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Vegetable Gardening: Growing English peas in the fall 7b North Carolina garden

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Forum: Vegetable GardeningReplies: 9, Views: 57
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HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

May 31, 2012
9:10 AM

Post #9146126

I've tried to find info about growing peas in the fall here without success.

Has any DG member grown English peas in the fall in zone 7b?

Thanks.
cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 31, 2012
11:43 AM

Post #9146317

I'm of no help, Honeybee. Just jumping on the thread to see what suggestions you get :0) Even tho, I think our 7b's are much different from each others.
My plan so far is to find the the shortest DTM variety and sow the first cool day of fall, around here that's usually Mid-September.
Eager to hear what others have to say.

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

May 31, 2012
12:04 PM

Post #9146345

I have. The short season snap peas produce for me and do well while the longer season shelling peas never even set fruit although the vines are vigorous and healthy. I think they just need more time than we get in the fall.

It's been a long time since I've spent any time in Charlotte -- I want to say your evenings get a little cooler than ours in the fall? If so, peas will probably do even better for you than they do here.

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

May 31, 2012
12:06 PM

Post #9146351

P.S. - Sugar Sprint and Amish Snap Peas are what produce for me in the fall. Of the two, I've decided I prefer the Amish Snap for overall taste, plant vigor, pest resistance and productivity, but the Sugar Sprints are *tiny* vines which produce almost as much fruit so they are probably a winner for containers and small spaces.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 1, 2012
7:06 AM

Post #9147454

NicoleC - I grew "Sugar Sprint" this spring. They did well, but I was not impressed with the flavor. One row has finished, and there are just a few left on the second row.

I looked-up "Amish Snap" and they appear to be a tall variety? Where did you purchase your seeds?

We usually get our first frost around mid-October. I'm hoping that with "climate change" it might hold off a bit longer this year so I can get in a nice crop of peas.

Thanks for the info ^_^
terri_emory
Alba, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 1, 2012
7:49 AM

Post #9147522

I have not tried it yet, but am going to this fall. I have a number of "English" pea packets I got from various places, many of they Italian heirlooms. I got fairly good results from a couple this spring but want a better harvest. So I am going to try again this fall. I was thinking I would try starting a row in September maybe. And just keep planting out every two weeks until I run out of peas. Nothing scientific, just using up what I have. I'm not the most experienced veggie gardener but I had good results when I lived up north so I want to be able to grow some variety of English pea here in Texas.

I guess we'll be experimenting together?

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 1, 2012
8:11 AM

Post #9147561

terri_emory - [quote]I guess we'll be experimenting together?[/quote]

I love gardening experiments. I have one going on at the moment with tomatoes growing in nothing but fall leaves - they are actually starting to flower!
terri_emory
Alba, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 1, 2012
8:44 AM

Post #9147599

Oh, I would think the tomatoes growing in the fall leaves would work! I used to get Sungold volunteers growing in my old compost bin slot where I would just throw all the fall leaves when I lived up north. That sounds like fun...

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 1, 2012
10:47 AM

Post #9147741

HB - I agree; Sugar Sprint to me were very sweet without much actual taste. The Amish Snap were not as sweet (although still fairly sweet) but had a nice fresh pea taste.

I got mine from Seed Savers Exchange but I see them available on other sites. Compared to the description on the SSE site, most of my pods were closer to 3" than 2" and matured in 55-60 days. (They beat the Sugar Sprint by a few days.)
http://www.seedsavers.org/Details.aspx?itemNo=939

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 2, 2012
8:53 AM

Post #9148927

Thanks, Nicole.

I will order some seed of Amish Snap from Seed Savers Exchange.

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