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Echeverias burning

Davison, MI(Zone 5a)

Help, my Echeveria's are turning brown in full sun. But I thought they were supposed to be in full sun. Did the 1/4 strength Schultz cacti & succulent fertilizer burn them? Please help. It's getting worse by the hour.

Davison, MI(Zone 5a)

That must be what it is, i'm going to take them out of the sun.

Baja California, Mexico(Zone 11)

Some Echeverias can take lots of sun, but they tend to do better with some protection. Heat and sun is a combination to avoid. The biggest potential for damage comes when you take a plant which is used to low light (for example, indoors) and move it into lots of sun (say a south-facing balcony) without a period of gradual accommodation.

A couple of hours a day should be enough for even sun-tolerant Echeverias this time of year. Bright shade is a better idea while plants are visibly sun-shocked. In all fairness, some plants do just fine and actually look better with stress colors activated (eg. agavoides), so it's not always a danger sign.

Quarter strength fertilizer probably did not burn your plants, but don't feed them any more until they've recovered from this episode. Flush it out next time you water. Summer is not the most active growing season for Echeverias here. Hope some of this helps.

Los Angeles, CA(Zone 10a)

As usual, I nod my head yes when I read Baja's advice. As another anecdotal report: most of my echeverias do better with dappled sun or a little cover…or setting them near an east-facing wall, so they get shade from noon onwards.

Davison, MI(Zone 5a)

Well, that's exactly what I did. They were just put out on the south deck. I put them in the shade. Will try sun again later against the east wall. Thanks for your great advice.

Acton, CA(Zone 8b)

If your Echeverias have been indoors all this time, I would not give them ANY direct sun for a good 3-4 weeks... need to expose them to natural, outdoor bright light for a while, or sun will fry them to pieces.

Los Angeles, CA(Zone 10a)

Once the situation is stabilized, don't lose hope about the burns, especially if the damage seems mostly cosmetic. I've killed echeverias with too much sun, sure; but I've also seen E lilacina (for instance) gradually recover from burns and scorching until it looks 100% better a year later. Sometimes they look sad all summer long but then recover in the fall.

Davison, MI(Zone 5a)

Thanks Palmbob, that sounds about right anyway to my inexperienced ears. I grew echeveria lucida a few years ago outside on the deck just fine. I think it was in full sun. It bloomed and grew big. I wish I haddn't given it away. I'm growing it again along with some more plants coming in the mail today , I hope. I'm sooo excited I can't wait. All your pictures and helpful advice in this forum are encouraging. I'll send pictures when I get the plants ready.

Davison, MI(Zone 5a)

Oh good, i'm glad they will probably recover. I'm probably not going to pick off any leaves.

Baja California, Mexico(Zone 11)

I'd let the plant cycle through its leaves the natural way and they will be renewed.

Don't know if it was one of the affected plants, but I saw E. "Doris Taylor" in your other thread... In my experience that plant does not do well in the sun. Keep it in bright shade or filtered light (or indoors by a sunny windowsill) for best results.

For what it's worth, E. lilacina has been one of the more sun-tolerant plants here. I have one growing and flowering in a few hours of mid-day sun. The glaucous blue/white types seem to handle the exposure better than most. It must be said that we don't experience high temps here, so the sun is a relatively benign cool coastal kind.

My favorite spot for accommodating plants to the sun these days is by a NE-facing wall under an overhang. They get some morning sun but no overhead rays. That is also an ideal location for younger plants or rootless offsets. This time of year there's rarely any morning sun anyway (May-June = morning fog/haze) so it's all diffuse light, which seems to be the best kind.

Acton, CA(Zone 8b)

My Echeveria Doris Taylor has been in full sun and looking great... but when I went to check on it just know, it appears someone else thought it looked great, too, and took it... I hate my neighbors sometimes (this is about the 20th plant stolen from my yard)

Los Angeles, CA(Zone 10a)

Ack! Geoff! I am full of moral outrage on your behalf. That's just damnable. Especially since if a person would merely strike up a conversation, you (or I) could send them home with more than enough cuttings to grace their garden. Theft like that is unacceptable.

In my yard, today I discovered I think birds or squirrels (or maybe over zealous gardener cleanup) made off with one of my Epithelantha sp, I think E bokei. Very strange. I'll have to pick a less exposed spot.

Acton, CA(Zone 8b)

I planted the front yard with over 100 tulips and daffodils to bring a little color to the overwhelming greenery of the palms and succulents... and though it took about 3 years, the squirrels stole all those as well. The problem with people is they tend to take plants I like, and they take the pots, too

Arlington, TX

Maybe people think...It's just a plant so taking it is no big deal and he/she has a lot more so they won't miss it. Non-plant freaks have no idea how much effort and attention go into each plant. I gave up putting anything in pots out front, now its all in the back where its safe.
C

Baja California, Mexico(Zone 11)

I would not dare to put a potted plant out in an accessible location if either the pot or the plant was nice. It would disappear within days, maybe hours. There are a few nice front-yard gardens in the 'hood, but they are all fenced in.

The nice thing is that my "front yard" (the public garden across the street) was public from the very beginning, so my expectations about loss have always been low. I try to camouflage things the best I can, but one day an aloe will flower and the wrong pair of eyes will take interest, that's pretty much guaranteed. I can live with that. I just hope that I get to see it first. And that whoever steals it knows how to keep it alive.

Acton, CA(Zone 8b)

sadly my collection is too large to fit anything anywhere else but the front yard... the closer something is to the actual house structure, the longer it lasts until stolen. The upside of this theft is the collection is finally shrinking instead of growing and so more room is becoming available.

Arlington, TX

That is a very glass half full view. Theft as a way of making room for new plants had not occured to me.
C

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