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Beginner Vegetables: radish failure

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dervish2
White Plains, NY
(Zone 6b)

May 31, 2012
8:38 PM

Post #9147090

My radishes had big healthy leaves. But when I pulled them up after 6 weeks, no radish, only a long tap root.

I think this may be an excess nitrogen problem, but I don't know. When I prepared the bed (new) I added composted humus to the soil. I added nothing else. I saw no sign of insects although I read that cutworms can destroy radishes.

Anyone have this problem? How do I fix it for the fall planting?

birke
Broward County, FL
(Zone 10b)

June 1, 2012
8:00 AM

Post #9147546

Maybe you could plant something now which uses extra nitrogen, tomatoes, cukes for example and then try your radishes in the fall without adding extra humus before.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 1, 2012
8:20 AM

Post #9147570

dervish2 - which kind of radish did you sow? Some are round and some are tapered.
dervish2
White Plains, NY
(Zone 6b)

June 1, 2012
2:12 PM

Post #9147996

Birke -- Have you ever heard of this before? Does it sound like it is a nitrogen problem? Now I have to find some recipes for radish greens. they are mildly spicy.

HoneybeeNC - they were round, an heirloom variety, I forget which one. They were not icicle radishes - too skinny.

If it is a surplus of Nitrogen, I guess my tomatoes and cukes nearby should do well, but my beets and carrots are probably doomed too.
Farmerdill
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)


June 1, 2012
4:14 PM

Post #9148203

One other possibility, since it was a very hot spring. Radishes don't bulb up when the soil gets too warm.

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

June 1, 2012
6:53 PM

Post #9148397

I planted a Daikon radish (Minowase hybrid, white and carrot-shaped). The above-ground part had stalks 3-4 feet tall, loads of leaves and flowers and produced lots of seeds. (Too bad it was a hybrid!) The root was supposed to be up to 16" long and 1.75 pounds ...

The root was actually more like 1" of a thin wooden pencil and trailed a hair-thin root another 6-8". This was in the best-amended soil I had at the time (still fairly heavy clay.)

Someone told me that was a "summer radish" and wanted more heat plus a long season, even though the catalog said "52 days" and it was in the ground at least 2, maybe 3 months.

Maybe yours will be the opposite and prefer the cold to the heat.
Did you expect a red ball?
bellieg
Virginia Beach, VA

June 1, 2012
6:57 PM

Post #9148401

My radishes did the same thing. i sowed several and very few had bulbs. Farmerdill is right too hot.

Belle
Farmerdill
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)


June 2, 2012
5:11 AM

Post #9148645

Minowase is a winter type radish. does not do well spring planted. Here I plant them in September for harvest around Thanksgiving. They will hold in the ground until they start bolting in February. http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/77406/
dervish2
White Plains, NY
(Zone 6b)

June 2, 2012
6:43 AM

Post #9148763

Farmerdill -

thank you. I think you may be right.

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

June 4, 2012
12:03 PM

Post #9151829

>> Minowase is a winter type radish. does not do well spring planted.

That would explain it.

I do have some that either reseeded or overwintered ... from the size, I assume re-seeded. However, even thoguih they proabably fell to ground last fall, they came up and bolted this spring as if they had been sown before the last frost. I don't think I've ever seen the above ground parts NOT go right into flowering.

I may try them again this fall. I have a lot of seed from last year. Interesting, I see that Kitazawa sells a hybrid strain, and Hazzards had an OP strain. Fortunately, I bought from Hazards!
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

June 4, 2012
1:39 PM

Post #9152022

"I think this may be an excess nitrogen problem, but I don't know. When I prepared the bed (new) I added composted humus to the soil."

Remember, Folks, humus really has no (or very little) nutritive value. I seriously doubt you have an excess of N if all you added to your soil was composted humus, dervish.

As for getting root crops, including radish, to bulb up you may want to focus more on phosphorus and potassium. And yep, as Farmerdill pointed out radishes don't tend to bulb when it is hot weather so best to sow them in late winter so they mature in early summer or sow late summer for maturing in the cooler months of fall.

I bought seeds of "Red Meat" radish several years ago because it was supposedly a "summer radish". I had no luck with it at all here in NC. It turns out it was later touted to be sown in late summer for fall harvest. My bad! :>)

Shoe (radish lover!)
Farmerdill
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)


June 4, 2012
3:27 PM

Post #9152171

Hey Shoe. I call it the watermelon radish, but I have grown in late winter early spring. Bulbs up when sown in January but does not hold at all. Really fine winter radish tho. http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/68333/

Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

June 4, 2012
4:33 PM

Post #9152326

Thanks!~

I still have some seeds so will give it another try.

Hope all is well down your way. Wishing you a bumper crop of all things this year!

Shoe
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 4, 2012
8:23 PM

Post #9152683

I just read that some radishes need to be sown when the days are getting shorter, in order to mature correctly. So they need to be sown after the summer solstice . This is coming from some one who cannot grow radishes tho.


I was just looking at a catalog that had 4 different color radishes that matured in less then a month, they are all different colors. I thought they would be so pretty and I could mess them I up in less then 30 days lol! I also have some seeds for those watermelon radishes.

This message was edited Jun 5, 2012 12:24 PM
dervish2
White Plains, NY
(Zone 6b)

June 5, 2012
8:59 AM

Post #9153147

I thought I was the only one who could not get radishes to grow. I thought they were the easy crop.

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

June 5, 2012
11:02 AM

Post #9153274

Some radishes must be easy. I succeeded the first time I threw some French Breakfast radish seeds into some heavy clay soil (very early, cool spring, and I kept them moist). Pinetree also said they could have been sown in late summer, but I didn 't try that.

What I appreciated most was that they were the very first edible thing that came up.

Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

June 5, 2012
12:00 PM

Post #9153343

I think I still prefer "Cherry Bell" radish above all others. They come on very fast, fill out nicely, hold their flavor long and don't get overly-spicy for a long time. Other radish I've grown seem to go from bulb to hot fairly fast.

I liked reading Terry's entry on the watermelon radish (Thanks for including the link, F-dill). What a great idea to use radish for something more than just nibbling on and/or in salads.

Shoe (off to set out some more dwarf tomato plants before our expected rain. Yay! Rain!)
Farmerdill
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)


June 5, 2012
12:18 PM

Post #9153358

Glad somebody is getting rain, all we are getting is light dry weather showers from time to time. By the way shoe, winter radishes, watermelon in particular have delicious greens. delicious cooked like turnips with chucks of radish mixed with the greens. None of them are really good garden salad radishes, use the European radishes for that. http://www.yummly.com/recipes/asian-radish http://www.epicurious.com/tools/searchresults?search= winter radish http://www.recipetips.com/kitchen-tips/t--827/all-about-radishes.asp
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 5, 2012
12:29 PM

Post #9153365

I grew the Black Spanish radish a couple of years. Man, were they hot. Way too spicy for me!

Shoe-glad to see you posting again. I'm jealous that your getting rain and it's cool enough for you to work in the garden. I'm impatiently waiting for the humidity to go down so the heat index will drop too. Guess I'll have to do housework.
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

June 5, 2012
1:40 PM

Post #9153441

HOwdy, Lisa...

Yeh...have been exceptionally busy here with the greenhouse, market, landscaping, and finally got to work on my own gardens again! I'm fine but sure am tired all the time! :>)

Nice recipe links, F-dill. I had to save the Pickled Daikon/Radish recipe! I love things like that. Guess I better get prepared for growing more daikons.

Shoe
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 5, 2012
1:51 PM

Post #9153465

Wonder how those radishes would be in Kimchi?
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

June 5, 2012
2:28 PM

Post #9153530

*thunk...

I LOVE kimchi! You just stole my heart! :>)

I better go prepare a fall radish bed.

Later!
bellieg
Virginia Beach, VA

June 5, 2012
4:14 PM

Post #9153660

I make my own kimchi, love it too!!
Belle
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 5, 2012
8:53 PM

Post #9154078

I've made my own Kimchi too. My Aunt is Korean, after making it I don't think we had any bugs in the house for 3-4 years. Yes, it does remove paint lol so it has many uses. My mom and I would buy a huge jar and have it half eaten by the time we got it home.
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

June 6, 2012
7:04 AM

Post #9154384

Maybe ya'll could post your kimchi recipes, eh? I've made it quite often, often making minor changes here and there to get it "just perfect".

Although I usually use cabbage I once bought some radish (or daikon) kimchi from the Oriental store, very crunchy and tasty.

We had rain yesterday/last night. Our nights are still very cool here (kind of rare) so sitting here wishing I had radish in the ground now. I'm sure they'd still be putting out pretty good.

Shoe
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 6, 2012
9:22 AM

Post #9154549

I don't have a recipe, I can't remember how we did it. I just remember we used cabbage and the house house did STINK! I have eaten the radish kimchi many times, but never made it.


If I can get her recipe I'll let you know. ANYTHING, for you Shoe. : )
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

June 6, 2012
11:56 AM

Post #9154726

Hah! You flirt! *grin...

Well, I've made the cabbage kimchi but it didn't stink up the place. The "real" kimchi is normally fermented for quite a while and I understand it stinks to high heaven. I just let mine "cure" for a day or so on the counter then keep it in the fridge.

Belle, do you have any tips for kimchi making? We keep talking about this, and radishes, I may end up going to the store and buying some radish.

Dervish, sorry to have gone off topic but maybe one day you'll be growing so many radishes you'll want some recipes, eh?

Shoe

Depsi

Depsi
Orofino, ID
(Zone 6a)

June 10, 2012
3:18 PM

Post #9159550

Lovely thread...I had the same problem with radish, watermelon no less, lots of leaves & tall bolt stems...I also put compost straight on them just as they were coming up...some did get small fruit on them but it was woody and very strong...I also am a worshipper of KimChi and would offer money to get a successful recipe...and Shoe, I always look for your input, trust your knowledge & posts completely...enjoy this continuous rain if you live anywhere near my area of the US...
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

June 10, 2012
6:45 PM

Post #9159789

"and Shoe, I always look for your input, trust your knowledge & posts completely...enjoy this continuous rain if you live anywhere near my area of the US..."

Howdy, Depsi. Nice to hear from you.
And thanks for your compliment, that goes a long way in this day and age. I'm grateful.

As for the rain, just bits and pieces of it right now but looking forward to more! My beans and corn are calling out. And I'd love to live closer to ya'll...don't you have the best soil in the country up your way?

As for Kimchi, I'll look up the recipes I've done (or made up) and share w/ya!

Best to you and yours.
Shoe
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 11, 2012
12:20 AM

Post #9160022

I just called my cousin in CA. she said she'd ask her mom about her Kimchi recipe. I told her I need a little more info then "some" and a little bit, as far as measurements go. Lol I will email her tomorrow. My aunt is Korean so it should be pretty authentic. When she was in Korea they use to bury it in the ground to let it ferment.

Donations will be accepted. Lol
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

June 11, 2012
4:02 AM

Post #9160102

Burying the Kimchi probably keeps the fermenting smell down.

Same here on the radishes. We have more problem with the radishes not bulbing as the weather gets hotter. I do use a shade cloth occasionally when it gets hot but have not tried it on the radishes to see if that helps.

Spring was three weeks earlier for us this year. Generally we plant radishes mid-March through mid-April in the spring. We'll start planting mid-August through mid-September for fall harvest.

I have on occasion let some of the radishes go to seed and used the seed pods eat raw or to cook in stir-fries. Some of the local farmers have been selling the pods to the restaurants. I am trying the rattail radish this year so will see what it's like.

Depsi

Depsi
Orofino, ID
(Zone 6a)

June 14, 2012
1:08 PM

Post #9165088

rattail radish, now that's one I've never heard of before...sounds interesting...
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

June 14, 2012
1:09 PM

Post #9165091

It is grown for the seed pods. http://www.seedsavers.org/Details.aspx?itemNo=654

Depsi

Depsi
Orofino, ID
(Zone 6a)

June 14, 2012
1:46 PM

Post #9165136

Wow, thank you...we love greens and anything fresh like that in the garden!...
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

June 14, 2012
2:42 PM

Post #9165230

You are welcome. We planted it around the time the radishes went in (March). I just started picking them this week. BTW - It doesn't take a lot of plants to get a lot of pods.
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

June 14, 2012
5:28 PM

Post #9165407

Be careful, Susan. I ate those seed pods a few years ago. Loved 'em! Delish! Unfortunately they tend to act like psyllium seed and sure kept me runnin' a while! :>)

I recommend eating them in small quantities, not pigging out on them like I did.

Shoe
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

June 14, 2012
7:16 PM

Post #9165560

No worries. I like munching but not in large quanities. No problem last year with the regular radish pods. Do you think it's an issue with just the rat tail variety?

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

June 20, 2012
5:52 PM

Post #9173440

I tried some Daikon radish seed pods, and they ARE good! Thanks for the tip. Now I know what to do with all the Daikon raidish seed I saved last fall (Minowase, and the vendor said "OP").

Like a mild radish, but a little "greener". These were small, some looked like a pea pod with only one pea.

These must have re-seeded last fall, and came up this spring under some plastic I had laid down to keep some of the rain off. I was about to throw them all on the compost heap, but I remembered your suggestion and saved a few handsfull. Now I just have to figure out how big the dangerous dose is .

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 23, 2012
5:40 PM

Post #9177692

Ummm, I didn't make radishes on the plants planted either, but left for the pretty flowers- I was always taught that Nitrogen builds tops, iron builds roots- if the plant doesn't have iron it needs it won't grow. Any ideas on how the iron in your beds is?
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

June 23, 2012
6:48 PM

Post #9177747

"Ummm, I didn't make radishes on the plants planted either, but left for the pretty flowers- I was always taught that Nitrogen builds tops, iron builds roots-"

Actually, kittriana, it is phosphorus that plays an important role in root growth (as well as flower production). Iron plays little role in root production. I think you have mistaken "iron" for "phosphorus" especially concerning radish production since the radish part we eat is the "root" ( so to speak).

Most soils have ample iron. Many soils have ample phosphorus but if either of the two are lacking I'd go with phosphorus.

Shoe

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 23, 2012
11:01 PM

Post #9177963

NC yes, pines and oaks thrive- our last year was truly horrendous tho- we also have good iron-but I planted in a raised bed-heavy compost and garden topsoil with mushroom compost. And while phosphorous is essential, so is iron in many plants. You guys have amended controlled beds, but iron is still important and it was just a passing thought to try...I know I will when I get home mid July once again
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

June 24, 2012
8:12 AM

Post #9178381

I agree, iron is a necessity. I just wanted to point out it has no specific effect on root production by itself. That's all.

Being in Texas I would imagine your soil may be more alkaline than other areas. If so that would certainly make iron unavailable to the plants, even if you had ample iron in the soil. Applying a chelated iron product would help that temporarily though.

Rick, I think you'll be safe adding a few seed pods to a salad, or a stir-fry. Just don't overdo it like I did, practically grazing on them! :>)

Shoe

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 24, 2012
9:14 AM

Post #9178449

There are 4 different bands of soils- vegetation -here actually, everything from alkaline to neutral and some acid, where I am, but I don't get to do much experimenting these days- this company believes in 14 hr days stuck in no a/c dustbowls with no food access, and doesn't allow us to idle nor anything much else(showers nor facilities). I am told a bunch of our drivers are getting food poisoning, and heat strokes, but being raised in the Tx, Ok, NM deserts And on a grade A dairy ranch, I learned skills many of the kids don't have. My father and grandfather taught me to read the land, and I have had friends whose dads were involved in oil companies, and I would listen to what the core samples showed- since that also is the land and affects plants. Then I've also worked in commercial nursery and given care of a barn- we pitched in during every phase and got to watch how each plant grows best with it's own mix of fertilizers and regimens. I am simply too worn down to continue that intense a schedule since I can't stand back, chuckl. I don't think a treatment of liquid iron for the season will fix the radishes this season- but I have been wondering what last summer conditions leached or irradiated in the soils, or what was changed so drastically. The wildflowers are showing signs of preparing for long dormancies. There is a band of iron deficient land of all places arround the red river region from Wichita Falls, Tx to Ardmore, Ok- and I HAVE watched the liquid iron treatments in Ardmore make a drastic improvement in plants there, side by side
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

June 24, 2012
1:24 PM

Post #9178782

Good grief, kittriana, it sounds like miserable conditions to be working in. I hope at least your drivers have AC in their trucks, or whatever they are driving.

" I don't think a treatment of liquid iron for the season will fix the radishes this season- "

No, my suggestion of liquid iron wasn't in relation to fixing the radishes. As stated further up those won't bulb up in heat anyway.

Shoe (running from the heat here today, trying to sneak in a half day off!) :>)

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 24, 2012
6:24 PM

Post #9179172

The laws for those who drive 18 wheelers have gotten extremely out of hand. Cellphones use in any form carries a fine of $2500. To the driver and $11000. to the companies- that includes getting tickets for being seen touching them. The law is on the books for cars, but you guys are at home and vocal enuff to protest those, so they want a reduced fine to make it thru the courts. Idling in many states is against the law now- NY-Dallas, California is in a world of their own- if a running motor can't have it's exhaust run thru the catalytic converters it's illegal- so for those trux that are equipped with APU's they can't use em( those are htg/cooling t'stats that run off a separate motor. Shake head, Calif has set a new standard for EPA emissions reduction now- tires have to have a special Calif rating to enter the state. Other states like Ohio are following suit. If you have a pet you are allowed to idle, but not for yourself. For the pet. The northeast corner of the USA is extremely non truck friendly- we have to pull over to take our 10 hr breaks and there is NOWHERE literally we are not illegal to be- they will come tow you with you in bed, it isn't the lot lizards on the lot beating the doors all nite- it's the truckstops telling you to get off their property and go park on the streets where they swear there is plenty of space-NOT. This is NOT a profession to treat you as a human being. I did say I know a few trix, since i' ve been out here so long, but they also try to take my job for cheaper dumber boys to burn out. Humph, I am not even mad at the moment and I sound like I am ranting, down in Texas we treat our field hands better than the truk drivers are getting these years...

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

June 24, 2012
9:21 PM

Post #9179360

I could have iron and/or phosphorous deficiency: no soil tests yet. I have only had soil for a few soils. I'm making it a few wheelbarrows at a time, so every bed is wildly different.

I THINK I have avoided nutrient imbalance and lock-outs by keeping the soil lean and never risking over-fertilization.
But each bed could have wildly different pH and that could interfere with uptake of this or that.
And I could have severe shortages of something - or something different in each bed.
But as long as nothing LOOKS severely malnourished or wierd, I'm putting my budget into generic amendments, not one soil test for each tiny raised bed.

Here I think that my huge exess of clay does help me some. Whatever minerals ARE around or get added, are going to be very well retained, buffered, and released gradually by the clay I curse. Compost brings in "a little of everything" in reasonable balance, and I do add as much compost as I can afford. I'll be remedying "zero OM" for years.

I fairly frequently add very small small amounts of balanced generic fertilizer (last time, "16-16-16" was cheapest for the concentration). I would not mess around with real micronutrients until I had a good soil test. (Iron, Mg and Sulfer woujld be the first semi-micros I would get fancy with if something looked sickly. Like, chelated iron, MgSO4, dolomite lime.)

However, testing pH is always worth it until you know your region. I should.

NE was easy: it's always acid or very acid. Add a few bags of dolomite lime every year or two. You can't CARRY and spread enoguh lime to make it TOO basic. Even if you do manage to beat the acidity above pH 7.5 or 8 ONE year, expect the rain to knock pH back down to "acid" in a year or two.

My first goal (starting with my pretty pure clay suitable for bricks or pottery, zero perk, zero areation) is to get enough organics and amendements into each bed to create any drainage, aeration, and eventually enough 'structure') to allow any growth.

Then give them a few years in annuals so roots, worms, and more compost can keep improving it. I turn 1-2 times per year for the first few years, adding as much compost as I can buy or make.

The oldest bed is good enoguh now that I mostly only scratch compost into the top 6". I try to improve each bed enough that, when I dig 8-12" down, it has not reverted to airless pudding-clay.

And I rely on raised beds with 8-12-16" walls, plus slope (grade) and drainage trenchs to keep them draining and aerated while the soil still has little or no real structure or air pockets and channels.

Before I invested in in soil tests, I would first get all the soil to the point of at least "poor" structure and some organic matter and roota. Then I will wheel enough soil from one bed to another to average them out. Then another year to mix and mellow, THEN maybe the price of just one test would be worth it to me.

I'm cheap and would rather buy 50 more bags of manure/compost mix than pay $60 for a soil test when I know the most desperate need is for organic matter and drainage/aeration. Meanwhile, I am carefull to fertilize very minimally, trying to go from "almost none" to "almost enough" of most things. I would rather under-fertilize then over-fertilze. Hunger and slow growth is better than toxicity and death.

So far the only times I see conspicuous yellowing or ill helath is in a very new, raw bed, with no life in it. Even that is rare now, since I back-innoculate from more established beds into raw ones, and am careful to give the most compost to the crummiest neediest beds.

I don't worry much about nutrition until I'm sure the roots won't drown, and there's ednoguh OM for SOME soil life to establish itself.

Thumbnail by RickCorey_WA   Thumbnail by RickCorey_WA   Thumbnail by RickCorey_WA
Click an image for an enlarged view.

SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

June 25, 2012
3:38 AM

Post #9179492

I'm surprised at the $60 cost for the soil test. Soil tests here through the county extension office are $7 each. Recently they started giving the first one for free. The test reports are specific to what goes in the area (veggies, flowers, grass, etc.) and also state how much of what needs to get added to correct the soil. So no waste or want on what gets added in. Less money spent on unnecessary additives.

We have slightly acid soil and highly alkaline water (8-9 ph). The more we water the more the soil ph goes alkaline. Soil amendments also affects the soil ph. We occasionally use cotton boll compost. It also has a high ph (7-8). Between the water and the cotton boll we end up putting sulfur on every year to lower the soil ph.

Adding iron here is one of the recommendations to deal with chlorosis in trees. In this area it's a short lived fix and only addresses the symptoms and not the issue. The real issue is the ph is so far off that it locks up the nutrients (including iron) in the soil. When we started using sulfur instead of iron it changed the fixed the issue. We were also putting on fewer applications of the sulfur then what we had to use on the iron.

I understand that you can tell a lot about the soil by what weeds grown in it. That might also be a way to tell what is going on with the soil.

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

June 25, 2012
9:32 PM

Post #9181239

>> The real issue is the ph is so far off that it locks up the nutrients (including iron) in the soil.

Before I amend my soil, its so hard that only one kind of weed does well, and I don't know it's name.
A little better, and dandilions manage.
Much better, and horsetails thrive.

I think that, by the time my raised beds are doing at all well, the original clay is no more than 25% of the mix ... maybe less. So each bed is very different. And thney are tiny and many ... hmm, up to around 9. Maybe 12 if you count the shady spots with roots where I amended much too little, and almost nothing grolws.

I haven't fully researched local soil test services, but I have more used car lots than trees near me, and zero farms. But I might get lucky.



SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

June 26, 2012
4:13 AM

Post #9181403

We have raised beds on a hill. The hill soil is a combination of midwest clay and sandstone outcrop. The soil in the boxes was either hauled in stripped top soil or compost of some kind.

Looks like Wash U closed their soil testing facility. They recommend either local or U of Mass.

U of Mass is $10 for the basic test. http://www.umass.edu/soiltest/pdf/Routine Soil Analysis - Use This Form for Turf, Landscaping, and Home Gardening.pdf

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

June 26, 2012
4:13 PM

Post #9182461

Thanks! I was born on tghe South Shore of Bahhstin and would not feel guilty to take advantage.

I got the PDF form and I'm saving the link. I think I wouldf splurge for the toltal organikc estimate. I think my best soil has almost enoguh OM, but very possibly I'm deluding myself.



dervish2
White Plains, NY
(Zone 6b)

July 16, 2012
6:51 AM

Post #9206951

Thanks everyone.

I am going to try again for a Fall crop. Any idea when I should plant seeds?

I make Kimchi too and I also make something called Lefet - pickled turnips with beets. I think it is Lebanese. Very easy.
birke
Broward County, FL
(Zone 10b)

July 23, 2012
7:24 PM

Post #9216409

kittriana, I second that! And those drivers ship the veggies under crazy conditions like waiting for hours to get loaded hot freight with the deadline to deliver and crazy car drivers trying to break in front of a truck to sue the company. CRAZY! Some farms are just outrageous in how they operate, from the pickers to the loaders. Rarely you'll find a decent farm operation out there. Sorry about the OT.

This message was edited Jul 23, 2012 9:24 PM

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 23, 2012
7:38 PM

Post #9216424

I was just home, tho the radishes did not make but one radish, still they have been blooming like krazy, and being neglected, those pods have already reseeded and were at their first leaves, so was the fern leaf dill reseeded and coming up, and the bronze leaf mustard was in flower and 2 ' tall from the seeds of the first plants this spring. The onion chives are struggling tho a few are trying to survive from seeds scattered earlier. Yup, Florida- I can tell horror stories of hauling fruits up from below Tampa in the late 80's- it really has improved,-tho I say that with reservations, chuckl.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 28, 2012
1:54 PM

Post #9221638

Isnt this the wrong time of yr to grow radishes in TX?

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 28, 2012
4:13 PM

Post #9221740

I wasn't home, they are growing themselves, I figured I'd just see if the root makes, or I get a ton more seedpods, my elephant garlic is growing strong too, and - hehehe- I saw where a tunnel had bumped up against the bricks and wire and someone couldn't burrow into that garden, chuckle. Nothing in this garden appears to be growing the way you would expect, but these are volunteers, and welcome to try to grow, I have to go on a search for sunflowers I would like to grow for next season so the new veggies can have a break-
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 29, 2012
4:17 PM

Post #9222850

Too hot for them to bulb. Garlic is different. I always add phosphorus for root crops. But then I stink at growing radishes lol but I didnt realize until recently that there are different types. Some have a long DTM. If I stick to the ones that take a month or less to mature Im good. Then I gow them in a little container so I know the soil is soft.
dervish2
White Plains, NY
(Zone 6b)

July 31, 2012
8:18 AM

Post #9224696

1Lisac --

Is there a temperature guide for growing radishes and other cold weather crops?

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 31, 2012
4:54 PM

Post #9225305

Try http://www.growinganything.com and see if it brings up the chart I saw about what veggies at what temps- I've seen better ones, but don't remember where

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 31, 2012
4:58 PM

Post #9225313

Yeah, it works- use the left column to goto planting times...
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 31, 2012
9:26 PM

Post #9225595

A temp guide probably won't be as helpful as a timing guide. You live in a cold area so you need to figure out when to plant in your area. Radishes germinate at about 50*.

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