a book titled "Dog Friendly Gardens/Garden Friendly Dogs" a few years ago that offered some good advice and ideas. You're on the right track & your bamboo fencing looks great! I have something similiar now around my rose and hydrangea beds. The other problem that I have is my dogs digging under shrubs during hot weather. I placed bricks or large stones around the feet of my shrubs which stopped this problem.
brigidlily
Lumberton, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 5, 2012
9:51 AM

Post #9111447

Other - way too hot for way too long, and trying to get rid of this stupid St. Augustine grass!

trackinsand

trackinsand
mid central, FL
(Zone 9a)

May 5, 2012
12:04 PM

Post #9111568

i voted other but it should have been "all of the above". it's a constant battle out there...sigh.
cateyez342
Sioux Center, IA

May 6, 2012
5:16 PM

Post #9113063

Invasive lily of the valley narrowly beats our earwigs and those little helicopter seeds that my maples drop.

greenbrain

greenbrain
Madison, IL
(Zone 6b)

May 7, 2012
4:33 AM

Post #9113615

Germination rate on maple helicopter seeds: 100%. lol
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 7, 2012
7:05 AM

Post #9113803

Sounds like these acorns... grrr!
Ithiel
Detroit, MI
(Zone 6b)

May 7, 2012
6:48 PM

Post #9114861

greenbrain wrote:Germination rate on maple helicopter seeds: 100%. lol


Oh boy. The maple growing nearest to my property just shed all of its seeds during a storm the other day, things are about to get interesting...and not in a good way.
kosk0025
Salem, OR
(Zone 8b)

May 8, 2012
6:50 AM

Post #9115378

Anyone with experience gently pulling up the maple seedlings, transplanting to a pot, nurturing for a few years for a new tree? My favorite beloved Japanese maple makes just a couple seedlings every year...I'm so tempted to try getting some more trees from it, but haven't tried yet.
bonehead
Cedarhome, WA
(Zone 8b)

May 8, 2012
7:35 AM

Post #9115468

Kosk, you might check over at the JM forum, there are some real knowledgeable folk over there. I have inherited a smattering of JMs and am at a bit of a loss re their care - the vast majority of them can only be termed rescue trees with really bad pruning and dead wood. I'm planting them in my wild areas and having a fun time seeing how they leaf out. Some are tagged, some not, so I don't really know their colors or shape. Someone gave me some JM seeds a while back, seems I passed them on to my sister to try germinating in her greenhouse. Not sure what came of that experiment. Perhaps she will chime in.

flowAjen

flowAjen
central, NJ
(Zone 6b)

May 8, 2012
8:21 AM

Post #9115548

I currently have 4 regular maples growing in pots that I had dug up(2 to a pot) but now they are about 2' or so, I need to give them their own pots, don't see why it wouldn't work with JMs too
kosk0025
Salem, OR
(Zone 8b)

May 8, 2012
9:01 PM

Post #9116646

Thanks BH & Flow
Regality
Concord, CA
(Zone 9b)

May 27, 2012
5:28 PM

Post #9140948

Snails, snails, and more snails! Oh, and this year an early infestation of whitefly. Ugh!
Bloominggardens
Edgewater, FL
(Zone 9a)

July 25, 2012
9:31 AM

Post #9218073

Huge grasshoppers of various colors.

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