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radish failure

White Plains, NY(Zone 6b)

My radishes had big healthy leaves. But when I pulled them up after 6 weeks, no radish, only a long tap root.

I think this may be an excess nitrogen problem, but I don't know. When I prepared the bed (new) I added composted humus to the soil. I added nothing else. I saw no sign of insects although I read that cutworms can destroy radishes.

Anyone have this problem? How do I fix it for the fall planting?

Broward County, FL(Zone 10b)

Maybe you could plant something now which uses extra nitrogen, tomatoes, cukes for example and then try your radishes in the fall without adding extra humus before.

Charlotte, NC(Zone 7b)

dervish2 - which kind of radish did you sow? Some are round and some are tapered.

White Plains, NY(Zone 6b)

Birke -- Have you ever heard of this before? Does it sound like it is a nitrogen problem? Now I have to find some recipes for radish greens. they are mildly spicy.

HoneybeeNC - they were round, an heirloom variety, I forget which one. They were not icicle radishes - too skinny.

If it is a surplus of Nitrogen, I guess my tomatoes and cukes nearby should do well, but my beets and carrots are probably doomed too.

Augusta, GA(Zone 8a)

One other possibility, since it was a very hot spring. Radishes don't bulb up when the soil gets too warm.

Everett, WA(Zone 8a)

I planted a Daikon radish (Minowase hybrid, white and carrot-shaped). The above-ground part had stalks 3-4 feet tall, loads of leaves and flowers and produced lots of seeds. (Too bad it was a hybrid!) The root was supposed to be up to 16" long and 1.75 pounds ...

The root was actually more like 1" of a thin wooden pencil and trailed a hair-thin root another 6-8". This was in the best-amended soil I had at the time (still fairly heavy clay.)

Someone told me that was a "summer radish" and wanted more heat plus a long season, even though the catalog said "52 days" and it was in the ground at least 2, maybe 3 months.

Maybe yours will be the opposite and prefer the cold to the heat.
Did you expect a red ball?

Virginia Beach, VA

My radishes did the same thing. i sowed several and very few had bulbs. Farmerdill is right too hot.

Belle

Augusta, GA(Zone 8a)

Minowase is a winter type radish. does not do well spring planted. Here I plant them in September for harvest around Thanksgiving. They will hold in the ground until they start bolting in February. http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/77406/

White Plains, NY(Zone 6b)

Farmerdill -

thank you. I think you may be right.

Everett, WA(Zone 8a)

>> Minowase is a winter type radish. does not do well spring planted.

That would explain it.

I do have some that either reseeded or overwintered ... from the size, I assume re-seeded. However, even thoguih they proabably fell to ground last fall, they came up and bolted this spring as if they had been sown before the last frost. I don't think I've ever seen the above ground parts NOT go right into flowering.

I may try them again this fall. I have a lot of seed from last year. Interesting, I see that Kitazawa sells a hybrid strain, and Hazzards had an OP strain. Fortunately, I bought from Hazards!

Efland, NC(Zone 7a)

"I think this may be an excess nitrogen problem, but I don't know. When I prepared the bed (new) I added composted humus to the soil."

Remember, Folks, humus really has no (or very little) nutritive value. I seriously doubt you have an excess of N if all you added to your soil was composted humus, dervish.

As for getting root crops, including radish, to bulb up you may want to focus more on phosphorus and potassium. And yep, as Farmerdill pointed out radishes don't tend to bulb when it is hot weather so best to sow them in late winter so they mature in early summer or sow late summer for maturing in the cooler months of fall.

I bought seeds of "Red Meat" radish several years ago because it was supposedly a "summer radish". I had no luck with it at all here in NC. It turns out it was later touted to be sown in late summer for fall harvest. My bad! :>)

Shoe (radish lover!)

Augusta, GA(Zone 8a)

Hey Shoe. I call it the watermelon radish, but I have grown in late winter early spring. Bulbs up when sown in January but does not hold at all. Really fine winter radish tho. http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/68333/

Efland, NC(Zone 7a)

Thanks!~

I still have some seeds so will give it another try.

Hope all is well down your way. Wishing you a bumper crop of all things this year!

Shoe

Liberty Hill, TX(Zone 8a)

I just read that some radishes need to be sown when the days are getting shorter, in order to mature correctly. So they need to be sown after the summer solstice . This is coming from some one who cannot grow radishes tho.


I was just looking at a catalog that had 4 different color radishes that matured in less then a month, they are all different colors. I thought they would be so pretty and I could mess them I up in less then 30 days lol! I also have some seeds for those watermelon radishes.

This message was edited Jun 5, 2012 12:24 PM

White Plains, NY(Zone 6b)

I thought I was the only one who could not get radishes to grow. I thought they were the easy crop.

Everett, WA(Zone 8a)

Some radishes must be easy. I succeeded the first time I threw some French Breakfast radish seeds into some heavy clay soil (very early, cool spring, and I kept them moist). Pinetree also said they could have been sown in late summer, but I didn 't try that.

What I appreciated most was that they were the very first edible thing that came up.

Efland, NC(Zone 7a)

I think I still prefer "Cherry Bell" radish above all others. They come on very fast, fill out nicely, hold their flavor long and don't get overly-spicy for a long time. Other radish I've grown seem to go from bulb to hot fairly fast.

I liked reading Terry's entry on the watermelon radish (Thanks for including the link, F-dill). What a great idea to use radish for something more than just nibbling on and/or in salads.

Shoe (off to set out some more dwarf tomato plants before our expected rain. Yay! Rain!)

Augusta, GA(Zone 8a)

Glad somebody is getting rain, all we are getting is light dry weather showers from time to time. By the way shoe, winter radishes, watermelon in particular have delicious greens. delicious cooked like turnips with chucks of radish mixed with the greens. None of them are really good garden salad radishes, use the European radishes for that. http://www.yummly.com/recipes/asian-radish http://www.epicurious.com/tools/searchresults?search=+winter+radish http://www.recipetips.com/kitchen-tips/t--827/all-about-radishes.asp

Liberty Hill, TX(Zone 8a)

I grew the Black Spanish radish a couple of years. Man, were they hot. Way too spicy for me!

Shoe-glad to see you posting again. I'm jealous that your getting rain and it's cool enough for you to work in the garden. I'm impatiently waiting for the humidity to go down so the heat index will drop too. Guess I'll have to do housework.

Efland, NC(Zone 7a)

HOwdy, Lisa....

Yeh...have been exceptionally busy here with the greenhouse, market, landscaping, and finally got to work on my own gardens again! I'm fine but sure am tired all the time! :>)

Nice recipe links, F-dill. I had to save the Pickled Daikon/Radish recipe! I love things like that. Guess I better get prepared for growing more daikons.

Shoe

Liberty Hill, TX(Zone 8a)

Wonder how those radishes would be in Kimchi?

Efland, NC(Zone 7a)

*thunk....

I LOVE kimchi! You just stole my heart! :>)

I better go prepare a fall radish bed.

Later!

Virginia Beach, VA

I make my own kimchi, love it too!!
Belle

Liberty Hill, TX(Zone 8a)

I've made my own Kimchi too. My Aunt is Korean, after making it I don't think we had any bugs in the house for 3-4 years. Yes, it does remove paint lol so it has many uses. My mom and I would buy a huge jar and have it half eaten by the time we got it home.

Efland, NC(Zone 7a)

Maybe ya'll could post your kimchi recipes, eh? I've made it quite often, often making minor changes here and there to get it "just perfect".

Although I usually use cabbage I once bought some radish (or daikon) kimchi from the Oriental store, very crunchy and tasty.

We had rain yesterday/last night. Our nights are still very cool here (kind of rare) so sitting here wishing I had radish in the ground now. I'm sure they'd still be putting out pretty good.

Shoe

Liberty Hill, TX(Zone 8a)

I don't have a recipe, I can't remember how we did it. I just remember we used cabbage and the house house did STINK! I have eaten the radish kimchi many times, but never made it.


If I can get her recipe I'll let you know. ANYTHING, for you Shoe. : )

Efland, NC(Zone 7a)

Hah! You flirt! *grin.....

Well, I've made the cabbage kimchi but it didn't stink up the place. The "real" kimchi is normally fermented for quite a while and I understand it stinks to high heaven. I just let mine "cure" for a day or so on the counter then keep it in the fridge.

Belle, do you have any tips for kimchi making? We keep talking about this, and radishes, I may end up going to the store and buying some radish.

Dervish, sorry to have gone off topic but maybe one day you'll be growing so many radishes you'll want some recipes, eh?

Shoe

Orofino, ID(Zone 6a)

Lovely thread.....I had the same problem with radish, watermelon no less, lots of leaves & tall bolt stems....I also put compost straight on them just as they were coming up.....some did get small fruit on them but it was woody and very strong.....I also am a worshipper of KimChi and would offer money to get a successful recipe.....and Shoe, I always look for your input, trust your knowledge & posts completely....enjoy this continuous rain if you live anywhere near my area of the US.....

Efland, NC(Zone 7a)

"and Shoe, I always look for your input, trust your knowledge & posts completely...enjoy this continuous rain if you live anywhere near my area of the US..."

Howdy, Depsi. Nice to hear from you.
And thanks for your compliment, that goes a long way in this day and age. I'm grateful.

As for the rain, just bits and pieces of it right now but looking forward to more! My beans and corn are calling out. And I'd love to live closer to ya'll...don't you have the best soil in the country up your way?

As for Kimchi, I'll look up the recipes I've done (or made up) and share w/ya!

Best to you and yours.
Shoe

Liberty Hill, TX(Zone 8a)

I just called my cousin in CA. she said she'd ask her mom about her Kimchi recipe. I told her I need a little more info then "some" and a little bit, as far as measurements go. Lol I will email her tomorrow. My aunt is Korean so it should be pretty authentic. When she was in Korea they use to bury it in the ground to let it ferment.

Donations will be accepted. Lol

Shawnee Mission, KS(Zone 6a)

Burying the Kimchi probably keeps the fermenting smell down.

Same here on the radishes. We have more problem with the radishes not bulbing as the weather gets hotter. I do use a shade cloth occasionally when it gets hot but have not tried it on the radishes to see if that helps.

Spring was three weeks earlier for us this year. Generally we plant radishes mid-March through mid-April in the spring. We'll start planting mid-August through mid-September for fall harvest.

I have on occasion let some of the radishes go to seed and used the seed pods eat raw or to cook in stir-fries. Some of the local farmers have been selling the pods to the restaurants. I am trying the rattail radish this year so will see what it's like.

Orofino, ID(Zone 6a)

rattail radish, now that's one I've never heard of before.....sounds interesting...

Shawnee Mission, KS(Zone 6a)

It is grown for the seed pods. http://www.seedsavers.org/Details.aspx?itemNo=654

Orofino, ID(Zone 6a)

Wow, thank you...we love greens and anything fresh like that in the garden!.....

Shawnee Mission, KS(Zone 6a)

You are welcome. We planted it around the time the radishes went in (March). I just started picking them this week. BTW - It doesn't take a lot of plants to get a lot of pods.

Efland, NC(Zone 7a)

Be careful, Susan. I ate those seed pods a few years ago. Loved 'em! Delish! Unfortunately they tend to act like psyllium seed and sure kept me runnin' a while! :>)

I recommend eating them in small quantities, not pigging out on them like I did.

Shoe

Shawnee Mission, KS(Zone 6a)

No worries. I like munching but not in large quanities. No problem last year with the regular radish pods. Do you think it's an issue with just the rat tail variety?

Everett, WA(Zone 8a)

I tried some Daikon radish seed pods, and they ARE good! Thanks for the tip. Now I know what to do with all the Daikon raidish seed I saved last fall (Minowase, and the vendor said "OP").

Like a mild radish, but a little "greener". These were small, some looked like a pea pod with only one pea.

These must have re-seeded last fall, and came up this spring under some plastic I had laid down to keep some of the rain off. I was about to throw them all on the compost heap, but I remembered your suggestion and saved a few handsfull. Now I just have to figure out how big the dangerous dose is .

Magnolia, TX(Zone 8b)

Ummm, I didn't make radishes on the plants planted either, but left for the pretty flowers- I was always taught that Nitrogen builds tops, iron builds roots- if the plant doesn't have iron it needs it won't grow. Any ideas on how the iron in your beds is?

Efland, NC(Zone 7a)

"Ummm, I didn't make radishes on the plants planted either, but left for the pretty flowers- I was always taught that Nitrogen builds tops, iron builds roots-"

Actually, kittriana, it is phosphorus that plays an important role in root growth (as well as flower production). Iron plays little role in root production. I think you have mistaken "iron" for "phosphorus" especially concerning radish production since the radish part we eat is the "root" ( so to speak).

Most soils have ample iron. Many soils have ample phosphorus but if either of the two are lacking I'd go with phosphorus.

Shoe

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