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Vegetable Gardening: What's going on with your Veggie Garden: Part 3

Communities > Forums > Vegetable Gardening
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Forum: Vegetable GardeningReplies: 351, Views: 3,090
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dreaves

dreaves
Hutto, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 8, 2012
6:50 AM

Post #9115376

This is a continuation of Texasrockgarden's thread about general happenings and free discussion of our vegetable gardens. Added a new thread since the second one was over 200 messages and would load slowly for some members. We came from here:

Part 2: http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1253515/
Part 1: http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1244336/

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MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 8, 2012
7:43 AM

Post #9115476

Thanks for the new thread David.

I've pulled all my garlic and many of my tomato plants are giving me BER tomatoes. I've been careful with watering, use a moisture meter to determine dryness so that BER is a conundrum - and an irritant. Between the birds nibbling and the BER I'm having trouble getting some for myself. grrrrr on that berrrrr.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

May 8, 2012
8:04 AM

Post #9115520

I picked some "Sugar Sprint" snap peas this morning. It seemed like they took forever, but they were sown on March 8th.

CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

May 8, 2012
9:01 AM

Post #9115664

Too much rain!

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mimitho
Sonoma County, CA
(Zone 8b)

May 8, 2012
10:49 AM

Post #9115837

Honeybee... what are you mulching with on the pathways? I want my raised beds to look as nice as yours, but my pea gravel just caches dirt and then make a weed bed :(

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

May 8, 2012
10:54 AM

Post #9115850

mimitho - all the pathways are filled with fall leaves to a depth of at least 6 inches. Earthworms break these down into usuable castings, which I spread on the raised beds twice a year.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

May 8, 2012
1:02 PM

Post #9115996

Here's a watermelon and tomato plant.

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kevcarr59

kevcarr59
BUda, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 8, 2012
3:36 PM

Post #9116157

Is this zuke going to be edible, or tough as rawhide?? The wife never saw it in the garden till last night...

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rwaterspf1
Durham, NC
(Zone 7b)

May 8, 2012
4:32 PM

Post #9116222

That is a big Zuke!

kevcarr59

kevcarr59
BUda, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 8, 2012
4:48 PM

Post #9116254

That's a BUDA-full zuke!!!
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 8, 2012
4:49 PM

Post #9116257

No it won't be tough or inedible. Those cook up great as 'boats'. Spoon out the center, chop and add some onions etc...Google 'zucchini boats', there will be lots of good recipes. Zucc pancakes are wonderful too. Topped with either sour cream or applesauce.

CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

May 8, 2012
6:05 PM

Post #9116352

Them suckers can hide!!

Make bread out of it.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 8, 2012
6:17 PM

Post #9116381

oooo, zucchini crusted pizza...*very* good.
Indy
Alexandria, IN
(Zone 6a)

May 9, 2012
11:29 AM

Post #9117381

I set out 6 watermelons yesterday...with IRT100 mulch and cloches. The cloches are nice for the early melons.
cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 9, 2012
11:34 AM

Post #9117387

Love the pictures of the gardens! Except for the flood picture, we got a big storm Monday night, took down about half of the corn. It was well into tasseling, so I'm going to see if I can salvage some. A few broken tomato vines and okra will need to be staked.

I got the pole beans planted and will get support up tonight. Tomatoes need to be tied.

Inside, I've started
Winter squash: Sucrine du berry, neck pumpkin, Thai lg. pumpkin, waltham, Long Island Cheese, Black futsu, Long of naples.
Melons: charentaise, prescott fond blanc
Cucumber: national pickler

Other then the mess it made, the rain made for some happy plants.


rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

May 9, 2012
11:50 AM

Post #9117405

[quote="cocoa_lulu"]we got a big storm Monday night, took down about half of the corn. It was well into tasseling, so I'm going to see if I can salvage some. A few broken tomato vines and okra will need to be staked.[/quote]
Bummer. I wish we'd get some rain here, but this time of year it's probably going to bring wind when it comes (in the form of convection storms).

-Rich
cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 9, 2012
12:07 PM

Post #9117415

I've recently noticed, that many of the pamphlets put out by the Agricultural Dept. "recommend sowing seeds right before a gentle soaking rain"...that last part cracks me up.
cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 10, 2012
6:57 PM

Post #9119215

I've got such a mess, it was hard to decide where to start today.
Most of the corn righted itself, amazing it can do that. But the storm left some areas so saturated I'm loosing tomatoes.

Pic #1 upright corn and my first attempt at building a support for the pole beans
pic #2 after much complaining and batting eyelashes , we now have Dh putting up the support for the pole beans (with wire and more posts). my hero. The beds in the foreground are for winter squash and I planted buckwheat to keep the weeds down, I'm loving it, it's so pretty. The bees seem to be eager for it to bloom as well.

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cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 10, 2012
7:04 PM

Post #9119227

Pic #1 sunflowers, the first bloomed today, these are for chicken feed, the okra is blooming. Pepper are ok, not great looking. I picked the first handful of bush blue lake beans today. There are some sesame plants in there as well, but still tiny and slow growing.


This message was edited May 10, 2012 8:05 PM

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cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 10, 2012
7:12 PM

Post #9119238

Pic #1 Summer squashes (should have some ripe in the next day or two), arugula, more peppers, melons
Pic#2 These are the sad tomatoes, it looks like I'll loose about 30-50 in the foreground

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cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 10, 2012
7:15 PM

Post #9119244

Ending on a happy note, southern peas are looking good, I would have to try really hard to kill them tho

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MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 10, 2012
7:59 PM

Post #9119297

Wow cocoa, everything looks grand. My buddies around town think I have such a big yard, but no way I could plant those long rows. Looking good!

I grew buckwheat last year too, just to have something in that bed, and I agree it's a pretty plant.
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 10, 2012
8:56 PM

Post #9119341

Cocoa ~ everything looks grand in your gardens but I hate to say this. If I had to guess your tomato loss is due to one of the wilts.

It looks like what is commonly called cotton root rot in this area. It often happens after a good drenching rain. I will hope I am wrong as it stays in the soil. After last years tomato crops, I know you were hoping for better.

What will you have growing on your cattle panel arches? I can't wait to see that when fully covered.

This large cucumber got overlooked too long but it doesn't appear overripe. I think I will like the cultivar ~ Alibi.

A friend said they dug over 8 bushels of potatoes today. He offered me some but I said I wanted to see what my harvest was first. I wasn't planning to dig for a couple weeks but I got curious and rummaged till I came up with one.

Todays' yield...

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stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 11, 2012
7:23 AM

Post #9119646

The rain has really helped green things up! All of your veggies look great, Lynea!

Pod, how did the cukes taste?

I have lots of blooms on my lemon cukes. I should have cucumbers forming soon. I think I'm going to regret growing them on this support, though.

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stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 11, 2012
7:31 AM

Post #9119651

The okra has germinated and is doing well. This is Hill Country Red.

I am up to my ears in peas!! We've never had this much success with peas. Maybe planting them a month late is the key??

The Marketmore cukes are finally taking off. We had a patch of dill right in front of this bed and found that it was blocking too much sun, so we harvested the dill and cut down all the plants.

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cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 11, 2012
7:32 AM

Post #9119653

Thank you, Mary, I've seen the amount of rocks you move around. Your selling yourself short, you could easily plant a few rows :0)

Kristi, I just updated a thread in the tomato forum. I think your right, it's some form of wilt, drats! My neighbor called to say she has it as well. I'll be calling the Ag office in a few days, thinking they are probably testing the larger fields around here. One gentleman on the other side of town grows 5,000 toms, I don't want to bug him, but I thinking of driving by and seeing what his field looks like.

On the cattle panels, I have melons: armenian, charentais and prescott fond blanc. And two other panels, I didn't take pictures of, are a vining zucchini and cucumbers. I have some seedlings under the panels, but have backups seeded in pots, as well. I've stopped spraying the DE, because I'm seeing more spiders and frogs, but it's still touch and go with the bugs.lol

That is one yummy, healthy looking potato! Do you order seed potatoes, what kind?
cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 11, 2012
7:41 AM

Post #9119674

I'm so excited for your peas, Stephanie! Kicking myself for not planting then this year. Enjoy!
Every thing looks good, I hope I can remember to ask how the production is on the Hill Country Red.
CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

May 11, 2012
10:30 AM

Post #9119875

Beautiful garden cocoa.
I have a few issues with some tomato plants too. The bed stayed too wet during our rainy week. They look wilted but have plenty of water.
Hate to see a mater plant die.

I tried to grow sugar peas this year. It was hot too early. They would not bloom. Then we had cold spell and suddenly they started to bloom but too late... I had already gave up and stopped watering them. Poof




texasrockgarden
Canyon Lake, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 11, 2012
12:06 PM

Post #9119982

A test ear. I've not grown corn but only once more than 30 years ago. I Googled when to pick corn and found that when the silks turn brown it should be ready. A further test is to examine the kernels near the top of the ear and if they have milk it is ready.

I took an ear with brown silk and with my pocket knife I cut across the ear at the top and peeled the shuck back a bit. It was juicy but not milk. I picked it and shucked it anyway. It looked good enough to eat to me.

I dropped it in a pot of boiling salted water and cooked it for 8 minutes (also from Googling). It tasted good enough that I think I will be eating corn on the cob for a while.

Twilley's ACcentuate Sweet Corn Hybrid


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Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

May 11, 2012
12:34 PM

Post #9120000

Oh, TRock, please do not boil your corn again!

NUKE IT IN THE HUSKS! You'll be thoroughly surprised at how juicy, tender, and SUH-WEET your corn will be:

Small ear - 2 minutes
Medium ear - 2.5-3.0 minutes
Large ear - 3.0-3.5 minutes

After you take it out, let it rest for ONE minute. Then, arm your hands with a couple wads of paper towels (your corn will be super hot!!!), and grab the corn in one hand. Use the other hand to "wipe" down the silks and husks in a sort of counterclockwise, twisting motion between your two hands. The SILKS and husks should all come off in one pretty EZ motion.

Try your corn with NOTHING on it...

Tell me how you liked it...

Thank me, later...

Hugs...

Linda

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

May 11, 2012
1:13 PM

Post #9120032

I already planted 38 tomatoes and have 11 more plants to go. First I have to make a new gardenbed for those last few tomatoes. But this morning I planted Snow Peas and put stakes and ran string for them. Never had Snow Peas before. I usually plant Sugar Snap Peas. I cheated and bought plants at the nursery since it is so late to plant peas already. I just didn't get to it sooner.
texasrockgarden
Canyon Lake, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 11, 2012
5:15 PM

Post #9120305

[quote="Gymgirl"]Oh, TRock, please do not boil your corn again!

NUKE IT IN THE HUSKS! You'll be thoroughly surprised at how juicy, tender, and SUH-WEET your corn will be:

Small ear - 2 minutes
Medium ear - 2.5-3.0 minutes
Large ear - 3.0-3.5 minutes

After you take it out, let it rest for ONE minute. Then, arm your hands with a couple wads of paper towels (your corn will be super hot!!!), and grab the corn in one hand. Use the other hand to "wipe" down the silks and husks in a sort of counterclockwise, twisting motion between your two hands. The SILKS and husks should all come off in one pretty EZ motion.

Try your corn with NOTHING on it...

Tell me how you liked it...

Thank me, later...

Hugs...

Linda[/quote]

Now that sounds good. I'll give it a try. I also want to try grilling some in the husks as I've heard and read it is good also.

texasrockgarden
Canyon Lake, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 11, 2012
5:17 PM

Post #9120309

[quote="newyorkrita"]I already planted 38 tomatoes and have 11 more plants to go. First I have to make a new gardenbed for those last few tomatoes. But this morning I planted Snow Peas and put stakes and ran string for them. Never had Snow Peas before. I usually plant Sugar Snap Peas. I cheated and bought plants at the nursery since it is so late to plant peas already. I just didn't get to it sooner. [/quote]

Sounds good. What kind of maters you plantin?

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

May 11, 2012
7:13 PM

Post #9120423

Viva Italian
Big Beef
Juliet
Parks Whoppers
Early Girl
Super Fantastic
Patio
Better Boy
Morgage Lifter
Big Boy
Sweet 100
Siberian
Cherokee Purple
Sun Gold
Fourth of July
Sugerry

kevcarr59

kevcarr59
BUda, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 11, 2012
7:48 PM

Post #9120456

Nice list Rita, just a quick question, isn't it a tad early up there? Have friends in Jersey and the last freeze was a couple weeks ago...
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 11, 2012
8:21 PM

Post #9120502

Stephanie ~ the Alibi cucumber is wonderful tasting and even the huge one wasn't bitter or tough. They are parthenocarpic and don't require pollination. Perhaps your lemon cucumber is needing pollination? I think you will like the mesh you are gowing them on. If you have a right angle, you should be able to pick the cukes from the back side. Easy peasy.

Cocoa ~ the taters were an impulse buy at TSC (my favorite store), the brand was Red Norland. I can't wait to see the harvest and taste it. I'm surprised there aren't many DGrs growing potatoes this year.

Salivating over that ear of corn TexasRockGarden... nummy!

And the nice selection of tomatoes ~ Rita.

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 11, 2012
8:39 PM

Post #9120519

The lemon cukes are very prolific; they're just getting warmed up! The boys have shown up and are waiting for the girls to show up. I've grown them in the past and them coming out my ears.

podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 11, 2012
9:30 PM

Post #9120554

Interesting... I knew that squash suffered the dating/mating malady but I didn't realize that cucumbers had male/female blooms.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 11, 2012
10:17 PM

Post #9120574

So do melons. They all have the blossom with the little fruit and the male blossoms that usually show up first.
cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 12, 2012
6:58 AM

Post #9120825

Trock, why thirty years without corn? That ear looks wonderful, I could eat corn for breakfast!

Krist, this Dger isn't growing potatoes. Dh loves and mean LOVES potatoes. I've tried growing them for him, however I'm reluctant to give them my best soil.lol You know, I've been begging him for a bucket loader, to make large amounts of compost...I'm going to show him your pretty potato and tell him it takes compost to grow those.lol
ERNIECOPP
Vista, CA

May 12, 2012
7:22 AM

Post #9120843

Cocoa,
If you have a tiller, you should try Sheet composting. I have always wanted to try it, but this year is the first time i have had th opportunity and it is so easy and working so well, i really like it. But i do not put anything in it that might wrap around the tiller. I just spread it out and use the tiller to mix the new with the old, and when i need some compost, i just uncover and use the bottom layers. I use mostly grass and leaves, as afraid of garden waste because of diseases, but if you want to put in garden waste, you may need a chopper.

Ernie

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

May 12, 2012
7:45 AM

Post #9120869

I'm doing sweeties in a 32 gal Rubbermaid tub. I may set some Irish potatoes in a couple months.

Unfortunately for us in the South, we plant and harvest short season spuds that will only give us a single layer of taters, unlike our brothers and sisters to the north, who can grow long season spuds that will fill whatever they're growing in, in true "underground potato tree" fashion.

Using prime growing real estate for just a few spuds becomes a calculated proposition.

Linda, who may sacrifice a small piece of land, or another tub, or the washing machine baskets (again) for some buttery goodness!

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 12, 2012
8:29 AM

Post #9120900

Lynea, you should try growing red potatoes or purple skinned potatoes. Both do well here and don't require tons of compost. A nicely amended bed is all that's needed. I didn't grow taters this year because I couldn't get my act together in time, but have successfully grown red and purple skinned taters very successfully the past couple of years.
cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 12, 2012
8:36 AM

Post #9120906

That's right, Linda, prime real estate! I have my own agenda for the good soil, but so jealous when I see pretty potatoes.

Ernie, Stephanie, don't be trying to talk me out of a bucket loader, I have my heart set on one :0) Shhh, as far a Dh knows it takes TONS of compost to grow potatoes! lol

Actually, I do a lot sheet composting and still fall short of having enough materials. My neighbor has a roping arena and piles the steer manure. It's too weedy for me to use without hot composting.

The kids just gave me my early Mother's day present, not a bucket loader, pretty cool though! I'll be back later with picture.

This message was edited May 12, 2012 9:47 AM
cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 12, 2012
8:46 AM

Post #9120923

Here it is, a 50's Clemson reel mower! I know Kristi has one and I have wanted one for years! I have so many spots throughout the garden that I hate to drag out the gas mower for. I can't wait for the grass to dry out and take it for zip around the yard :0)

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Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

May 12, 2012
9:15 AM

Post #9120956

Ok ya'll. Need set bell pepper seedlings today n heading 2 de fertilizer store. What do I need for de planting holes? ASAP. Thx.

rwaterspf1
Durham, NC
(Zone 7b)

May 12, 2012
9:39 AM

Post #9120977

Gymgirl, my whole yard is clay. for in ground peppers I dig out the clay and put in some potting mix. Plant my pepper with more potting mix and side dress with organic Fertrell plant food (3-2-3). Then I water them in with a mix of water, liquid kelp, and liquid fish.

-Vaughn
rwaterspf1
Durham, NC
(Zone 7b)

May 12, 2012
9:42 AM

Post #9120979

weed killing day. killed lots of bermuda grass. also planted a row of string bean seedlings and fertilized the peppers, tomatoes, and okra. I have a flat of okra seedlings but have to find a place to plant them lol


-Vaughn

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

May 12, 2012
9:58 AM

Post #9120991

I bought 37 tomatoes a week ago Tuesday. They stayed outside at nights and by Friday the 4th I had those all planted. The new ones I bought are also all outside of course. I usully get my tomatoes in ground by the 8th each year. This year I was slightly earlier than usual.

The slugs ate my cucumber seedlings that I also already planted! I am so mad. I had Burpless. I still have some Salad Bush ones to plant but I am mad about the others.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 12, 2012
10:05 AM

Post #9121000

cocoa - love the mower. We have one but now don't have *any* grass.

I just got home with a load of sandy loam for the garden...I want a dump truck for mom's day!!
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 12, 2012
7:36 PM

Post #9121511

Wow! Happy Mothers Day ~ Cocoa! I am liking your mower. That is uptown ! Have you offered to let the kiddos test drive it for you... lol My reel type mower is all I've use this spring. It and the bushhog for serious business.

A bed of potatoes isn't that inefficient. It makes pretty foliage while you wait for the benefits. I am thinking I'll dig potatoes in the next few days and will replant that bed with miniature melons, roselle and Malabar spinach which are ready to go in when the potatoes are dug.

I consider it a more efficient use of the space available. I did the same with the onions this time. I dug the bed of onions last weekend and planted the okra in the same bed. The potatoes and onions can go in early while still cold and the crops that prefer the warmth can go in next. When they are done, I hope to have the fall plantings of tomatoes and vegies waiting in the wings.

Anyway, that's the plan. Happy Mothers Day all... Kristi

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

May 12, 2012
7:48 PM

Post #9121536

Happy Mother's Day!

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

May 13, 2012
6:28 AM

Post #9121869

Happy Mother's Day!

We'll be enjoying fresh-from-the-garden snap peas with the chicken our daughter will be cooking this evening!
cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 13, 2012
6:58 AM

Post #9121916

Sorry to hear about your cucumbers, NYRita. I'm having a devil of a time keeping mine from being munched on as well.

Kristi, yep, the kids and I are having fun with the new mower...Dh say's, we are only allowed to play in straight lines from now on..party pooper.lol


Happy Mother's Day, to all the women who guide, nurture, and love us unconditionally!

That sounds good, Honeybee, enjoy your dinner :0)
CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

May 13, 2012
8:37 AM

Post #9122046

Happy Mothers Day.

me and sister are having a huge mothers day dinner with mom today. Sister is doing 90% of the cooking.
I got mom a Blue Orchid that was loaded with 16 blooms and few buds...it was so pretty.

And gotta post an update on this huge bell pepper.




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HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

May 13, 2012
8:43 AM

Post #9122052

Cricket - I didn't know orchids came in "blue" - it's gorgeous. (Was it dyed?)

Wish I could grow peppers that big!

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

May 13, 2012
10:31 AM

Post #9122148


Here are my peas in a pot :-)

I ran out of space in the garden and planted my peas in a container this year. I actually meant to start seeds early but never got to it so cheated and bought plants at the local nursery. These are Snow Peas. Never tried growing Snow Peas before. I usually grow Sugar Snap Peas.

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newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

May 13, 2012
3:18 PM

Post #9122357

I went out to two local nurseries today so I got some more cucumber seedling to replace the ones the slugs ate. Put out sluggo and hopefully these will fare better. Not Burpless though like I had. Only Marketmore, not my favorite.

The I bought some GREEN ARROW pea seeds and just planted them in a pot next to the pot of pea seedlings.

I also got bean seeds, Blue Lake pole and tenderette bush beans. Plan to start those seeds tomorrow.

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 13, 2012
3:32 PM

Post #9122362

Here are my blue lake pole beans.

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MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 13, 2012
3:49 PM

Post #9122383

Wow Steph, even if you don't get any food from that green hedge, it's beautiful nonetheless. Nice job!

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

May 13, 2012
3:57 PM

Post #9122392

Oh my. That is wonderful. I used to grow them like that in rows and along a trellised netting made to grow veggies up but that was years ago. I used to grow a lot of veggies and I really liked the pole beans. They sure do produce like crazy.

I just planted my last three tomato plants outside, two Fourth of July and one Sugerry (cherry tomato). I have no more room in ground, the rest of my 49 tomatoes are in ground but these three are in this grazy looking patio grow bag container. Sort of container. More like a sack LOL! The hardest part was stuffing the darn thing with potting soil.

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 13, 2012
4:12 PM

Post #9122405

This is the first year we've grown pole beans. We've grown bush beans the past couple of years. We didn't plant bush beans this year, tho.

Yesterday, I had my first bean harvest (along with a bunch of peas).

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newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

May 13, 2012
4:26 PM

Post #9122426

I shoulda starter earlier!
CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

May 13, 2012
8:05 PM

Post #9122706

Honeybee...the orchid is blue with no dyes. Walmart.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 13, 2012
8:23 PM

Post #9122731

Stephanie-those bean plants are beautiful, I need to sow my seeds, I just don't seem to have enough time this year. I have long beans. I have sowed bush seeds but I usually grow pole beans but I need to sow them for them to grow.
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 13, 2012
9:20 PM

Post #9122761

That is a pretty wall of pole beans and a nice harvest of them too.

[quote] but I need to sow them for them to grow. [/quote] LOL Lisa! I am in the same boat.

Todays' harvest. Wishing for more but not unhappy with the results. It was only a 4' x 5' bed that needs more depth for taters. At least it will make a few messes of them. What amazed me was how clean they were. No blemishes or scab.

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1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 13, 2012
10:52 PM

Post #9122797

Those are beautiful potatoes too. This weather has me so messed up, it seems late to be digging potatoes.

How's your dwarf tomato plant doing? I would have 3 tomatoes if the first 2 hadn't gotten BER, and the 3rd one had a bruise, but on closer inspection I noticed a tiny hole where a tomato fruit worm had gotten in. : (

I then looked at a few of the other tomato buttons (the entire blossom wasn't even gone) and found a few more really tiny worms. I tried to find every blossom and I squashed the worms, but if the season is going to go like this I'll never get any usable tomatoes.
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 14, 2012
5:53 AM

Post #9122970

Lisa ~ I love those NBD plants but the blooms are not producing maters. I guess I need to dose them with super bloom fert. The blooms are small and shrivel and die. I don't know the answer...

dreaves

dreaves
Hutto, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 14, 2012
8:08 AM

Post #9123205

Lisa,

Same boat, I have several things that I'd like to plant. Plus I have TONS of weeding that needs to be done. I am going to have worms in the corn, since I haven't been able to treat the ears. Still haven't pulled the beets. Some of them are going to be so big I'm afraid they are ruined...

With all that to do, I'm exhausted from a weekend trip to my daughter's college graduation in Kansas. Did dialysis early Friday morning, drove to the airport, flew to Kansas City by way of Denver, then drove to Manhattan, KS. Slept on a college-apartment futon Friday night, went to K-State graduation on Saturday morning and visited with daughter and son-in-law. Drove back to Kansas City Saturday night, slept on a hotel bed, then to the Airport by 7:30. Returned to Austin by way of Denver and, finally, did dialysis Sunday evening, then my own bed.

I picked tomatoes and squash this morning. Hopefully I will feel like doing some work by tomorrow. I have another graduation on Friday night in Tyler-- this time it is my nephew's high school graduation. No flying, but a little more driving.

This photo is cross-posted on the tomato season thread. There are Big Beef, Jet Star, and Indian Stripe. The overgrown squash are the result of the two-days away.

David

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MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 14, 2012
8:11 AM

Post #9123208

dreaves - I applaud your willingness to attend the graduation with your health issues. I'm sure your daughter appreciated it.

Those toms on the left, are they the Indian Stripe

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

May 14, 2012
1:47 PM

Post #9123672

I planted red pepper, lettuce, celery, italian parsely and brocoli rabe (plants). Then I started my pole bean seeds today. I have radish seeds, dill and chive seeds all still to plant. I also have bush bean seeds which I am not sure if I will start or not and I have to plant all my cucumber seedlings and start more cucumber seed.

dreaves

dreaves
Hutto, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 15, 2012
8:16 AM

Post #9124682

Mary,

Yes, the tomatoes on the lower left are the Indian stripe.

1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 15, 2012
9:58 AM

Post #9124795

Well, no gardening today due to rain and its so wet I probably wont be able to get out there for a while. (Oh well...)

David I dont know how you do it all..

Pod- I dont know why your NBD isn't setting fruit. Mine is in a container, on my back deck, so its setting fruit. The BER didnt really surprise me because I have that issue more often in containers but it seems to straighten itself out.

With all this rain, Im wondering how all my in ground tomatoes are going to do, I planted out much later then most of you. Cant complain about the temps though. But the bugs are something else.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

May 15, 2012
12:22 PM

Post #9124957

Well, my two Sioux plants are finally taking off! I've got several clusters of almost golf ball sized tomatoes on them, and there are blooms everywhere. I set only two plants, and let them branch off into two main stems each. And, I stuck a sucker in the dirt and it's got large marble size fruit on it and many blooms, too!

Based on what I saw this variety do in last year's drought, I took a calculated gamble and planted them out later than anything else. And, it looks like a payoff, since we're coming into the heat of summer and the plant has just started cranking out tomatoes. Just like it did in the drought, even when I couldn't bear to go out and do any watering!

We've had lots of rain here, too, and I am NOT complaining at all! My RB is fast draining, and there is no evidence of any BER on any of the tomatoes, praise God!!!!! I've been feeding once a week with MG Water Soluble plant food. I may side dress this weekend with my plant hole formula (2 cups EP, 2 cups worm castings, 2 cups Rock Phosphate).

The Beefmaster that Digger dropped off from Victoria, Texas has settled in and is cranking out tomatoes again, too. And, the cutting I planted has established itself and is loaded with blooms and tiny fruits.

I think I have eradicated most of the Stinkbug nymphs and teenagers, as well as some occasional army warms I find nibbling on my onions. Been "flicking my BIC" fireplace lighter on some butts! Once they hit the ground with singed legs/butts, they're not hardly climbing back onto the plants!

Aphids is the newest insect of choice left to be dealt with. They're on my sweetie leaves. Unfortunately, since they're growing in a Rubbermaid tub, knocking them off with the hose won't solve the problem, since they'll just fall back into the closed tub. No real predators waiting for them when they fall. So, might need to pull out some bigger guns than a blast of water...

Here're some pics.

#1 Sioux Cluster
#2 Sioux Blooms
#3 Beefmaster Cluster
#4 Beefmaster Blooms
#5 Sweeties filling in


This message was edited May 15, 2012 2:24 PM

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Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

May 15, 2012
12:27 PM

Post #9124960

And, here's what happening indoors, aaaaaaaaarrrrrrrrrrrrrggggggggghhhhhhhh...

#1 Sugar Crunch Cuke actually setting a bloom...
#2 Zucchini Squash setting blooms...

The roots are so tangled, I may have to cut open the cells to get them out...shoot!

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ERNIECOPP
Vista, CA

May 15, 2012
3:00 PM

Post #9125127

Feeling better now about my tomato efforts. i have about 25 or thirty tomatoes, pea size to golfball size on the 14 plants in the hotbox, but no tomatoes yet on the 6 plants along the fence. So, the Sweet Carneros is a very early producer, since he set the first tomato about 3 weeks ago, or the Hot Box is giving the plants there about a 3 week advantage. Dug my turnips and beets this morning. Turnips to 5 or 6 inches but still good inside. Bush beans just covered with blossoms and bean sets. Lots of Zukes, but am going to try to harvest at less than four inches to keep ahead of them. Cantaloupes have lots of blossoms and Watermelons a few. Tired of eating asparagus, but not enough to freeze, so lettinng it go to Fern a little early. Should have enough next year to eat and freeze both. Lots of small and medium artichokes now, too, but may cut the main plants down to get bigger ones next year.

Ernie

cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 16, 2012
6:11 AM

Post #9125732

I'm catching up. I tweaked my back last week. Realizing it wasn't getting better, I put myself to bed rest with a hand sewing project. I felt better after a day, but by then I didn't want to stop my sewing project.lol

Cricket, are you growing competition peppers, too? That pepper is huge!!!

Kristi, The potatoes look wonderful! Any idea of how much you dug up, compared to how much you planted?

Dreaves, I didn't use mineral oil on my corn last year. I feared the worst, they all had worms, but the damage remained at the tip. It was easy to cut off. Hopefully yours will be the same, let us know.

I really enjoyed everyone's pictures.



stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 16, 2012
8:21 AM

Post #9125906

Last night, we harvested garlic!! I also noticed that the re-planted okra seeds are starting to push up the dirt, so my Emerald Green okra should be off and running soon. The last set of seeds that we planted only got a few that germinated. Not sure what happened, either planted them too deep or something. The sunflower seeds we planted on Sunday have already started poking their heads out. That's awesome news as I've been wanting to grow sunflowers for a very long time! I will be harvesting onions soon, maybe tomorrow or this weekend. Several have already flopped over, but I'm not sure if that's because they're ready or because the neighbor's cat has been laying on them. I am STILL harvesting peas! They are running out my ears! Good thing they freeze well. LOL


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Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

May 16, 2012
8:26 AM

Post #9125918

Steph!,

I cannot believe someone is actually growing and harvesting GREEN PEAS!!!!!!

I soooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo want to grow PEAS!!!!!!!!!

I am GREEN with envy!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Great job!!!!!

Teach me how, please!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Linda

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

May 16, 2012
8:32 AM

Post #9125932

Steph,

This one's for YOU!

http://www.realsimple.com/food-recipes/browse-all-recipes/spiced-peas-cilantro-lime-00100000079227/

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 16, 2012
8:47 AM

Post #9125957

Linda, I just plant them and they grow. LOL Seriously, I pre-soaked them overnight in some hydrogen peroxide water. Then planted them around some supports. We found that chain link type fencing worked best. I planted 2 early varieties, Alaska and Wando. The Wandos are supposed to be more heat resistant. They have shorter plants than Alaska, but mature later.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

May 16, 2012
9:57 AM

Post #9126028

Check this out as a bean trellis.

http://www.kvpermaculture.org/blog/tag/bike-wheel-trellis/

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

May 16, 2012
10:06 AM

Post #9126036

Gymgirl - I, too, am growing Alaska and Wando peas. They are easy to grow as Stephanie said. Mine were sown March 18th and I should be able to start picking any day now.

I don't soak pea or bean seeds, just sow them in damp ground with organic fertilizer. Mine are growing on trellis netting strung between 8ft t-posts.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

May 16, 2012
10:42 AM

Post #9126065

OK, Bee,
Then you look at that trellis, too!

Hugs!
texasrockgarden
Canyon Lake, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 16, 2012
1:00 PM

Post #9126197

Today I planted 14 hills of cantaloupe (Casaba, Crenshaw, Kelsey and Moneyloupe) and one hill of watermelons (Jade Star). Also dug potatoes and 1/2 of the reg garlic and some elephant garlic. Finally got the tops cut off the onions I pulled about a week ago.

Been eating plenty of corn, cukes, eggplants and maters.

I recently acquired a garden buggy. Over the past couple days between showers I installed a rear flip-seat that makes into a mini truck bed.

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dreaves

dreaves
Hutto, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 16, 2012
2:00 PM

Post #9126265

Nice harvest and nice buggy... don't let Lisa see it. She already thinks men are suckers for gadgets and machines. ; ) I've picked a few tomatoes and a few cucumbers. The only things in full production are beans and squash. Hopefully I will get the beets pulled tomorrow and in the fridge for a few days until I can process them. Corn still needs weeding, too. (There is an Alison Krauss bluegrass song about a man who wouldn't hoe corn. I'd like to weed mine, but can't get to it.)
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 16, 2012
2:04 PM

Post #9126269

NICE buggy. I envy the potato harvest. Dunno why but mine was a bust. The only potatoes in the bucket were the eyes I started with. A few vines, no new taters. wahhhh.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

May 16, 2012
2:14 PM

Post #9126287

VERY nice harvest, TRock!

VEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEERY nice buggy, too!

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

May 16, 2012
2:34 PM

Post #9126297

I am so envious of all you down south and the wonderful harvest coming in. I guess the up side is when I am harvesting it will probably for too hot down there at that time of year.

I wasn't planning on buying more peppers as I already have one red bell pepper. But I was at Home Depot having to buy pots so I looked at their peppers. I bought a Cubanelle and a Fajita Bell pepper. The sign claims Fajita Bell is a good one for stir fry, with heat but not too much. Very darning for me as I never buy hot peppers!
rwaterspf1
Durham, NC
(Zone 7b)

May 16, 2012
3:43 PM

Post #9126389

The bunny has gotten the okra plants again and started going down the row of string beans. He got 7 plants so far. Peppers, tomatoes, cukes, zukes, and onions all happily growing. I'll have to put up that motion sprinkler and see if the bunny likes a shower.


-Vaughn
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 16, 2012
5:19 PM

Post #9126532

What buggy? I don't see a buggy. Lol : ) I'll only start teasing you about it when you start adding all sorts of gadgets and 1 upping each other, until then your fine.

dreaves

dreaves
Hutto, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 16, 2012
6:05 PM

Post #9126589

TRock,

I bet you could change to all-terrain tires and get hitch-mounted implements! I know there are towable tillers, plows, and disks. It would be great!!!
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 16, 2012
7:09 PM

Post #9126654

Cocoa ~ I didn't weigh the taters and couldn't guess. Was hoping for more but they still taste good. I'll work on a deeper bed next year. They are tasty, sliced with fresh onions, seasoned and fried. Or boiled with chives and butter and... or... lol

How are the crop circles in the grass looking? I thought of you while mowing this evening in the peace & quiet. I remembered saving this link and thought you might enjoy reading it. http://www.motherearthnews.com/Do-It-Yourself/Push-Reel-Lawn-Mower.aspx

The cucumbers are outdoing themselves. I think another reason to grow parthenocarpic cucumbers is not to have to wait for their mating season. Found two sprouted sweet taters in the pantry and am busy making plantlets. The weather will be good and hot when they are ready to plant. Just right!
texasrockgarden
Canyon Lake, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 17, 2012
7:33 AM

Post #9127047

[quote="dreaves"]TRock,

I bet you could change to all-terrain tires and get hitch-mounted implements! I know there are towable tillers, plows, and disks. It would be great!!! [/quote]

It definitely has the torque for heavy pulling.
cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 17, 2012
8:59 PM

Post #9127918

Kristi, is that how you maintain and sharpen your mower? Dh has ordered a sharpening kit, however It's some kind of compound/paste. I'm loving it, it's surprisingly much easier to use then I ever imagined.

Lucky find on the sprouting sweets. Mine for Brookshires have rotted, have 'city family' bringing me some organic sweet potatoes for us. Will try rooting those.

I canned 7 quarts of green beans and 4 pints of sweet pickled beets today. I can't believe how beautiful the weather has been. I could get use to this :0)
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 18, 2012
4:34 AM

Post #9128060

Yes... this weather is amazing and I wonder how long it will last. I harvested my first two tomato hornworms last nite, along with tomatoes and more cucumbers. Need to go look for more hornworms this morning.

Cocoa ~ I haven't sharpened mine but my brother told me to do it this way. http://www.reelmowers.info/ It is probably what your husband has in mind. I like the idea at the end to use a drill to run the blades backward. These mowers cut so clean and neat I love it but if I mowed a larger yard, I'd probably want a lightweight new model like yours.
cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 18, 2012
2:29 PM

Post #9128769

Thank you, we have no idea what we are doing. I was afraid the kit might be a waste of money. Having your brother's recommendation makes me feel better :0)

Btw, I picked a handful of okra this morning. Not enough to do anything with, so I sliced them up and put them in the dehydrator. I have found my new favorite summer snack! Thanks for the idea!
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

May 20, 2012
1:12 PM

Post #9130769

[quote="newyorkrita"]I am so envious of all you down south and the wonderful harvest coming in. I guess the up side is when I am harvesting it will probably for too hot down there at that time of year.[/quote]
I hate to burst your bubble, but when it gets "too hot down there" for things like green peas or even full-sized tomatoes, we can be harvesting eggplants, sweet small-fruited tomatoes of every shape and color, field peas, yard-long beans, peppers, okra, sweet potatoes, blackberries, squash, melons, green onions, and a number of other less-well-known species.

If we are careful to keep fresh plantings coming along, there are even a number of "cool-season" herbs and green veggies that will make it with a little partial shade and water. And at the end of your growing season, we are transplanting our fall-winter broccoli and Brussels sprouts and kale and collards to the garden and preparing the beds for turnip greens and carrots and onions and garlic and beets and chard...

But we do generally have crappy soils - heavy clays or excessively light sands - that need a LOT of building up to make them productive.

-Rich
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

May 20, 2012
1:26 PM

Post #9130784

[quote="HoneybeeNC"]Cricket - I didn't know orchids came in "blue" - it's gorgeous. (Was it dyed?)[/quote]
According to a close friend who is big into raising orchids, that turquoise blue shade is only achieved by "feeding" the plants with dye, which is taken up into the flowers. She detests them, needless to say, not least because the stores that sell them (Lowes' WalMart, etc.) don't reveal that as the dye runs out, the new flowers will revert to their normal color.

And from a Google search: "Ron McHutton, chief operating officer of the American Orchid Society, says of the orchids, 'No they're not real blue orchids, they're white orchids that have been dyed'."

-Rich
rwaterspf1
Durham, NC
(Zone 7b)

May 20, 2012
6:04 PM

Post #9131078

the maters got fertilized today. since the installation of the motion sensing sprinkler the beans have not been attacked. the Cardinal however has discovered he can light on the cuke cage and get a free bath.


-Vaughn

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 20, 2012
8:28 PM

Post #9131291

The Alaska pea plants are starting to toast, so those will be coming out sometime this week. I'll have to harvest the rest of the pods on them. I harvested onions tonight, but didn't get an opportunity to snap a pic as it was too dark.
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

May 20, 2012
9:38 PM

Post #9131354

[quote="rwaterspf1"]the maters got fertilized today. since the installation of the motion sensing sprinkler the beans have not been attacked. the Cardinal however has discovered he can light on the cuke cage and get a free bath.[/quote]
LOL - I have some in-ground sprinklers that are turned on my manually using a large piece of PVC pipe "keyed" to fit the recessed handles. The local birds have caught on to what I am doing and start getting excited, chirping and fluttering around in anticipation, when they see me pick up the PVC tool and head towards the valves. They know it is time for their bi-weekly baths; "Bird Brains" my foot!

-Rich
cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 22, 2012
12:38 PM

Post #9133732

I lied...apparently I am growing potatoes this year.lol
I fill beds with chicken manure, leaves and kitchen compost and cover it all with old hay. I let them sit for the summer and those beds are great for growing cabbages and broccoli come fall. I was pulling some weeds out noticed potato foliage. Because of the manure, I won't eat them, but left them, curious to see how they do. Must have been potato peels in the compost.

Speaking of chickens, my chicken food (sunflowers), are blooming. Hard to capture on film, but a happy spot in the garden for sure.

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Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

May 22, 2012
1:10 PM

Post #9133776

I have a neighbor who planted about three HUGE sunflowers in a row on the front lawn. They look like delightful yard art!

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

May 22, 2012
1:11 PM

Post #9133777

How long do they take to grow?
cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 22, 2012
1:24 PM

Post #9133801

Those were sowed mid-March, they are just plain black oil sunflowers, the kind you would find in bird seed. I like to grow them in early spring or late fall, in the summer they take more water then I'm willing to give them.

Linda, how are your new beds coming along?

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

May 22, 2012
2:57 PM

Post #9133941

Well, I only have the four tomato plants at the end of the 4x8 bed. Two plants have branched off into 2 main stems, and one has branched off into infinity!

I planted 17 bell peppers at the other end of the bed last weekend. This evening, I'm going to tackle untangling the eggplant, okra, squash, and cuke seedlings in the seed tray. They've grown completely through the drain holes and are a tangled mess in the drip tray. But, some DGers came through on the weekend, and assured me I have enough roots below to cut them apart without much damage.

I've got Rosemary and Chamomile coming up in the PVC Tube tray I made, and they're looking good. Harvesting a handful of Ky Wonder Pole Beans (that are growing under the patio cover...) every other day. And, the strawberry eBucket has picked up steam, once again, after a lull in production. Problem is the berries are tart, not sweet...I'll plant less per bucket in November.

Non-veggie related, I'm working on a lot of DIY yard projects in the meanwhile. Birdbath, squash teepee, bean trellis, etc. and about to build the 2nd raised bed.

And, I have lot more organization to do before the fall seed-starting begins in about 3 weeks (mid-June)!

A couple of friends growing my seedlings have mixed bag reports. Two (including me) have vines almost 6' tall with very few (or no) tomatoes. My Sioux do have blossoms at the tops and a couple clusters below. One other gardener has 4 raised beds of a tomato jungle with pretty good production going on there. And, my neighbor two doors down showed me the most beautiful, perfectly round heirloom tomato I've seen in a long time. Big as the palm of your hand!

And, finally, my neighbor across the street showed me these this morning...go figure. From her tiny little patch sitting out in the sun...

I think the non-producers are in soil that's got too much nitrogen. All lush greenery, and no fruit. I'm advising adding phosphate to the soil, and no more nitrogen.

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MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 22, 2012
3:19 PM

Post #9133969

Pretty tomatoes gg, sounds like you work hard in your yard. I know that feeling!

Ants are feasting on my tomatoes. I just hate it when I go look at the developing crop and see someone has been munching on the fruit. Grrrrrrrrr. This morning when I looked at the huge (and lovely) Hungarian Heart, two tomatoes were just covered in ants. I sprinkled heavily with black pepper and most of them left but not all. grrrrrrrrr.
cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 22, 2012
3:20 PM

Post #9133971

Oh my goodness, that sound fun and exhausting! I planted tomatoes much later then usual, now that the photos of big slicing tomatoes are coming in, I'm drooling! You do have a 10% of harvest clause when you give seedlings away, right?lol
What is a PVC tray?
cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 22, 2012
3:26 PM

Post #9133980

We cross posted, Mary. I've never had ants damage fruits before, must be one of those AZ pests. Is that a common problem in your area? A friend in Nevada once sent me a photo of a ginomous centipede that bit, stung, pinched (not sure what method of evil it employed) her on the toe. I thought right then and there, I'm never leaving this state.

MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 22, 2012
3:51 PM

Post #9134026

Fire ants are a big problem, these just looked like tiny black ants. I've not been back out to see if they have devoured the tomato or not.

Centipede's are some UGLY critters and their bite really hurts, for days. Was bitten two separate times when living in Hawaii. I don't see them here. Rattlesnakes though!

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

May 22, 2012
7:18 PM

Post #9134366

Cocolulu,
Last year a DGer told me I exhibited an example of sharecropping at its very best. My foster parents Kept me supplied with my own veggies that I never grew in my own yard! I might need to revisit that 10% clause...

A PVC tray is a method I stumbled across in the Orchids forum. I tagged it. If you go to the tags, you can review the discussion that the originator participated in.

Here's a pic of my seed tray. I used old drawers to hold the 4" PVC tubes.

There's a link to the discussion further below and a picture of the original PVC seed trays.



This message was edited May 23, 2012 2:05 PM

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Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

May 22, 2012
8:15 PM

Post #9134479

Cocoa_lulu,
Oops! Here's my tray.

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stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 22, 2012
8:36 PM

Post #9134507

The Marketmore cukes are really taking off. I think I have my first cuke of the season!

My lemon cukes are taking over the universe! Vines are going everywhere, even with the trellis.

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stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 22, 2012
8:43 PM

Post #9134515

I have oodles of cantaloupes! I counted 10 cantaloupes on this one (or maybe two) plants. I've never seen so many before.

It would appear to be time to harvest these onions. They were standing up yesterday. LOL

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kevcarr59

kevcarr59
BUda, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 22, 2012
8:56 PM

Post #9134544

Got back in town from a visit to Houston Sunday. A friend harvested some veggies while we were gone, but still left a bunch of cukes and a stray squash she missed. Saturday had a WONDERFUL visit with Gymgirl, and I think we both learned a thing or two. Linda, look for a D-mail...

Our first Big Beef just started to turn red and it wasn't the first fruit we saw. The Parks Whoppers have started setting fruit, but also found some leaves that look very much like what Cricket is fighting. Didn't see them until I was downloading the pictures on the computer. Will get out there in the morning and try to get this thing resolved quickly.

The watermelon and cukes are looking pretty good. Getting ready to transplant the Moon & Stars into some new pots I'm going to try as an experiment. The cukes are starting to fizzle but I don't think we did too bad. Had some good 8"+ cukes and we should have some of those plants gone in a few weeks.

#1 Red Big Beef

#2 Parks Whopper

#3 Crimson Sweets with some newly sprouted Congo's

#4 Cukes on the trellis

#5 The older Congo's...

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1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 22, 2012
9:25 PM

Post #9134560

Cocoa-when did you plant out? I'm still planting tomato plants, but that's because I still have space. Lol I have a bunch of different pepper plants so I'm trying to keep those in containers so I can keep them year round. This season is just going so fast...

I'm hesitant to put cuke or melons out because the vines go everywhere. Still have to sow my long beans, but they love the heat, and I have something for them to climb. I think trellising the other vines will put too much shade in the garden area. So I may do some cukes in containers. For some reason all I want to grow is tomatoes but I need to leave room for a few other things. Lol

I'm growing some Dwarf tomatoes and small determinates in containers under my covered deck. They receive very little direct sunlight but they must be getting it from somewhere, like GG beans, they are producing and the plants look great.

kevcarr59

kevcarr59
BUda, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 23, 2012
1:27 AM

Post #9134629

Lisa, could you post some pictures of the Dwarf you planted, curious to see what it looks like??
cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 23, 2012
11:16 AM

Post #9135231

That was a neat thread, Linda. I'm saving tp rolls for next years seedlings, I'm going to swipe your tray/drawer with hardware cloth idea :0)

Stephanie, looking good! Where did you purchase your garden netting? I've been looking for some with 6" grid for the pole beans. I've been to HD and Lowe's...coming up empty.

Kevcarr, Looks like you had a good garden sitter :0) I'm jealous of your visit with Linda. I would love to make it to one of the south Texas's RU...someday!

Lisa, Tomatoes went out the end of March. Rain and soil prep slowed everything down. I'm envious of those that can container garden, it's not something I can do well.



Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

May 23, 2012
12:04 PM

Post #9135283

Cocoa_lulu, et al,
Forgive me for not including the link when I replied. I was on the fly. Here's the link to the thread discussion for those who might want to see what the PVC seed starter tray looks like, and the discussion with the designer.

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1067922/

If you scroll down the thread about 10 posts, you'll get to the pics of the original PVC seed tray design, and then the discussion about how it is constructed.

My EZ button was to secure some old dresser drawers, drill holes in the bottom, and pack in my pvc tubes. I purchased a PVC pipe cutter from one of the box stores (HD or Lowes). Then, I discovered there's a ratcheting cutter that works much better than mine, which took awhile to get used to. The ratcheting cutter is much easier to use!

Hugs!

Linda


This message was edited May 23, 2012 2:06 PM

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Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

May 23, 2012
12:14 PM

Post #9135304

Let's see if we can enlarge that original pic.

Evidently not...but, you can see all these up close on the Iris Forum thread at the link in the post above this one.

This message was edited May 23, 2012 2:16 PM

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stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 23, 2012
2:04 PM

Post #9135465

Lynea, the bean support is a cattle panel. The cucumbers growing up the net are growing on a soccer backstop. The web is about 3" x 3" maybe. It may not even be that big. We got the backstop at a garage sale.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 23, 2012
4:22 PM

Post #9135667

A soccer backstop! what a great idea, I'll have to keep a lookout.
texasrockgarden
Canyon Lake, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 23, 2012
4:56 PM

Post #9135718

Todays gardening doings, 6 jars of fresh from the garden jalapeno jelly, 5 pints of salsa and about 3 quarts of brine pickles. Cukes were picked this morning.

Life is good down on the farm. :)

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MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 23, 2012
5:09 PM

Post #9135737

tex, how do you use the jalapeno jelly?
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 23, 2012
5:32 PM

Post #9135765

Cocoa & anyone else. This is a biodegradable, compostable jute net with 6" grid. I'm using it in the rice bean bed. Far easier to toss it when done rather than try to remove the dead bean foliage. http://www.gardeners.com/Biodegradable-Netting/38-776,default,pd.html

Still savoring the fresh cucumbers and I'll never have enough to pickle. Can't stop eating them long enough... lol Kristi

Edited as I think the gremlins ate some of my words.

This message was edited May 23, 2012 7:36 PM
texasrockgarden
Canyon Lake, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 23, 2012
6:14 PM

Post #9135829

[quote="MaryMcP"]tex, how do you use the jalapeno jelly?[/quote]

I just recently got a sweet tooth. I bought a few jars of pepper (super hots) jelly at a small town Market Days event just to try. Now I am hooked. I have seeds for several super hot pepper varieties. However, the jumbo jalapeno plants I am growing this year are producing blistering hot peppers, so I thought I would give it a go at making my own jelly. I used the recipe from my copy of "Ball Blue Book". The jelly set and it taste good so I am in business. :) It was a lot easier than had imagined.

Oh, how do I use it. Well so far I eat the hot pepper jelly on three salt less saltine crackers in the morning when I take my Fastin pill. I have had the hot jelly on various kinds of snack crackers at night at TV time. I haven't tried it with peanut butter yet, but will have to do that.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

May 23, 2012
7:11 PM

Post #9135905

You mean you haven't schmeared that Jalapeno jelly on a thick, juicy, piping hot Ribeye steak yet?

Totally sacreligious misuse of a sacred product...LOL!

Look in the tags. There's a microwave Jalapeno jelly recipe...

Please try it on a steak!! And save me a pint!!!
cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 24, 2012
9:33 AM

Post #9136603

Stephanie, how clever! I never would have guessed it!

Kristi, thank you! I didn't realize a bio-degradable netting was available, some of the reviews say it's difficult to hang between posts. Some reviewers went so far as to throw it away in frustration.lol How do you have your strung?

My MIL puts a jar of pepper jelly over cream cheese and serves with crackers. Sounds strange, but it's very tasty!
texasrockgarden
Canyon Lake, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 24, 2012
2:10 PM

Post #9136940

Gymgirl, Wish I could afford steak more often. However, living off social security or rather dieing off social security, it's not too often that I have the budget for steak, but I will keep that suggestion in mind.

I grill meats often just not steaks. Next time I'll give the jelly a try on some grilled stuff.

cocoa, pepper jelly, cream cheese and crackers is the way it was served as samples at the open market where I bought several jars of supper hot jelly that turned out not all that hot. I guess some of the heat cooked away in the cooking process.

I have made Jalapeno poppers pretty often stuffed with cream cheese mixed with pork sausage and that is a great treat for me.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

May 24, 2012
2:17 PM

Post #9136953

Ok, TRex!

Pork chops, burgers, sausages (yum), eggs, fingers!

dreaves

dreaves
Hutto, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 24, 2012
2:29 PM

Post #9136970

Gymgirl,

I found that Jalapeno jelly is best on fingers if one does not grill them. I prefer to keep them attached to my hand, and just lick the jelly off...

texasrockgarden
Canyon Lake, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 24, 2012
2:45 PM

Post #9136988

This is my 1st time making Jalapeno jelly. I followed the directions and removed the core and seeds. The jelly has a great strong Jalapeno flavor which I like, but only a bit of a slow and lasting sting to it. I think the next batch I will leave the seeds to try and get a little more heat. I know this years Jalapenos are smoking hot to the point of bring tears and a runny nose, but the jelly is no where that hot.

I've seen fingers at the HEB but never bought them. If not grilled what other ways are there to prepare them?

kevcarr59

kevcarr59
BUda, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 24, 2012
3:37 PM

Post #9137056

OOHHH Man, the Chicken Fingers HEB has are GREAT!!! Bet they would be even better with that Jalapeno jelly on them...
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 24, 2012
5:51 PM

Post #9137221

Cocoa ~ I've always leaned toward utilitarian rather than asthetics. Does that give you an idea that it is not orderly and neat? LOL

I put T posts in the ground spanning an 8 ft bed. Then whacked off an 8 ft plus piece, split a few of the grid ends and tied it to the T posts.

It has stayed in position without a problem but I found I needed to stake it to the soil across the bottom as the wind/pets/? will move it otherwise and could rip the beans out of the soil. Next time, I'll raise it off the ground by 6-8 inches instead.

Crude but effective.

BTW although I read the reviews I reserve judgement as I know many folks that were happy with a product, will not take the time to review it but when we are unhappy, we look for any avenue to vent. Kristi
texasrockgarden
Canyon Lake, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 24, 2012
9:08 PM

Post #9137502

Today I pulled the last half of the onions. These were growing in dirt rows rather than raised bed like the first half. On the whole these were bigger than the first half. The ground was dry and the roots were mostly dry so they had started curing in the ground.

Also had to water the cukes and tomatoes.

Picked a good mess of crowder peas that will need shelling tomorrow.

Finally, late this afternoon I got to put up 4 quarts of pickles, 2 Bread and Butter and 2 Polish Dills. Thank you Mrs. Wages. I just love her website. There is so much stuff to try.

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1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 24, 2012
9:24 PM

Post #9137523

I had to water today also. The first time this season, the wind isn't helping. Still planting a few tomato plants I just can't stop. But I must admit that they are really doing well, they are growing so fast and I have fruit set on almost every plant. The week it rained so much and the temps were 60-70 everything just sat there but not anymore, I got a late start, late even for me. But everything seems to be catching up. I have some Aunt Ruby 's German Green plants that are left over from a Market Order. They are such beautiful plants and the stems are huge, they have bloomed and have set fruit.

I'm still starting just a couple more tomato plants, lol but I'm amazed to watch them grow so fast. They seem to love the temps. Forgot the soaker houses, they were the main reason I went to HEB and they were on my list! Sheesh...but after last summer my old ones are shot. My pepper plants are loving life, it looks like Golden Marconi will be the first ripe one.

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 25, 2012
11:40 AM

Post #9138221

TRock...Mrs Wages website?? Do post details!

dreaves

dreaves
Hutto, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 25, 2012
12:48 PM

Post #9138317

Cucumbers from this week. Canned 3 quarts whole pickles and 11 pints dill slices. Still have tomatoes to sauce and need to do something with sweet corn.

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texasrockgarden
Canyon Lake, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 25, 2012
2:56 PM

Post #9138520

[quote="stephanietx"]TRock...Mrs Wages website?? Do post details![/quote]

http://www.mrswages.com/ More variety than Walmart. I made there Habanero salsa last night and it is hot. My stomach has been complaining all day today.

[quote="dreaves"]Cucumbers from this week. Canned 3 quarts whole pickles and 11 pints dill slices. Still have tomatoes to sauce and need to do something with sweet corn.[/quote]

Tis' the season. Good going, David. Those are pretty pickles.

I got one ear of corn from each of 70 stalks. I have never seen so much corn. I put the ears in heavy plastic bags and straight into the freezer. Of course I had to share a few with neighbors. I also boiled four ears about two hours after harvest last Saturday. And I forgot to take pictures until after it was in the freezer and I wasn't about to drag it out for pics.

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 25, 2012
6:19 PM

Post #9138755

Lots of cucumbers setting!!

The hubby got the tomato cage up today!

The last of the peas came out today. :(

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texasrockgarden
Canyon Lake, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 25, 2012
6:27 PM

Post #9138763

It all looks good stephanie.

Cybrczch

Cybrczch
Lincoln, NE
(Zone 5b)

May 25, 2012
8:56 PM

Post #9138890

Today I picked my first snap peas - I would have picked earlier, but I was out of town for 5 days, which let them actually get some size before I attacked the vines. Weeded the tomatoes cucumbers melons and onions. Picked green shallots (from seed) and green onion (from seed), and garlic scapes. Tomorrow will be picking romaine lettuce, spinach, and dill, and more peas, and my first heads of cauliflower that has buttoned.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

May 25, 2012
9:12 PM

Post #9138894

Mostly lettuce, a few onions to munch on, melons only getting started, tomato plant in bloom ,A little anticipation for my first tomatoes from the garden this season. Leeks went to seed real early this season and are still at it. The herbs and Jerusalem artichokes have about taken over.

kevcarr59

kevcarr59
BUda, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 25, 2012
9:56 PM

Post #9138914

Picked a few tomatoes the past 2 nights... A nice 12 ounce Big Beef in the front with a Parks Whopper behind it. Momma went to look at it and it dropped off in her hand...

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1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 25, 2012
11:03 PM

Post #9138926

Stephanie thats a great tomato cage. I keep trying to tell myself "no more tomato plants" but that seems to be the only thing Im planting. I need 30 of those cages.

Cybrczch

Cybrczch
Lincoln, NE
(Zone 5b)

May 26, 2012
12:34 PM

Post #9139479

Today's harvest (5/26)

First picture - snap peas (Cascadia and another variety, it didn't impress me so I can't remember its name), the last of the radishes, and assorted greens (leaf lettuce, romaine lettuce, spinach, swiss chard). And yes, a pepper - from the plant I overwintered from last year. I need to start another one for this winter.
Second picture - dill, a little parsley, and my buttoned head of cauliflower.

Beans are starting to show flower buds, peppers and tomatoes blooming, cucumbers just starting to vine up the supports (had to replant half earlier this year). Onions and shallots are starting to size up to the point I can pick green, garlic is starting to mature. Cabbage and broccoli growing okay, not too fast though.

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HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

May 26, 2012
2:01 PM

Post #9139550

I returned from a week at the beach this afternoon to find the tomatoes have grown about a foot and set lots of fruit!

Nineteen sweet potato slips hav survived being eaten by voles out of the fifty planted!

Sugar snap peas look a little over-ripe!

Lots of sugar pod peas, which was a huge surprise because I didn't know I had sown any!

English peas not doing well, probably because it's been really hot here. (It was 75f at the beach)

Picked one zucchini, one patty pan and one yellow squash.

Onions are beginning to bulb. Looks like the voles have eaten a few. (grrrr)

Melon vines growing all over the place. I'll have to encourage them to grow up the trellis tomorrow.

Sweet peppers look thirsty.

Guess I'm going to be up at the crack of dawn tomorrow ^_^
SteveOh
Cherry Grove, OH
(Zone 6b)

May 26, 2012
2:28 PM

Post #9139571

93f today and, bizarrely, my Favas are thriving and setting so many pods they are falling over.

Some of the garlic is ready, the rest will be ready soon.

I harvested a couple of beets today and there are many more almost ready.

The blueberry bushes are already give us a few to snack on.

The sugar peas are perfect, we picked and shelled a large bowl and devoured them. I was going to steam some to eat with butter...but we ate them raw in our chicken salad supper, then just popped the rest in our mouths.

Peppers are looking a bit dry, they are one of the few vegetables that aren't doing great this year, they are ok, but not great.

The bush beans are a total failure this year. The early planting that did so well with the peas and favas, was not to the liking of the bush beans.

The Jerusalem Artichokes are five feet high and very bushy, not the tall rather spindly plants I am used to seeing.

The first cucumbers will be ready by next weekend.

The weather for the next 10 days looks like 80-90s with a day or two in the seventies. So we'll be doing some watering. It's been a very warm spring, but almost everything is doing well, even the cool weather crops.
rwaterspf1
Durham, NC
(Zone 7b)

May 26, 2012
6:48 PM

Post #9139858

Surprisingly the lettuces haven't bolted yet. The beans are happily growing. Starting to set tomatoes and peppers, a few 3/4" jalapenos and maybe marble sized maters! Couple of 3" zuchinni and the cucumbers are setting flowers all over the place. Unfortunately the okra are still being decimated by the deer but at least they aren't getting my string beans.

-Vaughn

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

May 27, 2012
5:51 AM

Post #9140178

Steve, sorry to read that your bush beans have failed. You should have time to sow more. Perhaps your local garden center has seed?
SteveOh
Cherry Grove, OH
(Zone 6b)

May 27, 2012
6:38 AM

Post #9140231

Thanks Honeybee. We're not suffering for want of beans, we plant several varieties. For some odd reason, my Winsor Favas are thriving in the heat. Setting pods in 80-90f weather is not normal Fava behavior, but I'm not complaining. The pole beans and peas are thriving also and we picked our first crop of peas yesterday. They were candy sweet and absolutely delicious.

I do have a few bush bean plants that popped up late, so I'll have seed for next year.

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 27, 2012
8:31 AM

Post #9140364

Guess what we're having for dinner tonight??

The heat has arrived and it feels like a furnace when you go outside. That severely limits when I can get outside, early in the morning and then again later in the evening. My husband pulled out all the pea plants and is now shelling the peas. They'll go in the freezer. The cucumbers are really coming on and I have tons of baby cukes that should be ready this week. Tons of cantaloupes still. I think I'm going to plant watermelon seeds today.

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rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

May 27, 2012
9:26 AM

Post #9140426

[quote="podster"]This is a biodegradable, compostable jute net with 6" grid. I'm using it in the rice bean bed. Far easier to toss it when done rather than try to remove the dead bean foliage. http://www.gardeners.com/Biodegradable-Netting/38-776,default,pd.html
[/quote]
Really, did you read the reviews? There are a number of ways of weaving net, and they apparently chose one that just didn't work unless you planned to use the entire 30 feet in one piece. That's unfortunate; biodegradable is a really good idea IMHO. OTOH, I've got some plastic net support that has been up 3 years now...I just wait for the old vines and leaves to rot, then pull out what is left.

-Rich

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

May 27, 2012
9:42 AM

Post #9140447

Oh yum, all the beans look good. Stir fry anyone?
texasrockgarden
Canyon Lake, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 27, 2012
9:58 AM

Post #9140466

Added 14 more qts pickles yesterday, 7 spicy bread & butter and 7 Polish dills. It's time to get back on caning tomatoes.

Shelled over a quart of crowder peas two nights ago. It's time to pick again! This should continue most of the summer.

It looks like all the Texas gardens are coming alive.

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podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 27, 2012
10:23 AM

Post #9140491

Good looking vegies Stephanie and Txrockgarden. All I've been harvesting is more potatoes and plenty of cucumbers.


[quote="rjogden"]
Really, did you read the reviews?
-Rich[/quote]

May I ask what makes you question that I didn't read the reviews?
Even the pros outweigh the cons and 64% would recommend it.

I did not have a problem with it. I concede that it doesn't look great but the plants don't care nor do I. And, I find that in this climate, growing vines on metal fencing or cattle panels will burn the plants so jute is a good alternative.

Including photos:
1) the way the trellis material was received although I've cut two pieces off it already.
2) sorry for the greenhouse glare but this is how it unwinds
3) the two beds where I've used it.

Perhaps I am more spatially adept than some of the others that purchased it.
So now, maybe I need to go post my own review. Kristi

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stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 27, 2012
10:46 AM

Post #9140515

Lots of lemon cucumbers waiting to ripen. Would be lovely to have the first of them ripe by next weekend, but that may be pushing it a bit. This is the largest one I found.

Hubby wants to harvest this Marketmore cucumber, but I'm not too sure it's ready. I'd like to see it a bit plumper and a tad bit longer.

The Hill Country okra plants are loving the hot weather we've been having lately.

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kevcarr59

kevcarr59
BUda, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 29, 2012
10:10 AM

Post #9143322

Parking the tractor alongside the workshop this morning saw something scamper across the yard and into the garden. All I could tell it was fast, tan, and four-legged.

He actually stayed put long enough for me to go into the house and grab the camera...

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stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 29, 2012
11:20 AM

Post #9143457

Texas Spiny Lizard
texasrockgarden
Canyon Lake, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 29, 2012
6:08 PM

Post #9144021

Todays harvest made for a long tiring day.

The next couple days will be busy ones with shelling peas and canning more cukes and tomato sauces.

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rwaterspf1
Durham, NC
(Zone 7b)

May 29, 2012
6:18 PM

Post #9144038

Still watching things grow. Baby peppers, tomatoes, cukes, and zukes. The time of year of pulling weeds, waiting, watering, and killing bugs.


-Vaughn

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 29, 2012
7:04 PM

Post #9144117

Looks great TRock!!

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

May 29, 2012
7:43 PM

Post #9144166

TRock,
Next year, I might hire myself out as your sous chef/apprentice/assistant, so you can teach me canning and pickling!

Linda

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

May 29, 2012
7:45 PM

Post #9144171

Kev,
I once ran to get the camera to take a pic of a snake napping in a sago palm. I think I'll stick with the snake...

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

May 30, 2012
7:24 AM

Post #9144610

kevcarr59 - will it eat voles? If so, send me a few.

kevcarr59

kevcarr59
BUda, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 30, 2012
6:56 PM

Post #9145446

Not too sure, but it is insectivorous. I haven't seen him since, so I doubt it's still around.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

May 30, 2012
8:19 PM

Post #9145579

watermelon plant has blooms tomato plant has blooms,still and always at it.As you can seeThe black plastic didn't stay in the exact place it was placed. The plant is doing well though.Little cucumber plants a week old.

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dreaves

dreaves
Hutto, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 31, 2012
6:45 AM

Post #9145933

Linda,

There are several "Ball" books of canning and preserving. They have very complete instructions for things that can be canned with a boiling water bath as well as things requiring a pressure canner. If you follow the instructions, canning is not hard. (It is still a lot of work, but not rocket science.)

If you are going to make jams or jellies, I recommend ordering "Pomona's Pectin". It is available from the manufacturer or on Amazon. With Pomona's, I've found getting my jams & jellies to set properly a no-brainer. The benefit is that you can use different sweeteners, or just reduce sweeteners to your taste.

Like TRock, I have found the Mrs. Wages pickling mixes to be a simplified but good way to make pickles. I mostly use the Kosher Dill pickle mix, but there are several other mixes too. For Bread & Butter sweet pickles I use a family recipe that my mother used--it's more work than a mix, but it is family, after all.

Don't let a lack of experience deter you from trying canning. You can do it with equipment you already have in your kitchen. A kit with jar lifter, lid lifter, and funnel is inexpensive and makes it even easier.

David

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 31, 2012
7:59 AM

Post #9146034

We have rain going on in the garden this morning!! Lots of cucumbers will be ready to harvest soon. As always, the beans are going like gangbusters.

The wee little maters have their rain hats on.

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Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

May 31, 2012
8:11 AM

Post #9146053

David,
Thanks for the canning advice and leads. I hope to get there, soon as I grow that bumper crop! I already have an All American Pressure Canner that I bought back in 2006, when I just knew I was going to be a veggie gardener, pioneer woman, canning afficionado! It's still in the box!

Yesterday evening, I spent time cutting suckers to root for fall tomato starts. The plants are healthy, and one Sioux is full of green tomatoes that are taking their time to ripen. I have a Virginia Sweets that isn't doing anything but being lush. So, I figured I'd use them to get a jump on the fall season.

I rooted 7 nice long suckers into some potting mix I put into a galvanized nursery plant can. It looks sort of like an umbrella can, but only half as tall. I dipped the tips into ground cinnamon as a rooting hormone.

Five other suckers were started in individual 2-liter soda bottles, and are inside, under the lights. The canned suckers are outside under the patio cover.

This'll be yet another experiment to see which set of suckers does the best. If they take root, I can replant them around mid-August, and hope to see tomatoes by mid-November. Or, hopefully, for the Thanksgiving table where I'll be giving thanks!

Linda

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MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 31, 2012
8:17 AM

Post #9146064

Cross-posted...nice Linda...that's The One!

Speaking of canning and preserving, I attended a class last weekend about this subject. Some nuggets in brief:

- anything with a seed is a fruit

- instead of a boiling water bath, which takes about 45 minutes just to come to boil, use the steaming method. Same idea, same principles, same timing - less water to boil and that huge pot of hot water is negated. Here's the steamer on my wish list on Amazon...hint hint... ;-)

http://www.amazon.com/Back-Basics-400A-7-Quart-Aluminum/dp/B0000DDUCJ/ref=pd_sim_sbs_k_1

- steam/water bath acidic fruits and veggies

- you must pressure can non-acidic veggies (carrots, turnips, potatoes)

- acidic vs non-acidic seems to fall into the seeds vs no seeds camp although I'm not certain that is truly a blanket statement

- if your pressure cooker has ONLY a steam gauge type measure for pressure, be sure to calibrate it before every season. Best bet: a weighted gauge (pressure regulater valve). Here is the pressure cooker the instuctor recommends and uses herself. It has both gauges and her steam gauge is 2#'s off. Proper pressure is achieved when the weighted gauge 'spits' one to four times per minute.

http://www.amazon.com/All-American-921-2-Quart-Pressure/dp/B00004S88Z/ref=sr_1_1?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1338477007&sr=1-1

- do not buy a canner that requires a rubber seal. They wear out and by the time you replace them a few times, you could have bought a better cooker without the gasket.

This message was edited May 31, 2012 8:18 AM

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

May 31, 2012
8:25 AM

Post #9146080

Mary_McP!

Thank you sooooooooooooooooooooo very much for the feedback. Glad to know I bought the RIGHT stuff!!!!

I may need to call you, soon as I get enough veggies (and fruits) to can!

Working on getting a new upright freezer to store the other veggies from my fall/wtr projected harvest! Last season, I must've grown about 21 cabbages, and kept ONE for myself! I maxed out the freezer space on all the Arcadia Broccoli I put up!

If you love broccoli, grow Arcadia!!!

Linda

P.S. I left a couple broccoli stems in the buckets, and checked Saturday. Well, there's broccoli on the way, almost 9 months later!

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

May 31, 2012
8:46 AM

Post #9146107

My mother used to can.

I remember my dad having to scrape food off the ceiling (more than once) because the thingy on the top of the canner had blown off!

Canners are MUCH safer now ^_^

Then there were the times she let it run dry and we had to open all the doors an windows to let out the smoke!

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

May 31, 2012
8:54 AM

Post #9146115

Oh, my goodness...
cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 31, 2012
9:13 AM

Post #9146132

I'm not surprised to find everyone canning :0) Been stuck in the kitchen all week myself. Getting hard to manage the garden and canning at the same time. I do so enjoy watching my canning cabinet fill up though...I feel like a squirrel.

I had my first armenian cucumber..WOW..it really does taste just like a cucumber. I had my doubts.lol

I'm infested with squash bugs, and I do mean INFESTED! I don't where they are coming from this year. I've pulled up half the squash. The other half I'm not sure if I should pull out or not. Part of me thinks if I pull those, the bugs will move to my melons, etc.

My pet cow jumped over the garden fence and destroyed nearly half the corn. Kind of a bummer, but she could have caused far more damage then she did, so I'm grateful. Dh say's he's going to replace the corn with fresh beef, if she does it again.lol He is joking, he wouldn't dare.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

May 31, 2012
9:17 AM

Post #9146137

[quote]My pet cow jumped over the garden fence and destroyed nearly half the corn.[/quote]

Now it's my turn to say:

Oh, my goodness!

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

May 31, 2012
9:19 AM

Post #9146140

Oh, I just planted Armenian cucumbers for the first time this year and am really looking forward to tasting them.
texasrockgarden
Canyon Lake, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 31, 2012
9:35 AM

Post #9146171

Okra is cranking up nicely. Just put two quarts in the freezer.

Mary, don't be surprised if you receive negative comments about the steam canner. This is my second season using one. I have nothing but good things to say about it. Mine is aluminum and the instructions say to put some vinegar in the water to prevent for something I forget why now. I did and occasionally last year I would let the canner set with water in it for a couple days at a time. Well this year it had a pin hole in the bottom. It was an easy fix with JB Weld. I no longer use the vinegar and I never leave water standing in it.

When I bought my canner I didn't want to spend a lot so I went with the Back To Basic brand. I like the low profile water pan. It makes it easy to lift and move aside quart jars without getting in the way of the microwave that hangs over my stove.

There is a stainless steel Victorio steamer/water bath unit with a deep water pan. This will not work for me without my having to move the canner from under the microwave to work the jars. I don't have the room for that kind of process.

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stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 31, 2012
10:31 AM

Post #9146228

Lynea, isn't she supposed to be grass-fed?? LOL

Rain-soaked green beans

Mushrooms growing near the maters.

Today's harvest basket.

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MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 31, 2012
10:48 AM

Post #9146255

t-rock - the vinegar is to prevent the aluminum from turning black. It's just a stain, like many of my favorite t-shirts! Still clean though.

Stainless is only required if you are actually *cooking* in the pot. We are not, we're placing jars in a water bath so no food is being compromised by the aluminum cookware...but I'll go dig up that flame retardant suit anyway. Haven't needed it in a while. ;-)

I can't get either the okra or the armenian cukes to germinate...the buggers.
texasrockgarden
Canyon Lake, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 31, 2012
11:39 AM

Post #9146311

Stephanie, send some of that rain my way. There are no ready to ripen tomatoes on my vines at this time. :)

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

May 31, 2012
11:40 AM

Post #9146313

Does anyone do the refridgerator pickles?
tommyr2006
Poughkeepsie, NY

May 31, 2012
3:53 PM

Post #9146658

I'm starting to pick Snap peas! YUM!

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newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

May 31, 2012
3:56 PM

Post #9146666

Yumm is right. Sugar snaps are my favorites. Mine usually get eaten before they get into the house.
tommyr2006
Poughkeepsie, NY

May 31, 2012
3:57 PM

Post #9146669

LOL! Mine too! Although these are in the freezer for now. More on the way though!

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 31, 2012
4:10 PM

Post #9146692

Can I just toss my green beans in the freezer after I wash and snap them? I'm being overrun and don't have canning supplies.
tommyr2006
Poughkeepsie, NY

May 31, 2012
6:20 PM

Post #9146888

My guess is yes! I would! I WILL with my pole beans.

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

May 31, 2012
6:28 PM

Post #9146901

I used to freeze my home grown green beans all the time. Blanch them first and then freeze.

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 31, 2012
6:41 PM

Post #9146930

When I blanche them, it makes the beans limp. I like 'em crisp.
rwaterspf1
Durham, NC
(Zone 7b)

May 31, 2012
7:05 PM

Post #9146977

blanch and shock. put them in the boiling water for like 45 sec. then drop them directly into some ice water for a minute. keeps the crisp and the bright green

-Vaughn

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

May 31, 2012
7:40 PM

Post #9147027

I was going to say really? I always blanched mine and it never made them limp. The ice water is a good tip.

kevcarr59

kevcarr59
BUda, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 31, 2012
8:23 PM

Post #9147069

A cheap way to freeze different veggies is with a vacuum sealer. With the roll of bag material you can make bags to the size you need. They work GREAT for meat also. We buy the big pork loins from Sam's along with the 10# tubes of hamburger meat and divide them into separate packages.

Blanching the veggies, then partially freezing them before sealing the bags keeps the shape of the vegetable. We've had real good luck using them for veggies, with better than a year freezer life for most.

BTW, the cold ice water shock is the second part of the process, as it's necessary to stop the cooking process. If you don't shock it everything will tun to mush. Made Cabbage Rolls last week and the wife asked why did I put the leaves in the ice water. Actually could have let the cabbage cook about another 30 seconds, but it's easier to let them cook a little more after stuffing than to reverse the process, as you can't "uncook" them.

This message was edited May 31, 2012 9:29 PM
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 31, 2012
8:25 PM

Post #9147075

The ice bath is the trick to crisp blanched veggies. Steph, do you do that step? If not, try it next time and let us know if the results are better.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 1, 2012
7:13 AM

Post #9147466

Mary - [quote]It's just a stain, like many of my favorite t-shirts! Still clean though[/quote]

My mother used to call this "Clean dirt!" - I do, too ^_^

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 1, 2012
10:38 AM

Post #9147727

Yes we blanched and then did the ice bath. Maybe I left them in the boiling water too long.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 1, 2012
10:42 AM

Post #9147735

It only takes a hot second in the boiling water. By the time you mash 'em down under the water, it's time to start fishing them out!

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 1, 2012
1:20 PM

Post #9147916

I have 3 tomato plants growing. One is a Sioux, loaded with tomatoes that are just now turning. The Sioux variety cranked out tomatoes all last summer, through the drought, whether I watered or not. Which is why I'm growing them again this season...

But, that's not my report.

My report is based on the beauty of growing over 200 tomato seedlings, just because I love growing seeds inside in the cool, more than I like growing tomatoes outside in the heat. And, so, I gave all of the seedlings away to friends and co-workers, and kept the 3 I'm growing.

But, that's not my report...

My friends and co-workers have decided to return the tomato seedlings. Look what they morphed into...^^_^^

P.S. That's a quarter sitting on that tomato...

Last year, someone suggested that I was exhibiting "sharecropping" at its best!

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texasrockgarden
Canyon Lake, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 1, 2012
1:42 PM

Post #9147949

Very nice!

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 1, 2012
1:49 PM

Post #9147961

Thank You, Texasrockgarden!
Nothing makes me prouder than to see my neighbors' gardens growing my seedlings!

Here're the ones growing across the street from me.

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Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 1, 2012
1:53 PM

Post #9147968

And, yet another report is coming in about huge YELLOW tomatoes...

Alas, the foster parents have not yet gotten the hang of LABELING the babies before they shove them into the earth. So, we play the guessing game to keep the children happy!

Linda

P.S. I kept the variety sheet, so I have a fair chance of identifying what they're growing, even if they don't care to know them beyond, "a huge YELLOW tomato, a purple one, and a red one!"
texasrockgarden
Canyon Lake, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 2, 2012
10:33 AM

Post #9149042

Good times down on the farm. :) I don't have a farm but there are some good things happening here...fresh eggs, 5 new pints of Mrs Wages chili base made from home grown tomatoes and another 2 quarts of crowder peas shelled.

kevcarr59's lizard has a buddy over at my place that likes to play chase with Ms Pretty. Mind you Ms Pretty has no front claws but she does OK. Got this shot yesterday morning while I was out on the porch shelling peas.

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stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 2, 2012
10:35 AM

Post #9149048

Great pic of Miss Pretty and her friend!! BTW, Miss Pretty is appropriately named. :)

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 2, 2012
12:22 PM

Post #9149202

Went to a baby shower in a spa this morning, and managed to drop my cellphone in the foot tub! Ya'll KNOW I went in after that computer chip!!! I got all my garden photos on that chip!

So far, so good, but the phone is toast...

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 2, 2012
5:55 PM

Post #9149586

Oh no, Linda!!

kevcarr59

kevcarr59
BUda, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 2, 2012
7:04 PM

Post #9149694

Linda,

I've got the Ball "Blue Book" guide to preserving, if you want to see it. LMK... Lot's of good info and recipes. Will copy what I need and send it to you...

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 3, 2012
5:18 AM

Post #9149975

Oh, my goodness, Linda. I hope you'll not be incommunicado for long.

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 3, 2012
10:15 AM

Post #9150247

Cucumbers, cucumbers, and MORE cucumbers!!

We'll soon be pickin' okra!!

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stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 3, 2012
10:18 AM

Post #9150251

Also waiting on the maters to ripen. Why does it seem to take SOOOO long???

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Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 3, 2012
11:53 AM

Post #9150343

She's BACK!
New and improved Android Galaxy Epic 3G. Never had a touch phone before.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

June 3, 2012
6:14 PM

Post #9150778

I'm not that technology advanced!!

A couple of little green tomatoes, wait...wait...wait some more.

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HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 4, 2012
6:13 AM

Post #9151327

Linda - sometimes is worth having something break just to have a good excuse to get a "new and improved version" ^_^

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 4, 2012
9:20 AM

Post #9151596

Took some photos this morning:

1) overview from the back door
2) overview from south side
3) sweet pepper
4) squash
5) my faithful companion "Chloe"

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ERNIECOPP
Vista, CA

June 4, 2012
8:56 PM

Post #9152736

Has anyone tried to replicate the keeping qualities of a root cellar? We were freezing some carrots today, and i remembered how sweet the carrots would get about February or March in the root cellar in Idaho. Apples wrapped in newspapers would also keep all winter. There were empty potato bins in there, and i am sure other things would keep well also.

It was always cool in the summer but never froze in the hard winters. Has anyone ever built an insulated, mechanically cooled compartment that will keep root vegetables in their natural state for a long time?

Ernie

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 5, 2012
5:38 AM

Post #9152925

14 oz. From my neighbor across the street.

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MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

June 5, 2012
7:52 AM

Post #9153067

Linda, what variety is that beautiful tomato?

Honey, That's a very sweet looking Chloe!

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 5, 2012
9:26 AM

Post #9153170

Thanks, Mary!

Unfortunately, NOT one of the growers I gave seedlings to LABELED the varieties. I had a limited number of varieties, and pictures of each, so I'm just able to guestimate, based on the descriptions from the packets.

My best guess is that it is an indeterminate variety called "Beauty" beefsteak.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 5, 2012
9:33 AM

Post #9153175



This message was edited Jun 5, 2012 10:34 AM
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

June 5, 2012
9:53 AM

Post #9153199

Thanks Linda. I know just what you mean about labeling...most of my 'growers' didn't label either. Silly peeps.

Interesting edit there.
texasrockgarden
Canyon Lake, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 5, 2012
10:33 AM

Post #9153232

I have just about stopped giving tomato plants to my neighbors for the same reason. I furnish 4" plastic pots and white plastic label markers that cost ten cents and a nickle a piece and they won't even save the pots or labels for me to use the following year. Then I'll get this, "What was that tomato called with the stripes on it", and so on.

I'll ask what they did with the labels and they will tell me their grand kids pulled them all up. I ask don't you have a belt in your house? I then get a fixed stare like I am the idiot.

This all happened with a lady who got 60 plants one year and 40 this past season. All the plants were the $1.50 size the big box stores sell. You do the math.

I guess I am the idiot after all for trying to help people.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

June 5, 2012
10:51 AM

Post #9153259

I sell my plants. People *happilly* paid $2.50/each. Next round it's going to $4 for friends, $5 for non-friends. I found a woman who helps at the community garden at her church - their goal is to feed the hungry in Phoenix - and she scooped up all the plants I had left at $2.50/per. Everyone is happy.

It's not worth it if the act of giving the plants away ends up annoying you. :-\ I get annoyed at folks who take the plants and let them die. That's when I started charging, thinking it would not bother me so much if the person who takes on more than she can care for lets the plants die. Nope. Still annoyed me even with money in my pocket. I'll not continue to solicit from her any longer. It hurts to see my plants dying on the vine when I visit. sob sob...

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 5, 2012
12:02 PM

Post #9153346

LOL! Ya'll are too funny!

But, I totally agree about the "sad" feeling. I watched one neighbor's garden with humongous tomatoes from 28 seedlings of mine. The fruit was just rotting on the vine. Well, the condition this year for receiving my seedlings was that NO fruit was to rot on the vine! Especially when we living only two blocks from a food pantry!

So, now, I'm getting very regular tomato drop-offs, which is fine with me. All I have to do is sit them out on plates in one of our SIX lunch rooms, and they'll handle themselves!

We really DO have hungry people right here in America...

"It's a sin to kill a mockingbird..." And, it's a sin to let food rot on the vines...

kevcarr59

kevcarr59
BUda, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 5, 2012
12:08 PM

Post #9153350

I'm mitigating some of the financial pain by doing some "dumpster diving" to get supplies. Several retailers save pots & trays and I know a few I can visit on occasion to get stuff from recycle pile. It would still aggravate me if I gave or sold some plants to someone and they let them die from neglect, that would be the last time.

Found a local farmer's market & will sell some veggies there this weekend. No stall fee & the owner hosts it on her property... Was there last Saturday morning & there was constant traffic flow in & out, and most people were purchasing items. Interested to see what happens Saturday morning...

dem2rd
Naugatuck, CT
(Zone 5a)

June 5, 2012
5:01 PM

Post #9153718

What is the best way to stop something from eating my veggy plants? Happened in broad daylight wile I was at work, ate the swiss chard, beans, peas, squash..Help!!!
ERNIECOPP
Vista, CA

June 5, 2012
5:42 PM

Post #9153765

I think we all have the problem of having given things to people that do not show any appreciation for the gift, nor any respect towards the gift. It helps me to remember what Gibran said, about the beautiful flowering trees. {Paraphrased} "What purpose would the tree have in growing the blossoms, if there was no one to smell the wonderful wafting scent? "

Ernie

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

June 5, 2012
5:59 PM

Post #9153787

dem2rd ;your choice limited do to other concerns would be like sevin dust or dearth powder,a couple of choices.

ERNIECOPP; While get the point of that, the bees would the scent and pollen and any given creature still would the fruit. Somtimes we all get beyond ourself with our own concerns.
Reminds me of another thread I was reading where a woman lets people use the property for a market garden without charging for booth space or extras.people or persons in that catagory need to be appreciated there seem to be fewer that can ,want to , or will all the time. Still I'm a believer in the best of us as people and always will be.

kevcarr59

kevcarr59
BUda, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 5, 2012
6:14 PM

Post #9153799

I had to throw 3 real big ripe tomatoes away tonight that were chewed to death... Was going to hit with DE & Sevin dust bomb but we're supposed to get rain tonight POSSIBLY, and 40% tomorrow, with 50% Thursday & Friday. I know, I'll go dust now and we'll get a flood tonight and nothing Thur. & Fri...LOL...



Plant_Thang
Jacksonville, FL

June 5, 2012
6:40 PM

Post #9153842

Texasrockgarden, is the great sign still at the canyon lake dam? Slow down and see our dam Speed up and see our judge. It was there in 1985.
ERNIECOPP
Vista, CA

June 5, 2012
8:14 PM

Post #9153995

Juhur, I think he included the bees, too, as the tree was giving them the pollen, etc. What i got from it was that what we personally gain by giving may very well be all we will get, because if there was not someone, or something to accept what we offer to give, our effort in growing or doing would be wasted. So, while it is nice when it happens, i just do not expect much except the satisfaction i get from the creating and giving. As others here have found out, there is not much appreciation shown in most cases, by either people or the bees.

Ernie

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

June 5, 2012
8:23 PM

Post #9154010

I agree as in all things connected, I meant to type while I get that..meaning as to emotional satifaction of mind and being of what is.

kevcarr59

kevcarr59
BUda, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 5, 2012
8:46 PM

Post #9154069

Plant_Thang,

Know the sign you're talking about very well. Right as you come down the hill just before the "Dam Road". If you knew it in 1985, they've actually put a traffic light up there about 10 years ago...

I haven't been there in a while, about 3 or 4 years, so don't know if it's still there...

Kevin

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 5, 2012
9:01 PM

Post #9154086

Kev,
Save yourself some heartache, and pull your tomatoes as soon as you see some blush on the butt. Just put it on the kitchen counter and it will continue to ripen inside. You don't even need to put it in the window sill, cause I believe that photosynthesis process stops once you pull if from the vine.

I've had beautiful tomatoes that I pulled as soon as the bottoms showed some color.

No more heartache!

P.S. Thanks to whoever it was that taught me that tip!

Linda

kevcarr59

kevcarr59
BUda, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 5, 2012
9:21 PM

Post #9154098

Thinking it was birds that got them, this was the first problem we had like that. Just really upset because those tomatoes were so nice... Noticed one of the ones I chucked had a bunch of little pin holes like what leaf-footed bugs would do. Thought I had them gone but did see one tonight, will have to get back after them when this rain passes...

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 5, 2012
9:30 PM

Post #9154106

What're you using on the Stinkbugs?

kevcarr59

kevcarr59
BUda, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 5, 2012
10:07 PM

Post #9154131

The only thing I've seen in the garden were the leaf-footed bugs, and they were on the cantaloupes. Dusted with the DE and within about 2-3 days they were all gone. Will look for the stink bugs, in the files, to see what they look like just so I know... Dusted just about 10 days ago, was getting ready to do again, but now it's supposed to rain... Will play it by ear, may just use the Bayer Garden Insect spray again, since it has only a few days before I can harvest after spraying.

MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

June 6, 2012
4:37 AM

Post #9154236

kev, between the bugs, the birds, sun scald and BER, I didn't get many tomatoes this season. Yesterday I processed the 'big batch' of tomatoes I roasted on Sunday and got maybe a cup of sauce. It's so annoying to go out and find the tomato you've been eying as it ripened has been dined on already. I agree with gymgirl, pick at first blush, pull the stem and place on the counter stem side down. Something about preventing air entering at the stem spot.

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 6, 2012
6:08 AM

Post #9154324

Still picking tons of lemon cukes!!

Baby Rutgers maters--I'm ready for them to ripen already!!

Baby cherry tomatoes

I need to get some clips for the bird netting for the tomatoes. The birds are wayy to interested in my babies!

Thumbnail by stephanietx   Thumbnail by stephanietx   Thumbnail by stephanietx
Click an image for an enlarged view.

kevcarr59

kevcarr59
BUda, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 6, 2012
10:01 AM

Post #9154601

On the first picture of the Rutger's Tomatoes it looks like there are a lot of black specks on them. Could they be mites?? Curious if you had seen them..

Learning about the birdie's the hard way, had to chuck another tomato this morning, getting some netting this afternoon!!!!

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 6, 2012
10:18 AM

Post #9154626

I've never seen specks like those on a tomato before...

kevcarr59

kevcarr59
BUda, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 6, 2012
10:50 AM

Post #9154671

Didn't see any this year, but I saw some last year... maybe not on tomatoes, but do remember the little specks, think they might be mites...

What little I could salvage before the birds made another run, picked a couple more toms this morning... along with a bunch of cukes... In the past 2 days lost almost a dozen tomatoes. Getting some bird netting today, of course no rain so far, now weatherman saying we might not get any...Oh well... at least dusted DE this morning...

Thumbnail by kevcarr59
Click the image for an enlarged view.

MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

June 6, 2012
11:03 AM

Post #9154683

kev, you might want to look at mosquito netting at an army surplus store instead of bird netting. The downside with actual bird nettting is that birds get caught in it and then you have to deal with releasing them from it or prying them out of it if you don't notice in time to release them. army surplus stores sell mosquito netting designed to fit over a cot. It works really well in my garden. Maybe you could rig something like this if you don't have a structure already to hang the netting from.

These beds are 4'x6', the pvc is 10', the netting is a perfect fit.

Hope this helps.

Thumbnail by MaryMcP
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 6, 2012
11:18 AM

Post #9154692

Pure genius!

I think that would definitely keep the Stinkbugs off the tomatoes!!!

Mary, do you mind if I pin this on Pinterest?

This message was edited Jun 6, 2012 1:23 PM
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

June 6, 2012
11:26 AM

Post #9154700

I don't know what pinterest is but don't see why not...whatever.

The downside to this enclosure is bees cannot enter for pollination purposes. At this time only tomatoes are being protected by the netting and the air temp is in the triple digits so no tomatoes will pollinate anyway. Just keeping the birds off the already set tomatoes while they ripen.

kevcarr59

kevcarr59
BUda, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 6, 2012
11:40 AM

Post #9154711

Thanks Mary, my problem is my tom plants are almost 6 1/2' tall and on the corner of a raised bed. I would probably need about 50 square feet of netting... Plus, we've got zucchini right next to them and they are really packed tightly against the tom plants. I've got some 5' light-duty fence posts and had planned on criss-crossing them with PVC to make a hoop house-like set up.

Next spring the only thing going in the raised bed will be zucchini, cukes, & squash. Tomatoes are going into containers exclusively. Easier to move if need different spacing, diseased plants or things like that. With the catastrophe that befell Cricket, I will try to eliminate one variable out of the equation...or at least have a quick solution..

#1 & #2 Tomato end of raised bed, Big Beef, parks Whoppers plus 2 Roma plants...

#3 Cukes with a solitary cantaloupe, the only one the leaf-footed hasn't killed yet...

Thumbnail by kevcarr59   Thumbnail by kevcarr59   Thumbnail by kevcarr59
Click an image for an enlarged view.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 6, 2012
12:04 PM

Post #9154732

Kev,
You say a Leaf-footed Stinkbug killed off your cantaloupes? That's a new one on me.

I thought it was the Squash Vine Borer that damages/kills the vining plants.

MaryMcP
If I pointed you to Pinterest, you'd never be over here. It's an online pinboard (bulletin boards you set up for yourself to "pin" stuff you run across on the web).

Each board is a personal bulletin board of things you want in that category. I "pinned" your mosquito netted RB picture to my board entitled "Gardening Tips!"

Linda
texasrockgarden
Canyon Lake, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 6, 2012
6:23 PM

Post #9155146

kevcarr59, the only way I have found to beat the birds is to pick at first blush. I've tried netting, a 410 ga shotgun, water nearby which only brought in flocks of birds.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 6, 2012
6:32 PM

Post #9155159

LOL!
That sounds like that new weed killer commercial! The lawn care guy sprays a pristine lawn to kill one weed. Next morning, the homeowner steps outside to find the whole lawn dead. The only thing standing is that one weed! Hilarious!
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

June 7, 2012
9:37 PM

Post #9156561

[quote="MaryMcP"]Interesting edit there.[/quote]
I think if you edit a message and just erase everything (leave it blank) it shows up like that.

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 8, 2012
1:25 PM

Post #9157196

[quote="dem2rd"]What is the best way to stop something from eating my veggy plants? Happened in broad daylight wile I was at work, ate the swiss chard, beans, peas, squash..Help!!![/quote]

Depends on if it walks on two legs, six legs, hops or flies in on feathers.

At my old house I had problems with the two-legged variety. Acquiring a shotgun and practicing out back on weekends fixed that.

I fixed the feathered raider problem by putting out a birdbath and keeping water in it. Birds stopped pecking my tomatoes; they wanted water. And I believe I owe them an apology for blaming the berries on them. It wasn't a bird trying to chew through my shade netting to get to my blackberries yesterday, but a yard rat with a fuzzy tail.

Raiders which hop were solved with a fence. Doesn't technically keep the squirrels out, but they don't bother.

The six-leg problem is a little more complex. :)
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 8, 2012
1:29 PM

Post #9157204

Know your enemy!

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 8, 2012
1:35 PM

Post #9157212

Can I vent a bit here? This is turning out to be an awful garden year.

This winter, I lost a walnut tree. It rotted at the ground level. Granted it was a low spot, but it was on a slope and I piled up a mound of dirt to plant it in to drain even more.

Last year the apples nearly died. They look a little better this year. I have my fingers crossed.

Slugs ate almost all of my fall and spring crops. Aphids got the lettuce.

Two of my tomatoes looked happy one day and two days later they just up and died like they hadn't been watered in months -- the ones next to them are fine.

Two if my peppers out front got some kind of wilt and died. The ones out back have some sort of fungus rot on the fruit.

I just got the pathology report back yesterday -- every single one of my peaches, nectarines and plums have a massive infestation of bacterial spot. I can either remove them and never plant another prunus sp. or watch them die over the next couple of years.

Just as I was getting resigned to that, I looked out the window today and saw a wilted squash. It's not THAT hot today and the ground is moist. Yep, the dread SVB, which I've luckily never had before. Every single one of my vines has been hit, and that's a lot of vines since squash was this year's experimental crop. I tried the surgery technique on all the vines except the worst one. I pulled it up and it had NINE of them!

Granted, the garlic crop was awesome and I can't complain about the peas. The kohlrabi survived the leaves being eaten to lace. And basil is inevitable, right? But that those might be my only victories this year.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

June 8, 2012
1:52 PM

Post #9157251

I've had those years and mine"s not starting much better, condolences.Your luck and plants will improve with time though,all things change.(hopefully for the better)!!!!

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 8, 2012
2:07 PM

Post #9157270

NicoleC,
If possible, try to see the glass half full. Use these setbacks as an opportunity to clear the pallette, start with a blank slate, as it were, and begin afresh, again.

►Build your list of new veggies to try.
►Run soil tests in the interim to see if there's a problem there.
►Assess what was working in the beginning, and try to deduce what happened so you don't repeat the same mistakes (if it was something you decide you did...)

There are many, many, many more seasons ahead!

Linda

tommyr2006
Poughkeepsie, NY

June 8, 2012
2:46 PM

Post #9157353

Pulled the snap peas (they were done) and planted a few Toms and swiss chard.

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

June 8, 2012
3:43 PM

Post #9157433

I planted chard much earlier and even my lettuce is still good. Knock on wood.

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 8, 2012
4:01 PM

Post #9157447

Ever the optimist, Linda!

This is only my 3rd year in this house, so I've been in the honeymoon phase I suppose. I plan to be here for at least a few more decades so I've been careful to do things the right way the first time (or at least as much as there is a "right.") I've put a TON of work into the place and it shows, and while I expect losses this year has just been really hard. I got a fancy soil test this year that covers even micronutrients so I have a pretty good handle on where I need to pay attention. I found it very funny that the soil lab tech could even tell me I'd been using tons of municipal compost, because he told me to lay off it for a few years. :)

What am I doing new? Well, I'm growing new stuff. The BF likes the winter stuff so I've been planting way more of that, and every year I experiment with a new kind of veggie to find my best varieties.

When it comes to disease, I back up to many acres of woods and many of my neighbors have gardened for ages. The diseases are lurking in the wild and the bugs as well established.

I haven't even chopped down the fruit trees and I'm already measuring and planning my garden expansion. My BF isn't saying anything but I can tell he's pondering the amount of work this fall. :)

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 8, 2012
5:59 PM

Post #9157560

P.S. New garden design thread here if anyone wants to join in:
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1263915/
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

June 8, 2012
9:39 PM

Post #9157756

[quote="NicoleC"]And basil is inevitable, right?[/quote]
I hate to bring it up, but my bountiful crop of basils went from beautiful dark green to dying within a few days. The diagnoses is Downy Mildew, a disease that according to most sources didn't even exist until a few years ago, and is now threatening to destroy ALL Ocimum basilicum plants (http://vegetablemdonline.ppath.cornell.edu/NewsArticles/BasilDowny.html). Both Thai basils both got it (Siam Queen and a generic type), as well as Envigor™, Gecofure and Nufar sweet basils, all bred to resist fusarium wilt. The lemon basils (including Penang) were apparently not affected, and a few of the self-sown sweet basil plants seem to be less affected than the rest. Looks like pesto is off my menu until the breeders come up with a resistant strain.

-Rich
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 8, 2012
10:30 PM

Post #9157767

Geez..I thought I was safe with basil.

NicoleC I have had seasons like that. But the summer of 2010 was the worst (last year was bad but the weather was bad dry and hot) but 2010 everything I planted in one area died I'm not talking a small area. That garden is 50' x 75' so being optimistic is one thing but being realistic is another. All the money and time is something else. If I had a smaller area being optimistic would have been easier...I hate that sinking feeling in the pit of my stomach.


NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 9, 2012
5:01 AM

Post #9157856

[quote="rjogden"]
The diagnoses is Downy Mildew, a disease that according to most sources didn't even exist until a few years ago, and is now threatening to destroy ALL Ocimum basilicum plants (http://vegetablemdonline.ppath.cornell.edu/NewsArticles/BasilDowny.html).
[/quote]

Oh! I had that last year, but it showed up late in the year and the basil outgrew it so it really wasn't a problem, I just removed and destroyed the affected leaves. I bought the basil at a plant show so I couldn't say what breed it is, but if I get it this year I will report it.
mimitho
Sonoma County, CA
(Zone 8b)

June 9, 2012
8:47 AM

Post #9158064

[quote="HoneybeeNC"]mimitho - all the pathways are filled with fall leaves to a depth of at least 6 inches. Earthworms break these down into usuable castings, which I spread on the raised beds twice a year.[/quote]

That's a great idea. For my soil and winter weather, I think I'll need to chop up the leaves first. Anywhere that I've mulched with whole leaves (I have mostly maple and don't mulch with the walnut leaves), they turn into a goopy thick mat, which would be great for weed suppression, but I think I'd slip on it.

Now I just have to wait until fall !
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

June 9, 2012
9:46 AM

Post #9158129

I use the vacuum attachment on our weed blower (which we never use) to grind the leaves up to smaller pieces. It works great. Hope this idea is helpful to you.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 12, 2012
8:37 AM

Post #9162035

Yesterday I pulled all the pea vines. Today I started pulling the garlic.

The trellis on which the peas were growing is filling up with melon vines.

The garlic will be replaced with some bush beans.

The "Monica" tomatoes are growing, but sadly much of the fruit has BER :(

Honeybees are visiting the garden! YAY!

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 12, 2012
9:54 AM

Post #9162149

Summer Relatives, perhaps? LOL!
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

June 12, 2012
12:58 PM

Post #9162388

Honey - for the BER, someone on another forum told me she finely ground egg shells and scratched them into the soil. Claims she noticed immeditate improvement. fwiw, 2nd hand.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 13, 2012
6:16 AM

Post #9163307

Mary - thanks for the egg shell tip. I've tried that without success. I add an abundant amount of crab shell to my garden every year, and that helps to some extent.

My theory is that when tomato plants grow faster than their roots can draw up nutrients it causes BER. I have some other paste types growing in an area that gets more shade and they are producing fewer tomatoes. So far they have no BER.

I'm going to test different things each year until I come up with a solution (if I live that long!) LOL

Gymgirl - [quote]Summer Relatives, perhaps?[/quote]

I suspect it's a feral swarm out in the woods somewhere.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 13, 2012
6:55 AM

Post #9163349

LOLOLOL!
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

June 13, 2012
7:00 AM

Post #9163355

[quote]I'm going to test different things each year until I come up with a solution (if I live that long!)[/quote]
Exactly honeybee...exactly. It's so darn frustrating - there seems no consensus on this issue. I'm pulling all the San Marzano's from the bed this weekend, tucking in some sulphur to lower the pH, wait until September to plant some more.

I placed these trellises horizontally on the beds thinking to let the plants sprawl but that did not work as expected [best laid plans - literally] and combined with a thick mulch of ground up straw, I think the bed stayed too wet. It seemed never to register much dryness on the moisture meter. And the trellises made it difficult to scratch in granular ferts. sigh...so much to learn.

Thumbnail by MaryMcP
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 13, 2012
7:06 AM

Post #9163358

MaryMcP,
Not all is lost! I was inspired by your horizontal trellises. I scored one side of a discarded baby bed crib, and used the "ladder" to keep the neighborhood roaming cats off of my raised bed!

Thanks for the "accidental" tip!

Linda

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 13, 2012
7:13 AM

Post #9163362

[quote="HoneybeeNC"]I add an abundant amount of crab shell to my garden every year, and that helps to some extent.

My theory is that when tomato plants grow faster than their roots can draw up nutrients it causes BER. I have some other paste types growing in an area that gets more shade and they are producing fewer tomatoes. So far they have no BER.[/quote]

We're having crab legs this weekend, but doesn't it make your compost pile stink?

Regarding BER, eggs shells and such are longer term sources of calcium. But calcium might no be your problem. Instead of years of experimenting, I'd get your soil tested for calcium, sulfur and such. Then you'll know for sure if it's a nutrient problem or not.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 13, 2012
7:23 AM

Post #9163372

NicoleC - I purchase crab shell by the bucket from Worms Way. If you dried your crab shells you could probably add them to your compost without a smell.

The best thing would be to smash them into small pieces and add them directly to your garden. They break down surprisingly quickly.
JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

June 13, 2012
8:15 AM

Post #9163457

I have an old VitaMix container that I use to grind up crab shells, then just dig holes and mix it in with my unused garden soil. Then when I need the soil I just add it to where it is needed.

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 13, 2012
8:57 AM

Post #9163511

Ha ha -- my dog votes for burying crab shells in the garden. She would be very entertained! :)
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

June 13, 2012
10:29 PM

Post #9164451

[quote="MaryMcP"]Honey - for the BER, someone on another forum told me she finely ground egg shells and scratched them into the soil. Claims she noticed immeditate improvement. fwiw, 2nd hand.[/quote]
Ouch! I'm going to take a wild swing at the ball and say that it was probably pure coincidence. The metabolic and chemical processes needed to get anything from those eggshells into the developing fruit would take a lot longer than "immediate". The problem has been studied to death by biologists, biochemists and horticultural scientists, and even though there are a number of potential "causes", the one thing everyone seems to agree on is that it is a calcium problem. The issue here is that the developing fruit takes up all the calcium it is ever going to get VERY early in development. As soon as the fruit starts to develop, the flow coming in is via the phloem, which transports sugars from the leaves but not calcium (which, naturally, comes from the roots). Add to that the fact that eggshell calcium is only very slowly dissolved at near-neutral pH and - well, I'm calling foul.

Virtually all the BER problems boil down to water issues - there has to be an uninterrupted supply during that critical period when calcium is taken up by the flower ovary.

-Rich

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 14, 2012
5:23 AM

Post #9164569

[quote]Virtually all the BER problems boil down to water issues - there has to be an uninterrupted supply during that critical period when calcium is taken up by the flower ovary.[/quote]

Thanks, Rich - that is very informative.

We've had copious amounts of rain very recently, so perhaps my BER issues will be abated with the next group of flowers.

Next summer I'm hoping to be able to add a drip irrigation system to the garden. I will have paid off my car loan by then, which will free-up some much welcome extra income.

I'm going to need a pump to get water from the rain barrels into the drip system - any ideas?
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

June 14, 2012
5:34 AM

Post #9164577

Honey, can you use gravity instead of a pump? put the barrels on a stand?

Rich, Thanks for the information. The bed with all the roma types never dried out. I monitored it carefully with the trusy moisture meter. The bed had fresh soil, a sandy loam mix from a local landscaping company, plus a load of compost. I did not have a soil test but, using a cheap prong type meter, the pH was pinging about 6.5 when I planted. It's about 7 now.

Since roma's are historically more prone to BER, I'm going to switch to hearts for sauce tomatoes. It's just too discouraging to lose so much fruit after all my care. wahhhh, sob sob. I'll just grow something that's not so difficult.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 14, 2012
5:42 AM

Post #9164589

Mary - our garden is on a slope. Although we could put a barrel on a stand, I would be very scared that at some point it would tip over. I've either read, or seen on TV where one can put a pump in the barrel to water a garden. Right now, I'm schlepping buckets!

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 14, 2012
6:06 AM

Post #9164612

My rainwater tanks are uphill and upslope by a fair margin. Gravity will eventually work but the pressure is really lacking so it comes out as a trickle. It works, but it's really, really slow. I use my rainwater tanks for hand-watering stuff and watering in and such, but when I really need to give the garden a good long soaking, my drip system is hooked up to the spigot with a timer and I walk away. I'd put a pump on my tanks but I have no power out there. Solar system, someday...

If you use rainwater for drip irrigation, you have to do some special filtration or it clogs up the emitters.
texasrockgarden
Canyon Lake, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 14, 2012
1:45 PM

Post #9165134

Pic 1 Here is the latest canning effort, twenty five pints of tomato sauces, 10 Hot Salsa, 10 Pasta Sauce and 5 Chili Base. All using Ms Wages mixes.

The canning season is winding down here. It is time to rearrange the cupboard putting the newest jars canned in the back so the first canned are used first. The only thing left to can are jalapeno peppers and hopefully some okra.

It has been a good season.

Pic 2 My latest toy, jars with fermentation airlock for fermenting veggies. Already got some cukes going. Cabbage will be going into the second jar.


This message was edited Jun 14, 2012 2:48 PM

Thumbnail by texasrockgarden   Thumbnail by texasrockgarden
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stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 14, 2012
2:03 PM

Post #9165158

My pole beans have finished producing, but I have seen several new blooms so I'll have more soon! The okra has finally started blooming, so I should have okra to pick soon!

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 14, 2012
2:22 PM

Post #9165195

I'm putting out eggplants this weekend, and starting more pole beans. Ripping the tomatoe vines, and tending the bell pepper plants.

BTW, my bell pepper plants are a putrid shade of yellow. 14 out of 16. Two are a nice green. any Ideas why the yellowing? I'm thinking either overwatering, or too much fertilizer. I've been spot composting in the raised bed, and there might be too many nutrients in there.

LMK!

Thanks!

Linda

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 14, 2012
2:56 PM

Post #9165254

Mine are also like that Linda and I've not fertilized for several weeks. I think mine is lack of nitrogen. Gonna toss some cornmeal on the ground around them and see if that helps.
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

June 14, 2012
3:29 PM

Post #9165279

[quote="stephanietx"]Mine are also like that Linda and I've not fertilized for several weeks. I think mine is lack of nitrogen. Gonna toss some cornmeal on the ground around them and see if that helps.[/quote]
Nitrogen? Cornmeal? Am I missing something? Adding cornmeal should exacerbate any nitrogen deficiency because it is a very readily available carbon source. As it breaks down, the bacteria / fungi will suck up any nitrogen that is still present.

Were you maybe thinking of soybean or cottonseed meal?

-Rich

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 14, 2012
6:48 PM

Post #9165504

No, I've always been told that cornmeal was a good source of nitrogen. I can also add blood meal.

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 15, 2012
5:23 AM

Post #9165935

Food grade cornmeal; isn't a very good source, but the horticultural grade is.

Corn gluten meal is good for pre-emergent weed control.

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 15, 2012
6:59 AM

Post #9166036

Yes, I use the horticultural grade.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 15, 2012
7:53 AM

Post #9166100

My dilemma is I will end up with lush greenery (like last season) and NO fruits, from too much nitrogen. Which is why I haven't added any.

I did introduce some worm castings, and rock phosphate into the hole at planting time. That's about all, except one watering with MG water soluble plant food for veggies.

Puzzling.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 15, 2012
8:00 AM

Post #9166114

Linda, I think your peppers are in need of some nitrogren. Try some blood meal if you have it, or composted chicken manure.

http://www.territorialseed.com/product/8113
ERNIECOPP
Vista, CA

June 15, 2012
8:21 AM

Post #9166156

Linda,

Leaves that are healthy, no dead parts or bugbites, but just yellow, are probably suffering from either a lack of chlorophyll, from lack of direct sunlight, or too much water preventing mineral uptake and oxygen.

A good moisture meter that will penetrate eight inches is a real problem solver. For trees you need to be able to penetrate about a foot.

I have very pale yellow, almost white, leaves inside the very dense grapearbor vines and some yellow leaves on tomatoes inside the denser bushes. but as they are healthy otherwise, i am not concerned about them. But the part i do not have a suggestion for is why 2 of them are okay and the others yellow, unless those two plants are not getting the water the others are.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 15, 2012
8:47 AM

Post #9166175

Thanks, guys.

I think it may be a watering issue. I really don't wanna put more nitrogen in before I rule out everything else, cause I've been trying to grow a bell pepper for the last three years! All I've managed to get is miniature half dollar size peppers, or lush green foliage and no fruit...

So, I've been holding back on the water. We got major rains last Thursday night and all day Friday, and the old one-digit meter showed the soil is still moist 2" down, well above the root zone, so, I'd conclude it's still pretty moist down there.

If I see no improvement by Monday, I'll go ahead and side dress with some blood meal. I also read somewhere yesterday that bell peppers didn't need a look of additional ferts, because of that lush growth and no fruits thing. Which is why I chose to go with the rock phosphate, to build up a good strong root system, for healthy plants that would crank out more fruit.

Thanks!
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

June 15, 2012
10:05 AM

Post #9166254

[quote="stephanietx"]No, I've always been told that cornmeal was a good source of nitrogen. I can also add blood meal.[/quote]
Steph, do you have an actual source for this information? The only references I am able to find for using the corn meal in the garden is as a fungicide.

Of course, like any organic material corn has minerals that are released as it breaks down. But the total protein content of corn is approximately 3%, while the starch content is around 70%. Using the standard protein/nitrogen conversion factor of 6.25, this equates to a nitrogen content of 0.48%. In the long run, it may supply some nitrogen to the soil, but in the short term it will act as a drain on the available nitrogen because the carbohydrates supplied by the starches will stimulate the soil microorganisms to multiply, and they will use up any available nitrogen in the process. That's why it can work as a fungicide; presumably it selectively increases the populations of "healthy" as opposed to pathogenic microbes.

Corn GLUTEN meal might be more useful. With a protein content closer to 10% and a lower starch content, it might release nitrogen a little faster. But if I needed a quick shot of nitrogen and was determined to stick to "organic" sources I'd go with fish emulsion or blood meal.

-Rich

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 15, 2012
10:18 AM

Post #9166274

Rich, et al,
It just occurred to me that ya'll might be right about the nitrogen. My raised bed is built with a predominance of pine bark fines and chunks in the mix. I forgot that I was told I might need to ADD nitrogen to the bed, as the pine bark would LEACH the nitrogen!

I have fish emulsion and blood meal and will go ahead and add some tomorrow. I'll give a report on Monday.

Thanks!

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 15, 2012
10:22 AM

Post #9166277

I forgot about fish emulsion - yes that should work even quicker than blood meal.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 15, 2012
10:29 AM

Post #9166284

Great! I'll give 'em a hit of fish emulsion this evening! I've used it once before in a hose end sprayer. I mix 2 tbsp. into some water in the canister, then attach the hose and spray.
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

June 15, 2012
10:47 AM

Post #9166303

[quote="Gymgirl"]Thanks, guys.

If I see no improvement by Monday, I'll go ahead and side dress with some blood meal. I also read somewhere yesterday that bell peppers didn't need a look of additional ferts, because of that lush growth and no fruits thing. Which is why I chose to go with the rock phosphate, to build up a good strong root system, for healthy plants that would crank out more fruit.
[/quote]
I don't hold back on the fertilizer. When the plants start looking like they need something I give it to them, but really I consider that to be too late.

I do like the Espoma line myself, at least for preparation. Then I'm not opposed to a little Miracle Grow (the standard stuff) or a trace element spray. I try to limit magnesium, because around here at least it's correlated with bacterial spot diseases.

-Rich
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

June 15, 2012
10:58 AM

Post #9166320

[quote="Gymgirl"]Rich, et al,
I was told I might need to ADD nitrogen to the bed, as the pine bark would LEACH the nitrogen!
[/quote]
Just for accuracy, "leaching" would be washing through (as from watering or rain moving the fertilizer down in the soil beyond the reach of the roots). That certainly could happen in a very loose medium - it's one of the advantages of using solid naturally-slow-release sources, since they're less subject to undesired movement - but the other thing that happens is that the naturally-occurring microorganisms grab and incorporate the nitrogen into their own cells as they grow and multiply.

-Rich

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 15, 2012
11:04 AM

Post #9166331

[quote="rjogden"]
Steph, do you have an actual source for this information? The only references I am able to find for using the corn meal in the garden is as a fungicide.
-Rich
[/quote]

I can't refer you to an online source, Rich, but Steve Solomon says in "Garden When it Counts" in the Compost chapter and also in his composting book (the name escapes me right now) that seedmeals have a C:N of 6:1, which is about as low as it gets. Only bloodmeal, hoof and horn meal and fish wastes are lower at 3:1.

Anything under 20:1 causes the immediate release of nitrate at the expense of soil humus.
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

June 15, 2012
11:09 AM

Post #9166346

Just so you don't think I'm just an armchair quarterback ;o) Here are: Bell Pepper Red Knight 3XR, Bell Pepper Orion, Early Bell Sunsation (ripens bright yellow), Corno di Toro Giallo, and Purple Marconi.

Thumbnail by rjogden   Thumbnail by rjogden   Thumbnail by rjogden   Thumbnail by rjogden   Thumbnail by rjogden
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rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

June 15, 2012
11:42 AM

Post #9166386

[quote="NicoleC"]

I can't refer you to an online source, Rich, but Steve Solomon says in "Garden When it Counts" in the Compost chapter and also in his composting book (the name escapes me right now) that seedmeals have a C:N of 6:1, which is about as low as it gets.[/quote]
Nicole, the problem with the statement is that it is only partly correct and unfortunately misleading as a consequence. Maybe Mr. Solomon assumes you will do your own further research, but in agricultural terminology, "seed meals" are quite distinct from "grain" meals. I am NOT arguing that grains aren't seeds, but in agriculture high protein "seed meal" means defatted soybean meal (average protein content 48%), defatted cottonseed meal (avg. 23% protein), defatted sunflower meal (avg. protein 26%), defatted canola seed meal (avg. protein 40.9%) etc. That translates roughly into total nitrogen contents of 7.7%, 3.7%, 4.2% and 6.5%.

You see the pattern here, I'm sure. These are seed crops that produce oils instead of lots of starch (like grains) - and the meal is what's left over after the oil (the principal carbon source) has been extracted. All of these are valued as feed supplements for cattle, fish farms, etc., which helps explain why they can be costly - you're competing with livestock farmers. Often what we get are meals that are not quite up to feed-grade standards (e.g. because of spoilage as from too much rain around harvest time).

In any case, they are all MUCH higher in total nitrogen than corn meal (or any cereal grain meal) and MUCH lower in competing carbon.

-Rich
texasrockgarden
Canyon Lake, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 15, 2012
11:42 AM

Post #9166387

rjogden, Nice job.

Are you the guy who uses SuperBloom on peppers? Some body here on DG does and their plants load up with blooms and set peppers early on in the season. Their plants and peppers looked very good.

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 15, 2012
11:48 AM

Post #9166398

Horticultural cornmeal has an N-P-K ratio of 9-1-0. So pretty high in nitrogen for organic. Yes, it is good for weed control and fungal control, but it also is a good source or nitrogen.
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

June 15, 2012
11:50 AM

Post #9166400

Some more, for the heat seekers. Bishops Crown (a C. baccatum), Cantina (medium hot, used for stuffing), Tepin (thought to be close to the original wild C. annuum), Lemon Drop (another hot C. baccatum), and last (but hardly least) one of my Bhut Jolokia strains. I'll try to post more as smoe of the rest develop and especially when I get some colors developing (I've been mostly picking the ones that have ripened, before the birds have a chance at them).

-Rich

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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 15, 2012
11:55 AM

Post #9166416

rjogden
well done !
I shall call you the "Pepper Uber" !

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 15, 2012
11:57 AM

Post #9166417

Beautiful!! My peppers are paltry this spring.
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

June 15, 2012
12:06 PM

Post #9166431

[quote="stephanietx"]Horticultural cornmeal has an N-P-K ratio of 9-1-0. So pretty high in nitrogen for organic. Yes, it is good for weed control and fungal control, but it also is a good source or nitrogen.
[/quote]
I'm not contesting that HCM is a source of protein, though I have seen other much lower numbers, and the fact that that analysis is virtually the same as that of the gluten (which is mostly the protein fraction) makes me suspicious of those numbers - especially the nitrogen. What is your source?

Considering that the crude protein content of corn is generally around 8%, it is a bit hard to believe that the nitrogen content of the meal is higher. The rule of thumb for determining protein content from nitrogen analysis (which is immeasurably easier to measure than protein) is in the neighborhood of 6.25. Meaning that the protein (which contains much more than just nitrogen) is MUCH HIGHER than the measured nitrogen, by an average of 6.25X. Which means in turn that any corn meal with an analysis of 9% nitrogen would contain 56.25% protein! That is significantly higher even than soy, and I'm sure there are many farmers who would love to get their hands on those seeds!

Also, the number that is NOT included in fertilizer analysis figures but which can be critically important to organic fertilizer sources is the C:N ratio.

-Rich
texasrockgarden
Canyon Lake, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 15, 2012
12:14 PM

Post #9166440

rjogden, I am just now getting into the super hot peppers. Last year I grew the Bhut Jolokia and enjoyed the aroma and flavor, but it is very hot.

Have you ever visited http://thehotpepper.com/index.php? There are some interesting happenings going on over there. One I am interested in is making and fermenting hot pepper mash for hot pepper sauce.

How do you use your hot peppers?
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

June 15, 2012
12:18 PM

Post #9166450

[quote="stephanietx"]Horticultural cornmeal has an N-P-K ratio of 9-1-0. So pretty high in nitrogen for organic. Yes, it is good for weed control and fungal control, but it also is a good source or nitrogen.
[/quote]
Ah, I missed the word "ratio". If that is straight from the source you're quoting, be aware that "ratio" is not ever a legal description of fertilizer content.

The term "analysis" is the legal definition of fertilizer strength adopted almost universally.

The "analysis" for a 9-1-0 "ratio" could be 0.09 - 0.01 - 0.00. Let the buyer beware.

-Rich

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 15, 2012
12:29 PM

Post #9166462

Ya'll just went technical on me, and I'm real bad at deciphering that language, LOL.

So, in a nutshell, what should I do for these yellowing bell pepper plants? LOLOLOL!

P.S. Rich, I'm also growing Early Sunsation Bells for the first time!

I soooooooooooooooooooooooo want bell peppers that look like Rich's!!!

Linda
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

June 15, 2012
12:32 PM

Post #9166469

[quote="texasrockgarden"]rjogden, Nice job.

Are you the guy who uses SuperBloom on peppers? Some body here on DG does and their plants load up with blooms and set peppers early on in the season. Their plants and peppers looked very good.[/quote]
No, I've never tried "SuperBloom".

Way back in the 70's when I was at the U of GA we did some research on a number of products that were supposed to stimulate plant growth, most of them based on seaweed extracts. Research had shown that some products contain measurable concentrations of cytokinins, which are known plant hormones that affect growth.

I did some preliminary research using 6-BA (a commercial cytokinin) and found that seeds soaked in it and then germinated showed very marked changes in root development. Some of the other unpublished research (done under contract with the company supplying the materials) showed varying results. Some of the plant/spray combinations (we used tomatoes) did demonstrate better growth, but not necessarily better fruiting. A lot of what we saw could have been attributed simply to differences in trace element content that could be supplied more cheaply from other sources. In commercial horticulture, even if something works it has to add to the bottom line (make more money than it costs), something not of as much concern to us gardeners.

-Rich
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

June 15, 2012
1:02 PM

Post #9166504

[quote="texasrockgarden"]rjogden, I am just now getting into the super hot peppers. Last year I grew the Bhut Jolokia and enjoyed the aroma and flavor, but it is very hot.

Have you ever visited http://thehotpepper.com/index.php? There are some interesting happenings going on over there. One I am interested in is making and fermenting hot pepper mash for hot pepper sauce.

How do you use your hot peppers?[/quote]
I don't hang out there. Not that I wouldn't - but if I participated in every forum and newslist for all the things that interest me, I would never get anything else done. Peppers are actually just a small part of my gardening interests, and gardening is only one of my hobbies. This year it's peppers, partly because I love the varieties, the way they look, taste, smell; partly because I can grow so many different types in such a small space; and partly because I enjoy cooking (another "hobby" I suppose). My favorites so far are still the good old serrano varieties, but they don't dry well (especially down here in the land of liquid sunshine). I love the fruitiness of some of the other species besides the usual C. annuums everyone knows. I am NOT really a fan of the superhots, just curious (and they make great squirrel/rabbit repellents for my fruit trees, if I can ever learn to keep them off my skin). I've also got a Naga Morich and a Trinidad Scorpion starting to ripen fruit - I'll try to get those posted soon.

But I'm equally interested in the mild habs - I've currently got Aji Dulce, Aji Dulce Amarillo (yellow), Aji Dulce Long, Cacho Negro (dark brown fruit), Trinidad Perfume, Manabi Sweet, NuMex Suave Orange, Tobago Seasoning, Vicentes Sweet, and one known only as "PI 439416", the accession number given to the plants produced from an intentional cross. All of them are technically "habañeros", they look incredibly hot, and the ones that have ripened so far (from the "PI" plant) actually have that "hot" smell - but that one at least has absolutely NO heat on the tongue, just that wonderfully citrusy flavor. I'm including a picture of that fruit.

And I was quite surprised by a pepper I almost threw out (ran out of space). Named Criollo Sella, it produces small hot bright yellow fruit that have an incredible aroma and flavor. I rescued the plant (it was fruiting in the cell pack) and got it into a pot, and it is growing very well (for having been little more than a stick).

-Rich

Thumbnail by rjogden
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NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 15, 2012
1:20 PM

Post #9166522

[quote="rjogden"]
Nicole, the problem with the statement is that it is only partly correct and unfortunately misleading as a consequence. Maybe Mr. Solomon assumes you will do your own further research, but in agricultural terminology, "seed meals" are quite distinct from "grain" meals. ...
[/quote]

I could be wrong -- corn seed meal isn't found here; we have cottonseed meal -- but I was under the impression that horticultural corn meal was made from oil corn, not flint/dent types.
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

June 15, 2012
5:45 PM

Post #9166843

[quote="NicoleC"]
I could be wrong -- corn seed meal isn't found here; we have cottonseed meal -- but I was under the impression that horticultural corn meal was made from oil corn, not flint/dent types.[/quote]
Here's a link to a specific high-oil corn used as a dairy feed, comparing its protein content to that of "typical" oil corn (http://www.oardc.ohio-state.edu/hocorn/hoc_dairy_ni_041900.htm). It indicates the protein content is 9.83 vs. 9.23 for other corn. That equates to a nitrogen analysis of 1.57%.

Another published research paper (http://www.oardc.ohio-state.edu/hocorn/agf137no.htm, table 2 - about halfway down the article) shows a protein content for "High Oil" corn of 8.0 - 9.0%. Even removing the oil (which accounts for 7.2 - 8.2% of the total weight) you end up with a protein content in the resulting meal cake of only about 10% - or 1.6% nitrogen. The same research indicates the starch content of HIGH OIL corn is between 66.2% and 67.9% (compared with 71.3-73.4% for dent corn).

Bottom line here - there is still a LOT more starch than protein, even in "oil corn", and the total nitrogen of the meal after pressing never exceeds 1.6%. Ultimately, even at its best, corn is not an "oilseed". (So, my agronomy professors were not wrong...)

-Rich
rwaterspf1
Durham, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 15, 2012
5:48 PM

Post #9166847

finally! harvesting cukes, zukes, and peppers. tons of tomatoes on the plants but all green still. Should have string beans to harvest in a week or so.

-Vaughn
rwaterspf1
Durham, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 16, 2012
4:59 PM

Post #9167919

Pictures from today's harvest. Cukes, new mexico peppers, and poblanos.


-Vaughn

This message was edited Jun 16, 2012 7:00 PM

Thumbnail by rwaterspf1
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stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 16, 2012
5:51 PM

Post #9167970

What kind of cucumbers are you growing?
rwaterspf1
Durham, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 16, 2012
6:18 PM

Post #9168009

Steph: I got a late start on cucumbers and just got some Bonnie Burpless seedlings from HD


-Vaughn

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 16, 2012
6:38 PM

Post #9168048

Thanks! They look like a fun cuke to grow!

kevcarr59

kevcarr59
BUda, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 17, 2012
12:11 AM

Post #9168324

Vaughn,

How's your okra doing?? Finally got a few Burgundy going and remember some of your problems...

Cukes & peppers are looking good...

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 17, 2012
6:41 AM

Post #9168495

Saw my first stink bug, or it may have been a squash bug, yesterday. Ugh!!
rwaterspf1
Durham, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 17, 2012
6:42 AM

Post #9168496

Kevin,

My first round of okra (cajun delight) got eaten by the deer. My second round of Burgundy is about a foot tall in containers. I also have about 15 Burgundy seedlings about 8" tall and ready to transplant. I'll plant those after my bush beans are ready (bout a week or 2).


-Vaughn
cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

June 17, 2012
11:33 AM

Post #9168818

Sorry, I've been absent. The garden is kicking my tail...I don't expect I'll be grocery shopping anytime soon, woohoo! lol

I'm happy to find ya'll discussing peppers, I got quick question.
I planted some bell peppers from one of those mutli-pac varieties. I'm getting some purple bells, but they taste like green bells, which I don't really care for. How do I know when a purple pepper is sweet and mature? Will it turn red? Thanks!

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 17, 2012
12:01 PM

Post #9168838

It turns purple, almost a dark purple/brown.

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

June 17, 2012
1:40 PM

Post #9168956

I have baby cucumbers on my Salad Bush plants. I was happy to see them. First time for me trying Salad Bush plants.

Tomatoes growing really nicely this year. Green tomatoes but nothing near ripe. Much too early for ripe tomatoes anyway.

All my pole beans and yard long beans are growing but no blooms on either yet.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 17, 2012
8:42 PM

Post #9169466

I have planted all except about 10 tomato plants, expected to do that this weekend but a Basketball tourn. had other ideas. lol After I get those planted my garden will be full! I am starting to pick tomatoes. If 1/2 of the ones that are set mature I will have a fantastic season. This weather is perfect. I also have planted/sowed Inca Berry, 3 pepper plants (the rest are going in containers), Malabar Spinach (self sowed), Basil, 2 types of cukes, 2 types of long beans, Roselle.

Containers have more tomatoes including Dwarfs, Little Leaf Cukes (parth.),too many peppers, bush beans. Just started some more dwarf tomatoes. This will go in containers. Im hoping they can be indoor/outdoor plants as the weather cools down.

This weather is so nice I cant seem to stop planting.

Vaughn-What size containers do you have your Okra in?

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

June 17, 2012
9:16 PM

Post #9169487

Well those little green tomatoes I pic'd and posted on June 3rd are still green and I am still waiting for garden tomatoes. There just happens to be a lot more of them.
My beans are off to a terrible start, I think every bug on the planet likes them also.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 18, 2012
6:51 AM

Post #9169796

The "Royal Burgundy" bush beans I sowed four days ago sprouted overnight.

My daughter took home two (green) "Ace" sweet peppers over the weekend. I'll wait for a few to turn red for myself.
http://www.johnnyseeds.com/p-6748-ace-f1.aspx

The slugs and pill bugs ate the first sweet pepper plants, so I'm assuming the ones I picked are from those set out as transplants on April 15th or the 30th.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 18, 2012
7:26 AM

Post #9169825

I set out a tray of eggplant seedlings that are about 11" tall to harden off. Also, two zucchini squash plants and three Sugar Crunch cuke seedlings, that are wrapping all over everything.

Thought I would beat the squash vine borer, but it occurred to me the moth could STILL lay eggs with the vines sprawled all over the patio table...duh...

Anyway, this weekend was a garden project opportunity. I painted two frames I scored a year and a half ago, curbside. They look like ladders, and I thought "trellises". So, needing something in place for the cukes, I whipped out the Kilz Latex primer and slapped on two coats. This week I'll spray paint the frames to coordinate with my fence, then attach some hardware cloth.

I'm making things easier on myself, so these two cukes are going into a pallet garden at the base of the trellis. I'm gonna poke holes in two small bags of MG potting mix, slit the top, and sink those root balls in! The cukes will either make it, or not, but I'm not sweating it in all that oppressive heat! Same for the two squash plants, but they'll get the royal squash teepee built with the two pallets underneath.

I'll post before and after pics either here or on the fall/wtr 2012 thread.

Hugs!

kevcarr59

kevcarr59
BUda, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 21, 2012
10:44 PM

Post #9175329

Got a little surprise this evening going to check the garden. Got a bunch of tomatoes, 3 good size cucumbers and this little gem that blew me away. Not bothering with singles any more, working on doubles...LOL...

Thumbnail by kevcarr59
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rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

June 22, 2012
2:15 PM

Post #9176206

A few new pictures of fruit gathered over the past couple of days.

Naga Morich (from La Palma) - hot enough to keep squirrels off the sweet potatoes. One fruit in a blender with a little water, strained and mixed up to 1 quart with some spreader-sticker. Yes, I tasted it. Don't know yet just what I'll do with them.

Tepin pepper (from Park Seed) - good in pepper-vinegar sauces.

Kellogg's Breakfast tomato - very tasty, very large and unusual for ripening full-sized fruit in our humid June heat. Wish it made more, but they are a great treat when they come along.

Momotaro (from Kitazawa Seed) - medium-sized tomatoes, very uniform and even-ripening even in the heat, and very productive. I am getting one or two fruit every other day from a single plant in a self-watering planter.

Jaune Flamme (from CherryGal), a golfball-sized deep golden yellow fruit. These are fruit numbers 2 and 3 from this plant, and I just picked two more - from a plant growing in a 2-gallon nursery container. Believe me, next time it gets its own planter or a spot in the garden!

-Rich

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Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 22, 2012
2:20 PM

Post #9176213

Rich,
What's your verdict on the Momos? They will always be on my top three list!
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

June 22, 2012
2:50 PM

Post #9176260

More pics from today's harvest.

Amish Gold from TomatoFest. Very solid, meaty plum tomatoes, very uniform and brilliantly colored.

A Guyana PI199506 from La Palma. It is a Capsicum baccatum, and like many of this species it has a very strong fruity aroma and flavor. Medium heat.

A Trinidad Scorpion (first of these) from la Palma. A surprisingly large Cap Chinense. It's hard to see in the picture, but the fruit (and all the green ones still on the plant) have a little protruding point on the end that gives them their name. Called "superhot", I haven't yet opened it. This fruit perfectly fits the description "gnarly".

Nugget tomato from Park Seed. A miniature plum, nice flavor, very productive, absolutely HUGE indeterminate plant in a self-watering container is covered with uniform, brightly-colored fruit.

Last but not least - Golden Honey Bunch (from Territorial Seed), a classic very sweet golden cherry tomato. I can't pass the plant without popping a few in my mouth, but there are always plenty more. One of my personal favorites.

-Rich

Thumbnail by rjogden   Thumbnail by rjogden   Thumbnail by rjogden   Thumbnail by rjogden   Thumbnail by rjogden
Click an image for an enlarged view.

rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

June 22, 2012
3:25 PM

Post #9176309

[quote="Gymgirl"]Rich,
What's your verdict on the Momos? They will always be on my top three list![/quote]
I have been enjoying them almost every day in classic Caprese style, with fresh mozzarella, a little basil chiffonade (also fresh from the garden), and a drizzle of good homemade dressing of aged balsamic vinegar and extra virgin olive oil. I have to say in all honesty they are not my favorite - there are some beefsteaks I prefer simply for eating out of hand with a little salt - but they have the incredible advantage of continuing to grow and produce for me as daytime temperature highs top 90 degrees, something most large tomatoes simply will not do. I haven't heard a lot about their disease resistance, but I have had late blight hit a LOT of my OTHER tomato plants and weaken them; the Momo is showing some slight signs on lower leaves (which I do my best to keep trimmed off) but it has not spread through the plant like it has some of the other varieties. I am very impressed and will be growing it from now on. I am also anxious to try Odoriko, another similar Japanese Pink available from Kitazawa, and I see they are offering a new Red tomato, Katana, which will go on my Spring 2013 list.

-Rich

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 22, 2012
6:30 PM

Post #9176553

rjogden
my Momotaro didn't do as well as yours. Very small production and they are cracking under our heat.
But I like their taste.
I will try one more year. I think I might have started them too late compared to my other tomatoes.
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

June 22, 2012
10:21 PM

Post #9176753

[quote="drthor"]rjogden
my Momotaro didn't do as well as yours. Very small production and they are cracking under our heat.
But I like their taste.
I will try one more year. I think I might have started them too late compared to my other tomatoes.[/quote]
One of the things I most like about the Momotaro is the uniform smooth relatively thin skin. It seems to me it is the thicker-skinned types that suffer the worst cracking and checking here, one of the reasons it is hard to grow anything larger than a cherry (and some of them split pretty badly in wet weather). I have been absolutely religious about watering this year, which may have helped, as well as trying to keep the plants well fed through the period before initial fruit set. I water AT LEAST every other day, and I'm using self-watering planters that hold enough water to last at least two days even for the largest indeterminate plants I am growing. I did worry when we transitioned from several months of very dry weather to three solid days of heavy rain when tropical storm Beryl came through the area, but aside from a predictable increase in fungal diseases I didn't really see much deterioration. I am starting to see a lot of chlorosis as the plants run out of the initial fertilizer application and I've been side-dressing to try to encourage a second spurt of growth (without causing fruit damage or blossom drop). So far, so good.

-Rich
LiseP
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 23, 2012
9:06 AM

Post #9177141

Hi! Dropping in for a moment or two -- hopefully longer. This has been one crazy spring and summer so I've been missing in action on the list for the last little while.

Anyway -- am picking tomatoes daily. The photo is from a couple weeks ago. Darn critters have discovered the garden though, so now I have to pick tomatoes before they ripen fully. But they are still good, and we have more than enough for us to eat (the wildlife is eating the neighbor's share, lol!).

Still have parsley and chard, garlic's pulled, (kale and leafy stuff long since bolted, of course). Beans produced for awhile but shriveled into a rusty mess. One or two pepper plants are starting to produce (very little though) but most got gnawed to nothing (like Honeybee's, succumbed to pillbugs, I think). Cukes and squash also shriveled (SVB). Obviously, I have not been diligent enough with Sluggo Plus and other things, and have spent most of my time on the tomatoes.

But I do want to grow other things! So Aside from that, I just have seeds in packets and am wondering what I can plant now. Reading posts above, looks like I can sow more beans. Too late to start cukes and eggplant from seed? If this is the wrong thread for that question, feel free to redirect me. I've sort of lost track of things.

Thumbnail by LiseP
Click the image for an enlarged view.

podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 23, 2012
9:53 AM

Post #9177187

LiseP ~ glad to see you are having an excellent tomato harvest. I recently learned that if you need to harvest tomatoes early, cut an inch or two of the stem with the tomato. It will continue to ripen naturally then.

My eggplants are still delivering but I have started the next batch of cucumber seedlings earlier this week and they are sprouting today so yes on the cucumbers. I also started more Delicata squash and the fall tomatoes this week. Also planted the sweet potato sets this week. Glad to see you back and posting. Kristi
LiseP
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 23, 2012
12:28 PM

Post #9177341

Thanks much for that. I'll start leaving a little tomato stem then, and get busy with the seeds. I envy you your eggplant!
Lise

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 23, 2012
2:15 PM

Post #9177456

A DG member kindly sent me some "Fairy Tale" eggplant seeds, and the plants are just beginning to bloom. Such pretty blue-ish flowers!
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 23, 2012
2:37 PM

Post #9177482

I agree, they are beautiful blooms. I ate White Fingers eggplant last nite, am also growing Ophelia. Both are small plants and fruits.
These are definitely one of those plants that would do well in an outlaw garden ~ lol

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

June 23, 2012
3:17 PM

Post #9177526

podster, I just read your post and had to google Ophelia eggplants as I had not heard of them. I sure wish I was growing these now!!! They sound perfect. I have never grown eggplant and really never wanted to deal with giant sized plants. But one of the Ophelia would be perfect for a container. The fruits look like the perfect size for one person each.
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 23, 2012
3:27 PM

Post #9177538

Yes and the White Fingers eggplant is small also and the fruits are tiny and tasty. I cook them with the skin on.
My Ophelia has small fruits but none harvesting size yet.



newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

June 23, 2012
3:55 PM

Post #9177564

Is there a difference between the common purple eggplant and the white fruited ones? I have only seen the purple fruits in person myself.
rwaterspf1
Durham, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 23, 2012
4:22 PM

Post #9177602

In the garden today...harvested jalapenos and new mexico peppers, cukes, the last zuke (SVB got the plant), and a couple pounds of string beans


-Vaughn
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 23, 2012
7:11 PM

Post #9177767

Rita ~ my unrefined palate can't tell the difference. lol

Vaughn ~ you've made a haul today. I am always amazed at how the areas north us of start late and catch up quickly.

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

June 23, 2012
7:51 PM

Post #9177804

well. No great refined patate here either so I am sure I couldn't tell eiher. I just have it stuck in my mind that eggplant should be purple lol!
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 23, 2012
8:57 PM

Post #9177896

Now that I understand. I will never think yellow meat watermelon tastes correct and I know it is all in my head. lol

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

June 23, 2012
9:03 PM

Post #9177901

I agree LOL!
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

June 24, 2012
5:26 AM

Post #9178123

This thread is too long, started Part 4 here:

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1267208/

Come on over...

This message was edited Jun 24, 2012 5:28 AM

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 24, 2012
5:27 AM

Post #9178124

The color of vegetables and fruit will usually indicate the nutritional value. The darker the color, the higher the nutritional value.

I don't know if this also applies to the skin color of fruits and vegetables.

I like using this website to balance out the nutrition in my diet:

http://nutritiondata.self.com/

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 24, 2012
5:30 AM

Post #9178128


Deleted - see you on the new part 4 thread...

This message was edited Jun 24, 2012 7:31 AM
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

June 24, 2012
5:31 AM

Post #9178129

I know...I fixed it. sorry bee...it should be okay now.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 24, 2012
5:34 AM

Post #9178135

Yes, it's working now. Thanks, Mary.

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