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Vegetable Gardening: This week's harvest second try

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Calalily
Deep South Coastal, TX
(Zone 10a)

May 18, 2012
7:45 AM

Post #9128338

Second post, things we are harvesting this week.

Thumbnail by Calalily   Thumbnail by Calalily   Thumbnail by Calalily   Thumbnail by Calalily   Thumbnail by Calalily
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Calalily
Deep South Coastal, TX
(Zone 10a)

May 18, 2012
7:54 AM

Post #9128352

More vegetables

Thumbnail by Calalily   Thumbnail by Calalily   Thumbnail by Calalily   Thumbnail by Calalily   Thumbnail by Calalily
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Calalily
Deep South Coastal, TX
(Zone 10a)

May 18, 2012
8:01 AM

Post #9128361

A few more, this spring has been fantastic.

Thumbnail by Calalily   Thumbnail by Calalily   Thumbnail by Calalily   Thumbnail by Calalily   Thumbnail by Calalily
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stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 18, 2012
8:40 AM

Post #9128434

I'm so happy for your great harvests calla!! I know your customers will be so thankful!

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 18, 2012
8:42 AM

Post #9128437

OMG! Where do we go to buy this stuff?

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 18, 2012
8:50 AM

Post #9128444

Way, way down in south Texas, just about in the Gulf. LOL

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 18, 2012
12:11 PM

Post #9128621

Too far, waaaaah. Looks yummy.
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 19, 2012
4:29 AM

Post #9129306

Beautiful colors and wonderful harvest.

Do you recall what the cucumber cultivar is in the first set of photos?

Second set of photos ~ miniature eggplants?

How is the new greenhouse working out?

Glad the photos finally went through and hope your sales are fantastic too.

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 19, 2012
7:19 AM

Post #9129411

Calla, do you also have fruit trees or do you just stick with veggies?
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 19, 2012
11:04 AM

Post #9129587

Nice. Very very nice. Good job cala.
Calalily
Deep South Coastal, TX
(Zone 10a)

May 19, 2012
2:26 PM

Post #9129778

Cucumber in first set of photos is Little Leaf, if fact I should probably tell what all the varieties are.

First set of photos: tomatoes are assorted but the large pink one is Tiffen Minnonite, peppers are King Arthur, cucumber Little Leaf, Majestic cauliflower and Belstar Broccoli
Second set: Eggplants are Rosa Bianca, Prosperosa and Lista de Gandia (not miniature), potatoes are Mountain Rose and Purple Majesty, cucumber Green Finger, squash is Profit and Segev zucchini, Bennings Green Tint scallop and Lioness yellow, the white onions I can't remember
Third set: Merlin and Touchstone Gold beets, bok choi, Scarlet Queen and purple top turnips, Rainbow and Purple Haze carrots, Blossom fingerlings, Purple Viking potatoes

Greenhouses are working well, they're more shade houses in the summer, but the sides cut the wind and my eggplants aren't scratched. Market was so-so today, hope tomorrow is better. The "buy at the farmer's market" culture is not here in the valley, our markets are young, the first one started in 2008. Diabetes, obesity and high blood pressure are extreme down here so the college of health plus some of the clinics are trying to get more people interested in vegetables.
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 19, 2012
6:34 PM

Post #9129984

Unfortunate that those residents haven't discovered the farmers markets. I would only wish such selection was available here.

Thanks for IDing the variety of vegetables. It is always nice to see the end results of the different cultivars. I'm growing Little Leaf again but so far I've been happier with Alibi. Your eggplants look really yummy!

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 19, 2012
6:37 PM

Post #9129989

If I lived on the Island or down in the Valley, I'd be a regular customer!

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 21, 2012
3:09 PM

Post #9132383

Stephanie, there must be somewhere local! Can we rent a Uhaul truck and go down and fill it up? There's obesity, high BP and diabetes up here too!

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 21, 2012
4:15 PM

Post #9132488

I have a friend who owns a condo on South Padre. I could get us room & board for cheap!!

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 21, 2012
8:38 PM

Post #9132867

woooow
What a fantastic harvest !

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

May 22, 2012
5:14 AM

Post #9133120

Congratulations on a great harvest! Love your photos, too. I hope business picks up soon to make all your hard work worthwhile.
Calalily
Deep South Coastal, TX
(Zone 10a)

May 22, 2012
5:43 AM

Post #9133152

Summer is our slow season, winding down to end of July when we go on vacation and start back up in September for the winter. I am still learning how to plant crops for the topsy-turvy seasons down here. Hopefully the greenhouse will help us have warm season crops when the winter Texans are here this winter!

Darned raccoons are eating my cantaloupes, they steal 3 or 4 every night. I can't put the electric fence up because we're still working on the greenhouses.
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 22, 2012
6:15 AM

Post #9133213

Are your winter market sales better or worse than this time of year?
cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 22, 2012
12:51 PM

Post #9133748

How pretty, Calalily. Your photos are better then the photos on some seed packs.
Calalily
Deep South Coastal, TX
(Zone 10a)

May 23, 2012
4:46 AM

Post #9134691

Podster, winter sales are triple what they are in summer. That is what makes summer sales seem so bad. I really shouldn't complain, we are still the biggest vendor at the markets and still make decent money. In winter we have a line of people waiting before we even arrive and it takes about 30 minutes to sell all we could pick and pack in an 18 ft enclosed trailer. We run out of product before we run out of customers. In summer, it takes the whole two hour market and we usually don't sell completely out.

Thanks Cocoa.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

May 23, 2012
1:37 PM

Post #9135443

Man these threads still make me hungry.

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 23, 2012
2:07 PM

Post #9135469

Calla, do you think it could be because people have their own gardens in the summer?
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 23, 2012
4:20 PM

Post #9135665

I'm guessing it's what we in Phoenix call 'snow birds'. Waiting...tap tap tap...to hear from calalily.
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 23, 2012
4:33 PM

Post #9135679

I suspect snowbirds is right. They are probably more affluent and more health conscious with age than most.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

May 23, 2012
5:51 PM

Post #9135800

podster; I've been at it since about eight,I object.!

Only before we start at it ,if at all, I am from mesquite Tx. (lol) Go Figure.
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 23, 2012
5:55 PM

Post #9135805

WAit... what I'd say that you object to??? I didn't mean to step on toes. Oopsie

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

May 23, 2012
7:44 PM

Post #9135970

podster; I'M playing , that is about snowbirds. To us northerners those are finches that stay during winter.
Sounds a bit like jealousy , doesn;t it? (LOL)

I have a feeling that most become more health concious as age catches up them. That warm sun sure feels good to older bones where you are.
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 23, 2012
8:14 PM

Post #9136012

Whew! I didn't mean to offend. I grew up in the frozen tundra of MN and moved to AZ first. There we saw how the snowbird community was the economic backbone of the valley. Here in TX isn't much different. A lot of areas in the south are a bit impoverished and the tourist and snowbird community is a welcome boon. We luv our snowbirds and our birdies too. Kristi

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 23, 2012
8:49 PM

Post #9136072

Pod, I'd not thought of the snowbirds. Good point.

Calla's probably out working in her garden! LOL
Calalily
Deep South Coastal, TX
(Zone 10a)

May 25, 2012
6:09 AM

Post #9137785

Was working, trying to get weeds under control and figure out how to keep a raccoon out of the melons. Winter Texans=snowbirds.
Not a lot of local gardens, and the funny thing is, lots of our market customers have their own gardens. The main vegetables consumed by most of the locals are jalapenos and other hot peppers, tomatoes, onions, cabbage, potatoes, lettuce and avocados and mangoes for fruit.
We do better on the Island than any other market, more education, more diversity, more experience with food.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 25, 2012
8:22 AM

Post #9137973

But even fresh peppers, tomatoes, onions, cabbage, potatoes, lettuce, avocados and mangoes are better than store-bought!
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 25, 2012
9:30 AM

Post #9138067

Happy Birthday Carrie!!

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

May 25, 2012
10:17 AM

Post #9138125

Besides and anyway, the idea of fresh from the garden makes one feel better of emotion, the mind and body thing?
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 25, 2012
1:03 PM

Post #9138333

Pod-If you offend anybody, I think the world would shake..U r so kind hearted Ive never seen a post by you that could ever be taken as offensive.

Cala-how do you get "cool" and "warm" veggies at the same time? I know you trick them into germinating but growing is a whole other issue.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 25, 2012
1:09 PM

Post #9138339

Thank you, Mary!

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

May 25, 2012
2:55 PM

Post #9138519

One old trick is using ice after temperature is out of a seeds germination range,it causes variation that will get a finicky seed to germinate.
Of course under a Texas sun that is going last all of about ten minutes,only it would or could have some use sometimes

I have used that a few times when it has gotten to hot to germinate some plants.Even some warm sun loving plant seeds simply won't germinate after temps are stable and constant

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

May 25, 2012
3:08 PM

Post #9138529

YEAH, WELL WHOOPS, I kinda missed the point there some didn't I. It would interesting to know besides growing things in the shade how to do that.
Calalily
Deep South Coastal, TX
(Zone 10a)

May 27, 2012
4:44 AM

Post #9140133

It has to do with our watering system, where they are planted (the cauliflower and broccoli are closer to the water and receive some shade part of the day) and the variety. We use drip and overhead irrigation which gives evaporational cooling. It's getting too hot now, broccoli is faltering and cauliflower is getting a purple tint.
We do have greenhouses, but they have only shade cloth covering at the moment and are not heated, more for wind and sun protection for my peppers and eggplants. Cool season crops are outside, never in the greenhouse.
We grow tomatoes year round, but this has been a difficult year for them and I'm not sure why. We had very little rain last year, super hot summer but a freak frost in Nov, mild winter which should have been good and now super hot again.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

May 27, 2012
5:15 AM

Post #9140153

Nice harvest!

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

May 30, 2012
7:33 AM

Post #9144621

Lady Lily, I salute you! You are such an inspiration, and a sweetheart for sharing as you do. As do ALL of our DG friends!

It's a privilege to be a part of this family!

Linda

P.S. Uh, Steph, lmk when you wanna make a road trip to go visit Calalily. We can split the gas and stay at the condo!. Been trying to get down to Calalily's operation for two years now!
terri_emory
Alba, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 30, 2012
11:02 AM

Post #9144933

This has been a lovely spring, hasn't it?
Calalily
Deep South Coastal, TX
(Zone 10a)

June 3, 2012
4:31 AM

Post #9149953

It sure is getting hot now. Pulled the last of the cauliflower and broccoli. Figs are getting ripe and every bird in the neighborhood knows it!

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 3, 2012
10:53 AM

Post #9150305

Growing up, our next door neighbor had a very nice fig tree along the fenceline. Our dogs LOVED to eat the figs that fell off on our side. LOL
Calalily
Deep South Coastal, TX
(Zone 10a)

June 5, 2012
5:14 AM

Post #9152906

I don't think Duke (our black lab) has tried figs yet. I hope he doesn't like them!

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 5, 2012
11:57 AM

Post #9153340

Duke likes Bush's Baked Beans!

kevcarr59

kevcarr59
BUda, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 6, 2012
10:40 AM

Post #9154657

Last night's dash & grab before the birds nailed me, gonna get them suckers!!!

This mornings cuke raid, will still get another 3 or 4 for Saturday's Farmers' Market debut...

Have another half doz. cukes chillin' out in fridge for Sat. morning...

Hopefully about a half doz. zukes should be ready to go Sat., maybe a few squash also...

Thumbnail by kevcarr59
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Calalily
Deep South Coastal, TX
(Zone 10a)

June 9, 2012
4:23 AM

Post #9157838

Linda, I love the Bush's commercials! I hope our Duke never eats baked beans, he sleeps beside the bed!

Kevcarr, when you refrigerate cukes and zucchini, be sure they don't dehydrate.
terri_emory
Alba, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 11, 2012
7:36 AM

Post #9160410

All our dogs love figs...

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 11, 2012
7:48 AM

Post #9160430

I love figs!
terri_emory
Alba, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 11, 2012
8:10 AM

Post #9160469

I do too!
Calalily
Deep South Coastal, TX
(Zone 10a)

June 12, 2012
8:14 AM

Post #9161978

I bought 3 new trees this weekend, two year old plants with green figs. She didn't know the variety, said they were large white figs with a purple blush and very sweet.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 12, 2012
8:18 AM

Post #9161992

How much were they? And how big do they get?
Calalily
Deep South Coastal, TX
(Zone 10a)

June 12, 2012
8:21 AM

Post #9161998

They were $12 each plant. They will eventually get 12-15 ft tall.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 12, 2012
8:26 AM

Post #9162013

That's do-able in my yard!
Calalily
Deep South Coastal, TX
(Zone 10a)

June 13, 2012
6:02 AM

Post #9163296

I found all kinds of figs on Ebay, just have to figure out which seller is best. I really want a Black Mission fig.
texasrockgarden
Canyon Lake, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 14, 2012
6:14 PM

Post #9165461

[quote="Gymgirl"]That's do-able in my yard![/quote]

Gymgirl, figs are so easy to root from cuttings you should hit some of your neighbors up for some cuttings and root your own. I learned this on a post by Calalily about fig trees early this spring. I went out and took a cutting and followed TAMU's instructions for taking and rooting fig tree cuttings. I tried one and now it is over a foot tall.

The variety I have is the Texas White Everbearing. This is the first year for it to bear figs. It is growing in a 13 gal black nursery pot. It has tripled in size this year so I am sure the roots have started growing outside the pot. I plan to build a mound of mulch around it made from my wood chipper.

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 15, 2012
7:22 AM

Post #9166057

Growing up in San Antonio, almost every older home had at least one fig tree/bush and one pecan tree. LOL

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 15, 2012
7:49 AM

Post #9166091

TRock,
I'd been admiring my neighbor's 15 ft. fig tree across the street. Nice and compact.

Last month, after some heavy rains, the whole thing just fell over. She was ecstatic. I was heartbroken. She had wanted it gone a looooooooong time, and finally got her wish. But, before it was hauled off, she took a cutting for me.

It has since died. At least, it looks dead.. I stuck it in a 10 gallon pot filled with old potting mix, and put it under the patio cover. It looks dead...

I've had at least three attempts at starting a fig tree from a cutting, and no success. I need instructions.

Thank you.
texasrockgarden
Canyon Lake, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 15, 2012
8:03 AM

Post #9166120

Gymgirl here is Calalily's thread http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1232550/?hl=figs#top

At TAMU http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/extension/fruit/figs/figs.html

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 15, 2012
8:38 AM

Post #9166172

Thanks, TRock, et al!

I've tagged the instructions. It's too late now, right?
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

June 15, 2012
3:16 PM

Post #9166674

[quote="texasrockgarden"]

Gymgirl, figs are so easy to root from cuttings you should hit some of your neighbors up for some cuttings and root your own. I learned this on a post by Calalily about fig trees early this spring. I went out and took a cutting and followed TAMU's instructions for taking and rooting fig tree cuttings. I tried one and now it is over a foot tall.[/quote]
I was weeding around my young fig plants in the back yard last month and accidentally broke off one of the shoots. It already had a couple of tiny roots attached at the base because I keep the plants mulched right up to the trunk (unlike most of the other types of fruit trees). I stuck the broken shoot in a nursery can and threw in some cheap potting soil, put it downstairs on the seeding counter (which is temporarily empty) and hooked the timer back up to turn the lights on 12 hours/day. I put a "dome" over it to retain humidity and promptly forgot about it. Two weeks later (more or less) I was downstairs looking for something else and noticed the lights were on, and when I removed the dome the plant had four new leaves and was firmly rooted in. Easy, yes.

-Rich

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 19, 2012
6:40 AM

Post #9171338

Gymgirl - I have had the best luck with cuttings by putting them in small containers until well-rooted. I think your problem was putting a single cutting in a 10-gallon container.

Soil should be moist, but not wet

Take several 4" to 6" cuttings and place them slightly apart in a small container - fill the container with cuttings. Set the cuttings just deep enough so they don't fall over. I like 3" to 4" pots.

Put the container where it can get bright light, but no sun.

Cover the container with clear plastic, but don't let the plastic come in contact with the cuttings. I use thin bamboo stakes to keep the plastic off the cuttings.

Secure the plastic covering around the container with an elastic band or string

Every few days, remove the plastic and then replace it to give the cuttings fresh air

Rose cuttings take about 12 weeks before they can be removed - other cuttings could take more or less time.

You should not need to add much, if any, water during this time as the plastic will keep it from evaporating

I usually do this in late February early March. You will have to adjust to your own climate, but I have found doing so when winter is about to end is a good time.

I don't use rooting hormone

When I lived in South Florida, I "air-layered" lots of things. Everything there grows really fast!

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