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Canning, Freezing and Drying: Freezing Green Beans

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stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 31, 2012
4:21 PM

Post #9146709

Can I just rinse, dry, and snap my green beans and then freeze them? Do they need to be blanched first? The last time I did that they turned soggy.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

June 2, 2012
3:41 PM

Post #9149463

I don't blanch mine. I freeze them on a tray, separated so they don't touch, then vac seal in meal amounts.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

June 2, 2012
4:00 PM

Post #9149473

I don't even freeze mine on a tray first; I just ease them into a pint Ziploc bag, put them in the freezer, et voilà. A friend mentioned that she didn't blanch hers, so I tried it, and truly I couldn't tell the difference. Then I got a book on saving time whilst preparing food for storage, and she mentioned that beans didn't need blanching, too.

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 2, 2012
5:24 PM

Post #9149553

Thanks so much!! If I can just toss them in the freezer bag, I'm good to go!

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

June 3, 2012
3:36 AM

Post #9149931

Yes, you can. I always trim them neatly to fit into the bag and then pack 'em in there. Older beans are good sautéed for a longer time with olive oil and garlic, or drippings from pork, and perhaps an onion. I sometimes let my Fortex beans get away from me, but they're still nice that way. In fact I'd love to find more recipes for them because I overstocked last summer and still have some from last year that I have to use up.

beebonnet

beebonnet
Coos Bay, OR
(Zone 9a)

June 26, 2012
3:16 PM

Post #9182371

The other night I sauteed some frozen green beans with garlic and onion. At the end added a few splashes of balsamic vinegar. Continued cooking a bit and served. They were very tasty. I usually can all of my beans, but these were late and too few to bother so I froze them. This year I will freeze more because they were way better than I thought they would be. I hate store bought frozen green beans. Just goes to show you...
Now you say I don't even have to blanch them. Now, That's for me. Love simple.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 7, 2012
6:31 PM

Post #9197148

I found the experimental bags of beans I prepared last year - I vacuum sealed two batches of green beans on July 22, 2011. One was blanched and the other just cut. I think the texture of the blanched beans was a bit better but really not a big difference. It just doesn't seem right that it'd be unnecessary but this experiment seems to prove its not. Unless you are really fussy.

Tam
ilovetigger
Belleville, MI

July 7, 2012
8:50 PM

Post #9197304

Stir fry them with onion, butter, garlic, and asparagus. My families FAVORITE.

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 9, 2012
11:55 AM

Post #9199213

Love em with almond / butter flavors and with or without sesame seeds- no, can't find my recipes- too far from home, chuckl.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

July 9, 2012
11:58 AM

Post #9199218

The advantage of blanching even briefly is to kill surface bacteria which can survive freezing.

If the beans have come from my garden and not been in contact with the dirt, I don't bother... but I wouldn't trust beans from a store, etc.

This message was edited Jul 9, 2012 2:00 PM
Qwilter
Fleming Island, FL
(Zone 9a)

May 23, 2013
6:49 AM

Post #9530915

Well it is green bean season in FL and I've been gifted a bushel. I've been debating blanching (which Mom always did) over the "just washing then freezing. Since I like the simple route, that is what I plan on doing. I have 1 of nifty zip sealer gizmos so may as well use it.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

May 23, 2013
8:24 AM

Post #9531018

Nice to be gifted with beans! Enjoy!
jomoncon
New Orleans, LA
(Zone 9a)

May 26, 2013
5:35 AM

Post #9534244

I've been going crazy blanching & freezing the beans from my garden. Good to know I can skip the blanching part.
Jo-Ann
Qwilter
Fleming Island, FL
(Zone 9a)

May 26, 2013
6:11 AM

Post #9534281

I got over 40 c. in the freezer. Took me 3 hrs to trim the ends & cut them into pieces. The bagging & sealing was the easy part. I left some out to cook but have been tossing them raw into salads!!! YUM!!!!

lanakila

lanakila
Holly Springs, NC
(Zone 7b)

May 26, 2013
7:46 AM

Post #9534426

I'll admit; if it weren't for my feeding someone with an autoimmune disorder, I wouldn't bother but I blanch mine. You never know what has splashed up from the soil during watering or rain, or carried in by bugs, bees, and butterflies. It's really about contamination, not flavor or texture.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

May 26, 2013
10:55 AM

Post #9534613

I always cook my beans before I serve them anyway, so I'm not concerned about that. And of course anything that makes saving the harvest easier is good in my book!

Frozen green beans don't lend themselves to the kind of al dente treatment that fresh ones do, so I always sauté them for a while in olive oil or barbecue drippings, often with garlic and onions, and they're great like that.

beebonnet

beebonnet
Coos Bay, OR
(Zone 9a)

May 28, 2013
8:25 AM

Post #9536856

This was a great reminder of what I will do with my beans this year. (or not do) Thanks for starting up this thread again.

lavender4ever

lavender4ever
(Louise) Highland, MI
(Zone 5b)

October 16, 2013
8:26 PM

Post #9687705

I just prefer to blanch my beans, I think the texture is better. I vacuum sealed ten pounds from two pole bean tepees this year. I also gave away about ten more!

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

January 6, 2014
2:05 PM

Post #9741843

I'm finding my greenbeans are a bit stringy from the freezer - blanched or not. Are there any ideas for varieties that might be best to freeze?

Tam

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 6, 2014
3:33 PM

Post #9741896

Pick them a bit young or just ripe, not too old. I have successfully frozen Blue Lake pole beans, Royal Burgundy bush, and Contender.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

January 6, 2014
4:29 PM

Post #9741931

My frozen beans are never in a state to be sautéed lightly with butter and almonds or to be given the other sorts of treatments I'd use for small fresh ones. I usually cook mine a fairly long time with olive oil and garlic, or with bits of green pepper and onions, or using fat and juices from a pork roast or spare ribs. I caramelize them a little and they're delicious that way.
Qwilter
Fleming Island, FL
(Zone 9a)

January 7, 2014
3:27 AM

Post #9742205

I toss the bag & all(from the freezer) into a pot of water & boil for ~20 min. They come out very tender. Once boiled, they can be cooked any way you like.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

January 7, 2014
6:48 AM

Post #9742322

I wouldn't boil in plastic freezer bags. You don't know what's migrating from the bag to your food, especially after being exposed to that much heat. Just sayin'...
Qwilter
Fleming Island, FL
(Zone 9a)

January 7, 2014
7:04 AM

Post #9742345

These are "boil-in-bags" so safe for the heat. Not the zip loc bags.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

January 7, 2014
8:32 AM

Post #9742402

Aha. Personally I still wouldn't use them because I don't trust plastic, but at least they're made for that purpose!
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

January 9, 2014
6:59 PM

Post #9744259

I agree with GG, I don't let anything with plastic and heat touch my food. What is labeled "safe" and what is proven safe down the line are two different things. There are plastics that were once deemed food safe that have since been removed from the market. "Microwave safe" or "boiling safe" attests to the product's ability to hold up to heat. The bottom line is we are not really sure what the long range effects of heating food in plastic are. We think it might be okay according to what we know, and it very well may be the case, but we are not positive. There is evidence that there might be problems and there is evidence that refutes that. I think it'sjust as easy to use a sheet of waxed paper in the microwave or cook in the pot. I have switched from non-stick teflon to ceramic.
Qwilter
Fleming Island, FL
(Zone 9a)

January 10, 2014
4:46 AM

Post #9744409

Laurel - so good to hear from you. I usually dump them into the steamer but decided trying the bag in the water.
My philosophy is that "something is gonna get you no matter what you do". Chemicals in some of the water probably just as bad as what may be in the plastic.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

January 10, 2014
11:11 AM

Post #9744626

Good to see you too. Something is for sure going to get us someday. :) It's nice to have a little control over the variables. The jury is still out on plastics. There's no avoiding them even if you wanted to. They are everywhere.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

January 10, 2014
1:07 PM

Post #9744740

I bought a few different types - Emerite pole beans & what PineTree Seeds calls "Stringless Green Pod Bean" that's apparently an heirloom.

I'm always amazed at what is a legal food additive (yes, many plastics are on the FDA approved list of food additives). I try to avoid plastics as much as possible. I do use plastic to freeze in (always loading w/cool food) but store in glass & cook in stainless steel or enamel coated cast iron whenever possible. And of course so much of our supermarket produce & meats are packaged with a tight wrap of plastic. I love my garden & farmers market but I do also buy from the grocery store.

Yep - just only so much you can control!

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

January 14, 2014
9:39 AM

Post #9747668

The green beans I froze last summer have been a disappointment, very tough. I only planted 2 kinds, Kentucky Wonder and an obscure heirloom but I didn't mark them so I don't know what I froze.

I still have several pints of Ky Wonders I put up 2 years ago and they are better than what I froze last year.

Don't get me on a rant about plastics. I can't even open tubes of Ritz crackers without scissors because of the plastic. I should learn to make my own crackers.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

January 14, 2014
10:01 AM

Post #9747684

lol @ Dariu about the crackers. I am trying to develop a stoic's approach to all things, including people. It saves a lot wear and tear on scissors. :)

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

January 14, 2014
12:41 PM

Post #9747801

That's disappointing about your beans, Darius! I wonder why they didn't freeze well. Obviously it's not the variety if Kentucky Wonders did well for you a couple of years ago.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

January 14, 2014
12:55 PM

Post #9747813

Leslie, there are so many factors other than variety... maybe I left them too long on the vine, didn't blanch them, let them cool too much before putting in vacuum bag... who knows?

lavender4ever

lavender4ever
(Louise) Highland, MI
(Zone 5b)

January 26, 2014
5:29 PM

Post #9756213

I do not like Kentucky wonder for green beans, they always get stringy. I do like Kentucky blue, the blue lake Kentucky wonder cross. There are many that do not have strings. The purple pole beans and the Italian Santa Anna both are very stringless, with the purple staying tender at large size .

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