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Vegetable Gardening: STARTING OUR 2012 FALL/WINTER VEGGIE GARDENS

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Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 5, 2012
3:05 PM

Post #9153556

Although it seems a bit premature, if you haven't perused (or started) the seed catalogs, placed your orders, ripped the dying, raggedy plants out, started topping off your ferts and sprays, started collecting more compost and amendments, turned, tilled and toiled, you are BURNING daylight on the fall/winter VEGGIE growing season!

Whew!

Seems like we just planted tomatoes, and already it's time to start seedlings for MORE tomatoes for a possible fall/wtr garden, and decide what else we're planting for the fall crop. We're making our gardening lists and checking them twice! So, jump on board here, and let's get started on the NEXT go-round.

Start with the veggie variety lists you're planning for the fall/winter gardens!

Let the games begin (again!!!)

This message was edited Jul 9, 2012 9:01 AM

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NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 5, 2012
4:36 PM

Post #9153680

Well I ordered seed potatoes (finally found some for the fall!) but it's too soon to start much of anything here. I direct seed anyway; I don't find starting transplants to get me where I am going any faster and it's a lot of work.

I plan on the usual, though: peas, radishes, cabbage, carrots, spinach, turnips and my new favorite veggie, kohlrabi. No need to buy seed; I have plenty. :D

kevcarr59

kevcarr59
BUda, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 5, 2012
5:35 PM

Post #9153753

Got most of the seeds already but have heard of some better BS seeds, so that's the only one I need to get. What would be a good fall crop suggestion for Brussels Spouts and a Cabbage to grow this fall??

The rest of the list:

Early Snowball A Cauliflower
Major Hybrid Broccoli
Black Beauty Eggplant
Waltham Butternut Squash
San Marzano Tomato

Iffy on the list is Catskill Brussels Sprouts. Heard some negative comments so will investigate further before go through planting it. I've already found different seeds, but want more info on them... Long Island Improved BS, Nautic BS, Jade Cross BS are just a few I've looked at... LI is at the top of the list right now... Thoughts...
stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 5, 2012
6:18 PM

Post #9153804

Say it's not so!!

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

June 5, 2012
6:53 PM

Post #9153877

Gymgirl; Well is it allright if I watch(more like read) along,If I promise not to get in the way?

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 5, 2012
8:45 PM

Post #9154067

Juhur7 et al,

This thread is intended to be an open discussion for ALL veggie growers starting fall/winter gardens. Please accept my apology for the exclusion of your zone. Not my intention to exclude anyone.

With that, I'm having admins rename the thread, so all will know they are welcome in this discussion, wherever they're growing!

Linda

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 6, 2012
8:44 AM

Post #9154512

Note the name change!

Let the growing begin!
stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 6, 2012
9:26 AM

Post #9154553

I thought about planting some watermelon seeds today, but that's as far as I got.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 6, 2012
9:52 AM

Post #9154590

LOL! You'll never get me to admit how much I think about doing...

I received my fall seed order yesterday! First time ordering from the Sustainable Seed Company. I actually was looking for Tatume Squash seeds, and found them on this site, so I just hung around and placed my order. So far, this is some of what I hope to grow in the fall/wtr season:

From The Sustainable Seeds Company
Tatume Squash
Early Jersey Wakefield Cabbage
Early Round Dutch Cabbage
Brunswick Cabbage
Early Wonder Beets
Detroit Dark Red Beets
Snowball Y Improved Cauliflower
Texas 1015Y Onion Seeds
Red Creole Onion Seeds
Little Marvel Peas
Wando Peas

From Johnny's Select Seeds Company
Waltham Butternut Squash
Acorn Squash
Arcadia Broccoli
Green Magic Broccoli
De Cicco Broccoli
Cassius Broccoli
Fava Beans
Space Spinach
Da Cheong Chae-Mini Asian Pac Choi


In addition to the above, I'll be growing turnips, carrots, lettuce, mustard & collard greens, and trying for a fall crop of tomatoes from rooted cuttings.

The games have begun! ^:-)^

This message was edited Jun 7, 2012 9:54 AM

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 7, 2012
8:54 AM

Post #9155674

I plan to grow English peas this fall. Will start them in wallpaper trays and keep them covered until they reach a good size, and then slip them under the trellis netting. Hopefully this will give them enough of a head start to grow faster then the birds can eat the leaves!

Broccoli does well here during the winter, so I'm adding cauliflower, kohlrabi, and beets to the winter garden.
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

June 7, 2012
10:31 AM

Post #9155788

Gymgirl wrote:I actually was looking for Tatume Squash seeds, and found them on this site, so I just hung around and placed my order.

I had to laugh - I wonder how many of us do the same thing. I've found that "one special variety" I wanted to grow, then ended up ordering 20 times as much just because I didn't want to pay more for shipping than I paid for that one packet of seeds.

-Rich

rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

June 7, 2012
10:34 AM

Post #9155795

Gymgirl wrote:
Early Jersey Wakefield Cabbage
Early Round Dutch Cabbage
Brunswick Cabbage
Snowball Y Improved Cauliflower
Texas 1015Y Onion Seeds
Red Creole Onion Seeds
Arcadia Broccoli
Green Magic Broccoli
De Cicco Broccoli
Cassius Broccoli
Da Cheong Chae-Mini Asian Pac Choi

Out of curiosity (and assuming you are starting some of your seeds in trays or peat pots), when do you start your onion and cole crop seeds?

-Rich

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 7, 2012
10:41 AM

Post #9155799

Bee,
Please lmk when you sow your English peas! I've been trying to get the timing right for peas. Stephanietx has brought in a beautiful harvest of Wando and Alaska peas this past spring, so I think I have that planting timeframe down. But, it's the fall/wtr sowing that eludes me!

Hugs!

Linda

P.S. I am SOOOOOOOOOOO excited about the upcoming season, especially since I have at least one RB in place, and possibly THREE by plant out.

Question for the growers regarding filling my RBs for the fall planting. A lot of gardeners fill their RB very early and let them sit for awhile before planting in them. I won't have that luxury, since by the time the beds are built and filled, it'll be time to plant out the seedlings I start outdoors (or time to plant the ones that I start outdoors in seed flats...).

Any tips on what to safely add to the RBs so they'll be filled in a hurry and not hurt the seedlings would be much appreciated. To date, the one RB is filled with Tapla's RB mix:
5 parts pine bark fines
2 parts Vermiculite
2 part sharp, builder's sand
1 part Reed/Sedge Peat

It is fast-draining, loose, holds moisture pretty well, and is well-aerated. I didn't wait too long to plant the tomatoes in the mix (about 3-4 weeks after filling?), and they did fine. I guess if I put the press on and build the next RBs, I'd have about that same time frame or longer before I have to plant the seedlings that I intend to start at the end of this month, and again at the beginning of August.

My concern is that the Brassicas love the organic amendments. In the past, I've used Black Kow Composted manure. Just wondering if I need to let it sit awhile before introducing the seedlings.

LMK!

Thanks!

Linda

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 7, 2012
10:55 AM

Post #9155811

Rich,
I've never done the onions from seeds before, but the BayouGardener has a WONDERFUL tutorial on how he did it. I was a long process, but successful! He started the seeds in a water trough about 3-4 months before it was time to transplant for the fall.

Our recommended transplant dates for onion plants is November. So, I figure I have time to start the seeds by the end of this month, and they'll be ready for transplanting by the end of November. Last year, I transplanted Dixondale Onion Company plants on January 8th (my b'day). I counted six months, and they were just about ready for harvesting. I actually left them in until the end of August, then brought them into our Hot as Hades garage for storage. I had no other choice. Well, those full-size onions lasted from August 2011 until almost January 2012.

This year, I planted onion plants waaaaaaaaaaay late, and they're a miserable crop failure.

So, nothing beats a wish but a try, and the BayouGardener was straightforward enough in the details, and made it look really easy.

Last fall/wtr. I started ALL my brassica seeds indoors on my light kit, on the weekend of August 6-7th, and a few more on the weekend of August 19-20th. I had a bumper crop of cabbage, broccoli (Gorgeous!!!), and a few cauliflowers. My Brussels Sprouts were planted in the wrong soil (they need soil as hard as concrete, and my container mix was too loose, so all I got were "blown" sprouts - you can Google that...)

This message was edited Jun 7, 2012 1:14 PM

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kevcarr59

kevcarr59
BUda, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 7, 2012
11:05 AM

Post #9155827

Gymgirl,

When I did the mix for the aeration containers for the okra, made addition to a little leftover mix I had. Added Black Kow Composted Manure, some Garden Soil & Vermiculite along with CRF. Transplanted the okra right in, when I watered the runoff was coffee colored and caught it with a 5 gallon bucket, added some more water & used the water can to water again. They've grown about 2" this week alone...

With my PUNY list I saw yours and had to make some additions:

Texas 1015 Onion Seeds
Red Creole Onion Seeds
Red Burgundy Onion Seeds
Long Island Improved Brussels Sprouts
Royal Marvel Hybrid Brussels Sprouts

I think I'm gonna pass on cabbage this fall, just too much else to prepare for with the list I've got now...

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 7, 2012
11:06 AM

Post #9155829

Linda/Honeybee = Last year I directed seeded peas 8/10, germinated 8/20, bloomed 10/1 and first harvest was 10/9. I don't think I could have started any sooner -- too hot -- but I didn't harvest many before it got too cold for them to bloom.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 7, 2012
11:24 AM

Post #9155846

NicoleC,
That is some GOOD INFORMATION you just posted. The timeframes really help! We don't get as cold as you do (at least not for sustained periods of time...), and not freezing until around mid-December.

I guess the trick is timing in a short growing window, starting them out when the weather's not too scorching hot, and goosing them along as fast as possible before the temps drop into the what? low-60s? high 50s?

What's the coolest temp they'll continue producing in?

I'm growing Ky Wonder Pole Beans in my buckets that are sitting under the patio cover. They're cranking out consistently (albeit, slower than if they were sitting out in full sun). I'm thinking I could start the peas under the patio cover, too, same timeframe as NicoleC, and grow them from mid-August thru mid-November, maybe?

I'l Google lowest growing temps.

NicoleC, which variety did you grow? I have Wando and Alaska peas on the way (copying you, Steph!)

Where in the world IS Stephanietx?

Linda

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

June 7, 2012
12:15 PM

Post #9155896

Oh goody! I want to play along with this thread. Usually I just do the usual spring garden but this year am planning a fall garden. I have my spring peas growing but plan on a fall crop of peas and more also. I have never tried a fall crop of any thing before but have already gotten all my seeds.

I plan to grow-
Peas-
Cascadia Snap Pea (new for me, never tried this variety)
Mammoth Melting Snow Pea
Sugar Star Snap (never tried these either)
Super Sugar Snap
Norli (again new for me variety) French variety!
Green Arrow (I am growing these this spring and like them)
Seems that I bought Mammoth Melting peas from two companies so I don't think I will plant them all but maybe I will!

Brocolli-
Rapa Brocolli from Gourmet Seeds
Purple Sprounting from Burpee

I have Nevada and Little Ceasar Lettuce. Also Zen Hybred greens from Burpee.

Plus I have bunching onion seeds. I never got to planting them for spring so I wondser if I can plant them as a fall crop?
stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 7, 2012
12:32 PM

Post #9155910

I'm contemplating what to do in the rain today. :)

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

June 7, 2012
12:37 PM

Post #9155917

Rain is good for the garden!

I sure did order a lot of pea seeds lol! :-))

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 7, 2012
12:39 PM

Post #9155920

LOL!

We're still waiting on rain that's been promised for the last 3 days...probably have a gully washer Saturday morning...

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 7, 2012
2:34 PM

Post #9156092

Linda - the only peas that produced for me that quickly last fall were the Sugar Sprint. However this spring, the OP heirloom Amish Snap came in slightly faster and was a better pea overall, so I'll be trying the Amish Snap this fall as well. Last fall mine produced right up until frosty weather. Light frost didn't kill the plants, but it stopped them from blooming and burnt the ones on the vine a bit.

BTW, a couple of years ago I started keeping index cards with each variety, species, source, etc. and all the critical dates as well as general notes -- and whether I'd grow them again or not. The card has a standardized format in a box with alphabetical dividers and sort them by name, year and growing season. Up front I keep what's out there now so I can quickly find them to make notes.

I still keep my rotation maps with some notes, but the index cards have proved to be an awesome tool, way better than my earlier incarnations with notebooks and such. It has really helped me as a go-to source when people ask about a particular variety, I'm surfing a seed catalog or I just can't remember (which happens often!) And it's easy to keep updated. If anyone is looking for a way to get organized, or just a new way, I can really recommend this method.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 7, 2012
2:46 PM

Post #9156109

NicoleC,
I'd be very interested in your veggie cataloging system, either here or in a private dmail. Don't know how much the others might mind this little side-trip, but it might be beneficial to others.

Ya'll please weigh in if you'd like NicoleC to share her system here. If not, there's another thread that's currently discussing "how you organize your seeds". We could take the discussion there.

LMK!

Linda

kevcarr59

kevcarr59
BUda, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 7, 2012
7:48 PM

Post #9156423

I'd be interested since I just started a big spreadsheet for the aspects of my garden adventures. It's getting harder and harder to keep all the different suppliers & seeds and such straight.

rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

June 7, 2012
9:27 PM

Post #9156551

Gymgirl wrote:I guess the trick is timing in a short growing window, starting them out when the weather's not too scorching hot, and goosing them along as fast as possible before the temps drop into the what? low-60s? high 50s?

That's always been my problem. I have had no trouble at all starting perennial green onions. I always have dozens waiting to be transplanted. The little plants will keep forever in flats patiently waiting for a spot in the garden or one of the self-watering planters as long as I keep them watered and use a little liquid fertilizer when they start to look spent. But when I should be starting the seeds for the short-day bulbing onions that do so well here, the days are still getting into the mid-90's with warm nights. I have a place in the garage/basement for starting seeds, but I do not control the temperature so it is nearly as hot as outside (hotter at night), and of course fluorescent light is never as good as sunlight.

I have the same issue with the Brassicas, but they at least don't need such a long lead time.

-Rich


This message was edited Jun 8, 2012 12:30 AM
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

June 7, 2012
9:28 PM

Post #9156553

newyorkrita wrote:
Rain is good for the garden!


Tell that to my tomatoes - I finally had to break down and spray for late blight that started appearing after the tropical storm that came through brought three days of rain. And now it's raining again... No, I'm not really complaining - just wish the timing was better.

-Rich


This message was edited Jun 8, 2012 12:32 AM

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 8, 2012
7:45 AM

Post #9156879

rjogden wrote:
But when I should be starting the seeds for the short-day bulbing onions that do so well here, the days are still getting into the mid-90's with warm nights.


I'm confused. If they do so well there, what's the problem with going ahead and starting the seeds? As long as the seedlings are growing into the cool weather, starting them when it's still a bit warm shouldn't be a problem. If it is, see further...

A (not-so?) novel idea that's being thrown around on several threads lately is to start the seeds in the refrigerator!. If they need cool to germinate, then, "by golly," give 'em some cool. I could dedicate a shelf to a flat of onion seeds. Matter of fact, that might actually be the answer, for real, now that I'm brainstorming this!

If we started some seeds in the fridge, say, 12 weeks before our temps start to begin to dip into the 60's, they'd be the perfect size for transplanting directly into the garden, and they'd not miss too many beats adjusting to a slightly warmer temp outside. It would only last awhile anyways, and continue to dip back to where they were growing.

DEFINITE experiment coming up!!!!

THANKS Rich!

I feel another experiment coming on...

Check out a YouTube video called "How to Plant Onion Seeds in a Container"
by The Bayou Gardener.

He started his onion seeds in an aluminum trough, 8" deep, 1 foot wide, and 6' long, then transplanted them into the garden. The tutorial is fascinating!

STARTING ONIONS FROM SEED
http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=how to plant onion seeds in a container by the bayou gardener&source=web&cd=1&ved=0CFMQFjAA&url=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y7sXbzozjTs&ei=FBfST-rKL8XY2QWF8_2ZDw&usg=AFQjCNEaC3g9UO7HHzMF4JIzIOHcq6OgkQ

ONION UPDATE
http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=onion update by the bayou gardener&source=web&cd=4&ved=0CGUQFjAD&url=http://thebayougardener.com/smf/index.php?topic=12776.0&ei=9BbST5fdB4Pg2QX7mcCLDw&usg=AFQjCNHvK6dI6-xhXV5cbZ3dKxVzz0pmdw



Lemme know what ya'll think about this idea.

Linda



This message was edited Jun 8, 2012 10:16 AM
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

June 8, 2012
12:33 PM

Post #9157118

Gymgirl wrote:I'm confused. If they do so well there, what's the problem with going ahead and starting the seeds? As long as the seedlings are growing into the cool weather, starting them when it's still a bit warm shouldn't be a problem. If it is, see further...


Thanks for the links. I haven't had much time for web browsing (or rather, I already spend too much time...). I've had excellent results with bought-in plants. Dixondale's Red Creole matured like regular store-bought yellow onions, mostly medium-sized with tight, dry scapes (no giants, but they keep better than the larger, sweeter types). From Just Fruits and Exotics I got Texas Supersweet (yellow), Contessa (white), and Southern Belle (red), all large sweet "typical" short-day types. I was surprised at the difference in the plants I received - the ones from Just Fruits were easily twice the size of the Dixondale plants and took off with no hesitation. I've read that larger starts tended to bolt, but that didn't happen. The only problem was that the Contessa are a lot later to mature than the others - over half of them are still in the garden now waiting for the tops to start dieing back or breaking over, a couple of weeks after the last of the red and yellow onions have been moved to the drying racks in the "carport" (my outdoor workshop).

I've had good luck with the purchased transplants, and I don't mind the cost of the quality plants I got from both supplier, but I don't like the feeling of being dependent on them and on their shipping schedule. The problem with starting seed here is that it is still usually REALLY hot around the time to plant - trays outdoors in the sun dry out in a hurry, and my protected seed-starting areas are very limited. And like everyone, I suppose, I hate spending considerable time and money (and TLC) on something without a good chance of success.

-Rich
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 8, 2012
1:41 PM

Post #9157222

Stephanie-why don't you plant your watermelon seeds you still have time? I don't start my pumpkins until August for harvest for Holloween. I usually don't start anything for my cool weather garden/market plants until the beginning of August or later. I guess I consider my fall garden warm weather plants, like the second round of tomatoes and such.

My warm weather plants are no where near ready to pull out, they are just starting to really get going. We've only had 1week in the 90s (which is enough for me) but there's no way I'd give up that space NOW. My long beans are just starting to set.

I'm still planting tomato plants maybe I can count these for my fall garden lol. If the weather stays like this Ill have veggies all summer long!

BTW I don't see any zone limits on this thread. I'm assuming all zones are welcome and nobody is in the way.

This message was edited Jun 8, 2012 2:49 PM

Cybrczch

Cybrczch
Lincoln, NE
(Zone 5b)

June 8, 2012
1:49 PM

Post #9157246

Zone 5 (average first frost date October 12 - historic data from September 11 to November 7)
Going to start cabbage, broccoli, chard and kohlrabi plants for the fall garden this weekend. Where the lettuce, spinach, and radishes were will have a late crop of bush beans mid-June. Will plant cucumbers before July 4. Later will start fall lettuce and spinach.
On onions...
This is the second year I've started onions from seed. Long day varieties (Copra and Redwing) I start in January. Found two Copra onions in my refrigerator from last year's crop, still tight, no sprouting. Last year when I planted them out in the garden, the birds pulled up a quarter of the plants the first day, and continued for over a week. This year, not a one was disturbed. Also second year for Ambition shallots (oh man I love them).

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 8, 2012
1:51 PM

Post #9157249

I'm working with the Houston Urban Garden Planting Guide, and it lists 7/1-8/1 as the OPTIMUM seed starting window for watermelons AND pumpkins.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 8, 2012
1:54 PM

Post #9157256

Reply to Juhur7 posted on June 5, 2012
08:53 PM


Juhur7 et al,

This thread is intended to be an open discussion for ALL veggie growers starting fall/winter gardens. Please accept my apology for the exclusion of your zone. Not my intention to exclude anyone.

With that, I'm having admins rename the thread, so all will know they are welcome in this discussion, wherever they're growing!

Linda
stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 8, 2012
2:12 PM

Post #9157283

Oh, I know I have time, I've just been lazy and trying to avoid going out in the heat. LOL

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

June 8, 2012
2:44 PM

Post #9157351

Really? You are ready to start fall crops now in zone 5? I was think mid July to start my Fall crop seeds. I am still starting my regular season cucumber seeds now!

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

June 8, 2012
2:49 PM

Post #9157363

I was going to reply I didn't expect that to be taken that seriously, I felt about as big as a penny for a few minutes after reading that.
Thank you Gymgirl ; for your kind consideration of others feelings, that was very nice.

I will try to behave in the future and thanks again.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 8, 2012
2:55 PM

Post #9157372

Rita,
Our first frost date is November 11th, and I'm about to start seeds the beginning of next month...

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 8, 2012
2:56 PM

Post #9157374

You're doing quite nicely, Juhur7!

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

June 8, 2012
3:41 PM

Post #9157430

Maybe I should start them earlier. But it is usually so hot here in August.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 8, 2012
4:38 PM

Post #9157488

Rita,
I've learned from the gardeners here that, long as the seedlings are properly hydrated, they can take more heat than we think they can take. I'm gonna start some seeds indoors and transplant when the weather cools off. I'm also gonna start some outside in flats, so they'll already be acclimated. Finally, I'm gonna start some seeds in the (wait for it) --------FRIDGE!
Don't cha just love being gardener?

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

June 8, 2012
5:17 PM

Post #9157526

I can't start any inside as I have no lights set up. So I always start my seeds outside. Of course starting them outside shouldn't be a problem.

Cybrczch

Cybrczch
Lincoln, NE
(Zone 5b)

June 8, 2012
6:11 PM

Post #9157570

Newyorkrita - When I follow the dates listed in the 'guides', I don't get my brassicas to mature, so I start them earlier. July 4 is a standard last planting date for cucumbers around here, and I can plant beans anytime from last frost to mid-July and get a harvest. Chard is also spring to early fall.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 8, 2012
10:58 PM

Post #9157771

Many of the cool weather veggies will not germinate in the heat. I've germinated them in paper towels and plastic bags on the cool tile of my bathroom floor. I did a test run and they would not germinate in the heat. Once they germinated I sowed them directly into 4" nursery pots. Some I put out in the heat some I kept under lights. The ones I put outside really struggled or died. Just like tomatoes and peppers need warmer temps to germinate some cool weather crops need cool temps to germinate and grow.

During the summer I have no trouble starting my hot weather veggies outside, some I direct sow then there is no transplant shock, but some of the cool weather veggies, just won't germinate. There was a temp chart around here somewhere I will try to post a link this weekend.

Rita-depending on how many plants you are starting you can always just put them in a sunny window or use a cheap shop light. I grow 1000s of seedlings a year and that's all I use.

Cyb-is that your cut off because they won't ripen before a freeze? My family is from there, I didn't realize it was zone 5. I feel that way here, except for a few extreme years I feel like I can start anything at anytime as long as it has time to ripen before it freezes.

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

June 9, 2012
7:58 AM

Post #9158021

I am thinking this is a very good discussion about starting the Fall season veggies. Lots of input from different regions.

I guess I could start some inside in a window. I start some of my warm season veggies inside like this. That is I fill reused cell packs with fresh potting soil and put my cucumber seeds in them and now have cucumber seedlings. But I keep them in the kitchen, where it is warm.

Lettuce, I think, needs cool temps to germinate. I have lettuce seeds, onlion seeds and even Bok Choy (which I am not sure if I will start or not). But then might as well start it. Nothing to loose but the price of a packet of seeds. Maybe use the indoor method for these? For the brocoli also. To get more light I can bring them outside as soon as they sprout.

But for the peas, I have far too many for me to deal with doing anything but direct sowing. Kinda went overboard on the Fall pea seeds but I want to try these types I have for myself and see what I like best as I will have the room for fall planting them.
Mindyrecycles
Tucson, AZ
(Zone 9b)

June 9, 2012
3:09 PM

Post #9158428

I'm not thinking too much about fall yet since I've got a big project going on that's taking all my attention. We just jackhammered up a concrete pad in the back yard and after we carry away all the remnants of that, we need to put down some brick walkways, put out 7 raised beds and get irrigation to those. But I do plant to plant peas, lettuce, carrots, radishes, tomatoes, brussels sprouts, sweet potatoes, potatoes, and Gymgirl has talked me into trying broccoli again.

Mindy in Tucson

kevcarr59

kevcarr59
BUda, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 9, 2012
3:26 PM

Post #9158449

Gymgirl's VERY good at talking people into things...LOL...
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

June 9, 2012
4:03 PM

Post #9158475

Today I cleaned and bleached my grow containers. I have 14 8-packs so that's 112 cells. All tomatoes. Tomorrow I'll seed the cells, place in a dark room on heat mats and see how everything does. The plan is to plant out in August to get a good tomato supply before our first frost. All toms are 60 DTM or less.

It will still be very hot in August but I think the roots like that, I'll have to protect the plants from sun scald but I think I can do it. Most of the plants will be sold to others, keeping only a dozen or so for myself.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 9, 2012
5:29 PM

Post #9158530

I just manage to share my passion! Can't help it if I'm contagious!!

MaryMcP!
Way to share!!! That post is so helpful to me. Y'all know I'm NOT good with the planting scheduling. No joke folks. I'v been going thru last year's garden diary, and it's already saving me some grief!

Question: I've already pulled suckers from my tomato plants to start rooting some stock for a fall effort. I think it's time for the vines to come down. i have eggplants that are ready to go outside in their place. I've read it's best to cut the plant just below the soil and not dig it out, so as to not disturb the soil microstructure. But how do I plant the eggplant seedlings with the tomato stems in the way?

Thank you all for your contributions to this discussion. Very informative stuff.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 9, 2012
5:29 PM

Post #9158531

I just manage to share my passion! Can't help it if I'm contagious!!

MaryMcP!
Way to share!!! That post is so helpful to me. Y'all know I'm NOT good with the planting scheduling. No joke folks. I'v been going thru last year's garden diary, and it's already saving me some grief!

Question: I've already pulled suckers from my tomato plants to start rooting some stock for a fall effort. I think it's time for the vines to come down. i have eggplants that are ready to go outside in their place. I've read it's best to cut the plant just below the soil and not dig it out, so as to not disturb the soil microstructure. But how do I plant the eggplant seedlings with the tomato stems in the way?

Thank you all for your contributions to this discussion. Very informative stuff.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 11, 2012
7:48 AM

Post #9160428

Where is everybody?

I spent the weekend going through my seeds. It's a good think I kept records last fall/wtr. I logged in where the seeds were purchased, the year, how many I sowed, and how many actually germinated. I got a pretty clear picture of which seeds may not be viable for planting this season. Good thing I followed my mind and ordered some fresh seeds!

But, ever up for an experiment, I'll sow half of the 2010 seeds, and half of the new seeds. Yah never know, and nothing beats a wish but a try. Plus, I didn't order from the same company this time, so, no telling what the fresh seeds will do either.

I checked Dr. Bob Randle's Big Book for gardening in the Houston area, and looks like there's a planting schedule that goes something like this for year round gardening: Sow seeds every OTHER month beginning in early summer (June-August-Oct). This way, there's always some seedling or other available to plug into any holes in the veggie patch. It's more of a succession planting schedule, and, I'm gonna try to follow it this season, to see if it works for me.

I'd rather have something going at all times, and no big holes or empty RBs.

Also, regarding that Bayou Gardener video on starting onion plants in a container. He used an old trough, 8" deep, by 1 foot wide, and 6' long, then transplanted them into the garden. I'm thinking a short piece of gutter would do the trick on a smaller scale, perhaps? Worth a try. I'm hoping to sow the onion seeds by mid-August, to transplant by early November. My first season with onions, I planted them January 8th and had a fine crop. But, I've read the longer they grow, the larger they get, so I could still plant some in November, and again in January. Worth a shot.

That's my weekend report. Too hot to be out in the yard much. Stinkbugs moving in on the few remaining tomatoes on my vines. About to take them down to plant out the eggplants, squash, and cukes that already are filled with blossoms, inside the house!

Hugs all!

Godspeed, and Good Harvest!

Linda

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 11, 2012
8:09 AM

Post #9160466

This spring I was cleaning house in my seed storage and germination tested everything over 1 year old. Pretty much everything was fine. While there are seeds (like lettuce) that fell off in their performance quickly, most everything as nearly 100% germination going back to my oldest seeds still in the box from 2006. The one exception was some of my seeds I saved in 2010. They were like 50% -- I think my seed saving techniques needed improvement that year.

I haven't seen squash bugs yet this year but the Japanese beetles are moving in. I have seen assassin bugs. And the aphids were horrible this spring but the lady bugs moved in and I haven't seen a single aphid on my summer crops; usually my tomatoes get them.

It rained all day yesterday and likely today. I did get out in a break and harvested some zucchini, blackberries and blueberries, but that's a daily thing right now. A little weeding this AM while the ground was wet -- it's a lot easier to dig those &^%#$^! violet tubers out when the ground is wet. Otherwise this weekend I chopped down my dying trees and did some thinking about the layout of the garden extension. Going to call a fence company today for quotes on a nice picket fence to go around the garden and another idea I have.

You have holes in your veggie patch, Linda? I always have the opposite problem -- time for fall crops to go in and nowhere to put them.
Garden_Sass
Central, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 11, 2012
8:45 AM

Post #9160538

I've planted many "off the reservation" varieties, mostly hybrids, and loved a few of them but drat, they phase out of sale on a regular basis - guess the plant breeders have to go with the "new models" they create without regard to us home gardeners. Green Comet was my favorite broccoli, just try to find it these days - Southern Comet is the replacement!

Anyway...this is the Travis County TX Master Gardener trialed variety list:
http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/travis/docs/VegetableVarietiesTravisCounty2010.pdf
AND planting guide - keep in mind this shifts depending on the weather:
http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/travis/docs/VegetablePlantingCalendar2010.pdf

Hays County TX List:
http://hays.agrilife.org/files/2011/08/recommendedvegetablevarietiesforhayscounty_3.pdf

Your county Extension office usually has a web site with recommended varieties and if you have a Master Gardener group they can help. Organic gardening clubs also have their favorites.

Another option is to look up CSA (organic farmers that sell to the public) farm web pages to track the vegetable varieties they grow such as Boggy Creek Farm located in Austin with their satellite farm in Milam County. They give out a report on varieties grown and available:
http://www.boggycreekfarm.com/pages/news-of-the-farm-current-issue.php

Happy Gardening!


Garden_Sass
Central, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 11, 2012
8:59 AM

Post #9160571

Oh...another tip: Johnny's Selected Seed commercial catalog (great reference) has soil temp vs. % germination charts for all vegetable species. I have a short probe, dial faced soil thermometer that I use to take noon day soil temp 5 days in a row then average to see if temps are in range before I start planting. Of course so many other factors come into to play...

http://www.johnnyseeds.com/



This message was edited Jun 11, 2012 10:00 AM

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 11, 2012
9:15 AM

Post #9160600

NicoleC,
I only have one RB. Before this season, all my gardening was in eBuckets and free-draining buckets. Once the RB was built, I planted only 4-5 tomato plants in it, then had to curtail my spring gardening activity for awhile. I had to go inside to attend to the house. I'd much rather live in my yard! So, all I've had to tend to was the almost empty RB with the tomato plants!

A couple weeks ago I planted 17 bell pepper plants in the bed, on the opposite end. They're just now taking off. I have about 25 eggplant seedlings, 3 cuke seedlings, 1 Zucchini squash seedling in the house under lights. The eggplants are about 8-10" tall, and are ready to go in. The cukes and the zuke all have buttercup yellow blossoms all over them! Actually, I've been rustling them when I can, to hopefully make some pollen fly so that when I put them out, they'll take off.

I scored one side of a baby crib frame, and will use it as a lean-to trellis for the cukes. And, I have the mat'ls to build a squash teepee. My only concern is, soon as I put the squash out, the SVB will kill it. But, I'm working on an idea from MaryMcP? Honeybee? about setting the transplant it in a toilet paper or PVC sleeve when I plant it. Seems the SVB comes up out of the soil to get to the vine, and if the sleeve is in place, I may stand a chance the moth won't get to that first 3-6" of vine to lay eggs for the larva.

I'm going to take down the tomato vines today, and plant the eggplants on that end. The plan is to build another two beds for my brassicas (cabbages, broccoli, cauliflowers), next to the 1st bed, but more shaded. I've observed they do better in a bit of bright shade, out of direct sunlight. Plus, when the season starts warming up, that shade cover helps extend the growing time frame, a bit. I did some research on what follows the tomatoes, and found that Broccoli after tomatoes actually benefits from something or other the tomato plants leave in the soil. So, after the eggplants are done, the broccoli should be ready to be transplanted in their place, along with the cauliflower, and maybe some potatoes on the other end? Not sure if that would work to put spuds in that bed. I do have several 25 gallon tubs I could use for the spuds.

I'll also have a bed for the root crops: onions and carrots, turnips and beets. And, I can plant greens, lettuce, and spinach in my Earthboxes.

That's the plan. We shall see how it turns out!

This is from last fall/wtr., four months after transplanting the crop outside.

The new RB is now on this spot. The other two will also go on this spot.

Linda

Thumbnail by Gymgirl
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 11, 2012
9:17 AM

Post #9160604

Thanks, Garden_Sass!

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 11, 2012
9:31 AM

Post #9160632

Gymgirl? dont plant on top of the old roots, move sideways an inch or two and space in a different pattern than previously

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 11, 2012
10:21 AM

Post #9160736

Thanks, Kitt!

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 14, 2012
8:05 AM

Post #9164733

Stinkbugs are moving in with a vengeance! Good thing I only have a few tomatoes left, and the vines are coming down this weekend!

I cringe to thing what my neighbor's tomato patch looks like...they don't keep ahead of the Stinkbug nymphs...
stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 14, 2012
9:24 AM

Post #9164835

I think I'm going to order some seeds today for fall. I know I want some beets (for the hubby), broccoli, burgundy bush beans, lettuces, and some kind of carrots. Not sure what else will catch my fancy.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

June 14, 2012
10:37 AM

Post #9164899

steph, aren't bush beans a summer crop?

hubby says I can plant all the obama beans I want but he forbids me to plant bush beans. hahahah

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 14, 2012
11:40 AM

Post #9164979

Cute, Mary...LOL!

Steph,
If you're just ordering Broccoli, check out "Arcadia". It is an absolutely GORGEOUS plant, even if you never get a head of broccoli. Beautiful blue-green leaves. I'm certainly including this again in my edible landscaping!

Another plus: These plants never seem to die! They just keep cranking out sizeable side shoots LOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOONG after the head is cut. In fact, I have some from last August, that have grow back on the stems I left in the eBuckets! Even the heat from the spring didn't take 'em out.

However, once the aphids moved in, I went ahead and cut them down. I think they'd still be furling in the wind otherwise...

Linda
stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 14, 2012
1:25 PM

Post #9165105

I ordered the following today:

Carrots (Danvers 126 & Scarlet Nantes)
Royal Burgundy Bush Beans
Early Wonder Beets
Calabrese Broccoli
Lettuces--Lolly Rosa, Ruby, Bronze Mignonette, & Buttercrunch
Peas--Little Marvel
Bloomsdale Long Standing Spinach
Dill
Cilantro, Slow-bolt
Parsley, Dark Green Italian

I may still do some shopping for other things. Just gotta see how it works out.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 15, 2012
7:55 AM

Post #9166104

Last year I direct sowed "Green Goliath" broccoli seeds on Sept 8th and cut the first head on Nov 16th.

I've purchased "Arcadia" seeds for this winter's crop, and "Green Magic" for 2013 spring crop.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 15, 2012
8:06 AM

Post #9166125

I'm trying to get a handle on when to start seeds for an extended spring crop. Seems we go from freezing cold to blazing heat in about two weeks, starting from the end of February to the end of March (well, almost...)

Seriously. It seems like our spring window with temps cool enough to keep the brassicas from bolting would have me planting seedlings out between mid-Jan to mid-Feb, under some kind of protective cover. Then, they'd have to grow like lighting to mature by the heat of April. I do have some heat-tolerant varieties, so it might be do-able.

Is that how ya'll are timing it?

Thanks

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 15, 2012
8:20 AM

Post #9166148

Linda - when I lived in South Florida, (zone 10a) I grew broccoli in the winter and had great success. I didn't keep records back then, so don't know when I sowed seeds, but it was probably in late September or early October after the best part of hurricane season was over.

http://www.zipdatamaps.com/33418

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 15, 2012
8:57 AM

Post #9166184

Ok, Bee.

Then, I've got the timing down pat! I'll be starting some of my broccoli and cauliflower seedlings the end of this month, for staggered out planting from mid-August through December 20th. That'll carry the growth over until mid-April, or when the plants bolt from the heat.

I had a fantastic crop last season! I was doing it correctly all along, and just didn't know it! I started all my broccoli, cauliflower, BS, and cabbage seeds on August 6 & 7th, and again on August 20 & 21st.

This time, I'll add a second sowing around October 6 & 7th, and again the 20 & 21st.

Hugs!

Linda

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 15, 2012
10:19 AM

Post #9166275

Linda - staggered planting is always a good idea. Do you get frost where you live? I usually count back from the first fall frost date, and go from there.

I also "feel the air" - something I can't explain, but it tells me when it's good and when it's not. Unfortunately, climate change has made it difficult to judge things the way I've done in the past.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 15, 2012
10:26 AM

Post #9166280

Bee,
I'd say Houston doesn't get any significant freezes during our winter season, except for about 5-10 days with below freezing temps between mid-January to approximately the end of February. Those are our coldest periods. And, the freezes aren't usually sustained. In Houston, we usually have a late night/early morning freeze, then the temps go back up into the mid-40s or higher during the (mostly) sunny days. We might have one, two, three times when we'll have freezes that last more than just overnight. And, then, usually no more than 3-4 days in a row, if that many.

So, all in all, our winters aren't headline news, which is why we can grow cold weather veggies from the time it gets cool, all the way through to next March. That's a long period of growing time (almost five months), and I can make better use of the large window by staggering further into the season.

Last season, I started and planted everything at the same time. This only made for one large harvest, all at once. Staggering will allow me a broader period of harvest over the entire season.

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 15, 2012
10:35 AM

Post #9166289

Gymgirl, I agree with Linda. Even here, I plant my frost hardy crops in the late fall -- pretty much brassicas. The brassicas stop growing for a while when it gets too cold in the winter, then resume growing in the spring. Down your way they may not even go dormant.

Kale just grows all winter no matter how cold it gets. Too bad I don't like kale!

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 15, 2012
10:37 AM

Post #9166291

NicoleC,
Gymgirl IS Linda! LOL!

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 15, 2012
10:50 AM

Post #9166309

Northern Ohio had fields of cabbages growing. Saw 2 diff sizes of growth, but they looked really good. Most folx get their humidity in the spring, Houston is prone to dry springs and wet summers when weather is better on track, but the south has a lot of probs with cabbage loopers and crews, so I quit messing with most brassicas, tho we do have a very good new broccoli that likes Hou area, can't get to records to find what I had planted

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 15, 2012
12:17 PM

Post #9166448

Kitt,
I grew Arcadia Broccolis for the first time last fall/wtr., and had a wonderful crop. And the rest of the brassicas did very well, too. I think I only picked off about 8 cabbage worms all season.

Linda

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 15, 2012
1:08 PM

Post #9166509

Gymgirl wrote:NicoleC,
Gymgirl IS Linda! LOL!


My bad, I meant HoneyBee!
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

June 15, 2012
3:49 PM

Post #9166725

NicoleC wrote:Kale just grows all winter no matter how cold it gets. Too bad I don't like kale!

That is a shame! Ever try a good old fashioned recipe for the soup? Potatoes flavored with onions and a good strong Portuguese sausage (or any you like) in a meat or vegetable broth with as much (or little) kale to give color and nutrition. Cook it until the kale is falling apart - you'll never notice it's there (but your body will - it's one of the very best vegetable sources of many essential nutrients, and the minerals aren't bothered by cooking).

Here are two by Emeril (http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/emeril-lagasse/emerils-kicked-up-kale-soup-recipe/index.html) and Rachael Ray (http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/rachael-ray/portuguese-chourico-and-kale-soup-recipe/index.html), but a Google search will turn up dozens of variations.

I recently found that the variety of "kale" used for the Portuguese version of the soup may not be one of our familiar curly kales or even the "new" small dark Tuscan kale (Nero, "Dinosaur", Lacinato, etc.), but something rather different and maybe milder. Called "Galega de Folhas Lisas (Smooth Green Leaf)", it is sold by Seeds From Italy (http://www.growitalian.com/kale-galega-de-folhas-lisas-smooth-green-leaf-35-11/). It looks like a cross between a kale and a loose-leaf cabbage. I'm going to try it this fall

As for myself, I just render a little pancetta in a deep pot, add some finely chopped fresh garlic and then a little liquid (water, stock or broth) when it just starts to color up to keep it from burning, add chopped kale and toss to coat, add a good amount of sea salt, fresh ground black pepper and some chili flakes and whatever else inspires me, cover and let cook over a slow heat until it is tender.

-Rich

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 16, 2012
5:01 AM

Post #9167263

Rich, I've tried a bunch of ways, I just don't like it. I can grow a bumper crop of kale, too.

That Smooth Green Leaf kale looks more like a collard to me. It's splitting hairs, I know, but maybe you can report back if it tastes like kale or taste like collard.

Fortunately spinach does well for me in the winter, too, and I love me some spinach.
stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 16, 2012
7:09 AM

Post #9167384

I use Kale as a trap crop for cabbage worms! LOL

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

June 16, 2012
12:59 PM

Post #9167695

So your the one responsible for all those cabbage moth Butterflies(LOL)!!

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

June 16, 2012
3:13 PM

Post #9167820

Oh geez, my kale is COVERED in those green cabbage butterfly caterpillers. Darn near impossible to see. But the birds help me, the catbirds love to go in there and hunt for worms.

Makes me wonder how well I will do with the fall crop of brocoli and brocoli raab I have planned. Have the seeds already but not ready to start them yet.

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

June 16, 2012
3:26 PM

Post #9167835

Just went and read the directions on my brocoli seeds which say 120 days to maturity. 4 months, wow, I had forgotten that they take so long. So will get this seeds started either this evening or probably tomorrow.

I also have brocoli raab but those seeds say 60 to 80 days going to hold off planting them. Then there will also be peas for fall but again not yet ready to plant.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 16, 2012
4:56 PM

Post #9167915

Rita,
The good thing about the fall wtr gardens is far LESS bugs to deal with! They must hibernate or something. But look out when it warms up again cause those babies wake up HUNGRY!!!

Ray_Der_Phan

Ray_Der_Phan
Oceanside, CA
(Zone 10a)

June 16, 2012
5:04 PM

Post #9167927

Kale? Bleck!! It grows like a weed here. Round up that junk! Or juice it when you have an upset stomach...it's better than than Ipecac.

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 16, 2012
5:06 PM

Post #9167930

I've decide to spray Dipel from now on when there's a worm problem. For a home garden sized area the price is pretty cheap if you mix it yourself, and it doesn't hurt anything except the worms eating your crops.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 16, 2012
5:26 PM

Post #9167948

Here's a pictorial update on the tomato Trellis frame I used this season for the first time. I cut most of the vines back this morning, and thought y'all might wanna see just how much the lines held up.

It was so easy to just wrap the vine around the line and anchor it over the crossbar. Will put this frame over all my tomato beds from now on.

The vines topped out at feet 8 feet.

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

June 16, 2012
5:27 PM

Post #9167951

Honestly, the only thing being bothered by insects around here is the kale by cabbage worms. Not about to spray just because of that. Not very fond of kale, planted it by mistake. (thinking I was buying brocili raab). It sure does grow like crazy though.
stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 16, 2012
5:52 PM

Post #9167971

Linda, is there supposed to be a picture with your post?

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 16, 2012
6:52 PM

Post #9168073

Trellis frame update pics.

Thumbnail by Gymgirl   Thumbnail by Gymgirl   Thumbnail by Gymgirl
Click an image for an enlarged view.

rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

June 16, 2012
10:15 PM

Post #9168282

stephanietx wrote:Linda, is there supposed to be a picture with your post?

Details, details... ;o)
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

June 16, 2012
10:27 PM

Post #9168289

newyorkrita wrote:Oh geez, my kale is COVERED in those green cabbage butterfly caterpillers. Darn near impossible to see. But the birds help me, the catbirds love to go in there and hunt for worms.

Suggestion (for what it's worth) - deal with them now or give up growing cole crops for a year or two. Seriously, take advice from someone who's been there. Birds are great, but there is an "ideal ratio" between predator and prey that says the prey must be there in staggering numbers to support a predator population. Think lions and wildebeasts. The wildebeasts will wipe out your crops and the lions will be happy.

OK, OK, a vague analogy at best.

Why is everyone coming down on kale? It is, hands down, the most nutritious green (non-starchy) vegetable out there, period. Higher in vitamins A and C than spinach. Higher in iron and calcium (and almost everything else) than cabbage. Loaded with phytonutrients and antioxidants, especially the Lacinato types. Broccoli comes close, but kale is available from the time it peeks it's leaves up above the ground until it turns bitter in the summer heat. Most people I know who swear they hate kale have never had it sweet and simple after a few hard freezes have killed off almost everything else in the garden. It's worth saving.

-Rich
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

June 17, 2012
4:43 AM

Post #9168402

Rcih, how do you fix kale sweet and simple? [I don't know what to do with it.]

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

June 17, 2012
8:40 AM

Post #9168653

I have been eating some of the kale because that is what I have. But I find kale to be a much stronger flavor than brocoli, which I much prefer. I thought I was buying brocoli raab seedlings or I wouldn't have the kale. The jury is still out as to if I would plant it again next year but I am thinking not. Give us a great receipe for kale and maybe I will change my mind!

As for the cabbage worms, I used to grow brocoli and I can't remember if I sprayed it or not. But since I was only interested in the heads, I didn't care if the leaves had been munched on. But I will probably order some thing with BT to use on the brocoli.

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

June 17, 2012
10:23 AM

Post #9168748

I planted the brocoli seeds. I have them in those cell pack thingys you buy at the nursery that I save and reuse. Fresh potting soil and just plant them. This way I can move the seedlings around until they go in ground.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 17, 2012
5:44 PM

Post #9169272

My hubby will eat just about anything, but even he won't eat kale. I don't like it either.
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

June 17, 2012
10:15 PM

Post #9169517

I like kale two ways. First, cooked with pancetta and garlic in a little olive oil until it's tender. The VITAL thing is that the kale MUST have been exposed to freezing temperatures, otherwise it's way too strong for my taste (and I like kale).

The second way is in a classic soup claimed by many nations, made with onions, potatoes, sausages and kale in a meat and/or vegetable broth. I sauté sliced onion in a little olive oil until it just starts to turn translucent, then add sausage (casings removed - a good Chorizo or Andouille work best) and cook until it's brown through. Then I add the kale, torn into small pieces, and toss it in the hot oil, followed by new potatoes - whole if they're small enough. They are grown commercially nearby, and do well in my garden too, so the "new" potatoes are plentiful in the very early spring, just when the kale is at its best. Then in goes the broth, with seasonings and herbs (I like bay and thyme, with a little crushed red pepper, plenty of black pepper, and good sea salt). All is brought just to a boil, the heat is lowered, and the pot is covered and allowed to simmer until the potatoes are fork-tender. I correct the seasoning if needed and remove the bay leaf or bundled herbs, and enjoy! The kale doesn't dominate, it just adds some interest to the soup (and tons of nutrition).

-Rich

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 18, 2012
8:06 AM

Post #9169867

This weekend's happenings:
Since it was so overcast out Saturday, I worked in the cool of the garage. Have I thanked God enough that my home sits on crosswind tunnels that blow straight through my yard and the house when I open windows and doors? But, I digress...

►Painted some "trellis" ladders I scored curbside almost two years ago. Two layers of Kilz Latex primer, to be followed with Krylon Spray paint to coordinate with the fence. The plan is to lay two bags of MG potting mix at the base of the ladders, slit the top, and sink the two cuke seedlings in. Same for the two zucchini squash, but they'll get the royal squash "teepee" built. The pallets will sit underneath the teepee. Pallet gardening at its best! The ladders will just lean on the fence, after I put a face of hardware cloth on them. And (prayerfully), there'll be space underneath the ladders to start some lettuce and spinach seeds and shield them from the scorching sun, once the cukes climb up and cover the frame.

►Painted galvanized poles for the two bird baths I'm constructing. Holding off on further advancement, to let the 11-yr-old nephew tackle some yard projects!

►Ripped the Ky Wonder Green Beans and sifted the pine bark fines mix. Will mix in copious amounts of Black Kow Composted Manure, and put the eggplants there next.

►Played with the bell peppers that are still alive, but just a tad less yellow than before. Sprayed with the MG Water Soluble fert Friday evening, and not a real change by Saturday morning. Well, maybe just a barely perceptible change. Keeping my eye on them.

Sorry for the sideways pics above of the trellis frame that held up 8 ft tomato vines on single lines. Very efficient and neat system. A total "EZ" button!

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

June 18, 2012
9:44 AM

Post #9169983

Well, no freezing temperatures around here so the taste of the kale is quite strong. I was thinking of possibly using it in a soup though. I am thinking that might work.
gretagreenthumb
Wichita Falls, TX

June 20, 2012
8:15 PM

Post #9173649

Very, very interesting -- already getting ready for fall gardens. . . Trying to wrap my head around that idea. Actually I've attempted it before, just can't get myself to plant cool weather crops when it is 100 degrees outside.

I planted cole crops this spring and I too had my share of cabbage worms, except not one was found on my kale. I still have beautiful kale in my garden -- not really knowing what to do with it, but I do put a small newer leaf in my smoothies. If there are enough fruits in that smoothie, it will be drinkable. You guessed it -- not too fond of that super healthy, but strong veggie. Wondering if I leave it in the garden through the summer if it will get that much needed freeze and be somewhat palatable.

Oh, for those who are interested. I planted royal purple bush beans this spring. We picked them this week. Those beautiful purple beans like to hide under all the leaves, close to the ground. I wasn't too crazy about the flavor -- too beany. In fact I am considering pulling them up or rototilling them in.

Now I must go plan my fall garden. . . maybe. Okay, I'll give it more serious thought.
stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 20, 2012
8:34 PM

Post #9173671

Hi greta!! How are you girl?

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

June 21, 2012
10:02 AM

Post #9174372

Well. I feel like I have moved to hot Texas today here on Long Island, NY as we are haveing a heat wave. Only a short one though for two days and then back to normal temperatures.

I have already put my brocolli seeds in and I hope they don't fry in this heat!
stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 21, 2012
10:54 AM

Post #9174432

Do you have a way to provide them some shade?

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

June 21, 2012
12:32 PM

Post #9174569

Stephanie, they are in the shade as I started the seedlings in re-used cellpacks like you buy annuals in. I save them, put in fresh potting soil and plant.

So far so good even with this heat as I see tiny seedlings this afternoon. Our temps are supposed to be back to normal by Saturday and nice and comfortable.
stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 21, 2012
3:58 PM

Post #9174846

My seed packets arrived today!!

Thumbnail by stephanietx   Thumbnail by stephanietx
Click an image for an enlarged view.

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

June 21, 2012
5:46 PM

Post #9174956

Lots of goodies you have there. And looks like your four footed helper is making sure the seeds are well looked after!
stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 21, 2012
7:20 PM

Post #9175082

He is always sooooo very helpful! LOL

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 22, 2012
8:05 AM

Post #9175718

Sorted my fall vegetable seeds this morning. Nothing to sow until August, which will probably be when the tomatoes are about done.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 22, 2012
9:31 AM

Post #9175848

I'm still gun shy about throwing seeds out into my new Raised Beds. I'm still addicted to fluorescent lights and drip trays!

Making my list, and checking it twice. About to start sowing some seeds next weekend!

Got a visiting DGer coming by tomorrow to help me construct my second raised bed. I can finally get all the remaining containers of pine bark fines and sand off the patio, and into the ground where it belongs. Gotta grab LOTS of bags of Black Kow Composted manure, cause these beds are for the broccoli, cauliflowers, and cabbages, the HUNGRY HIPPO water HOGS!

I'm getting excited about growing stuff in the ground for the first time.

P.S. Since I posted about the yellow bell pepper plants, they've perked up a bit. Still not vibrant green, but not so yellow anymore. It's rained hard twice since then, after I watered them with the MG Water Soluble Fert for Veggies. I also spritzed them with a solution of 1 Tbsp. of Epsom Salts to 4 cups of warm water. Supposed to encourage bloom set. And, I'm supposed to repeat this in 10 days. Since I sprayed, the small, nubby blooms that were on the plants before I sprayed have burst open into large blooms. We shall see!

Thanks for ya'lls participation in this thread. Keep posting your moves, so the other growers (and I) can get a better sense of the sowing/planting schedules for the fall/winter gardens!

Hugs, my friends! ^:-):-):-):-):-):-):-):-):-):-):-):-):-):-)^

Linda

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 22, 2012
11:26 AM

Post #9175961

Linda, which veggie seeds will you be sowing?

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 22, 2012
2:18 PM

Post #9176210

Bee,
Here's part of my list (posted above):

From The Sustainable Seeds Company
(Tatume Squash)
Early Jersey Wakefield Cabbage
Early Round Dutch Cabbage
Brunswick Cabbage
Early Wonder Beets
Detroit Dark Red Beets
Snowball Y Improved Cauliflower
Texas 1015Y Onion Seeds
Red Creole Onion Seeds
Little Marvel Peas
Wando Peas

From Johnny's Select Seeds Company
Waltham Butternut Squash
Acorn Squash
Arcadia Broccoli
Green Magic Broccoli
De Cicco Broccoli
Cassius Broccoli
Fava Beans
Space Spinach and other varieties
Da Cheong Chae-Mini Asian Pac Choi

For the Spring Tomatoes, I'm going to try some of the Dwarf Tomato Varieties. I ordered:

From Tatiana's Seeds (Canada)
Dwarf Wild Fred
SunSugar F1

From Victory Seeds
New Big Dwarf
Tasmanian Chocolate
Rosella Purple

Then, there's:
Mustard & Collard Greens
Seven Top Turnips ( large tops to go with the greens and spinach - all mixed in a crockpot!)
Various Carrot varieties
Lettuce (Romaine)
more Okra (Clemson Spineless, Red Burgundy, Cowhorn, Hill Country Red, Cajun Delight, Stewart's Zeebest)
Eggplants (seedlings going into the new bed tomorrow after it's put together and filled). About 6 different varieties, including Hansel & Gretel, Pot Black, Ping Tung,
Bell Peppers which have been in about 3.5 weeks now. They're starting to make blooms, and trying to green up for me.

I think that about covers the list of what should be growing between now and the end of April? May?

Oh, and I have about 9 rooted tomato cuttings that are going back in tomorrow, too, so praying for a fall harvest of tomatoes for the Thanksgiving table.

I think this is enough...

This message was edited Jul 20, 2012 10:30 AM
stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 22, 2012
3:54 PM

Post #9176326

Linda, you can always direct sow some seeds and plant some under lights. That way if you have a failure out in the garden, you have back ups. Then you can wean yourself off of planting under lights except for maters and peppers in Jan.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 23, 2012
5:39 AM

Post #9176921

Linda, you and I will be growing some of the same vegetables, so we will be able to compare notes :-)

Here's my list with proposed sowing dates:

Pak Choi - Toy Choi Hybrid (8/6/2012)
Brussels Sprouts - Catskill (8/13/2012)
Peas - Thomas Laxton (8/13/2012)
Kohlrabi - sweet vienna (8/13/2012)
Cauliflower - Snowball Y (8/20/2012)
Broccoli - Arcadia (8/27/2012)
Beet - Detroit Dark Red (8/27/2012)

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

June 23, 2012
9:04 AM

Post #9177140

Oh, I have baby Pak Choi seeds also. I wasn't sure if I should show them for fall as I had read that Pak Choi is very finicky and hard to grow. I wouldn't know as I have never tried before.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 23, 2012
2:23 PM

Post #9177466

newyorkrita - I didn't know Pak Choi was hard to grow. I've never tried growing it, either. We'll have to compare notes once they are ready to harvest (if the grow, that is.)

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

June 23, 2012
2:27 PM

Post #9177469

From what I read, they want the weather to be just right or they bolt. I guess we will find out.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 23, 2012
2:54 PM

Post #9177504

newyorkrita - yes, I just did some quick research and found the same thing. I also saw articles that suggested adding borax to the soil. I've added this to my shopping list.

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

June 23, 2012
3:09 PM

Post #9177520

Humm, I had not heard that. Really I just got the baby Pak Choi seeds on a whim as I thought it might be a nice green to try and grow.

I just went and really looked at my brocoli baby seedlings. Really tiny but seem to be doing great. So many seeds came up that I will have to do some thinning when they get big enough.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 23, 2012
5:03 PM

Post #9177655

newyorkrita - broccoli seedlings transplant very easily. Just take as much of the adhering soil as possible, and plop them in a new hole slightly lower than they grew before.

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

June 23, 2012
5:42 PM

Post #9177695

Thanks but I really don't have room for the extras. Will have more than enough as it is. I do have other things planned that I also need room for. Don't I wish I had a big plot to plant everything I think of lol!

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 24, 2012
5:37 AM

Post #9178137

newyorkrita - I have a huge garden, and still don't have enough room!

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

June 24, 2012
8:58 AM

Post #9178433

I think that is always the way, Never enough room no matter how much there is lol!
cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

June 25, 2012
10:01 AM

Post #9180103

Rita, your climate is so different from mine, I *almost hate to say anything.lol
I find the baby and dwarf choi do well. They do mature and bolt quickly, but if I plant small amounts in succession, it works out better then planting a large bed all at once. Hope they do well for you :0)

I made my fall seed order this morning, I hope it gets here quickly, because some I could sow right now.
The squash bugs are so bad, I've pulled all the summer squash plants and ordered some parthenocarpic to grow under cloth.

parthenocarpic zucchini, Caveli and Perfect Pick
watermelon, Sweet Favorite and Trillion
muskmelon, Superstar
cauliflower, Cheddar
winter squash, Autumn Crown and Rumbo
carrot, Hercules
parthenocarpic cucumber, Little Leaf
Romanesco
shelling peas, Wando and Early Frosty




cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

June 25, 2012
10:03 AM

Post #9180107

Oops, I forgot one. Vine peach, also called Mango Melon. Anyone tried these?

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

June 25, 2012
11:15 AM

Post #9180243

Thanks, lulu, I have the seeds so I figgure I will just try try. The sucession planting is a good idea. I will try that.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 25, 2012
11:21 AM

Post #9180250

A big "shout out" to DGer Kevcarr59 and his wife, Betty, from Buda, Tx., who spent all day working with me Saturday!

Kevin and I put together RAISED BED #2, a 4x8 footer on 16" corner posts. Then we set it in place. This week, I'll face the outside of the box with the extra cedar fence boards I have, to match the new fence and RB #1.

We had so much fun Saturday!

My nephew, Elijah (11 years old), got to handle a drill with Kevin, dig holes for "hole composting" of some veggie scraps and coffee grinds, and finally, SPRAY PAINT some old drawers I scored a month ago. The drawers are so adorable, and will be used as seed starter trays for 1/3 of my fall seeds.

Elijah and his two sisters will plant seeds in the drawers, this next weekend. They'll sow broccoli, cauliflower, cabbages, mustard and collard greens. I scored an old liquor crate yesterday, and will sow onion seeds this weekend too.

Elijah will drill the drainage holes in the bottoms of the drawers, since he was off in a tree and didn't get to that part...

Here's a picture of our handiwork. I figure I can add color to the yard, even without flowers! Flowers to come, NEXT spring...

Thumbnail by Gymgirl
Click the image for an enlarged view.

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 25, 2012
2:06 PM

Post #9180543

The seed drawers are a fantastic idea! I would have left the bottoms unpainted, though, for better aeration. I know my seeds do *much* better started in breathable wooden trays than plastic ones.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 25, 2012
2:11 PM

Post #9180552

I love the colors. I, too, would not have painted the interiors.
cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

June 25, 2012
2:37 PM

Post #9180592

Those look wonderful, Linda!
Practical and a neat way to brighten the garden :0)

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 25, 2012
3:00 PM

Post #9180621

NicoleC
The bottoms aren't painted. That's a 7 o'clock shadow! Except on the green box. I was show him how to do long strokes with the paint can. He was having trouble holding the paint can and pressing the nozzle. Then, we switched to the "two-hand" holding method! I was thinking of cutting out the bottoms and recovering with hardware cloth lined with weed block, but, that's more trouble to do...we'll drill lots of aeration holes, and some on the sides, too!

HoneyBeeNC
Only the first few inches of the insides are painted. Once the potting mix is in, the whole inside will LOOK like it's been painted!

I was about SAVING paint, for future projects! I've got planters to paint, too!

Hugs!



This message was edited Jun 25, 2012 5:05 PM

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 25, 2012
4:46 PM

Post #9180759

If the bottoms aren't plywood -- they look like fiberboard from here but apparently I don't see so well! -- you may have to do the bottoms in a couple of years anyway. But that's a nice quiet project for a hot day or a frosty day.

Great re-purposing idea!

kevcarr59

kevcarr59
BUda, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 25, 2012
5:36 PM

Post #9180822

Glad to help with the raised bed project and thank you for the great lunch at Los Cuco's. Betty & I went to our friends' house and lazed around in the pool after our construction and lunch afternoon. Saturday night was the best nights sleep in a long time.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 25, 2012
7:32 PM

Post #9181024

thanks for the compliments, y'all. can't do that facing in all this heat. so back to making those seed lists and checking them twice, er, four times!

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

June 25, 2012
10:02 PM

Post #9181267

From a far away viewer enjoying hearing about the projects,sounds fun!!!

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 28, 2012
10:53 AM

Post #9184833

So, everybody has laid down the garden tools, till it cools off, huh?

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 28, 2012
11:02 AM

Post #9184853

Gymgirl - well, actually, we had a record low of 55F here yesterday, so I spent quite a few hours in the garden.

Going to close up the house and turn on the a/c soon, though, as it's supposed to be in the upper 90's later today, with triple digits, and perhaps, a record high on Sunday. The old record was 104F

Anyone who still doesn't think "climate change" is real, should step outside this weekend for a few hours!

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 28, 2012
11:43 AM

Post #9184917

The past few days we've had some very pleasant low temperatures at night, but we're heading back into lows in the mid to upper 70's for the next week or so -- and 110F highs. And no sign of rain in the forecast.

I did get out and soak the edibles and younger plants/shrubs/trees yesterday eve and this morning, even though much of it meant hauling a watering can. At least the rainwater tanks can reach *most* of the back yard and orchard -- and I'm afraid to check how much is left. They are big, but not bottomless.

On the plus side... I don't have to mow!

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 28, 2012
12:41 PM

Post #9185021

NicoleC,
While we're waiting on more gardening activity posts, would you mind using this opportunity to take us through your file box organization method?

Post pics of your cards, box, dividers, etc., how you log the info, etc., etc., etc.

We'll give you an interrupted block so you can post all the details together if you can't manage one long post.

Can we all agree to NOT post in-between her posts, once NicoleC starts her tutorial? Once she let's us know she's done, then the questions can follow? All Agreed?

Nicole, let us know when you can begin!

Thanks!

Linda

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 28, 2012
1:06 PM

Post #9185046

Linda, I'll be happy to, but I think I'll start a new thread when I'm ready so other people can add their ideas, too. It might be more coherent that way, and anyone not interested doesn't have to follow the thread.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 28, 2012
1:20 PM

Post #9185068

Ok, Nicole!

Just fyi, there's a thread already started over on the beginner vegetables forum that's discussing seed organization.

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1242763/

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 28, 2012
1:23 PM

Post #9185073

IT'S RAINING OUTSIDE!!!

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 28, 2012
1:39 PM

Post #9185088

Quoting:IT'S RAINING OUTSIDE!!!


Sure beats raining inside!

You know there's a shortage of rain, when this is "good news". We are not expected to get rain for at least a week!

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 28, 2012
2:36 PM

Post #9185159

Uh, IT'S STORMING (out...)

I'm gonna be drenched btt I reach my car...

Ray_Der_Phan

Ray_Der_Phan
Oceanside, CA
(Zone 10a)

June 28, 2012
5:15 PM

Post #9185347

It's HOT! Reached about 74 today (sorry, I had too) :)

Things are going very well this year. Only a few weeks of June Gloom. We're getting a lot of sunshine this year.
grits74571
Talihina, OK

June 28, 2012
5:55 PM

Post #9185415

just last week we were talking about planting Nastursians in the fall garden so I have been looking for seeds any helpful hints as to where I might find some .I will be planting my usual fall garden of turnips,mustard,kale, chinese cabbage,Alaskan peas, winter radish..This and more as I go along last year the fall garden held up well into the spring planting season.. the fall gardens are a delight as there is not much to do such as insect control or watering every year my fall garden becomes more and more extensive LOVE IT

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

June 29, 2012
7:17 AM

Post #9185953

Myself I think I'm looking at winter vegies instead of fall.Temps are way to much for fall vegies,106 yesterday ,102 today, I feel like I'm living someplace I don't even know,that's a strange feeling.I've lost some of my summer seedlings(herbs and flowers).
I'll be while getting round to Brussel sprouts ,more lettuce, a few things.Some of you have most likely read this before as we have only had 3/100dreths of an inch of rain for June this is not looking good.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 29, 2012
10:06 AM

Post #9186197

Regarding the fall/winter brassicas, here's my plan.

Since I usually start my seeds indoors anyways, I'm going to start 1/3 of my broccoli, cauliflowers, and cabbage seeds tomorrow in the APS 15-cells (this is an experiment to see just how early I can possibly start them and be successful). I've seen whole community gardens around Houston with almost full-size heads of cabbage by mid-September! So that means they HAD to start seeds indoors somewhere, at least by the beginning of June.

Here's my schedule from last year:
8/6 & 8/6/11: I sowed seeds for broccoli, cauliflower, cabbages, Chinese cabbage, Brussels Sprouts, mustards & collard greens
9/2/11: potted them up to the drinking water bottles
9/17/11: hardening off for 9 days
9/29/11: Everything transplanted to the garden

My schedule was off several weeks because I thought it was too hot for the seedlings to be transplanted out. This season I'll make that adjustment, and get them out for hardening off at 6 weeks, and transplanted out by week 7 or 8. I have purchased floating row cover to help keep the moths off the seedlings at transplant time. It'll still be warm, and they'll still be lurking.

As long as the seedlings are kept properly hydrated, they'll make it through the tail end of the heat. Once the weather starts cooling off, they'll have developed a good root system, and will take off like bullets!

And, I've heard the the Farmer's Almanac is predicting it will get cooler earlier this year, like September/October. That would be GREAT!

Linda

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 30, 2012
7:38 AM

Post #9187299

Linda, according to my notes, I direct seeded broccoli Sept 6th last year, and cut the first head on Nov 16th. We had a very mild winter, so I was harvesting right up till I needed the space to sow peas.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 30, 2012
7:43 AM

Post #9187306

Thanks for that tip,Bee!
my broccoli took forever because of the heat. that's why I'monly starting a few early this time .

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 30, 2012
7:52 AM

Post #9187337

That's a good plan. Even if it get cold here this winter the brassicas will survive.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 30, 2012
8:04 AM

Post #9187350

it's cloudy out, and the ground is saturated. looks like i have a small window betee between drops to go plant some more eggplant transplants and bells. moving slowly today. just finished coffee. i hear thunder...

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

June 30, 2012
9:08 AM

Post #9187424

Well wasn't trying to make this the weather thread it finally rained here also yesterday for two hours and this morning for about the same. That ends the drought here and man I'm happy!! It's still hot for gardening only at it anyway.
Be back with more greens beside the lettuce still going and me trying to keep that cool enough to stay tasty.(like September).
Myself, I enjoy the Brassicas , Including many that some do not(no such thing to me).

kevcarr59

kevcarr59
BUda, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 30, 2012
7:33 PM

Post #9188203

I guess I heard the same thunder Linda did... Finally got some rain, maybe a 10th of an inch, ground cracking again...

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 30, 2012
8:07 PM

Post #9188239

we got a bunch of rain most of today, and more predicted for tomorrow.
stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 30, 2012
9:25 PM

Post #9188320

I'm jealous.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 30, 2012
10:01 PM

Post #9188341

don't be.
all i wanted to do was go out, plant my flats , layer my rb #2, and pull the briar brambles before they overtake the bed (again). none of that happened. and the sun just taunted me...

so, i was forced to stay in and clean house...

This message was edited Jul 2, 2012 9:47 AM

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 1, 2012
7:01 AM

Post #9188536

We might get a thunder storm tonight, if not I'll have to hand-water tomorrow.

Picked the first "Jimmy Nardellos" peppers this morning. Fried one and found the taste sweet and delicious. These are the frist "frying peppers" I've ever grown/eaten.
stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 1, 2012
8:21 AM

Post #9188611

LOL Linda!! We've had a few clouds and cooler temps today.

happytail

happytail
St. Simon's Island, GA
(Zone 9a)

July 1, 2012
8:23 AM

Post #9188614

I am just getting ready to start on my late summer/fall planting of okra, tomatoes, and peppers. Late July I'll start with lady peas, eggplant and a few more tomatoes. My issue right now is my summer tomatoes are still producing green tomatoes. I got a late start this spring, and they are still doing great. But I need the space if I'm going to get a fall crop in. Do I just pull them out?

I have my cool weather crop seeds ordered, and will start them inside sometime in the next week or two. This will be my first cool weather garden in south Georgia, and I'm excited to see what does well.

Radish
Packman broccoli
Long island brussel sprouts
Leaf lettuce mix
Carrots
Asparagus
Garlic
Sugar snaps

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 1, 2012
8:56 AM

Post #9188648

happytail - I would not pull those still producing tomatoes.

Sow your seeds in small pots, and as they grow, pot them up to bigger pots. By then your current tomato plants should be done, and you can transplant the new tomatoes.

If you can; set the pots down into the ground, it will keep the roots cool.

kevcarr59

kevcarr59
BUda, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 1, 2012
12:34 PM

Post #9188844

Happy:

I would agree with Honeybee on keeping the tomatoes in the ground, so when the heat breaks a little bit, you'll still have toms. When you get ready to pull the tomatoes, have some composted manure ready to put in to amend the bed. It will be much easier to do when the roots of the tomatoes come out, and let it sit a week or 2, then do your transplants.

Would also like to hear how you do with the Long Island Brussels Sprouts. Have you done these before?? This is my first try at sprouts at all, so it's totally new to me. Gymgirl has given me a few pointers, so that's a big help.

Just my cent-and-a-half...

Kevin

happytail

happytail
St. Simon's Island, GA
(Zone 9a)

July 1, 2012
3:47 PM

Post #9189032

Well, I don't want to pull the tomatoes, so thanks for the advice. I would be sad to lose all those good tomatoes. I planted these little oval orange tomatoes called Nugget, and they are fantastic. Like eating candy, they are so sweet. And my celebrity are just now getting to be a nice size.

I have not tried Long Island Improved, but have read good things. Brussel sprouts grow well here, so I hope to have good luck. Also planting Oliver, a more compact variety with a shorter harvest time. I can't wait to eat them fresh, instead of buying them from the grocery store.

kevcarr59

kevcarr59
BUda, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 1, 2012
4:11 PM

Post #9189057

I'm trying the Long Island Improved & Mezzo Nano from Seeds of Italy. There is another I found some seed at the grocery store display, but it's name escapes me at the moment...

With us not getting freezing temperatures until November or December, it's going to be awful hot to put these in the ground in late August or early September. That's about the biggest thing I'm worried about, it being hot during the fall & it stressing the plants. The wife & grand daughter absolutely love them, so I've got to grow them...



happytail

happytail
St. Simon's Island, GA
(Zone 9a)

July 1, 2012
6:38 PM

Post #9189208

I think I'll start mine inside, in the a/c with a grow light, and then put them out in mid-late October. I have a Parks seed starting tray with this spongy medium that seems to work great for me. And the heat mat below helps germination.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 2, 2012
7:52 AM

Post #9189779

Well,
Nothing got done in the garden this weekend, except everything got totally drenched. Which I'm definitely NOT complaining about...except the grass, maybe...

The more I think about it, the more I want the grass gone and just some paver pathways in place. Maybe one small (very small) patch of grass...

Didn't feel well, so didn't get to sow the seeds, either. Although, the okra experiment with KevCarr59's seeds has gone well. Now, I have more than enough okra plants! Will probably set them out this evening, along with the remaining bells and eggplants.

So far, have 5 okra and 6 eggplants in buckets and containers. Have half of RB #1 to fill, once I rip out those tomato plants. The bells that were in distress have greened up and are putting on blossoms and fruit! I think ya'll were right about the nitrogen deficiency!

That's it for the weekend report. What'd ya'll get done toward the fall/wtr gardens?

Linda

kevcarr59

kevcarr59
BUda, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 2, 2012
10:32 AM

Post #9189972

Quick Okra update: FINALLY, a second Zeebest Okra has sprouted about 3 weeks after the first, which is now about 2" tall. At this rate it may be October before I get to see what a Zeebest Okra looks like...The Burgundy & the seed from last year doing well also. The 4 Cowhorns are now about 5" tall and looking great...

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 4, 2012
10:49 AM

Post #9192812

Happy 4th to everyone. Great day for gardening!

First off , I refreshed one end of RB#1 with some compost, lime, rock phosphate , and fertilizer. I've planted all the remaining bell pepper seedlings. Next up is the remaining eggplants and rooted tomato cuttings. Once all this is in, the bed will be fairly filled. I'm tempted to sprinkle some carrot seeds in between the spaces, since this is where they'll go once the bells are up.

What do y'all say about this idea?

After that I'm emptying the EBs where the pitiful onion nubs are just sitting. Redirecting the EBs for my mustards and collards, and onions I'll start from seeds this go round.

Y'all eat some Q for me!

Linda

happytail

happytail
St. Simon's Island, GA
(Zone 9a)

July 4, 2012
1:08 PM

Post #9192956

Started some of my fall tomato seeds and some Holy Basil today. Ordered another Bio-Dome from Parks Seeds, and some refill sponges for the existing 3 domes I already have. I've had such good luck with these little spongy things from Parks, I just can't go back to the peat pots. Almost 100% germination rate with the sponges, and it was just hit or miss with anything else I've tried. I did get a heating mat, and this year, I added a grow light for my seedlings.

Tomatoes started today:
Dagma's Perfection
Riesentraube
Costoluto Genovese
Fireworks
Super Sioux

All heat lovers with a shorter season (60-78 days)

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

July 4, 2012
1:29 PM

Post #9192976

Oh, yumm on the tomatoes!
Mindyrecycles
Tucson, AZ
(Zone 9b)

July 4, 2012
3:32 PM

Post #9193113

We just had our first good downpour of the summer! Hooray! Now I hope it's done in time for fireworks tonight. I won't do anything in the garden today but plan over the long weekend, to fertilize and continue our slow makeover of the backyard. We ate our first serving of okra Saturday and hoping for more this weekend. Harvested some white sweet peppers and put them in chicken fajitas. I also harvested my first edible cantaloupe ever.

Thumbnail by Mindyrecycles
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 4, 2012
3:52 PM

Post #9193146

That is one good looking cantaloupe! Congratulations!
cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

July 5, 2012
8:55 AM

Post #9193867

Nice Mindy! You'll never be able to enjoy one of those so called cantaloupes from the store again ;0)

Happytail, have you grown Costoluto Genovese before? Interested in hearing if it is a prolific producer.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 5, 2012
1:25 PM

Post #9194216

I've grown it. Nice flavor, but can't tell you definitively about production.

Here are some update pics on those bells I was concerned about.

Pic #1 was when only the two bells in the lower right corner were greening up.
Pic #1 was taken yesterday. All the bells are finally taking off (the wee bells in the pic were planted yesterday...)

Pic #3 Also planted some eggplants (2 Hansels & 2 Gretyls)
Pic #4 Tomato cuttings I rooted several weeks ago. Hoping for Thanksgiving tomatoes!

Thumbnail by Gymgirl   Thumbnail by Gymgirl   Thumbnail by Gymgirl   Thumbnail by Gymgirl
Click an image for an enlarged view.

steadycam3
Houston Heights, TX
(Zone 9a)

July 5, 2012
2:21 PM

Post #9194306

I had really good luck with some snow peas called Melting Sugar as a fall crop. Seed in August and use the same type trellis as Gymgirl and i use for tomatoes, ie the string. when I get rid of the vines, I just cut the strings and install new string for the next crop. No need to "unwind", just throw whole thing on compost heap. I plan to grow broccoli, gai lan, snow peas, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, red potatoes. My latest cucumbers are still going strong as well as my lima beans.

happytail

happytail
St. Simon's Island, GA
(Zone 9a)

July 5, 2012
2:25 PM

Post #9194313

My DH made me a thing for my snaps to grow on, with eye hooks all around the bottom, that I can tie up to my maypole thing, and I'll be able to just cut the string and throw the whole thing on the compost heap too! I'm so excited!

I have not tried the Costoluto tomatoes before, but they are rated highly for our HOT summers. Hopefully they'll do well for a summer tomato. Will keep you posted.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 5, 2012
8:06 PM

Post #9194777

Steadycam,
You're not growing any root crops or brassicas this fall /winter?
lusciousleaves
West of Chicago, IL
(Zone 5b)

July 6, 2012
6:53 AM

Post #9195079

Hi all. It looks like this thread could use a few more zone 5r's. Near Chicago here. Have played with fall/winter gardening a little in the past and would like to again this year. I'm hoping for a good long season this year. With the heat as high as it is, as early as it is, that might actually happen. Time will tell.

But in the meantime, I've been getting ready for another long growing spell. Just seeded for the fall in trays:

Bloomsdale spinach
Dwarf blue kale
Michililli cabbage
Baby bok choy
Early Dutch cabbage
English cress
Cress
Swiss chard
Fennel
Butterhead lettuce
Baby romaine lettuce
Mizuna
Broccoli raab

In the garden:

Bull's blood beets
Early Wonder beets
Detroit dark red beets
Zinnias
Sunflowers
Manmouth dill

Plus, I've been scouring the seed catalogs for what to add next. I have a huge seed order in a shopping cart at one of the suppliers and am going to have to whittle it down in the coming days. I've got another chore ahead moving the strawberries into the asparagus bed (or maybe toss them altogether) to make room for fall planting. For this particular bed, my husband made cold frames that fit over it to extend the season. I'm itching to try it out this year. We tried tunnels, but the winds tore them to bits so we had to reevaluate and come up with other options.

Two more days of this wicked heat and then we can finally get back to a normal summer season. :D

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 6, 2012
9:47 AM

Post #9195325

Lusciousleaves, welcome to the discussion. ALL zones are welcome here. Looks like we're gonna be growing some things in common. Nice for comparison!

Keep on posting! I think the southern growers are inside enjoying the A/C!

Linda
steadycam3
Houston Heights, TX
(Zone 9a)

July 6, 2012
2:51 PM

Post #9195655

yes, GG, Im going to grow radishes, carrots and beets but the two broccolis are the only brassicas. Cabbage takes a lot of space and I dont like it THAT much. I love broccoli so I give the cabbage space to the broccoli or gai lan. I forgot to say the radishes, beets and carrots. They do really well for me. Gradually my soil is getting less lumpy so my carrots are growing more normal instead of "space alien" carrots.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 6, 2012
5:00 PM

Post #9195762

Steadycam,
What soil blend do you grow ur root crops in?
steadycam3
Houston Heights, TX
(Zone 9a)

July 6, 2012
5:41 PM

Post #9195816

I started several years ago with a mix of potting soil and the earth double-tilled under my beds, adding compost every time I plant a new crop. Im working toward getting something closer to Tapla mix, adding more pine bark fines and some fine rock crumbles for more structure. What I had been using decomposed quickly so the level in my beds had to be replenished often. I just let things "evolve" rather than doing any radical changes. I pretty much compost every weed, grass, plant, stick and kitchen peelings that my property produces so I always have compost. I was limited to how much of the pine bark fines I could purchase so I do that more slowly than I would like but Im not a person who frets.
lusciousleaves
West of Chicago, IL
(Zone 5b)

July 6, 2012
6:47 PM

Post #9195897

GG, 90% of the US is inside enjoying the AC! :D Including us way up here. I keep repeating the mantra, "One more day. One more day of the heat . . . "

My garden has never produced a carrot without getting filled with those little worms. White fly, I believe. I'd like to give them another shot again this year, though. Maybe planting later in the season will prove more reliable.
grits74571
Talihina, OK

July 7, 2012
11:47 AM

Post #9196664

Gymgirl you mentioned rooting tomato cutting how about a few helpfull hints on doing this
steadycam3
Houston Heights, TX
(Zone 9a)

July 7, 2012
1:51 PM

Post #9196823

Im not GG but take a sucker and stick in a glass of water under a flourescent light or kitchen window and in 5 days you will have roots. then plant in soil.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 7, 2012
2:19 PM

Post #9196863

I'm Gymgirl! Thanks Steadycam!

I changed up my method a bit. I wasn't getting as strong a seedling by rooting them in water . What I do now is dip the tip of the cutting in either a rooting hormone (which I rarely have on hand) or some ground cinnamon. Then, I poke a hole in some fresh potting mix, ease the cutting on down, water in, and sit it off into some shade until I see some new growth.

I took the suckers while the mother plant was relatively healthy. My suckers average between 8" and 12" long.

That's it!

Linda
steadycam3
Houston Heights, TX
(Zone 9a)

July 7, 2012
3:04 PM

Post #9196935

I have a double T12 48" shop light suspended over my sink area in the kitchen which allows me to root things on my bar which I dont use for sitting or eating. My sister laughs at me for growing something "anywhere there is a small ray of light" in her words. My bar does look like a commercial nursery most of the time but it allows me to see my plants often. For someone like me with ADD, out of sight is out of mind. I think it is this strong light which makes it so easy for me to root things in water. My tomato seedlings have roots thicker than the "hair on a dogs back" as my mom would say. When I plant out, I bury the plant to the point only the top two sets of leaves are above the soil line.

Thumbnail by steadycam3
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 7, 2012
4:15 PM

Post #9197011

Nice setup!

And now that you mention it, I have a breakfast bar countered that is never used! Duh!!!
grits74571
Talihina, OK

July 7, 2012
6:22 PM

Post #9197139

Thanx for the help My DW does root starting so I showed her the answers so maybe she will get some going ,I know she has some rootone cause she took all of mine and has not givin it back

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 8, 2012
1:38 PM

Post #9197969

I have a question regarding rooting tomato suckers...

If I take a sucker from a determinate tomato plant, will it grow into a full-sized plant and produce tomatoes?

I have lots of healthy looking determinates that I would like to try a fall crop with.

Thanks.
grits74571
Talihina, OK

July 8, 2012
1:59 PM

Post #9197992

Ok Ladies I took 4 cutting(suckers) from an Abe Lincoln (roma) tomato which I put into a shaded bed and four of same which I put into a jar of water on my back porch where it is shady so now it is just wait and see ...Honeybee if it grows it will be a direct clone see us gardeners have been doing SYFY for a long time///

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 8, 2012
2:31 PM

Post #9198012

grits74571 - thanks for your reply. I understand the "clone" part, but am wondering if - because they are determinates - whether or not they will grow into full-sized plants, or if they know they have already reached their end of life.
steadycam3
Houston Heights, TX
(Zone 9a)

July 8, 2012
3:13 PM

Post #9198046

HB, if we extend that logic, a cloned cat would be born the same age as the parent cat. We know that is not the case because cloned animals are born babies and grow up just as any other animal does. Sorry I dont have time to google that right now to give references but you could, if you have time. All plants from cuttings are clones. Determinate is kinda like "annual" and indeterminate is similar to perennial. The clone of the determinate would then be determinate and have a limited lifespan just like the parent plant. If you clone an annual, ("take a cutting") before the annual dies, you will have a "new" plant which will grow until the frost kills it.

This message was edited Jul 8, 2012 5:22 PM

Cybrczch

Cybrczch
Lincoln, NE
(Zone 5b)

July 8, 2012
4:17 PM

Post #9198133

Honeybee,

Are you asking if you take a cutting from a determinate tomato (one that is genetically designed to only grow so big, then terminate the growing points in a flower cluster), will the cutting plant get as big as the parent? Or will the cutting plant send out the terminal flowers before it reaches full size and prevent the plant from growing to its full size? I don't grow tomatoes from cuttings, but my guess is that if you take a cutting and remove any flower clusters you will 'reset' the fllowering trigger of the plant so that it will grow vegetatively to its full size before setting flowers.

This message was edited Jul 8, 2012 5:18 PM

Cybrczch

Cybrczch
Lincoln, NE
(Zone 5b)

July 8, 2012
4:29 PM

Post #9198145

A frigid 85 degrees F out today, well frigid compared to what we have been getting.
Planted Burpee Stringless Green Pod bush beans where the spring lettuce and kohlrabi were.
Planted the last of my Cool Breeze cucumber seed where I harvested the garlic earlier this week - 15 nice bulbs.
Cole crops and chard started indoors a couple weeks ago, growing well.
Tomato harvest has started - three Muriels (all with a little BER, sigh... the calcium/magnesium supplements couldn't stand up to the weather), and one perfect looking Bella Rosa. Peppers (except for the damaged pimento type ones I picked earlier) I am resisting until they turn color...
Wrapped my sweet corn crop in bird netting, scattered critter repellent around the base, and sprayed the ears with capsaicin spray. Hoping I save enough ears for at least one meal, compared to last year when the squirrels (!) went on a rampage and I didn't get a single ear.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 8, 2012
8:46 PM

Post #9198406

I just LOVE it when y'all talk veggie gardens!

Looks like fall seed starting is about to ramp up. I got a whole lot cleared up in my yard this weekend, so my way toward the seed starting trays is clear.

Hey y'all, I'm getting an ammonia smell in my garage since I stacked six and a half 25 lb. bags of MooNure compost in there. The bags are sealed. Should I tear a slit in them so they can get some air? Does this mean the compost isn't finished? I couldn't leave them outdoors cuz of the ants and possible compost predators.

Thanks

Linda

meadowyck

meadowyck
Brooksville, FL
(Zone 9a)

July 8, 2012
9:04 PM

Post #9198414

I just found this thread, so will go back and read all, but just wanted to say I'm glad I found this one as I'm just about to try growing a veggie garden for the first time in FL, it feels weir to start at this time of the year. I've gotten several seed orders in, just have to go slow with getting everything (low budget, as I just got laid off a few months ago). I still have my grow bags, soil mix, and then I'll be set. I'm picking up a 50 pound bag of DE to start my seedlings in, then the next week another item, and so forth.

Looking forward to compairing notes with others who are growing this time of the year.

Jan

ps I love the multi color drawers
grits74571
Talihina, OK

July 9, 2012
4:37 AM

Post #9198607

meadow how much did you have to pay for 50lb. bag of DE here I can say that the change left from a 20 would buy you a cup of coffee...
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 9, 2012
4:44 AM

Post #9198609

O.K. ~ you lost me. Jan, you said you are picking up a 50# bag of DE to start your seedlings? I've always known DE to be diatomaceous earth which is used for bug control, not seed starting fodder. Am I wrong? Kristi

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 9, 2012
6:17 AM

Post #9198702

Cybrczch -
Quoting:Are you asking if you take a cutting from a determinate tomato (one that is genetically designed to only grow so big, then terminate the growing points in a flower cluster), will the cutting plant get as big as the parent? Or will the cutting plant send out the terminal flowers before it reaches full size and prevent the plant from growing to its full size?


Yes - exactly!

Quoting: my guess is that if you take a cutting and remove any flower clusters you will 'reset' the fllowering trigger of the plant so that it will grow vegetatively to its full size before setting flowers.


I hadn't thought of that, but it makes sense.

I'll cut just a small number as an experiment to see what happens. I have an area where I've pulled onions, and have wanted to grow something there.

Thanks for your input - much appreciated :-)

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 9, 2012
6:26 AM

Post #9198722

meadowyck - I gardened in Palm Beach County, Florida for 30+ years and it gets a little getting used too. But I loved being able to start seedlings outdoors in late summer for winter/spring harvest. Those Jan/Feb occasional frosts were the only thing that spoiled the fun.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 9, 2012
6:59 AM

Post #9198794

I think you're right, Kristi, about the DE. Meadowyck should be starting seeds in a sterile, seed-starting mix. I use MG, but there are any number of brands available.

Meadowyck,

Thanks for the drawer compliment! You have no idea how many responses I have gotten about those drawers. Every time I see them, they make me smile. Will be drilling holes in them today to start my onion seeds in the deeper drawers, and some of the brassicas in the shallower drawers.

Regarding the seed-starting process, here's a link to a seed starting tutorial I put together. It's what I do, however, there are many, many, many other ways to do it. You can skip the part about sterilizing the mix, since you're starting with fresh. I only sterilize re-purposed seedling mix that I use over again, from time to time. I'm starting with more fresh this time. I'm probably very anal about the sterilizing thing but, since I'm on a gardening budget, if I can sterilize what I have to use over and again, well, that's a penny saved!

And, the number one tip I can give you is --

►DO NOT PLANT YOUR SEEDS TOO DEEP!

I have found over these last four seasons of successfully starting tomatoes, bell peppers, and brassicas from seeds, that one of the greatest contributors to seed-starting failure is planting too deeply.

I use a pair of chopsticks and drill holes in my potting mix that, on average, are never deeper than 1/4". It may seem shallow (it did to me, at first), but I compared my previous failures to my current success, and that is just about the defining variable that made such a difference.

Hugs!

http://allthingsplants.com/blogs/entry/136/

Linda

This message was edited Jul 9, 2012 9:12 AM
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 9, 2012
9:22 AM

Post #9199022

I place the seeds on the ProMix and sprinkle a light covering of soil on top of the seeds. There is less chance of them being planted too deeply in that manner.

And, the number one tip I can give you is --

►DO NOT LET YOUR SEED STARTING MIXTURE DRY OUT!

I've found that to be the primary requirement of seed starting.

I don't know if anyone else here does succession planting but I just set out 7 cucumbers, 6 squash and will try to do the tomatoes between these wonderful showers. 1/2 inch of rain so far... yippee!

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 9, 2012
9:42 AM

Post #9199047

Kristi,
You keep posting those succession planting details here, and you're gonna have a following!

Hugs!

Kudos on the "dry out" tip!
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 9, 2012
11:14 AM

Post #9199172

Linda ~ it is just to keep new summer vegies started and when the ones in production play out, rip them up and replant with the new starts. Or you can plant successive rows every two or three weeks with the same results.

This climate is tough on beans, squash, cucumber plants, etc and by starting new plants throughout the summer season, it will keep up continuous production. Just curious if anyone does this or only two plantings? Spring and Fall? Kristi

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 9, 2012
12:47 PM

Post #9199267

Kristi,
I'm trying to get on your bandwagon!

My goal is to always have something ready to put in, as soon as I pull something out. Since I'll be starting the brassicas and onion seeds this week, I will strive to have seedlings ready to stagger plant out from August 1st until December 20th.

We have approximately 285 growing days in Houston, and I wanna capture as many growing days as I can starting with my fall/winter garden!

Linda

This message was edited Jul 9, 2012 2:57 PM

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 9, 2012
1:04 PM

Post #9199293

Kristi,
Where are you starting your seedlings? This will be my first attempt at starting any seeds outdoors, except for some beets and turnips I did once before. I know it's easier to just sprinkle the seeds on the RB (I guess, since this'll be my first attempt), but with all the pillbugs in my yard, I like to give a seedling the best advantage I can.

I truly don't mind starting them inside under lights, and transplanting them out. Plus, since I have limited growing space, I like to control the number of plants, and would rather set out the right number, than waste seeds by having to thin where I sowed too many!

My first attempt will be with sowing 1/3 of the seeds in the painted drawer seed trays and leaving them outside...but, I'm still starting 1/3 indoors, and I'll be direct sowing the final 1/3 directly in the RBs. It's not a hard and fast experiment, cuz I won't be sowing them all at the same time.

Well, I could if I only sowed a few seeds all at the same time, in the three different locations...maybe...

Linda

meadowyck

meadowyck
Brooksville, FL
(Zone 9a)

July 9, 2012
2:34 PM

Post #9199393

Yep DE is the diatomaceous earth. I love trying new seed growing media so this will be a first. I'm a little disappointed in the company as they havent called me back yet.

Jan

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 9, 2012
4:29 PM

Post #9199502

What's the benefit ?
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 9, 2012
7:59 PM

Post #9199786

Jan ~ the diatomaceous earth I have is so fine I can't imagine using it for seed starting. I use two different grades of DE, garden and food grade. I use it for insect control. Please do keep us updated on this project.

Linda ~ I start the seedlings outdoors in yogurt or sour cream containers with drain holes drilled in them. They sit in the same conditions that they will grow in when planted, full sun. I do raise the containers off the ground to prevent bugs or fire ants or other four legged varmints from plundering in them.

I can understand starting spring seedlings in a warmer environment but in summer, seeds/seedlings have no issues with heat as long as they are kept moist. It seems there would be a certain amount of conditioning to move seedlings outdoors from air conditioning to these blessed' 100 degree temps. That is a step I chose to avoid. JMO... Kristi

1st photo some of the seedlings
2nd photo some of the four legged varmints

Thumbnail by podster   Thumbnail by podster
Click an image for an enlarged view.

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

July 9, 2012
9:02 PM

Post #9199860

I've never started a fall crop before, because I always over-fill my beds and hate to pull anything.

But this year, spring and early summer were very cold, and I was very busy, so my "sprin g crops" didn't go in until very rceently. Days were still cool until the Bok Choy emerged, then we got "warm" weather, like days in the 70s and no rain.

I've never had Bopk Choy be fussy before, but thsi year many different varieties all got sulky and stopped growing shortly after the seedling leaves emerged. Too warm? Soil not rich enough?

Anyway, I'm trying to decide whther to start some "spring" Bok Choy very very late in trays to replace the stalled "spring" crop ... or wait another few weeks and call it a Fall crop. That makes more sense!

P.S. If anyone wants some Bok Choy seeds or other Asian greens for postage, I went crazy buying 2-gram packets, and now have a whole library of Bok Choys, Choy Sums, plus Tatsoi, Mizuna, Komatsuna and a partirdige in a pear tree.




Bok Choy - Pak Choy - White Stem Brassica rapa Chinesis Group
12-14" - 35 days - Taiwan Bok Choy "Round Leaf San Tong" OP (Tainong)
8-10" - 45 days - "Tall" - (Tainong)
18" - - - 50 days - Pak Choi "Joi Choi" F1 Hybrid (Hazzards)
?" - 45 days - - - Pak Choi (Hazzards P6510)
6" - - - 45 day - Medium size (Kitazawa #298)
10-14" - 50 days - Standard size (Kitazawa #056)


Bok Choy - Pak Choy - Green Stem, mostly small, Brassica rapa Chinesis Group
40-45 days - "Ching Chang" Baby Bok Choy Tainong #5001
35-40 days - Mei Qing Choi Baby F1 (Sakata / Tainong)
40 days - Shanghai Pak Choi "San Fan" F1 Hybrid (Kitazawa #299) heat tolerant but early bolting (?)
40 days - bigger - Standard, heat tolerant, (Kitazawa #059)
"Dong Zhi" F1 Hybrid , cold tolerant, (Tainong)


Flowering Bok Choy "Yu Choy Sum" Brassica rapa Chinesis Group or B. rapa var parachinensis
all from Tainong Seeds
80 Day Yu Choy - slowest bolting
40 day Yu Choy (For Yu Choy or Yu Choy Sum - stems or budding flowers)
55 day Yu Choy Sum - F1 Hybrid, big stems
65 day Yu Choy Sum - F1 Hybrid, Canton, cold trolerant, latre season


Gai Lan (Chinese Kale/Brocolli) Brassica oleracea (Alboglabra Group)
50 day - Gai Lan 'Te You' (Kitazawa #293)
50-65 days - Dark Green Gai Lan - for spring (Tainong)
60-65 days - Late Season Gai Lan - slow bolting for cool season (Tainong)


Etc:
45-65 days Broccolo Spigariello Italian Heirloom leaf broccoli, very cold-hardy, B. oleracea var. 'Spigariello', (Hazzards)
35-40 days - cut 10-12" - Leaf Mustard / Small Gaichoy (Tainong Seeds) Big leafy vegetable
Tatsoi low rosettes (Kitazawa #062) B. rapa Narinosa
40 day - Mizuna, Japanese Mustard, cut & come again, B. rapa nipposinica (Japanese Mustard)
Komatsuna, all season, (Tainong), B. rapa Komatsuna (Japanese Spinach Mustard)
30-40 days - Red Amaranth - hot weather crop - Large, pointed round leaves with red-purple center, (Tainong)



meadowyck

meadowyck
Brooksville, FL
(Zone 9a)

July 10, 2012
5:42 AM

Post #9200048

podster

love the four legged critters...LOL Hay the bed they are on, mind sharing where you purchased? I have some similar bed for mine and I can't seem to remember where I purchased mine and I need new ones. My company was up north new england area I believe and had such great prices... As my fourlegged are in the LARGE variety...LOL

Jan
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 10, 2012
6:12 AM

Post #9200108

The bed brand name is Coolaroo. They are well loved and used. I have two beds that are actually for the big dogs but these varmints seem to have co-opted them. lol I've had the beds for awhile but thinking I bought them off of ebay.

Jan ~ do you have feed stores in your area? That is where the DE is sold very cheaply here. Just a thought.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 10, 2012
7:07 AM

Post #9200163

Pod,
You make a very good point about having to transition the seedlings from the A/C to the outdoors. My logic was that by the time I put them out to harden off, the relative temps on the outside would possibly match those of the indoors, but, your way cuts out the guesswork and the necessity.

My main issue would be keeping the seedlings hydrated while they're out in the heat all day.

How do you keep them moist through the daytime, in full sun? I could put the cups in the painted drawers and mulch over them with something like straw or hay. That would help. We have a feedstore nearby. I drilled holes in the two deepest drawers last night. And, I already have a gazillion yogurt cups with holes already drilled in them, too!

Lemme know, cause you're moving me by leaps and bounds into your system.

Thanks a bunch for posting the pics, too. And, I love the four-legged predators!

So, has anyone besides Kristi sowed seeds yet?

Linda

This message was edited Jul 10, 2012 9:14 AM

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 10, 2012
1:20 PM

Post #9200583

Ok, Kristi, you've talked me into it!

Gonna put the seedlings into the yogurt cups, and OUTSIDE THEY GO!

My mind is now on constructing a pvc drip irrigation system for the two RBs, and I can't use all the brain cells babysitting seedlings under the lights. So. Going with your method, except for the two deep boxes I'll use to sow onion seeds. They'll still grow outside, until I'm ready to transplant them in Nov-Dec.

Hugs!
grits74571
Talihina, OK

July 10, 2012
2:20 PM

Post #9200634

Now this is just what I do I sow most of my fall veggies direct to where they will grow ..I start by making a furrow and wetting it several days until it is muddy then I sow the seeds in the mud and cover with several layers of wet newspaper and keep the newspaper wet untill the seeds sprout after all or most all the seeds have sprouted i remove the paper and lightly sprinkle some potting mix over the row and if it is really hot I place the papers back over but as shade using little sticks as tent poles or if I am feeling fancy string a line above the row to hold the papers suspended weight the edges down with rocks or just piles of dirt ..i live in the mountains of Oklahoma so rocks are abundant ..If the weather has cooled off by quite a lot then I do the same except no paper just cover with a light covering of potting mix..

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 10, 2012
2:43 PM

Post #9200658

Thank you, Grits!

meadowyck

meadowyck
Brooksville, FL
(Zone 9a)

July 10, 2012
5:46 PM

Post #9200852

Feed stores are a ways away, and this place specialises in DE, plus it is a really nice view into town where it sits, so it is only 8 miles away, the feed stores are more to the east and south and about 20+.

Jan
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 10, 2012
5:52 PM

Post #9200856

Gymgirl wrote:Pod,
You make a very good point about having to transition the seedlings from the A/C to the outdoors. My logic was that by the time I put them out to harden off, the relative temps on the outside would possibly match those of the indoors, but, your way cuts out the guesswork and the necessity.

My main issue would be keeping the seedlings hydrated while they're out in the heat all day.

How do you keep them moist through the daytime, in full sun? I could put the cups in the painted drawers and mulch over them with something like straw or hay. That would help. We have a feedstore nearby. I drilled holes in the two deepest drawers last night. And, I already have a gazillion yogurt cups with holes already drilled in them, too!

Lemme know, cause you're moving me by leaps and bounds into your system.

Thanks a bunch for posting the pics, too. And, I love the four-legged predators!

So, has anyone besides Kristi sowed seeds yet?

Linda

This message was edited Jul 10, 2012 9:14 AM


Linda... the containers I use are larger yogurt containers.

The seedlings will be small and don't need to be over watered.
If they receive too much water, they can damp off.

The only time the seedlings will have serious demand for water is when the root system becomes developed.
They will be in situ by then.

These seedlings don't get watered on a daiIy basis. I water by judging the surface of the soil by sight and insert a finger on the perimeter of the container before I will add water. When the seeds are germinating, you want them to stay moist. Once you have seedlings, you can kill them with kindness. Kristi
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 10, 2012
5:56 PM

Post #9200860

Jan ~ did that company ever get back to you? Sounds like they are convenient to your location.

Rural areas are less suited for convenience but values can be found in unusual places. Kristi

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 10, 2012
7:07 PM

Post #9200953

Krist,
you're using the what 12 oz.? 16 oz? yogurt cups. I have 75 of the 6 oz. cups...
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 10, 2012
7:36 PM

Post #9200994

These containers say 2 pounds ( 32 oz). They are larger but even with the smaller containers, the roots will be minimal when they start out. Underwatering still won't be an issue.



This message was edited Jul 10, 2012 9:41 PM

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 10, 2012
9:08 PM

Post #9201112

Ok. I also have a boat load of square, 4" nursery pots I could use. They're larger than the yogurt cups...
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 10, 2012
9:27 PM

Post #9201132

I would use the smaller yogurt cups, Linda. They will work fine. And I say this but we are using different seed starting mix. Does yours dry out very quickly?

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 10, 2012
9:44 PM

Post #9201142

I'm using a cockamamie blend of seedling mixes this go round, but i have some vermiculite I could cut in for moisture retention.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 11, 2012
5:42 AM

Post #9201325

grits74571 -
Quoting: then I sow the seeds in the mud


I thought I was the only one that did this. LOL - although I have leaned not to do this with pea seeds early in the spring, as they just rot.

I do it a little differently... I make a furrow (or a hole if it's a transplant) and fill it with water several times until it stops draining quickly. Then I add fertilizer and mix it in well, then sow seeds (or put in the transplant) and cover with dry soil.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 11, 2012
7:46 AM

Post #9201480

I just love when people are speaking the same language!!!

I might just have to try a few "in the mud!" I've got LOTS of mud right now.

Yesterday I laid out sheets of heavy cardboard inside RB #2 (which isn't quite finished since its still sitting up on its legs until the rain stops and the box dries out so I can screw on the cedar facing, dig the foot holes, set it and level it).

Anyhow, I stood there watering the cardboard (duh...). Then I spread a layer of coffee grinds, a layer of excelsior, then more coffee grinds, and one more layer of excelsior. I dampened each layer (duh...). Then, the killer mosquitoes ran me inside.

I HATE mud...if spies caught me and probed my mind for what would make me sing like a canary, it would be the thought of DIRTY mud!! I think I could take mud made from some virgin dirt, but the thought of cats roaming, and grub worms, in the mud just makes me want to vomit half the time. Which is why I'm serious considering working harder to resurface the muddy areas so I can go outside in the rain, in peace...

I'm sorry. I digressed...

Didn't get to the seedlings, and I'm already burning daylight on my fall crop! Shoot! But, I had a carfull of excelsior and coffee grinds, so that took priority over pulling out the yogurt cups and seedling mix...

"There's always tomorrow!!" (words from a gardener who's run out of daylight and energy. Not to be confused with infamous words from a lass intent on keeping the family farm at all costs, as she curses the setting sun from a hill...)

meadowyck

meadowyck
Brooksville, FL
(Zone 9a)

July 11, 2012
8:35 AM

Post #9201538

gymgirl, don't know if you know this childhood song, the worm crawl in the worms crawl out, they play pennuckle in your snote...LOLOLOL, sorry I'm not a big fan of all the bugs eithers. Yes I got a hold of the guy at the company and I also told him that he needed to answer his emails and that if he didn't have time to he should note it on the sight that it will be a long wait for a reply or just take it down. He just laugh...Oh well I tried... He has a shipment due intoday and he "suppose" to call me when he gets it ready. We are planning for a morning pick up so we can eat breakfast at the hardees there...LOL

Jan

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 13, 2012
8:23 AM

Post #9203788

The haunting song is called "The Worms Crawl In" by Schoolyard Blues. The lyrics are as follows:

"The worms crawl in, the worms crawl out,
The worms play pinochle with your snout
The worms crawl in, the worms crawl out
Into your stomach, and out your mouth
They eat your intestines, they scramble your heart
Now you fell like you're falling apart
This is how it is to die
You end up looking like apple pie!
Did you ever see a hearse go by,
And think you could be the next to die?
They put you in a little box,
Cover you up with dirt and rocks
They take you to the family plot
And there you stay, to stink and rot.
For you they make a flower wreath
And chuck you in a hole so deep.
But maybe you're not really gone,
You can hear the mourning song.
You yank the rope to ring the bell
You call for God and you curse hell"

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 13, 2012
8:33 AM

Post #9203797

It's raining again today. But, no matter, all is well...

I soaked some Ky Wonder Bean seeds I harvested from my spring crop, and, wouldn't yah know it, they SPROUTED!!! So, a la Kristi, I grabbed my trusty yogurt cups and sank two seeds into each one. By the time the rain stops next week, I can lift the whole plug and set it down into a couple pallet beds at the base of the re-purposed window cornices, which have become lean-to bean trellises.

Once the bean canopy covers the top, I can plant lettuce and spinach underneath, and shade them from the sun. As the beans die back with the chill, the lettuce and spinach should be ready to take off.

This message was edited Jul 13, 2012 11:56 AM

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 13, 2012
8:46 AM

Post #9203814

THIS IS MY SEED SOWING WEEKEND! YAY?????????????

Kristi,
Pray for me!

Linda
cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

July 13, 2012
9:32 AM

Post #9203848

Lol, Linda, you crack me up. I take so many leads from your seed starting..I have no doubt you'll do fine!
But, then again a good prayer and advice from Kristi, isn't bad either :0)

Hope to get seeds started today. Spider webs are on my seed starting stuff, stored outside. Just need to munster up some courage and clean it all first.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 13, 2012
10:13 AM

Post #9203880

Cocoa,
Girl, I knew this seed-sowing weekend was coming, so about a month and a half ago on a bright cool day, I bit the bullet and spent half of a Saturday morning in the yard washing seed trays, all the pots, and the seed-starting stuff. It wasn't so hot out, and I thought, "you can do it now, while the weather is cool, or you can do it in the flames of Hell." So, that was my impetus.

I am soooooooooooooo glad I did.

Since you're "following" me, here's the solution I use to wash/sterilize everything in. It makes the chore very pleasant. Make sure you're in a ventilated area. Wouldn't want you to swoon!

I fill a large Rubbermaid tub with hot water (put the gumbo pot on in advance). I've used a small mop sink in the past, but, use whatever you have
►Add about 1 cup bleach
►1/2 - 3/4 cup Lemon Ajax
►1 cup of Mouthwash (I use cheap, Minty Blue stuff from the $ store - don't need name brand)

The solution smells so fresh, you wanna keep on washing! Rinse well, and let your stuff air dry.

That's it!

When I used the mop sink, I just added about 1/2 cup bleach and a couple squirts of Ajax, and a couple splashes of the mouthwash (which does the same thing as it does for your mouth, besides lending the fragrance...). So, just judge on the parts for whatever vessel you're using. Don't go too, too sudsy/bleachy, or you'll have to rinse longer.

Hugs!
cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

July 13, 2012
10:48 AM

Post #9203911

Thanks, Linda! That's sort of program here, I keep it all outside and use the pressure hose first and blast the spiders to other side of the yard, lol! I usually don't have bleach on hand, but substitute anything that calls for bleach with vinegar. I hope that's enough to kill plant pathogens, but honestly I don't know. Haven't had any bacterial seed starting problems, yet, knock on wood :0)

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 13, 2012
11:13 AM

Post #9203936

LOL, if I used a pressure hose, I'd blast EVERYTHING I was trying to wash to the other side of the yard!!!

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

July 13, 2012
12:09 PM

Post #9203982

HOW BOUT the one with the verse:
They'll wrap you up in bloody sheets
and bury you about six feet deep.
chorus: the worms crawl in the worms crawl out. and continuations etc.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 13, 2012
12:48 PM

Post #9204020

Kevin,
Where are you? Haven't had a progress update in a few. What's going on with your commercial effort?

Linda

meadowyck

meadowyck
Brooksville, FL
(Zone 9a)

July 13, 2012
3:36 PM

Post #9204200

thanks gymgirl, I had forgotten most of it and boy I sure messed up my typing on the words... I would go back and edit but the heck withit...LOL

Jan

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

July 13, 2012
4:18 PM

Post #9204256

That song has all kinds of lyrics since it was once part of a very old ballad, and has since become Halloween or blues music. THE old ballad first verse ; To you' they've lied
you have used your pistols
and you have tried
They'll wrap you up in bloody sheets
and they'll bury you bout six feet deep; then the chorus' original ballad about a western outlaw;? Only I don't know who either.?

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 14, 2012
8:44 AM

Post #9204869

Please don't hurt the garden spiders. They eat many of the bugs that eat our veggies.
cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

July 14, 2012
9:00 AM

Post #9204889

No need to worry, Honeybee. I'm not an indiscriminate bug killer. Normally I don't leave my seed trays outside either. But when I do they attract black widows, which I usually leave alone as well. They don't bother me, I don't bother them. There are times that their nests are in too dangerous of a location and not worth the risk. Blasting them off with a hose gives them a much better chance at surviving them bringing them into my home where they will be squished.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 14, 2012
9:49 AM

Post #9204957

I've only ever seen one female black window spider and thought how beautiful she was. Then I asked my hubby to take her deep into the woods!

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

July 14, 2012
10:14 AM

Post #9204977

I get the orb weavers, brown widow or brown recluse your choice, eastern tarantula,jumping spiders, regular garden spider. Interesting group I don't mess around with,some of them I have to keep a watchful eye, for they are as dangerous as any. Then there are these grey fellows or gals,with a darker grey hour glass on the underside of the abdomen, they are about the size of a silver dollar.
Every few years past they have been everywhere. I don't mind having the spiders I just don't want to walk into any of them while they are hanging around!

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 14, 2012
10:36 AM

Post #9204995

Here's a website that explains how to identify a brown recluse spider:

http://www.ascendedhealth.com/brown-recluse-spider/

kevcarr59

kevcarr59
BUda, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 14, 2012
6:38 PM

Post #9205394

Linda,

Still working on the commercial deal, just didn't think it was to go on this thread. All of it is setting up for next spring, just going to do a little fall planting to check out the broccoli, Brussels sprouts, & cauliflower, and a couple winter squash. Once I'm back from the Florida trip to my Mom's, then I'll really start gearing up for the fall stuff. Have already pulled the zuke & most of the cukes out, just have to pull trellises and clean up that end of the raised bed.

Once I do that I'll cover that end with weed cloth & cover with pine bark mulch for the containers to sit on. Then in the spring it'll be ready to go for cukes. That big raised bed will be strictly cucumbers next year. A quick question: About how tall does the Arcadia Broccoli grow? Will order seed from Johnny's before I leave, so they might be here when I return.

Looking at your lists in the post, you've got onion seed from Sustainable Seed, I thought you were using Dixondale? I think I may go ahead and get slips from them...

UPDATE: One of the 8 HCR seeds I put in 3" peat cups & just had sitting on the bench next to the other containers has FINALLY sprouted with all this rain. It's been sitting there almost a month. It hasn't even shucked the seed coat yet, so I'm not holding much hope, we'll see what happens.

Later,

Kevin

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 14, 2012
7:33 PM

Post #9205437

Hey Kevin,
I was asking about your current fall/winter garden progress. I'll follow your commercial progress over on the other thread.

My Arcadia Broccoli grew in 6.5 gallon, free-draining buckets, and stood approximately 3.0-3.5 ft. when I ripped them.

Dixondale won't ship me onion transplants before December, so I'm gonna try starting my own for transplanting. If I succeed, I'll have my own transplants before by December. If ail, I'll know soon enough to place an order . y very first successful onions from Dixondale were planted on January 8th and I harvested onions that were between tennis ball and baseball size .

Here's the link to the New Big Dwarf discussion.

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1205579/



This message was edited Jul 14, 2012 10:31 PM

This message was edited Jul 14, 2012 11:06 PM

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 19, 2012
4:02 AM

Post #9210987

Was happening?
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 19, 2012
4:14 AM

Post #9210995

Ripped up the dead rice bean plants in a raised bed and plopped a half dozen indeterminate tomato plants in their spot last nite. The trellis is already up. As always, gardening on the run. I finished that up right at dusk last nite. I also took cuttings of another tomato to try for fall cuttings. The blessed moles have moved into one of the raised beds, now what to do?

I'm still harvesting enough tomatoes to eat, harvesting okra daily, drying herbs and saving seeds.

Was up with you?
stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 19, 2012
11:25 AM

Post #9211471

Pod, do you have a gun you could use on those moles?? LOL
CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

July 19, 2012
11:45 AM

Post #9211503

I've been lurking and reading. Got kinda slow for a while. I sowed 3 Northern Giant Cabbage seed. The seed was very expensive. I think I want to let one go to seed if the worms don't eat it first...but I am assuming it won't go to seed until spring of next year. I have never had any cabbage to go to seed. Don't they bust open in the middle and send up flower shoots?

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 19, 2012
12:06 PM

Post #9211521

Kinda sorta...in the spring, when it gets warm. You're right about keeping the worms away, though, cause they'll dessimate a cabbage down to a lace doily.
CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

July 19, 2012
1:11 PM

Post #9211599

The almanac says my region will be cooler about 4 weeks sooner than normal. I am starting my Fall cole crops 4 weeks early. I started my Fall tomato plants the same time I always do and hoping they are able to produce this fall but they will be in a greenhouse and only growing 1/3 of what I normally grow.
Sowed some bush green beans in a table top garden to get a late harvest.
I am also putting a shade structure over a 4ft x 4ft table top garden bed to start lettuce and carrots early. The shade will cool the soil down and help them germinate. Right now the shade is a burlap sack. When they germinate, I will put regular shade cloth over the bed.
I have all my regular cabbage, broc, and cauliflower in the mail. Waiting on my broccoli raab and purple cauliflower.

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

July 19, 2012
1:25 PM

Post #9211618

Pulled out the dried up pea vines and really should sow the fall peas now.

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

July 19, 2012
2:47 PM

Post #9211685

Ok, I planted some of the peas. Planted Green Arrow garden peas, Swiss Giant Snow Peas and Sugar Star Sugar Snap Peas.

I still have Norli, Super Sugar Snap, Mammouth Melting, and Cascadia Peas to plant. I seem to have two packs of Mamouth Melting, one said Snap Peas and the other said Snow Peas so I am confused. Better not plant those two together.
cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

July 19, 2012
3:24 PM

Post #9211722

I started leeks, cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, and romanesco. Decided that is enough to baby sit for now, don't think I'll start anything else till September.

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

July 19, 2012
3:43 PM

Post #9211731

Gezz, and here I thought I was doing so well planting my peas!
cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

July 19, 2012
3:49 PM

Post #9211739

Oh, you did very well!
I'm tried and sleepy typing. My seeds went into flats, not as much energy to plant as a bed of peas, but I'd say we both deserve a nap.lol

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

July 19, 2012
4:02 PM

Post #9211752

Yes, poofed today which is why I didn't plant more peas. Maybe tomorrow.
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 19, 2012
5:28 PM

Post #9211823

Well... I'm poofed and tried too but it's from going to work today. lol
Sounds like y'alls typing fingers are sure getting sleepy .

Stephanie ~ I was thinking a hand grenade or flame thrower on the moles maybe. A local gardener told me he placed castor bean seeds in the mole tunnels. The logic is the seeds are poisonous. But he said when he quit doing that, the moles returned with a vengance. Need a mole digging dog maybe... on second thought... naw. Kristi
cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

July 20, 2012
6:44 AM

Post #9212233

LOL, I was poofed, tried and wurn out. Typing no better then a bicycle, two tired :0)
As much as I complain about being tired, I really do appreciate the way one plant goes out of production, another steps into its place. There's sort of a graceful rhythm to it all.

What did think of the rice beans? Did you harvest dry?
araness
Auburn, AL
(Zone 8a)

July 20, 2012
7:09 AM

Post #9212259

ok please ignore my junky seed stand...top are the tomatoes, second are my cole crop seeds.

Does anyone have a good chart for planting etc for Pearland? My neighbor and I are working off two different time tables and I'm lost as to when to start seeds and transplant.

We are growing:
Tomatoes (her date Aug 31 - Mine Aug 10)
Mustard Greens (7 top?)
Turnips
Collards
Cabbage
Brussel Sprouts
Broccoli
Beets (purple and gold)
Parsnips
Fennel
Carrots
Spinach
Lettuce
Mustard

Thumbnail by araness
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 20, 2012
9:08 AM

Post #9212373

This is my seed-sowing schedule from last fall. I had a bumper crop of veggies.

My plan was to start seeds late-June to mid July to see how an early start on transplants might make a difference, but that didn't happen. I'll be starting seeds this weekend, without fail, but I'll still be two weeks ahead of last year's schedule.

Since I usually start the seeds indoors anyways, I'm going to start 1/3 of my broccoli, cauliflowers, and cabbage seeds tomorrow in the APS 15-cells which are 3-1/2" deep. I've observed that those hungry hippo transplant brassicas benefit from a well-developed root system, and the deep cells give me a good root ball. You'll get the same from your water bottles. I've seen whole community gardens around Houston with almost full-size heads of cabbage by mid-September! So that means they HAD to start seeds indoors somewhere, at least by the beginning of June. I didn't make that time frame this year, but...

Here's my schedule from last year:
8/6 & 8/7/11: I sowed seeds for broccoli, cauliflower, cabbages, Chinese cabbage, Brussels Sprouts, mustards & collard greens
9/2/11: potted them up to the drinking water bottles
9/17/11: hardening off for 9 days
9/29/11: Everything transplanted to the garden

My schedule was off several weeks because I thought it was too hot for the seedlings to be transplanted out. This season I'll make that adjustment, and get them out for hardening off at 4-5 weeks, and transplanted out by week 6 or 7 (or whenever they get at least 5-6 true leaves).

Since I'm using a deep-root cell, I'm not going to have to pot up the seedlings at all. I've observed that the hungry hippo brassicas transplants benefit from a larger root ball, and I’ll get nice ones since I'm using the APS deep root cells. I also purchased floating row cover to keep the moths off the seedlings at transplant time. It'll still be warm, and they'll still be lurking.

As long as the seedlings are kept properly hydrated, they'll make it through the tail end of the heat. Once the weather starts cooling off, they'll have developed a good root system, and will take off like bullets!

Linda
araness
Auburn, AL
(Zone 8a)

July 20, 2012
9:21 AM

Post #9212394

Thanks, I'll give you a call this afternoon if I can, I still have to make yogurt and soup for Serg to have something to eat tonight. We've just got in him bed and I'm off to make the soup and start the yogurt and keeping my fingers crossed that the pain pill knocks him back out.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 20, 2012
5:47 PM

Post #9212811

Gymgirl - my schedule is as follows:

Pak Choi - Toy Choi Hybrid (8/6/2012)
Brussels Sprouts (8/13/2012)
Peas Thomas Laxton (8/13/2012)
Kohlrabi - sweet vienna (8/13/2012)
Cauliflower Snowball Y (8/20/2012)
Broccoli - Arcadia - direct seed to garden (8/27/2012)
Beet - Detroit Dark Red (8/27/2012)
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 20, 2012
5:53 PM

Post #9212820

araness wrote:
Does anyone have a good chart for planting etc for Pearland? My neighbor and I are working off two different time tables and I'm lost as to when to start seeds and transplant.



This is a pretty dependable one for all parts of the country.
http://www.motherearthnews.com/What-To-Plant-Now-July-Gulf-Coast-Gardening-Region.aspx
Do you think Pearland might have its' own issues? Kristi

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 20, 2012
6:24 PM

Post #9212845

LOL, Araness is 8 minutes from me. I can throw a rock and hit Pearland!
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 20, 2012
6:43 PM

Post #9212870

Don't you be throwing rocks at her Linda... lol
araness
Auburn, AL
(Zone 8a)

July 20, 2012
6:49 PM

Post #9212882

lord no, especially not today. Nursing a 40 something year old male is worse than having a sick child. How does one get to this age and STILL have wisdom teeth? Thank the stars I didn't find the bell I was going to put by the bed or I'd have murdered him and blamed it on the dentist.

I'm going to have a glass of wine and fall asleep in the tub.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 20, 2012
7:04 PM

Post #9212896

LOL, Araness is 8 minutes from me. I can throw a rock and hit Pearland!

Bee, looks like we're on the same schedule! Im hoping to sow new transplants every three weeks, up until December 20th, the Winter Solstice. Then, I'll switch over to sowing the tomato seeds on December 20th, and more brassica seeds for 8 weeks to plant out again up until January 20th. That'll be the final planting for a spring garden effort .

Tomatoes WILL be in the ground by February 15th next year.

Wow...it's almost time!!!

Linda

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 20, 2012
7:09 PM

Post #9212902

No rocks will be thrown...

I still have all my wisdom teeth. Which is obviously why I'm wise ,LOL!!
decherdt
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 21, 2012
9:07 AM

Post #9213327


A&M Agrilife has some decent guidelines,
General TX
[HYPERLINK@agrilifebookstore.org]

these are more local to the TX coast.
http://harris.agrilife.org/program-areas/hort/publications-links/veggies-herbs/

Way up North here, I like
txmg.org/wichita/files/2010/04/B-6-Vegetable-Varieties.pdf for North Central TX

Thumbnail by decherdt
Click the image for an enlarged view.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 21, 2012
12:21 PM

Post #9213464

I'm as old as dirt, and I still have all my wisdom teeth.

Gymgirl - I can't start tomatoes as early as you because we get frost until the end of March.

Here's my spring schedule:

Sweet pepper - Ace - indoors (3/13/2013)
Onions due this week from Dixondale (3/13/2013)
Tomato - Monica - sow indoors (3/13/2013)
Sweet Pepper - Ace - sow indoors (3/13/2013)
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

July 21, 2012
1:48 PM

Post #9213533

Gymgirl wrote:
Tomatoes WILL be in the ground by February 15th next year.


I can't even imagine putting my tomato plants in THAT early here, as there is usually snow on the ground at that time. So many zone 8 gardens are different. Still, this year, I could have put them out earlier than I did. Last year we had a lot of late snow and rain storms as well as just cold weather. The tomatoes did not like that. Then, THIS year, we had no late storms, and I could have put mine out earlier than I did, but still not in February!!

Evelyn

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

July 21, 2012
2:39 PM

Post #9213589

Yesterday it rained all day so I got nothing done but today it is just beautiful, I got back working on my planting peas projects. First I tore out all the Spanish Mucica pole beans as I need the space for peas. Wouldn't have torn out beans for peas but I tried these beans for the first time this year and hated them. From now on will stick to Blue Lake Pole Beans which I am also growning.

Anyway, planted SUPER SUGAR SNAP and MAMMOTH MELTING SUGAR where those beans used to be. Then I planted NORLI peas in another spot. I still have CASCASIA SNAP and MAMMOUTH MELTING SNOW PEAS that are not planted yet and I don't have any engery left to do them today.
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

July 21, 2012
2:43 PM

Post #9213593

Oh, here is a sample of what I find in February...melting after a light snowfall...

Thumbnail by evelyn_inthegarden
Click the image for an enlarged view.

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

July 21, 2012
2:48 PM

Post #9213602

Looks about the same as around here in February.

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 21, 2012
5:25 PM

Post #9213738

Evelyn, I know people here in zone 7 that planted tomatoes in February this year. It was an odd spring and definitely a risk, but they were eating tomatoes a whole lot sooner than me.

February is peas & radishes time for me -- my boyfriend's favorite time of year.
cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

July 21, 2012
6:23 PM

Post #9213792

Mmmm, I could roll around in some of that snow after this sweltering Saturday!

Some of my cauliflower, romanesco and cabbage have sprouted. I just sowed them Thursday and it's been 104 degrees for the last two days. That amazes me.
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

July 22, 2012
7:26 AM

Post #9214210

NicoleC wrote:Evelyn, I know people here in zone 7 that planted tomatoes in February this year. It was an odd spring and definitely a risk, but they were eating tomatoes a whole lot sooner than me.


Yeah, had I known it was going to be such a mild winter, I could have put them out early as well. Next year, I will put a few out early, and if they don't kake it, I will have plenty in reserve. The funny thing is I did have plenty of seedlings as I grew a lot this year compared to most. Now I have them planted all over the place. A gopher ate my Jaune Flame´ and that, apparantly was the only one. Oh well! :-)

Most winters we have a heavy snowfall or several during February,

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 22, 2012
7:33 AM

Post #9214216

We finally had a 3 day break in the rain so that the soaked RB #2 dried out, so I spent most of the day facing it with the cedar planks I had left over from my Hurricane Ike installation . Every time I tackle one of these projects, I appreciate how hard my dear husband worked.

Now that it's finished I can finally get all the containers of pine bark off the patio. But I paid dearly last night! Between hot flashes and leg cramps I walked the floor for half the night...

And my hands are swollen. Playing the piano will be exciting today...They'll here some new notes!
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

July 22, 2012
8:07 AM

Post #9214256

This is the usual...

Thumbnail by evelyn_inthegarden
Click the image for an enlarged view.

evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

July 22, 2012
8:38 AM

Post #9214299

Oops, GG, we cross-posted...sorry!

No rain here except for a couple of sprinkles a few days ago. I have to go into Sacramento today and it will be over 100°...we wouldn't usually be going there, but to see our great-grandbaby.

GG ~ Sorry you had such a bad night. (Been there, done that!) Take care and not overdo it in the heat.

newyorkrita

newyorkrita
North Shore of L. I., NY
(Zone 6b)

July 22, 2012
9:33 AM

Post #9214348

Something was digging in my newly planted peas, probably a squirrel by the looks of things. Had to go out and fix it.
grits74571
Talihina, OK

July 22, 2012
5:24 PM

Post #9214902

Once more I will post about a surefire treatment for leg cramps Castor Oil just rub it on the cramping area VIOLA cramps gone also great for sore swollen hands rub well on hands put on a pair of cotton gloves and it works like magic as for the hot flashes I ain't going there...
araness
Auburn, AL
(Zone 8a)

July 22, 2012
7:43 PM

Post #9215048

Find a solution for the hot flashes and I want to know.

The pain, well I've had to resort to PT, Chiro and acupuncture these last 6 months or so. It beats being drugged up most of the day..tried that and you can't live.

Thanks for the websites, I have those and it's what I use but I disagree with a few of the dates, I stick my tomatoes out in mid August and I'll have fried stalks within the hour.

Linda, I set my maters out last year Feb 29th and will try for a bit earlier this year. It was a fantastic yield since we had such a mild and long "Spring" and we had our best year as far as productivity. But was a bit sad when everyone else still had tomatoes and mine had already given their last.

My seedlings have a few issues this season, used a different brand of seed starting mix and it retains way to much moisture and they looked a bit sick to start. Looking up but I won't have the beautiful plants I had last spring to transplant. I'm up to 25 EB's and the 4x4 raised bed so I'm trying new things and learning what my yard likes and doesn't.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 23, 2012
8:08 AM

Post #9215535

Been trying to post this pic all weekend. Something's wrong with my phone -- the NEW one...

Here's what I worked on all day Saturday. It may look like a plain old box, but I used the remaining cedar pickets from my Hurricane Ike fence and faced the outside of the pine bed so it would match the fence.

I'm kinda proud of my handiwork. My leg muscles are still hurting from all the squatting down to screw those planks on.

Linda

Thumbnail by Gymgirl   Thumbnail by Gymgirl
Click an image for an enlarged view.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 23, 2012
8:17 AM

Post #9215551

PLEASE DO NOT POST PAST THIS MESSAGE. NEW THREAD STARTED

STARTING OUR 2012 FALL/WINTER VEGGIE GARDENS, PART 2
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1272354/

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