Most popular garden flower?

Portage, WI(Zone 5a)

OK, around the yard, not just garden. Most commonly grown (is that the same as popular?) flower. Annual and perennial. Only annual I grow is Sunflower. Perennial - I have more Trumpet Flower vines than anything else. Tons of wild flowers but that is another thread.

Anderson, IN(Zone 6a)

Probably , and you could no doubt add iris, everybody that grows flowers has at least one iris growing around somewhere
And as for the other thread , you might just as well discuss that here, as here is where you are.

Portage, WI(Zone 5a)

Yes, I just added my 4th kind of Iris.

Anderson, IN(Zone 6a)

Gotcha!!! uh huh?

Anderson, IN(Zone 6a)

Well they ain't flowers but my melons are coming up as well bachelor buttons, zinnias ,african daisy, red salvia ,and more to come. Something keeps eating my sunflower sprouts and I'm not to happy with that.

And believe it or not, I didn't use to like annuals.

Portage, WI(Zone 5a)

Deer are the number reason that I can only grow sunflowers behind fences. They just love eating those little sprouts. Before I knew this, when I first moved in here, I remember buying a 50 lb bag and spreading seed around all over the place. Not a one came up. Now I know why.

Anderson, IN(Zone 6a)

Well the poor things are hungry!!

Anderson, IN(Zone 6a)

well here's a popular fellow or gal.;

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Hobart, IN

Hmmm - do you think day lilies would qualify for most popular? Or at least "most planted"? They're not at the top of my list but they are popular.

Portage, WI(Zone 5a)

Yes, Day Lilies would probably win for most grown,

Anderson, IN(Zone 6a)

I have three types of natural of four hybrids of those myself. "Ya say" is because they are easy to grow!

Hobart, IN

I don't have a lot of space to dedicate to all of the foliage that comes with daylilies. Still have 3 or 4 types but pulled out duplicates last year to make space for veggies this year.

Bardstown, KY(Zone 6a)

Ferns. Imagine that Cindy!

Hobart, IN

I do love the ferns. I have 3 large sections of ostrich ferns in the wilder sections of garden that came from a couple of plants that an elderly green-thumb neighbor gave me 25 years ago. Just added a parsley fern to my collection and am debating about succumbing to my desire for the arborvitae fern. I used to be crazy for Campanulas but ran into several that misbehave.
I still think the day lilies are most popular at least in my region just by the sheer number of 'Stella D'Oro' plants I see.

Portage, WI(Zone 5a)

So far I have no Lilies. Are they really easy to do? Do I need some?

Hobart, IN

To me, they're pretty easy to grow if you have some part sun/full sun and the room for all of that foliage. There are several reblooming types available that would provide some extra flowers later in the season. I'm no expert though so you might want to check out other forums. IMHO, the foliage can get rather ratty looking later in the season.

Anderson, IN(Zone 6a)

My wild daylillies turn brown after blooming, the noid hybrids stay looking fairly nice for the most after bloom. I am kinda happy that one that stays nice with the folaige after bloom I grew myself from seed. A lemon bloom.

Hobart, IN

When you say "wild daylilies", are you referring to the common "ditch" lilies?
I do have one that I really like - 'Double Cutie' - with lemon double flowers. And it doesn't take up too much space in my crowded sunny bed.

Anderson, IN(Zone 6a)

I'm referring to those orange guys you might see along roadsides,ditches. streams, etc. There are also the yellow types from somewhere else that naturalize and I have three or four of those.
I have a huge clump of orange wild I am getting to dig up and throw most likely,they are about 12 years old or so and not looking to good except for one runner shoot.Around another corner there must be 200 of them anyway.So anyway, I have a bunches of them!!

Anderson, IN(Zone 6a)

These guys ,background to the right.

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Portage, WI(Zone 5a)

Would Coneflower be in the running for most popular?

Anderson, IN(Zone 6a)

I've got bunches of purple and bought a 'milkshake' this morning. So many purple I might give a few away this fall.
Oh I almost forgot that's a cutleaf at that right of the pic, some of the folaige showing there.

They do have the forum only for them.could be!

Hobart, IN

gasrocks - I do agree that coneflowers are gaining in popularity, especially the newer varieties.

Anderson, IN(Zone 6a)

Just saying hi ya CindyMyzone; You might like to know I have one that grows real nice in the shade.Despite what intructions say,just saying.

Hobart, IN

Oooooo - what's the name of your coneflower? I do have some of the plain E. purpurea that can handle some shade. They grow in my "neglected" area since they don't get supplemental watering. Is your 'Milkshake' in bloom? That seems like it would be stunning with a dark or shady background.

Anderson, IN(Zone 6a)

CindyMyzone; Not yet with the mikshake, and the e.purpurea is what was mentioning about.That makes that rather anti-climactic,guess I was saying what you already knew.
It always seems to say full sun about growing them,there are some here that grow well in the sun,other that grew and grow towards part shade,and of course the one that grew in the shade.
I am betting the white will grow in the shade as it is white as well as purple blooming flowers seem to free seed to the shade.
The daylilly peach my hybrid. And keeping with the thread do you reconize the last pic?When I was a youngster these could have easily been.Every garden had them then.

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Anderson, IN(Zone 6a)

And even till answered ,as far hybridizing, well, O.K. So I'm a wanna be......

Hobart, IN

I like that peach color. How fun to develop your own hybrid. Is that last photo a hollyhock?

Anderson, IN(Zone 6a)

CindyMyzone5 Yes it sure is, one the wild french var. that Chaubauds are developed from.The peach is from Noid hybrids, the yellow I know the name of,only it escapes me at the moment.

I was thinking hollyhocks once may of been as they were as numerous as roses years ago.

Portage, WI(Zone 5a)

When I think of what my Grandmother had in her garden, Hollyhocks is the first thing that comes to mind.

Hobart, IN

Seems like we don't see hollyhocks so much anymore. I did try to grow them once from collected seed. They came back for the second year to bloom but they were heavily infested with some sort of bug - maybe a thrip of some sort? - and I was torn between keeping them until they finished blooming or pulling them out because the foliage was so ratty. I haven't tried them since. Maybe my site choice was weighted against them - hot and dry? Not so good.

Anderson, IN(Zone 6a)

CindyMyzone5 That is always a problem with hollyhocks ,ratty foliage, pretty blooms.I have a dwarf red hollyhock that blooms more rose or purple that has pretty foliage. Not much to look at overall though..

Hobart, IN

Sorry to say this so don't take offense but I'm glad to find out that it's not just my lack of expertise. :)

Anderson, IN(Zone 6a)

CindyMyzone5' There is not anything to be offended about and I keep restating what you have mentioned before.
That is really more the way I type than what I sometimes mean to say.I was really hoping you woudn't take any offense to that after I read it realizing it could be taken that way. I even remember or was thinking it was you talking about dwarf Hollyhocks some time ago. So all is well? We still get to convo about a plant in the garden from time to time?

Like the Coneflower I should of phrased the question different ,it just is one of those things.

Hobart, IN

I didn't take anything personally - just relieved that hollyhocks can be rather troublesome and that I could feel a little bit better as a gardener knowing that it wasn't entirely my fault that they didn't do well. Perhaps I was taking a little comfort in other gardeners' problems with this plant. All is well.

Minneapolis, MN

I love Hollyhocks! I too have had troubles with them though. At my old house I planted them all alongside the house. As mentioned, they came up and bloomed for a couple of seasons. I planted 2 years in a row to try to get some blooms each summer. But something does seem to love to eat their foliage and rather than having the show-stopping display I had envisioned, I ended up being pretty embarrassed of them as they looked so ragged. Now I've moved to a new house and I thought I would give hollyhocks a try. I got starter plants from the nursery, and one variety bloomed for me this summer. But again, something is feasting on the foliage. Unless I can figure out what is using them as their own personal buffet, I think I will plant something else next year.

I wonder if Hollyhocks have lost popularity not only because of the foliage issue, but also because they are BIG plants that don't stay put. Yards are smaller than they once were and I think for some people a big plant that reseeds itself semi randomly turns into a nuisance or at least more trouble than they are worth for many working parents and suburbanites.

Hobart, IN

I wish the foliage pests weren't such an issue because I think it would fun and unexpected to have a tall element with those dramatic flowers even in a smaller garden. Heck, I'd grow it again if that problem was resolved.

Portage, WI(Zone 5a)

Here I thought they had a spray for everything by now. What attacks the Hollyhocks?

Anderson, IN(Zone 6a)

Every Beetle in the insectopedia, to begin with!!

Hobart, IN

It's been years but I remember seeing bugs with long snouts. Doesn't help much, heh?

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