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Tomatoes: What's this tomato plant disease?

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DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

June 10, 2012
5:23 PM

Post #9159675

Hi! My cherry tomato plant (Solanum lycopersicum 'Super Sweet 100') was doing well until I put it outside a few weeks ago in zone 5b. It had been growing about an inch a day near a sunny bay window. I moved it a few feet away outdoors facing the same direction (NW) and in part shade. The first thing I noticed was that it grew more flowers and wilted in the direct sun. I read that tomatoes like direct sun but this plant won't tolerate direct outdoor sunlight.

Then the leaves touching the house died, so I moved it away from the house closer toward the sun about 1 foot. It's still potted and I feed it the same way I did when it was healthy (Miracle-Gro and humic acid alternated with white vinegar and hydrogen peroxide). The leaves in the shade are blue and healthier and the leaves closer to the sun and touched by rain are light green. The first tomatoes appeared this weekend but they are only about 1/3 inch and green.

The main difference after moving the tomato plant outside is that the growth rate rapidly declined from 1 inch a day to 1 inch a week, the leaves wilt frequently (in direct sun and rain), some leaves are covered with white dust (?), the leaves have holes and there are I guess moldy spots colored yellow and brown. The first photo shows diseased leaves, the second photo is the wilt, the third photo is white "dust", and the fourth photo is the previously healthy plant. Please give me advice on how to enable this tomato to continue living outdoors. I don't want to bring it back to the kitchen.

DoGooder

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kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 10, 2012
7:20 PM

Post #9159845

Many of our plants droop in direct noon sun but perk up at sundown, that is a survival trait to conserve liquids, however your plant doesn't look as if it were prepared to be kicked outdoors into the real world so abruptly. I can assume these problems didn't show up til the plant was outdoors? The leaves look as if sunburned some- water splashed and left on the plant as the sun travels overhead - the roots need watered not the plant- can you see anything tiny on the leaves or as if there were holes thru the yellowed leaves, it honestly looks to me as if something were chewing thru the plants roots- our experts will be on later, I am pretty sure, but I don't think I would return it inside either, chuckl
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

June 10, 2012
7:53 PM

Post #9159916

kittriana, the problems did start when I put the tomato plant outdoors. It's leaning against our porch and sometimes I pour water from above on one side and that's the side that has almost all the spots. I guess the water droplets are burning spots on the leaves, so I will have to water it at the roots all the time from this point forward.

I also noticed that the tomato branches droop in the daytime then rise again at night and that did happen to a small degree when the tomato was indoors, but it droops much more now that the plant is outdoors. Thanks for telling me that's a harmless survival method. I'm thinking of moving this plant to a backyard plot that gets mostly filtered light and only 4 hours of direct sun a day.

DoGooder



kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 10, 2012
8:12 PM

Post #9159936

I hope the curl of the leaves isn't thrips, I am not the one in this frame of mind to diagnose that... but quarantine it before moving it. The tomato is simply hardening off as fast as it can. If you have Epsom salts it looks like it could use a treatment- 1 Tbsp to a gal of water- this can be done as a drench-if done in time for the leaves to dry before the sun is too hi, it can absorb the minerals in Epsom salts thru the leaves, or by sprinkling on the soil and watering in. To help the plant not need so much water pinch the lower branches back and it should help the plant toughen up the newer leaves quicker. Moving it around is a shock to a plant, no matter how well meant, try to find where you want it and let it get busy...and like I said earlier, hopefully the guys who are getting to actually grow gardens and memories are much sharper than mine atm will give you better assistance, chuckl,
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

June 10, 2012
9:06 PM

Post #9159971

kittriana, I do have some epsom salts available. Thanks for the tip! I didn't realize there would be so many problems hardening off the tomato plant since I took it out in mid-spring when the weather was warm. It's in a pot so if I move it to another location at least it won't suffer transplant shock.

DoGooder

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 13, 2012
8:09 AM

Post #9163448

DoGooder

When moving a plant from inside to outside it needs to be "hardened off". First place it in the shade for a day or two, then move it to a spot where it will receive sun for only an hour or so in the morning or late evening for a day or so. Finally begin to move it each day to a place where it will receive more sunlight. After ten days to two weeks it should be able to withstand full sun.

Tomatoes need at least six hours of direct sun each day. Eight hours is best.

Tomatoes that are not in the ground need a container that is as least five gallons in size - seven is good - ten gallons is best for each plant.

Watering tomatoes too often will drown the roots and the plant will die.

From what I have read, vinegar is used to kill weeds. I've never read that one should use vinegar on a tomato plant.

The reason your tomato was growing by an inch per day when inside was because it was not getting enough light.
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

June 13, 2012
11:35 AM

Post #9163681

HoneybeeNC, thanks for the advice about hardening off plants! I started hardening off a Gerbera daisy I got last Sunday by placing it in part shade during the day. It's doing okay so far. As for the tomato plant, I think it gets about 4-6 hours direct sun per day and the container is about 4-5 gallons.

I provide it with about 2 cups of water per day (about 3 times more than I was watering it when it was indoors). However, if I don't water it that much it droops a lot more. As for the vinegar killing the plant I read that one should add undiluted 10% acidity vinegar to the weeds, but I only add a tablespoon of 5% vinegar to a 1.5 gallon watering can and I calculated that's about .001% as much vinegar as weed killing vinegar solution, so I don't think it's harmful. However, I did kill a monkshood with my vinegar and hydrogen peroxide solution, but the rest of my potted plants either don't care or thrive with that solution (every 4 days).

After cutting off most of the dead leaves and watering the tomato plant only at the roots the plant is much healthier. It doesn't make any sense but it seems to love overcast skies and looks its best under clouds. I photographed the plant today after about 15 hours of rain (attached photo). It has at least 10 tomatoes and dozens of flowers so I guess it's healthy since this species is supposed to produce ripe fruit in mid-summer and it's began that process.

Here's a web site describing the species:

http://myfolia.com/plants/10-tomato-solanum-lycopersicum/varieties/486-supersweet-100

You mentioned that the tomatoe was growing faster indoors because of low light, and maybe that's the case, but indoors it had windows on three sides getting morning, noon, and evening light and now half the plant is under the house eves and is in darkness most of the day so I'm not sure if it's getting more or less light. The linked web site says this plant should grow to a maximum of 3.9 ft. but it's over 6 ft high. I don't know if it's the Miracle-Gro, humic acid, or what else it has available but it seems happy for now and that's all I can hope for.

DoGooder

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DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

June 13, 2012
11:59 AM

Post #9163702

HoneybeeNC, I forgot to mention why I add white vinegar to the water. I read that many greenhouses add acid to their irrigation water to make the irrigation water as close to rainwater was possible. It's not uncommon for rain to have a 4 or 5 ph and when it enters the soil the acid breaks down nutrients for plants to eat. Because rain is so acidic it destroys water pipes, so governments usually harden public water by adding alkaline substances to it. A downside to that is that tap, hose, and sprinkler system water that most people use to water their plants is missing valuable acid to help break down nutrients for plants.

Some people use Vitamin C. Greenhouses use inexpensive acidifying chemicals that they buy in bulk. I can buy 1 gallon of white vinegar at the supermarket for about $3 and it lasts about half a year so I only pay about $6 per year for gardening acid.

DoGooder

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 13, 2012
2:51 PM

Post #9163930

Diff areas do have diff water, usually the vinegar solution is reduced as the plant gets bigger, undiluted full strength vinegar can kill plants, cloudy skies give it a break from strong sun and help speed up hardening off, A lot of plants are growing to their max this year, the Epsom will help the plant process chlorophyll better- and green it up- you are using distilled vinegar instead of apple cider vinegar- the distillation process removes several things that are healthy, but I am not sure if it matters for your purpose, I just keep remembering distilling makes water(and other lqds) hungry so they are always searching to steal their substance back into themselves. Good luck
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

June 13, 2012
3:21 PM

Post #9163966

Kittriana, thanks for the advice on the advantages of apple cider vinegar! I will consider repeated applications of Epson salts to assist photosynthesis.

DoGooder
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

June 19, 2012
6:11 PM

Post #9172092

Have you tested your soil? In looking at your pictures I would say the biggest that pot is would be about 3 gallons. It might help to give it some peroxide in the water, but then you might just be adding too many chemicals. I think it needs to be planted in the ground. Just my opinion.

And all plants take time to adjust to new areas and conditions. However, yes, putting a plant from inside your house directly into the sun is a killer. It probably should have been trimmed back at that same time.

These are just my 2 cents worth.
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

June 19, 2012
7:25 PM

Post #9172209

Jnette, I did write earlier that the pot was 4-5 gallons because I thought I had put it in one of my largest paper pots which are 13" diameter, but actually I put it in a smaller pot, perhaps a 10" pot, so it's probably 3 gallons as you say. I do add peroxide every 4 days, about 2 teaspoons per 1.5 gallon watering can at this time. I might plant the tomato plant in the ground or I could cut off the bottom layer of the paper pot and let the roots grow. I don't know much about tomato plant roots, but I put it in that size pot because the original seedling was in a small pot about 4" so the roots would have to grow about 4 times the original size to outgrow the transplant pot.

I agree with your opinion that the tomato plant should have been trimmed back when I placed it outside. A few days ago I trimmed all the old leaves which are rounded as in the 4th picture of my original post, and it grew about 3" since then. The rounded leaves didn't have flowers or tomatoes, but the new dark bluish pointed leaves keep adding flowers and tomatoes. This is my first time growing a vegetable plant so I don't know much.

DoGooder
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

June 19, 2012
7:50 PM

Post #9172244

:0) well, you are learning a lot for your first time. First thing I would have done is get it out of those paper pots. They are terrible. I try not to buy anything in them, but if I do, that is the first thing I do before anything else.

Whoops!! just re-read your post and you actually put it in one of those. Sorry, maybe not everybody agrees with me. And some use them I guess. To me they are the dreaded pots of plants. Just shudder when I see them.

Guess it's time for me to get out of here and mind my own business.

Just one last thing. Curious about what the tomato actually is? A nondeterminate obviously. But when it was in the house it looked like it was getting leggy. Not enough light.

Ok, You have heard enough from me. Good luck. Jeanette
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

June 19, 2012
8:20 PM

Post #9172281

Jnette, I don' mind hearing your opinions. However, I am interested in whether you don't like paper pots for aesthetic reasons or because they harm plants. I buy paper pots mostly because they're inexpensive which allows me to experiment. Plastic posts are also inexpensive but I try to avoid plastic whenever possible so the only way I can get a 4 gallon pot for a few dollars is to purchase paper.

Also, paper pots can be planted in the ground without disturbing the roots. And I guess they provide more aeration than clay pots. Also the type that I get have holes on the sides which I love because that provides better drainage. They don't look pretty but at least they are the same color group as the the cardboard boxes, jute and wood planters I use.

The tomato variety (Solanum lycopersicum 'Super Sweet 100) was listed as indeterminate on one web site and determinate on another web site, so I'm not sure whether it will continue to grow till winter. I thought it would be more like a vine but the branches stretch outward and it is now about 4.5' wide and 6.5' high. The new branches are full of flowers and tomatoes from top to bottom so I guess it will produce its namesake 100 cherry tomatoes.

DoGooder
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 19, 2012
9:13 PM

Post #9172337

Just skimmed this thread so but I did notice that you add H2O2 often. Just remember it kills the good as well as the bad pathogens. You don't want sterile soil. You need microbe activity in your soil.
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

June 19, 2012
9:26 PM

Post #9172346

1lisac, thanks for the information about H202! I added organic fertilizer when I repotted the tomato plant and I hope the H202 didn't harm the micro-organisms.

DoGooder
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 19, 2012
9:32 PM

Post #9172353

Add alittle more. I don't think it will hurt anything. I would start with a small amount, you can always add more, it's hard to take it out. Lol

Just like antibiotics they kill good and bad bacteria but H2O2 kills all types of microbes. But since your growing in a container you can add more.

You mentioned that this is the first time you have grown veggies. I think you are doing great. When you quit learning you quit gardening.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

June 19, 2012
10:05 PM

Post #9172368

Ok DoGooder, I forget that the farther East you go, the more different type of gardening there is. Even South. No, the paper pots they use out here are plant killers as far as I'm concerned. And yes, the paper is cheaper but you sure would never plant these that we get in the ground and expect them to be able to grow thru the pots.

I am in the process of trying to figure out a mulch that they use in the South and we don't get here. I am totally amazed sometimes. But you know what I think it is, that the transportation is so expensive we don't have any dealers here that want to charge the customers for it. Probably think they can't sell it. So many things.

I hope you have a great crop of cherry tomatoes off of the plant. It will get used to the sun. I just got a cat on the key board. 'nite. Jeanette
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

June 20, 2012
4:26 AM

Post #9172461

1lisac, thanks for the compliment! There's so much information about gardening, I will keep studying it all my life! Lucky for me I enjoy reading about plants and gardening.

DoGooder
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

June 20, 2012
4:50 AM

Post #9172480

Jnette, the paper pots I use are tough like wood. It took me 15 minutes to saw through the top of a pot last year. However, the bottom 1" of the pots become soft and are easy to puncture or remove to allow roots to grow through. They're called Biodegradable Pots and I get them at NovoselEnterprises.com.

I've used peat pots for smaller plants and they almost always become moldy, so I never buy peat pots anymore. If I had the money I would buy only clay pots. I want my pots to match because as a new gardener I frequently move my pots and I want the potted plants to match with the garden and the other companion pots wherever I move them. I'm a frugal gardener and I find that I can reuse my containers more often if they match everything else.

Last year the major lesson I learned was to use fertilizer. This year one of the main lessons I've learned is to build the structure first (i.e. trellis, pots, edging, plant stands...) then decide what plants to add. I think most plants are happier if they can be immediately transplanted than waiting around for me to get a new pot or trellis etc.

DoGooder
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

June 20, 2012
7:00 PM

Post #9173549

Well, you and I have a lot to learn about gardening DoGooder. I have been gardening all my life which is quite a long time, and still learn. I am learning more that there are other ways of doing things than the ways I have always done them, because I have lived in the same area all my life.

Like Lisa says, when you stop learning, you stop gardening.

Another thing, just recently I have found more "new" plants in the nurseries. Plants we, up here, didn't know existed. Very interesting.

Have fun, and don't forget to grow things other than tomatoes for your table. :0)
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

June 20, 2012
7:23 PM

Post #9173585

Jnette, I got some cabbage seeds and I hope I have time to plant them. I'm originally from the Northwest (Oregon) but I grew up in zone 8 in Multnomah County. So while I'm in zone 5 now as you are, I happily recall my childhood and the greener environment of the Northwest. Massachusetts zone 5 winter is a lot of bare twigs, yellow grass and white snow, but I assume in Washington's zone 5 district the abundant coniferous plants create a green environment year-round.

DoGooder
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

June 20, 2012
10:13 PM

Post #9173755

Yes, we do have some Birch, Cottonwoods, and a few others, like willows. But mostly Cedars, Pine, Larch, which as you know lose their needles too. I was very surprised the first time I found that out. A needle tree that was bare in the winter!! But we do have many to keep it green in the winter with the white snow.

You have a good memory. Your cabbage might make it yet if you have somewhere out of the sun you can plant it. After all, you are in zone 5. LOL
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

June 27, 2012
1:06 PM

Post #9183648

It rained a lot this week and I noticed light-colored bumps growing on the tomato stems (see attached picture). Is this root nodes? If so is that an indication I need to repot now or just a symptom of rain and humidity? I added 1 cup Epsom Salts last week and a tablespoon of organic fertilizer and maybe that increased root growth.

DoGooder

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Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

June 27, 2012
4:01 PM

Post #9183827

Those are strange to me. How big a pot do you have it in? I thought you said you had them infairly large pots? Do you mean you put a whole cup of ES on that one plant? How did you do it, dissolved in water, scratched in around it? a whole cup to one plant seems like a lot to me. I don't know that it would hurt it any, but just seems like a lot. Especially if the plant is in a container.

I don't know that it would hurt it any, or cause the bumps. I will be interested in hearing what others say.

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 27, 2012
4:40 PM

Post #9183867

Normal for mater plants, half the epsoms chuckl at least! Less more often is best, if those vines were on the ground it would happily be rooting itself to support the length of vine and load of tomatoes it wants to grow, otherwise I wouldn't worry any abt the nodes,
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

June 27, 2012
5:47 PM

Post #9183932

Well, I remember that DoGooder is planting in pots. But, if it were me, I think I would get it out of the pot and into the ground. It looks like a really strong, healthy plant, but don't know what the bumps are and how long it will be real strong and healthy.

I suppose it depends on how you administered the ES too. If you watered them in with the ES dissolved in the water, I would say the plant is really absorbing them. It might be too late to take it out of the pot. Might as well just stand back and watch what happens. I don't think it will explode. LOL sorry Do Gooder, I think 1/4 cup would have been better. per plant. But like I said it might not hurt it. Who knows, maybe you discovered a new fertilizer.
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

June 27, 2012
8:26 PM

Post #9184187

Jnette, I measured the pot today and it's 9" so I guess it's maybe 2 gallons. I plan to repot the tomato plant soon because it's about 7' now so I guess the roots would be at the edges of the pot. There is a 1 inch layer of chunky pine bark on the top, and I placed the Epsom Salt on top of the bark and then poured a few cups water on it until it dissolved. I water the plant every day so I think the Epsom Salts are completely in the soil by now.

As for the bumps, I checked the Internet and discovered that tomato runners begin as light green bumps so I hoped that's what's happening to this plant. However, I wanted to find out if anyone on this forum has seen a disease that looks like this, hence why I posted today. Kittriana says the bumps happen sometimes and it's nothing to worry about, so since the tomato looks healthy otherwise I don't have anything to be concerned about now except that my plant needs more room for the roots to grow.

DoGooder
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

June 27, 2012
8:44 PM

Post #9184205

kittriana, thanks for confirming that the nodes are normal and healthy! Last year nodes formed on one of my clematis plants and it became a home for ants and stunted and withered. It died early this year, so that's why I became alarmed when I saw nodes growing on my tomato plant.

This plant is growing like gangbusters, so I assume the nodes would root in the ground as you say because it needs a lot of nutrients to fuel its growth. I forgot that in the wild tomato vines grow on the ground because I'm so used to seeing them hanging from ceiling pots or attached to wire cages and stakes. Vines often develop runners where they meet the ground so since wild tomatoes grow on the ground like vines I guess they evolved to grow runners to take advantage of as much nutrient-rich soil as possible

DoGooder
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

June 27, 2012
10:29 PM

Post #9184258

Sorry I wrote stuff and then deleted it all. Wait for Kittriana to tell you what to do with the plant.
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

July 2, 2012
2:37 PM

Post #9190315

Hi! I checked my tomato plant after a brief thunderstorm today and I noticed that some of the tomatoes appear to have brown spots like rust. Could that be the beginning of blossom end rot? I repotted the plant a few days ago by placing the bottom half of the original pot in an 18" pot, and I thought it had died because the stems and leaves were stringy the next day but it revived, nevertheless I still don't have any red tomatoes.

DoGooder

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Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

July 2, 2012
2:53 PM

Post #9190331

No, Not BER. BER is a definite black spot right where the blossom had been.

From how those pictures look, your tomatoes look very good. My gosh, for zone 5, which is the same zone I am in, yours are fantastic!! Why would you think you should have ripe tomatoes by now? Mine are just starting to bloom!!

I think you should maybe put your attention to something else and let them be. How hot is it there? Are you having a heat wave? If so, I would not do anything other than water them unless you really think they have a disease. If so, can you take a leaf that shows the rust or whatever to an Extension Office, do you have one? Or to a nursery that might know. If you don't have a leaf that has it, take a picture right up close of the area you are looking at, and take that with you.

Good luck.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

July 2, 2012
2:55 PM

Post #9190337

I forgot to ask you if the rusty spots ARE in the spot where BER would be?

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 2, 2012
2:58 PM

Post #9190341

I wouldn't have repotted, but not sure what your brown spots are, all sorts of things could be in shock, or burned- from any nuumber of things! The water - chlorine in city water- too rich a soil mixture- did you ck to see how many days it takes for growing this plant? Many are slow to ripen - but once Goin roll steadily on, here in the south the season has slowed down, it will take another month or two before production picks back up, you guys up north are being slammed from cool nights to hot nights and hotter days- I just came down from Philadelphia thru Virginia the morning after those winds tore thru there- way too hot and ppl were dying from that heat alone. Guys, I am no expert at all this, just a person trying to pay attention- your help is appreciated when we pool knowledge! Keeps my oh yeah's! Bubblin to the top of the brain, chuckl
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

July 2, 2012
4:38 PM

Post #9190451

Jnette, thanks for the compliment for the tomatoes! At this time I'm not worried about the size and number of the tomatoes. There are about 60-70 and they range in size from 1/4 to 3-4 inches. They look big in the photos but in reality they look like marbles.

What worries me is that they will never ripen because they've been green for about two months. I don't know much about tomatoes and I've seen a lot of pictures by DG members showing their huge harvests of tomatoes, so I thought mine were being held back by something. Thanks for telling me that it's normal for zone 5 tomatoes to be green at this time of year. Today the temperature is a high of 89 degrees and the weather people say the temperature will increase in the next few days.

I've been watering the plant twice a day, otherwise the leaves curl into 1/3 inch rolls and look like mint-colored cinnamon sticks. The Western sun is brutal on the tomato plant but I had to move it closer to the sun so I could attach the ever-growing branches to my porch rail. I will take your advice to not worry and just water the plant and prevent myself from staring at it a dozen times a day. As to the Extension Office, I don't know what that is.

Thank you for telling me the rust-like stuff isn't BER. It's mostly on the bottom of the tomatoes as seen in the 2nd photo. So since it's on the bottom of the tomatoes where I read BER first appears I thought it might be the first symptom. Maybe it's burn marks because of the hot sun. - DoGooder
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

July 2, 2012
4:51 PM

Post #9190467

kittriana, thanks for telling me the transplant shock could have made the tomato plant more susceptible to burning. I cut off a lot of leafy branches that took shade away from the tomatoes and most are now facing direct sun, so I guess they are burned. I did transplant using a very rich soil, mostly potting soil and spare germination mix. As for the harvest time, the following website says this cultivar takes about 96 days to produce a harvest and should have ripe tomatoes by mid summer:

http://myfolia.com/plants/10-tomato-solanum-lycopersicum/varieties/486-supersweet-100

DoGooder

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 2, 2012
5:54 PM

Post #9190556

Found by riceke on an earlier thread and I saved it for myself- see if this helps or just poses more problems, chuckl, www.://extension.iastate.edu/publications/pm1266.pdf an agricultural county extension office is what they are referring to- NOT sure if Ma has those- any county offices in your area could tell you tho
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

July 2, 2012
7:24 PM

Post #9190650

kittriana, thanks for explaining what an Extension Office is. The University of Massachusetts at Amherst has a Center for Agriculture and I could contact them with questions.

DoGooder
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

July 2, 2012
9:15 PM

Post #9190747

Wow!! 96 days? Are you sure? I don't think I have ever seen a tomato that takes that long. Because we are zone 5, I try to plant only tomatoes that take from 57 to maybe 65 days. That is a terribly long time DoGooder. What are they?

Thanks for letting DG know what the extension office is Katrina. I haven't been on for quite a while.
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

July 3, 2012
3:36 AM

Post #9190859

Jnette, the cherry tomato cultivar is 'Supersweet 100' Solanum lycopersicum. I got my plant 71 days ago in the mail and it had lots of leaves then, so I guess it's been alive longer than 96 days, because I assume it takes longer than 25 days to grow over 12 inches high with several branches and leaves.

DoGooder

This message was edited Jul 3, 2012 5:38 AM

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 3, 2012
4:56 AM

Post #9190918

Murphy's Prime Law. What can go wrong- will. My luck would be that if I had transplanted a tomato that grown bearing fruit- the plant would get even with me for messing with it's rootball by shedding all the fruit, putting it's growth in new roots and taking another 96 days to look as if it were going to even make tomatoes again, sigh. Not certain by any other reasons than personal experiences, but if you have kept sending that poor tomato thru everything you've said- the 96 days is just an estimate of ideal conditions...Hope your luck is better than mine!
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

July 3, 2012
6:30 AM

Post #9191034

kittriana, other bad luck I had was that unbeknownst to me the tomato plant had grown roots through the bottom of the pot into the ground so when I picked up the pot to place it in the bigger pot I tore many thick roots. I guess the plant will decide where it wants to focus its energy: new roots or fruit production. Maybe next year I should get a dwarf tomato plant so I don't have to keep moving it to accommodate the new vine growth.

DoGooder

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 3, 2012
6:48 AM

Post #9191050

I like to just plan on my maters hitting their 12' lengths, let em sprawl for dry years and stake em to 5' off the ground for a wet year, then treat em like a grapevine and let em hang across a hemp cord the rest of the way, I know you are in the north- so that means cooler ground for a LONG time, but next year you'll have lots of experiences to remember, don't forget to keep notes for yourself!!!
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

July 3, 2012
10:09 AM

Post #9191369

DG, don't worry about tearing the roots. I doubt that it will even phase it. Most plants do better with a root pruning. I know tomatoes aren't normally one of those, but I am sure it won't hurt it.

Did you get a lot of plants in the mail, or is this the only one? Only one time in my life I have bought tomato plants via mail, and if I remember right, it was a giant, or something like that, maybe a tree tomato, and I got 2 of the weakest plants I have ever gotten. Needless to say they didn't even make it to be planted.

Just a waste of money. I know, it was not a normal tomato grower. LOL Just a tomato I don't find around here.
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

July 3, 2012
11:31 AM

Post #9191460

Jnette, I'm not good at sowing plants by seed so I mostly buy plants, usually via online mail order catalogues. I was shopping for some flowers and the site had a link for vegetables, so on a whim I decided to buy a tomato plant to try vegetable gardening for the first time. My mom used to grow tomatoes and that's how I learned homegrown tomatoes are much tastier than supermarket cardboard tomatoes. I chose a cherry tomato plant because I wanted the plant to look decorative like a berry plant since it was going to be in the front yard.

DoGooder
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

July 3, 2012
12:19 PM

Post #9191503

Who did you get the plant from? I have had fairly good luck getting live plants from Burpee, Jung, and some others. But normal shrub plants etc. are different than getting vegetable plants. Hope you get a good crop. And yes, the flavor will be much better than the ones you buy in the store. For one thing they are picked green for shipping. No chance to get any flavor. They need that sun!!
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

July 3, 2012
3:43 PM

Post #9191752

Jnette, thanks for recommending Burpee and Jung! I got my tomato plant from GardenCrossings.com, but when I went to their web site today and clicked on the Vegetables link there was nothing available, so maybe they only sell vegetables for the busy spring season. I liked the begonias I got from them last year so I ordered again from them this year, but the shipment was partly damaged and the Million Kisses Begonias had some yellow leaves and spots (1st photo).

However, that is a strong cultivar and in a week they were in perfect condition and now they have 2-foot vines (2nd photo). The wax begonias are doing well but they tend to get moldy leaves in our humid climate so this might be the last year I buy them (3rd photo). The 4th photo shows my Garden Crossings plants doing well on my porch garden. The wax begonias have grown many blooms and are taller (in the basket and front pot), the Million Kisses begonias decoratively cover their metal stands, and the tomato plant is in the background when the photo was taken but it has since grown larger and it's wrapped around the front rail.

DoGooder

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cathy166
Stamford, CT
(Zone 6b)

July 5, 2012
1:21 PM

Post #9194209

DoGooder, I finally finished reading the bulk of these voluminous mails. I'm a bit surprised that you purchased a plant in the mail when these sweet 100s root so easily indoors. You are probably less than 100 miles from me, so I'll tell you what I know about this plant for this area. DTM or days to maturity is not from the day you receive the plant; it is the number of days after transplanting into the ground or elsewhere. I know nothing of paper pots, and I'm guessing they are a sort of paper maché pot. There may be additives in the paper pot that are not good for the plants. Not hardening off was your first problem.

We do a lot of container gardening. Tomatoes need to be in a large container, more like 5 gallons, even for a patio type determinate plant. They must have proper drainage. When you replant, they need to go into soil where they can spread their wings (roots) easily, You don't need to loosen the soil in the current container. Those little bumps are definitely an aerial root. That is why it is best to plant DEEP, so that those roots get underground nutrition. You can get a lot of inexpensive plastic pots, but you need to pull off the bottom so that the plants get good drainage. We have used community recycling bins, cheap laundry bins and more ridiculous things for containers. We don't usually add stakes where you have to tie; we use inexpensive but strong trellises. They go in the containers, and you can vine the tomatoes through the holes.

I would not put another additive into those tomatoes other than fresh potting soil. You are definitely giving this plant too much attention. When ripe, these small tomatoes should be quite sweet. And they do produce 100 tomatoes because each stem provides 10-20 tomatoes. BTW, even good indoor sunlight is nothing like outdoor sunlight or even outdoor clouds.
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

July 5, 2012
1:34 PM

Post #9194238

cathy166, thanks for confirming these Mexican-based tomatoes can grow in a New England climate! I assume they will ripen by the end of summer. As for DTM being the time from transplant to harvest, I don't know how to figure that since tomatoes are transplanted at different growth stages. A gardener who transplants a 4" plant would have to wait longer for a harvest than a gardener who transplants a 1 ft. plant.

I'm glad I tranplanted the tomatoes in an 18' pot so I don't have to worry about whether there's enough media. Thank you for confirming the bumps are aerial roots. At the original location the plant roots had to travel through 6" of bark dust so I guess that's why they started to grow stem roots because they weren't able to get enough nutrients.

DoGooder
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

July 12, 2012
6:04 PM

Post #9203252

Some of my tomatoes are becoming yellow and orange, so I guess the plant's doing fine. But the day I saw the tomatoes ripening I also saw something that seems strange. The flowers on the smaller new tomatoes are attached to the fruit (see photos). Does anyone know if that's a bad sign or doesn't matter?

DoGooder

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kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 12, 2012
8:53 PM

Post #9203443

I would hazard it means they are trying to grow so fast they aren't remembering what they are supposed to be doing, they will probablyy be fine, and the petals will brush off as they ripen
lycodad
Hornell, NY
(Zone 5a)

July 12, 2012
9:35 PM

Post #9203496

The flowers are normal. They will usually just fall off when the fruits ripen. You should have some nice ripe tomatoes in a couple of weeks, maybe sooner.

Al
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

July 13, 2012
4:49 AM

Post #9203605

kittriana and lycodad, thanks for telling me this is a temporary condition! This morning I found the first ripe tomato (attached photo). How long should I leave it on the vine?

DoGooder

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kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 13, 2012
5:43 AM

Post #9203636

Depends how hungry you are- of you touch the tomato, and it comes off easy, it's ready.
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

July 13, 2012
6:37 AM

Post #9203692

kittriana, thanks for the advice!

DoGooder
lycodad
Hornell, NY
(Zone 5a)

July 13, 2012
7:28 AM

Post #9203731

I'd be ready right now!

Al
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

July 13, 2012
1:29 PM

Post #9204063

Al, I am ready to eat this tomato, but I want to get a bowl-full so I'm going to wait a little longer till more tomatoes ripen.

DoGooder
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

July 13, 2012
3:28 PM

Post #9204196

DoGooder has willpower.
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

July 13, 2012
4:36 PM

Post #9204284

Jnette, LOL! I can muster the willpower for a few days as I do like to see the tomatoes turn red on the vines. That's a pleasure because I waited months staring at green tomatoes. However, I didn't have the willpower to resist marshmallows and Whoppers today.

DoGooder
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

July 13, 2012
6:01 PM

Post #9204364

DoGooder. Please remember you are in the same zone as I am and I would love to see some green marbles on my plants. I am only looking at yellow flowers right now. I think that the reason your green tomatoes were green for so long is because you were transplanting them etc. all the time.

You do have will power, but I think you need more patience. LOL, Just my opinion. I forgot, and don't want to go back and read this whole thread, but is this the first year you have grown tomatoes???
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

July 13, 2012
7:15 PM

Post #9204433

Jnette, yes this is my first year growing tomatoes. I've never grown any vegetables before but I started gardening two years ago and have been doing lots of research which helped prepare me for vegetable gardening this year. My tomato plant was already over a foot tall when I got it so I guess it was planted in winter at a greenhouse. Perhaps you started your tomatoes in the spring which would explain why they're not at the fruit stage yet?

My goal for this tomato plant is to get 2 pints of tomatoes which would pay for the cost of the plant and supplies to grow it. Also, I hope it tastes fine! I'm worried though because they sprayed for mosquitos in my neighborhood and maybe the pesticide will produce toxic tomatoes.

DoGooder
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

July 13, 2012
8:28 PM

Post #9204509

DoGooder, no, all it takes is a greenhouse and that is what sellers use. I don't have one. They probably started theirs about the same time as I did.

How long ago did they spray? Did they use crop dusters? I would say to wash it good when you pick it. Do they let you know when they are going to do it? Normally they do, and then if you don't have too many plants, just cover your edibles with something.
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

July 13, 2012
9:44 PM

Post #9204583

Jnette, they sprayed our neighborhood a few weeks ago as far as I can remember. I guess it's a state program to control the mosquitos which appear to rule the summer in my region of Massachusetts. Normally I can't walk on a forest trail without getting bitten once every 10 minutes if I wear light summer clothes. Since I live next to a swamp I sometimes get bitten 4 times per minute when I'm gardening so I have to wear a mosquito "burka".

DoGooder
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

July 14, 2012
10:05 AM

Post #9204968

Yes, living next to a swamp would do it. I doubt that the spraying will hurt if you wash everything good. I still would cover things if you have enough notice and don't have too much.
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

July 18, 2012
6:45 PM

Post #9210736

Hi all! We had lightning and harsh rain today, but my tomatoes survived! I decided to pick them lest they fall off in another storm. I've attached some photos I took today after the storm.

The verdict: the harvest is a success, but each tomato tastes different yet pleasant in its own unique way. A few tomatoes really are "Supersweet" as the name says, but some are tangy and others have a warm sunkist flavor. After three months of worrying I can rest assured that "Supersweet 100" is a great tomato plant for my region. There are many dozens of green tomatoes in the process of ripening, so I expect many more harvests this year.

Thanks everyone for your patience with all my questions and your valuable advice!

DoGooder

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lycodad
Hornell, NY
(Zone 5a)

July 18, 2012
7:19 PM

Post #9210789

Okay - now you can start eating them!

Al
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

July 18, 2012
7:28 PM

Post #9210805

Al, my sister and I added many tomatoes to our evening meal! They're delicious!

DoGooder
lycodad
Hornell, NY
(Zone 5a)

July 19, 2012
12:15 PM

Post #9211542

My very first pick of the year this morning. "Tumbler" was grown from seed in early March, transplanted into a 5 gal recycle pail moved inside and out our back porch depending on the weather. The plants are dwarf determinates with about golf ball size tomatoes good for salads. I have lots more coming in the garden, but they will be later in August.


Like you DG, we folks in the northeast seem to be the last people on earth to eat fresh tomatoes.

Al

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DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

July 19, 2012
1:19 PM

Post #9211609

Al, those tomatoes look great! Thanks for telling me the Tumbler cultivar grows well in the northeast. I'm considering getting a Tumbler plant next year because I think it would look better next to my shrubs than the 8 ft. Supersweet 100 vine I have that's hanging from fishing line from the porch roof.

DoGooder
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

August 4, 2012
11:20 AM

Post #9229390

Folks, I would like to announce that today my plant has achieved the 100 harvest mark! Its name is Supersweet 100 indicating that's how many tomatoes per season. However, there are plenty of new flowers that the bumblebees like and dozens more tomatoes on the vine so who knows how many more flavorful tomatoes this plant will produce. I've attached a photo of my biggest harvest on July 28th (39 tomatoes).

DoGooder

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kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

August 4, 2012
2:58 PM

Post #9229608

I thot it was named Supersweet 100s, oh well. How long are your vines so far? Lots of folks maters are hitting 20' I think I heard- crazy year! Grats!
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 4, 2012
4:41 PM

Post #9229700

DG, your tomatoes look great!! No, I still do not have ripe tomatoes. I decided that in the morning before it gets hot I am going to go down with my pruning shears and do some serious clean up. I did that last week on the lower parts of the plants, now it is time to start cutting from the top down. There is not time for new tomatoes to get started in my season so the strength needs to go to the fruit that is already on the plants.

So glad that you are having a good harvest. Now, did you make notes, and plans on how to for next year? I know that even now I make changes in which plants and how to fertilize them with which one etc. However, so much depends on the weather too. Our biggest problem is that the last couple of years the month of June is so cold and wet that the plants just do not want to do anything. Not even get the roots going. So, the whole month is lost.
lycodad
Hornell, NY
(Zone 5a)

August 4, 2012
7:24 PM

Post #9229852

Congratulations DG - now you're terminally addicted to tomato growing like the rest of us! You've only got 2000 more varieties to try out next year. Your Sweet 100's look great! Enjoy..

Al
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

August 5, 2012
5:14 AM

Post #9230023

kittriana, my tomato plant is only 8 ft. After it hit the 8 ft. mark it stopped growing higher and now the vines spread outward towards the air. So the plant doesn't look so great.

Jnette, yikes! I'm sorry about your tomato plant. I hope you get some ripe tomatoes by the end of August. I have been making notes and deciding what cultivar to grow next year, but I would give up tomatoes if we could have cooler summer weather like your zone.

Al, Massachusett's hot humid zone is difficult for me since I grew up in Oregon's mild and much less humid zone 8 and I miss it. However, my tomato addiction is helping me cope with the weather. Every few days I get another harvest, and it's satisfying and healthy to have fresh vegetables on a regular basis.

DoGooder
Sequee
Carmel, NY
(Zone 6b)

August 5, 2012
10:30 AM

Post #9230316

Um, that would be about 5,000 more varieties to try... Would that I could live that long to try them all!
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 5, 2012
3:27 PM

Post #9230663

Enjoy them now DG 'cause you will sure miss them in the winter and dream of those BLTs.
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

August 5, 2012
3:39 PM

Post #9230672

Sequee, I wish I could taste all the varieties. I assume I will like them all, so long as they're fresh-picked and not supermarket-processed.

DoGooder

PeteB7

PeteB7
Trumbull, CT
(Zone 7a)

August 5, 2012
3:55 PM

Post #9230693

Are you on well water or city? I checked a few water reports in our area and the average PH is 7 in most towns, 7.5 in some, so bumping it a bit more on the acidic side is a good idea. The reports showed a typical outer limit of 8.5 even 9 in some cities.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 5, 2012
4:26 PM

Post #9230731

So Pete, what ph should the tomatoes be? I'm on well.

PeteB7

PeteB7
Trumbull, CT
(Zone 7a)

August 5, 2012
7:18 PM

Post #9230949

Do you know the PH of your well water?

I'm new to this but from what I've read tomatoes require a "soil" PH of 6.0 to 6.8, however one university study says 5.5 to 7.5. Perhaps it depends on the variety? The thing is that soilds such as soil do not have a PH, rather the moisture in the soil takes on compounds in the soil that alters the PH of the liquid. Also, it will depend on the PH of the water that you start with which is what we are talking about. Most potting mixes have a large percentage of Peat which is acidic, and I read that some suggest adding garden lime when planting tomatoes probably because the Peat is too acidic which is what I recently did just following an experts advice. I have to think about this more to decide on the best thing to do. I don't think it is really that critical unless it is way off but since I use a drip system to water I don't want to have to treat the water which is around a PH of 7. I might just leave out the lime next time and see if the soil mix with acidic Peat takes the water at 7 down to something like 6 or 6.5 in order to keep it simple. Also, since I use the same water for different plants it is better to have the soil correct for the water being used in an appropriate way for each plants PH requirements.

DoGooder, those look excellent, making my mouth water!

This message was edited Aug 5, 2012 10:21 PM
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 5, 2012
11:29 PM

Post #9231080

Ok Pete, so are you saying that I can't just check the ph of the water? I have to mix soil with it? I don't use soil. Just alfalfa bales. Lots of nitrogen. Whoops, those are my tomatoes. We were talking about my brugs etc.that get so much foliage weren't we. I use potting mix with my container plants. So, check that?

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

August 6, 2012
4:38 AM

Post #9231162

Ph of the water can change the soil ph, your maters are apt to start blooming again. Might try beating them with a kitchen towel a bit and see if it will help, the sun has dropped colder in the skynow, I notice it cuz of my windshield having sun at a more irritating angle to me,
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

August 6, 2012
6:13 PM

Post #9232313

Hi all, I just joined. I'm from Montreal. Very hot summer. Jnette I just want to say that high nitrogen will give you lots of foliage but no fruit. You need to increase the K levels in the soil. Also, PeteB7, it's true you should add lime for the calcium. I'm acing some problems with cracking.

PeteB7

PeteB7
Trumbull, CT
(Zone 7a)

August 6, 2012
7:10 PM

Post #9232392

Hi, I'm new to this and I only added lime because I was reading from an expert who said to do it.

About pH again, I just looked up about the Black Prince tomatoes that I"m growing and they suggest a soil pH of 5 to 6, that is low!

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

August 6, 2012
7:37 PM

Post #9232438

On the ph thing? They are talking brugs as well as tomatoes guys, it takes lime in hard soils for the plants to be able to uptake nutrients at all, shouldn't be an issue in planting mediums that are premixed

PeteB7

PeteB7
Trumbull, CT
(Zone 7a)

August 6, 2012
7:53 PM

Post #9232455

Jenette,

The instructions with some soil PH meters tell you how to prepare a sample. Here is one in .pdf format:
http://www.lusterleaf.com/img/instruction/1845_instruction.pdf

The procedure there is fairly complicated and I kind of disagree with it. What we really want is the pH that the plant sees. Using Deionized water does not tell you the contribution of the water that you're using. I would use the meter after a typical watering and try to do it without removing soil. It is very important to clean the probe before each use since oxides on the metals can completely throw off the reading. It makes sense to average readings in several
spots around the plant and even after 5 or 10 minutes until we get a feel for the soil. I'm still trying to find the best way to use one, and it might just be too low quality to get any meaningful readings. The one I have is not that exact model but is a similar cheap one.

Those instructions say not to use it in water, I use mine, which is a different brand, and it has not seemed to bother it. It usually reads about 7 with our tap water when properly cleaned, but I've seen 6.5 to 7.5 right from the tap. Those
instructions say to clean with cotton or paper, I've read online to use steel wool with mine - a non-metalic scrub pad without chemicals would probably be better. These cheap pH meters mostly use at least one aluminum probe, and aluminum oxidizes quickly in air so this is why they should be cleaned before each reading. Lab grade pH meters, that cost 10 to 100 times more use Silver, Platinum or completely different probes.

This one is popular with Aquarium people but the probe can only be used in liquids, as I understand
it, not soil - just an example of a better meter:
http://americanmarineusa.com/phmonitor.html

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

August 6, 2012
8:19 PM

Post #9232475

Aluminum oxidizes rapidly with salt. Such as inclusive the fertilizer salts, water not so much as the salt.

PeteB7

PeteB7
Trumbull, CT
(Zone 7a)

August 6, 2012
8:45 PM

Post #9232509

Aluminum oxidizes just from the moisture in the air this is why electrical wiring overheated in homes when they started using aluminum wire. Pastes are now used/required when aluminum wiring is used. Yes, salts, acids and bases are even worse for aluminum. Bare aluminum is actually highly reactive, it quickly produces a layer of aluminum oxide that is not so reactive as a stable outer layer. I'm not an expert but this is what I've been told.

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

August 7, 2012
8:39 AM

Post #9232958

I was thinking more of ships, chuckl, but all true, aluminum wiring had the issues also of slower conductivity than copper which increased resistance, the original water pipes in Houston were ceramic because of the constant humidity, let's see where were we?
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

August 7, 2012
10:42 PM

Post #9233790

PeteB7, thanks for the compliment! The tomatoes are delicious!

hugobee, I'd be interested in learning more about how you're preventing cracked tomatoes. When I stopped watering my tomatoes daily they started cracking so half my harvests were cracked. Then I started watering every day and the cracking stopped for a while then started again. I guess I need to amend the growing media.

DoGooder

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

August 8, 2012
5:13 AM

Post #9233907

Cracking is caused by the tomatoes uptake of water uncontrolled, they just grow too fast, stick with a moderate amount of water steadily
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

August 8, 2012
5:58 AM

Post #9233970

I've been trying to keep the watering even. We've had almost no rain here,so when I water, which has been almost daily, I do it slowly and thoroughly. But most of my toms are in containers. Kittriana you're in Texas. How often are you watering? I staring to slow down on how often because the last couple of nights have cooled down a bit, less humidity. Maybe in the 70's. No problem with the cherry's, just the Better Boys and Japanese Black Trifele.
DoGooder, I'm now staring to check each tomato and if I see that it's starting to blush I am removing them and bringing them in before they crack.
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

August 8, 2012
8:01 AM

Post #9234126

kittriana, thanks for the advice!

hugobee, I prefer ripe tomatoes that have been red on the vine a few days, but I guess less rip uncracked tomato is a better deal than one that has cracked that could be damaged by insects.

DoGooder
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 8, 2012
9:17 AM

Post #9234210

How is the flavor of the ones you are picking that way Hugo? Obviously the longer you can leave them on the plants the better the flavor. Does the cracking make them spoil, get bugs in them, or are they just not that pleasant to look at? At what point to they crack? Normally I have not had them crack unless they are getting almost ready to pick anyway. Maybe you can leave them on a bit longer than "the first blush"? Seems like such a waste of all of your work to lose that "special" home-grown, vine ripened tomato that we all crave in the summer.

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

August 8, 2012
11:31 AM

Post #9234390

I am actually everywhere a bit at a time, IF I were 'home' depending on where I was at, I would follow what I've learned is best for that area/soil... since in all the places I've lived there was always a different way to use what I've learned in growing older- vague? I am not an expert, by any means- I've been to Canada- just north of the border of the USA from Vancouver, to east of Montreal, Ooops, duty calls- bbl

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

August 8, 2012
1:23 PM

Post #9234538

I actually don't like mine so ripe they are mush, which some var get that way super fast, of allowed to ripen that long, the crack is how volunteer seeds show up later unexpected, some cracks skim over, some don't, but the cracks do allow bugs and diseases to enter if left - I gather when I notice them and process them to store. I don't particularly have any desire to try every variety, but some of the old heirloom op's did need improved, shrug, just saying, we slow watering when the plant indicates a stall, or we are done with them, August is hard on plants in Texas- with luck it cools by Sept and the plants Might pick back up if they lasted so long.
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

August 8, 2012
1:38 PM

Post #9234559

Hi Guys, I am now picking them at the first blush if I spot even the smallest crack. So far no bugs, but one Better Boy looked iffy so it went into the garbage. I am now really trying to monitor the watering so hopefully there won't be any more cracking. What I have noticed so far is that the Better Boy in the container is cracking whereby the BB in the ground isn't and I think it's because it gets watered by a watering system every other day.
Jnette, the flavor is good. The problem is that sometimes they are a bit woody in the middle. For the most part they have been juicy. DG I have no choice at this point but to pick them and bring them in.
This is the first time I've really had a problem with cracking. I am pretty sure it's because I have over watered them due to the extreme heat and the fact they are in containers. I think I need to go back to basics and remember gardening 101! LOL!
Kittriana, it's true that I have to pick them asap. I also don't like over ripe mush tomatoes. Anyways, live and learn.
Sharon
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 8, 2012
4:13 PM

Post #9234802

Sharon, try Gym Girl's method of Earthboxes. They don't cost more than a buck and a half, and sounds pretty much fool proof. I have finally decided to do it myself next year. I have been planting in Alfalfa bales and wanted to use them up so used them this year. But next year will go to the Earthboxes.

She has great instructions on the link she posted a few posts up.
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

August 9, 2012
12:07 PM

Post #9235780

Thx Jnette, I'll look into it for next year. Always looking to maximize my space and growing season. I'm interested to know what tomatoes you are thinking of growing for next year. I am always looking for suggestions from people. Of course I might not have access to all the varieties, which is why I always debate about seeds...
Sharon
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 9, 2012
12:38 PM

Post #9235821

That's where sowing seeds instead of buying plants are better if you can do it. You get what you want.

Will let you know on the tomatoes Sharon, gotta run, ttyl
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

August 9, 2012
8:48 PM

Post #9236309

Hugobee, thanks for the information about overwatering causing cracked tomatoes! I decreased the amount of water I provide the tomatoes and today’s harvest of 6 were okay. Also, a few weeks ago I put a water spike in the pot, one of those $1 orange plastic spikes that attaches to a soda bottle. At first the water emptied in a few minutes, but now the water sits in the bottle for several days.

DoGooder
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

August 10, 2012
5:43 PM

Post #9237188

Glad to help DG! We've had rain since yesterday and I'm worried about cracking.
Jnette, what always amazes me are the self seeding tomatoes that I find popping up. Mind you, they're always cherry toms, but it blows my mind that in my zone they can survive. Obviously they don't produce as quickly or as much. Guess I should bring them in and give them a head start, but I only find them after planting so I either pull them out or move the stronger ones to a sunny location and hope for the best!
Sharon
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

August 10, 2012
5:55 PM

Post #9237200

Sharon, we had a strong storm today after I watered the plants and I hope the tomatoes don't start cracking again. Maybe I should have covered the pot to prevent the rain from watering it again.

DoGooder
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

August 10, 2012
6:06 PM

Post #9237212

DG, I was thinking the same thing. That's why we need to keep as much foliage as possible, although I've read that rain touching the tomatoes is as bad as too much water in the soil, so I don't know what to do!
Sharon
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 10, 2012
6:23 PM

Post #9237231

You lost me Sharon. Why do we "need to keep as much foliage as possible" this time of year?
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

August 11, 2012
9:38 AM

Post #9237767

Hi Jnette, I guess the foliage can help protect the plant from absorbing too much rain and sun scald. Also the plants are still setting fruit... I used to remove a lot and now after the summer we're having I have left more on than I normally do. Any thoughts on that?
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

August 11, 2012
10:29 AM

Post #9237810

Sharon, yes the leaves help prevent the tomato roots from being soaked by rainshowers. However, even leaves aren't enough. After yesterday's rainshower I found 7 cracked tomatoes this morning. But, the good news is that today my tomato plant reached the 200 mark and I've harvested 209 tomatoes not including the cracked ones I threw out.

DoGooder
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

August 11, 2012
11:49 AM

Post #9237897

DG, I am impressed. I'm still hoping I'll get 100 from my Sweet 100's, LOL! Which by the way, seemed to take forever to develop fruit. Now it seems to be okay but some are really puny. Anyways, this season has been a challenge - water, no water, rain, heat, we've had it all, not necessarily in the order we'd like. Depending on how cracked they are, I am not throwing them all out. Most of mine have just the beginning near the stem and I removed them immediately.
Should I throw them all out?
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 11, 2012
3:16 PM

Post #9238099

No don't throw them out. Cut out the portion you don't want and use the rest. Gosh, I wish I had the problem. Nothing ripe yet and you all are talking like it is going to be a long hot summer. I don't count on anything. We normally have a hard freeze not long after labor day and after that has killed them all off, it turns nice again. Last year was the exception tho. It was like you all are talking. Can we count on it to be a real steady thing?

I have never heard of the tomato leaves protecting the roots from the rain. If it's that bad put an umbrella over them. Sorry, I am be facetious. Guess I can learn a new thing now and then, but that is a first.

I don't take a huge amount off, but don't believe in the sun scald that much here either. If we were in Arizona, Texas, etc. I maybe could go along with that. Actually, I think you need to start a new thread Sharon using "Why are my tomatoes splitting", or whatever word you want. You will get a lot of comments. Look how many I got just by asking if it was too hot last year? We're still on it.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 11, 2012
3:20 PM

Post #9238102

That was on my last thread that I started last year and it has 266 replies and I was asked to start a new one.

I just wanted to say that if you start a new thread as I suggested, you will get suggestions from Shoe. Pay attention to what he says. Horseshoe. He knows. There are a lot of good smart people out there, all willing to help.
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

August 11, 2012
4:00 PM

Post #9238169

Sharon, Supersweet 100 was cultivated from Sweet 100 so the two cultivars are very similar as I can see from your description of your tomatoes. My tomatoes did "take forever to develop." I stared at green tomatoes for about 2 months I think and just when I had lost hope I started to see the first yellowing.

I also have some tomatoes that are "really puny." Some are deep red but only about 1/3 size of the normal tomatoes. As to throwing them out at first I threw out the cracked tomatoes, but now I eat them at the next meal and they taste fine.

Jnette, I can never count on the weather here. New England is known for extremely unpredictable weather. I remember this time last year Hurricane Irene uprooted about 20 big trees in my neighborhood. I was able to salvage some giant hostas that were growing at the foot of the trees and they're now growing in pots on my deck.

DoGooder
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 11, 2012
7:04 PM

Post #9238441

Good for you DG. Wow, bet they are beautiful.

Ok Sharon, I went up and looked at the thread I started last year, and my first ripe tomato was August 31st. I was shocked. So, maybe I am not that far behind.

To tell you how the weather is changing, when we first moved here 18 years go, we picked ripe tomatoes in July.

Global Warming?

Nobody believes in it, but me I guess.
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

August 12, 2012
7:25 AM

Post #9238741

Thanks DG. Jnette, I'm going outside to see what the damage is from the storm we had yesterday. DG you must have had the same thing?
Last year, Jnette, I had so many cherries by the end of July, beginning of August, I was going nuts. My real struggle are the heirlooms and hybrids. I'm also growing Super San Marzano and I can say I'm that impressed.
At least the sun is shining today.
Sharon
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 12, 2012
11:16 AM

Post #9238947

Did you say you are impressed with the San Marzanos, or not? My SMs didn't do much this year. Only a few on them. I have several I am not pleased with. Last year I had Pineapples I really liked. This year I have 2 plants and one tomato between the 2. I have quite a few tomatoes on my Costolutoes. And they are a really good tomato. Funny shaped, but very meaty and good. They look like little pumpkins on the tomato plant.
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

August 12, 2012
2:28 PM

Post #9239133

Sharon, yes my plant and tomatoes were damaged by the storm. I plan to go out today to chop off some of the branches.

DoGooder
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

August 12, 2012
6:12 PM

Post #9239368

Too funny Jnette, I agree with you. What I meant was that I was not impressed with the SSMs. When I use my iPad, the words have a way of showing up when I type that are completely not what I meant. I have double check what I write. No, I found the SSMs weird. Wimpy stems and leaves and they don't look so healthy. If I can find seeds for Amish Paste I might give them a try. Trouble is there are so many I want to try and no space!!!!!
DG, it's a wait and see, still haven't cut tops off but I'm trying to be vigilant about not having too many suckers.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 12, 2012
10:23 PM

Post #9239597

Sharon, last year my Amish Paste only got a few tomatoes on them. I only give them one chance and if they do that tot me, I don't do them again. I have had SSMs several different years. And yes, like you, I have so so results. Some good, some bad. No more. They are too much work to grow iffy plants.

I tried some new ones this year. Momontaro and cripe,now I can't remember the name of the other one. OH Omars Lebonese. I will have to take a look. I know I got some pretty big ones on them, but don't know how many. Don't know if enough to bother with again.

I started a new thread on the tomatoes because some others wanted it. Go ahead and jump in. Jen
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 13, 2012
12:09 PM

Post #9240183

Hugo-I have the same problem with my ipad. I have to reread very carefully and many times Im not even sure how some words got there. As for tomatoes its just to hot here. A month ago I lost some smaller plants when it rained for a week, we havent had rain since and temps in the 100s.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 13, 2012
3:22 PM

Post #9240396

Sharon, if I have some seeds for Amish Paste I will send them to you. I didn't plant them this year since I didn't have good luck with them last year. J
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

August 13, 2012
8:19 PM

Post #9240734

Hi guys, never sure which thread I should be on. 1lisac you have to be vigilant with the iPad it has a mind of its own,
J, I would try Amish paste but maybe something more interesting. If the Gold Medals are good, I'll sed you seeds.
Sharon
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 13, 2012
9:15 PM

Post #9240771

Thanks Sharon. Jeanette
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

August 14, 2012
5:12 AM

Post #9240920

1lisac, yes, it can be too hot for tomatoes. Not too long ago I had figured since tomatoes thrive in full sun that the more sun the better, but now that I've had spectacular success growing Super Sweet 100 in part shade I've changed my mind. I spoke to my mom today who lives in a zone 10 region of Greece and she says all her tomatoes died because of the heat. However, she said last year her tomato plants did well because she covered them with a cloth.

DoGooder

This message was edited Aug 14, 2012 7:17 AM
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

August 20, 2012
11:41 AM

Post #9247822

Help! My tomato plant is covered with white powdery mildew (1st photo). I first noticed it on August 13th when I cut about 80% of the leaves and added 2 trellises for the growing branches. Now with the trellises I can see the leaves better and I've noticed many diseases such as the mildew, holes in the smaller leaves, and yellow areas on the bottom of leaves (2nd photo). I haven't added any pesticides this year, so I guess I should start a pest control program.

Also, when I chopped off most of the leaves the tomato plant went into shock I think because it went from producing an average of 22 tomatoes per day to 4 tomatoes per day. It's using its energy to grow more leaves rather than ripen fruit. It's added about 25 large leaves since I pruned it and the branches have grown another foot long. Unfortunately, most of the new leaves are covered with mildew.

DoGooder

Thumbnail by DoGooder   Thumbnail by DoGooder
Click an image for an enlarged view.

Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 20, 2012
1:44 PM

Post #9247949

Ok, first of all, how much longer do you have of your season? When is your first frost date? If you don't know, you can get it off this site. Since you are in zone 5, MA, I doubt you have enough time to have time to get new tomatoes on your plants and ripen too. Especially since you said it is raining now. So, "if it were me". Remember, this is what I said. I didn't say to do it. I would cut off any new branches and the tops beyond any viable (tomatoes you are sure you will be able to use before winter) tomatoes.

Then, if it is still cool, I would cut off large leaves. It sounds to me that your plants are so full of foliage that they are not getting any air circulation thru them.

What do you mean you are only getting 4 tomatoes a day? new ones, or newly ripened ones? I cannot believe cutting off all those leaves sent your plants into shock. Are you saying they quit starting new fruit, or quit ripening fruit?

Remember, this is just my opinion. Go ask Carolyn.
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

August 20, 2012
5:23 PM

Post #9248220

Carolyn, the average first frost in Hopkinton is October 1-10, so I guess I probably have at least a month to get ripe tomatoes. I estimate there are about 150 tomatoes on my plant, but none are red and a few are pale orange or yellow. However, yesterday I woke up to find what looked like frozen dew on the wax begonias in the basket next to the tomato plant because we had a cold night, so there might be an early frost this year. Thanks for recommending cutting off the new branches and tops beyond viable tomatoes!

As for air circulation, the plants were chock full of leaves, mostly diseased, so that's why I cut off about 80% at mid-month. However, I didn't expect the plant would start growing leaves like crazy, but luckily I put a lot of branches on trellises so there's okay aeration. The four tomatoes per day I mentioned are ripe tomatoes. On August 13th when I pruned my tomato plant I harvested 22 tomatoes, but afterwards I got this many:

0, August 14
6, August 15
8, August 16
0, August 17
5, August 18
4, August 19
4, August 20

So my average harvest is 3.86 tomatoes per day for the last 7 days. I don't know if the tomato plant when into shock, but my harvest dramatically declined from its previous average of about 22 toms per day to now only about 4 per day. However, the plant is slowly recovering because most of the tomatoes were green a week ago and now most are an almost white pale green which is the next stage towards becoming ripe. I'm glad I pruned the plant because there were so many diseased leaves and tomatoes and branches rotting on the ground and lack of aeration, so in the long run I'm guessing it was helpful to prune the plant. - DoGooder
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

August 20, 2012
7:43 PM

Post #9248409

Some of my toms are showing powdery mildew, but the output seems okay. I started removing the worst, but as we creep toward September, I'm zone 5b, I don't think too much new foliage is going to grow.
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

August 20, 2012
8:00 PM

Post #9248425

Sharon, I guess the powdery mildew doesn't affect production. I assume my plant became infected because of the frequent rain-showers we had last week. I'm satisfied with my harvest, but as the saying goes, "give them an arm and they'll take a leg." I'm 3 tomatoes away from the 300 tomato harvest mark and if I reach that mark it will be much more than my highest expectations at the beginning of the season when I thought I would be happy if I could just get 40 tomatoes.

DoGooder
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 21, 2012
9:33 AM

Post #9248899

Why do you want more foliage to grow Sharon? I don't understand. When is your first frost date?
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

August 21, 2012
2:04 PM

Post #9249193

Hi Jen and DG, not sure about the frost date . They are saying we could have a warm fall and some f my plants are still producing fruit. However I'm starting to top them off. The only reason for the foliage is to prevent sun scald, which a couple of my plants did have even though I didn't take off any leaves.
I'm so conflicted about what to at this point but like I said, I'm topping off my plants, because who knows?
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 21, 2012
5:20 PM

Post #9249427

We normally have a heavy frost sometime in September and then it continues to be warm up into October. But the first frost has already killed the tomatoes.

So, I just wait and hope that they will ripen. My first ripe tomato last year was the 31st of August. After that they just kept ripening until they were all ripe. I only plant one cherry tomato, a Sun Sugar. I think they are the best. Now when I say my first ripe tomato, I mean my first large tomato. DH told me he ate the first Sun Sugar this afternoon. And he said I have a couple Tomontaros just about ripe. So, maybe the cooler weather is getting them to do something. Whata ya think Sharon? I don't know how large the ones that are ripening are, but that plant has a couple of really large tomatoes on it. I will have to take my camera down tomorrow.

You really should start the plants from seed in the house. Then you can grow whatever kind you want. That reminds me, I couldn't find any Amish Paste seeds, but I will continue to look. I have better luck with Super San Marzanoes for a sauce or paste. When I get enough tomatoes I roast them in a big roaster in the oven. They are so good.
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

August 22, 2012
6:41 AM

Post #9249825

Ok. DG. How is it you have so many tomatoes? I'm zone5b too, and my toms took forever...I think the cooler weather helps them ripe as long as it doesn't get too cool at night, then that can mess up everything. As long as night time stays around 60 maybe mid 50's. But we haven't gotten that low, so I'm hopeful. Like I said in the other thread,the go,d medals are doing well and they are a plant that likes cooler nights. You should consider it for next year. Regarding Amish Paste, have you tried Tatiana's tomato seed sight?
http://t.tatianastomatobase.com/wiki/Tatiana's_TOMATObase_-_Heritage_Tomatoes
My guess she would have it. Many people are very fond of this tomato. The verdict is still out on the super San Marzano's ...
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

August 22, 2012
3:01 PM

Post #9250382

Sharon, my trials and tribulations growing this tomato plant have been many. I guess luck and using what I learned during my first full year of gardening (2011) helped me the most, with luck probably being more important. This is my first time growing food. I'm grateful GardenCrossings.com took fine care of my plant before shipping it to me in perfect condition.

So my plant started out well at the nursery and the farmers who cultivated this variety in Mexico apparently did a great job with genetic engineering. This plant has been to hell and back over and over again. Many times I was certain it was dead because every branch was drooping and the leaves were all shriveled into narrow crinkly tubes. Yet I followed the advice I got on this thread and other places on the Internet and miraculously am completing my first season growing a vegetable (my only one this year) with success beyond anything I imagined when I photographed my little 13" seedling right out of its shipping box.

Today I harvested 4 tomatoes which brought me past the 300 mark (301 total), for a plant whose name says it will produce 100 tomatoes. I've done so many things to help this plant I don't think it was any one thing but a combination of genetics, care and luck (i.e. the weather). Basically I babied it in a bay window for several weeks, then hardened it off abruptly in its pot facing hot noon and evening sun and shaded by my home during cool mornings, transplanted it into a giant pot by tearing off the bottom of the original paper pot to minimize root shock, placed it halfway in a soil media of mostly Shultz potting mix with some added vermiculite, Germination Mix (Gardeners.com brand), and I think a few handfuls of old potting soil from another plant, then did extreme pruning a few times, watered it every day, and added Miracle-Gro + humic acid or Epsom salts every few weeks.

Yesterday I photographed the tomato monster that's taking over my West garden (attached pictures). If I had a trellis high enough for the longest branch it would be over 10 ft. tall now. I might spray some neem oil on it this week to control the powdery mildew that's spreading faster than the tomato plant.

DoGooder

Thumbnail by DoGooder   Thumbnail by DoGooder   Thumbnail by DoGooder   Thumbnail by DoGooder   
Click an image for an enlarged view.

DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

August 22, 2012
3:16 PM

Post #9250399

Sharon, I forgot to mention I also added pine bark mulch to the soil and perlite in the original pot (transplanted from the greenhouse pot). I use regular pine bark used for mulching bought by the cubic yard from a local loam distributor. It has a lot of big pieces and it's dark brown (undyed). - DoGooder
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

August 22, 2012
5:52 PM

Post #9250540

Good for you DG. Is is Sweet 100 that you are growing? Mine won't get 300 that's for sure! I'm learning more every day about container mixes. Next year how many do you think you'll try? I just ordered seeds!!!
Jen, Tatiana's tomato base has Amish paste seeds.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 22, 2012
6:22 PM

Post #9250579

Well, whatever you did DG, you did right. I sure would hate to go thru all you did every year for every tomato I plant. Where did you say you got it? Who did you order it from that got it from Mexico?? You should leave Garden Crossings good feedback in Watchdog.

Sharon, did you order the Amish Paste seeds? I didn't have very good luck with them last year so I won't be getting any. I am sorry, I didn't have any for you, I might have gotten seeds from someone else. Maybe Corey in Edmonds. I got a few different ones from him. One was Omar's Lebonese and I have tomatoes on that plant about 6" across. We'll see if they ripen. Bob said one of my San Marzanos is ripe out there. But he didn't pick it. He probably should have or the squirrel will get it. I have one squirrel out there that loves them but he really likes the Sun Sugars. However, Bob ate the only SS that was ripe. I plant that one more for the squirrel so he will leave my other tomatoes alone. I don't care that much for the cherry tomatoes. They are good for salads but that is about it.

hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

August 22, 2012
7:09 PM

Post #9250646

Jen, I just ordered a bunch of seeds from Tatiana's seeds. I must be insane. Amish Paste isnt one of them. Here's what I ordered, obviously I'm not planting all of them. If there are any you think you want let me know and I can send you some seeds. there are two others I want "Tasmania chocolate" and German red strawberry
1. Black from Tula
2. Aunt Gertie's Gold
3. Kellogg's Breakfast
4. Druzba
5. Red Penna
6. Orange Strawberry
7. Anna Russian
8. Gold Nugget

Am I crazy or what. DG, Linda, same goes to you re the seeds.
9. Iditarod Red
10. Bloody Butcher
11. Brandywine, Sudduth's
12. Black Russian
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

August 22, 2012
7:14 PM

Post #9250654

Sharon, I'm growing Super Sweet 100:

http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/30540/#b

One of the reviewers at the Super Sweet 100 web page said their plant produced 1400 tomatoes, so I guess my tomato plant is underperforming by only producing a few hundred by the end of the season. As for next year, I will only plant small size tomato cultivars in our West garden because I want that garden to look beautiful again so I will probably plant dwarf tomatoes that look like shrubs. I might try planting a few more Super Sweet 100s in our South garden but it only gets 4 hours direct sunlight per day so I'm not sure if I should plant any toms there.

Jnette, I read that Super Sweet 100 was created in Mexico and that it's genetically related to Sweet 100 which is its predecessor. I bought mine at GardenCrossings.com last spring as a potted seedling. I will definitely leave positive feedback at the Garden Crossings page at Dave's Garden Watchdog since not just this tomato plant but all the plants they sent me have done well. - DoGooder

DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

August 22, 2012
7:19 PM

Post #9250669

Sharon, I don't think you're crazy just adventurous!

DoGooder

PeteB7

PeteB7
Trumbull, CT
(Zone 7a)

August 22, 2012
7:45 PM

Post #9250715

Just to add to this, I also ordered 4 plants from GardenCrossings.com, 2 Home Run roses in gallon pots on sale, a Top Hat blueberry plant that was on sale, and a Himrod grape vine. The last two came in 5.5" pots. I planted the Home Run roses first and within a day from being out of the box they started blooming new roses. They were chopped down to about a foot for shipping in the box but I expect that they will shoot up in the spring. They were producing many new blossoms within a week that I quickly removed on the advice of Proven Winners who produces the Home Run type. This is often suggested to promote root growth in their new location. Maybe they got the message and they stopped blossoming for about a week and now again are producing some. The roses look fine to me just a bit short.

I have a spot where I want to put the Himrod grape vine but it is not ready so it is in the pot and growing strong the leaves look very good. The vine is about 3/8 to 1/2 inch diameter which is impressive since I thought it might be a tooth pick size. I think this indicates that it is an older plant and might produces grapes within a year or two. They told me over the phone before I bought not to expect fruit for 2 to 3 years and I felt that they were being honest.

The Top Hat was half price and didn't seem to be growing much. I was ready to put it in a 10" container and decided to root prune it - not really knowing what I was doing. It is not doing well now with the leaves turning brown but I wouldn't doubt if I am over watering or it is just in shock and needs some time. I'm very pleased overall with the purchase. I primarily wanted the Home Run roses since I could not find them locally, and shipping did not increase much with the two additional items. Total shipping was 17.95 which I think is reasonable considering the two large gallon containers. Should I have put this in the Garden Watchdog? I'll probably wait to see if the plants survive to give long term advice. These are the only plants I've ever ordered through the mail.

I'm looking at Sweet-N-Neat cherry tomatoes for next year but this plant might be on the small size for an e-bucket, on the other hand it might thrive. Does anyone have experience with them or know a simple way to find a store that has them locally? I don't want to start from seeds.
http://parkseed.com/tomato-sweet-n-neat-scarlet-improved-hybrid/p/05369-PK-P1/

These don't seem to be exactly the same:
http://bonnieplants.com/products/vegetables/tomato-varieties/small-fruited-salad-tomatoes/sweet-n-neat-cherry-tomato

Just noticed that the review at Park Seed was not very good. I know that I read good things (taste and production) somewhere online.

This message was edited Aug 22, 2012 9:52 PM
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 22, 2012
8:13 PM

Post #9250732

Pete, is that the only place you can get that plant? I have found that Parks is terrible shipping plants. They have been a good seed vendor for many years. But, they do not know how to handle and ship plants.

I don't know a thing about Bonnies other than Walmart and other stores carry those.

Have you been using e-buckets? For how long, how many, and how do you like them?

PeteB7

PeteB7
Trumbull, CT
(Zone 7a)

August 22, 2012
10:12 PM

Post #9250801

I found it here also at Hirt's:
http://hirts-gardens.hostedbywebstore.com/s?ie=UTF8&searchKeywords=sweet+n+neat

I'm now remembering that I was thinking of having this in a pot in the kitchen where we have a lot of light - 3 windows, glass doors and skylights. I have no idea if it would grow well there. I think it is small for e-buckets but I would use it there if I knew it would produce well and thrive. My gut feeling is that this is a bit small and the Super Sweet 100 is a bit large for what I'm looking for. Still, I might go for the Super Sweet 100 next year given the high production.

I've only tried the pair discussed on the other thread this season, I'm new to gardening.
My main mistake was putting so much Basil in the same pot, the roots crowded out the tomato plants. Still one plant is doing well and has 16 Black Prince tomatoes on it.
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

August 23, 2012
2:55 AM

Post #9250839

PeteB7, I'm sorry about your Top Hat plant. I don't know much about blueberries other than that I read mycorrhiza stunts their growth. I did once get unhealthy-looking plants from Garden Crossings-Million Kisses Devotion Begonias. However, when I contacted them I was told the begonias would soon recover and so I placed them on my indoor plant regimen (rotating Miracle-Gro + humic acid & vinegar + peroxide every two days) and within a week all 4 plants were growing a profusion of healthy leaves (see my July 3rd post for photos).

I'm glad your roses and grape vine are performing well! And thanks for the information about Sweet-N-Neat cherry tomatoes! I added that cultivar to my list of contenders for next year's tomato plantings. I think it's an excellent plant for my kitchen bay window.

DoGooder

PeteB7

PeteB7
Trumbull, CT
(Zone 7a)

August 23, 2012
9:53 PM

Post #9251857

Not worried about the Top Hat, it was just an experiment and I think I'm over watering it, the soil smells bad and I'm sure that's not a good sign. I'm going to let it dry out some.

I've decided that Sweet-N-Neat are too small for the e-buckets but I might try them inside as you have in mind.

I'll post more ideas for medium size cherry tomato plants on my thread.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 23, 2012
10:37 PM

Post #9251872

DG, where did you get the information about using vinegar on plants, and what does it do?

Very interested since we all agree that it is used to kill weeds.

jen
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

August 24, 2012
1:38 AM

Post #9251898

Jnette, I read on a few websites that adding acid to tap water makes it more like rain because rain almost always has a much lower ph (more acid) than tap water. The reason tap water has less acid is because rainwater corrodes town pipe systems, so the government amends it to make it less acidic. But unfortunately the less acid in the tap water makes it more difficult for the water to break down nutrients for the plants to eat. When acid rain water enters the soil it breaks down nutrients which helps plants to digest the soil nutrients.

Therefore, greenhouses often add acid to tap water they use for irrigation because the acid helps the plants get more nutrients from the growing media. I use white vinegar because I don't need much acid and I can easily get an inexpensive bottle at the supermarket, but greenhouses often use different kinds of acid chemicals they buy in bulk. Here's a web site that describes how greenhouses change water ph:

http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/hort/hil/hil-558.html

DoGooder
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 24, 2012
9:08 AM

Post #9252176

I think I need to write to Al about the Pine Bark. We have so many Pine trees in this area and also Bark Mulch companies. But, the Pine trees in the area get a beetle in the bark that kills the trees. Now I am wondering if I want to use any of that Pine Bark in my plants. I wonder if I am looking for problems where there may not be any.

The site DG gave me on vinegar was very interesting, but I think you almost need to be a scientist to follow it. LOL, are you a scientist DG? I guess I just am not keeping my mind on this this morning. Might look again later.
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

August 24, 2012
11:32 AM

Post #9252275

Jnette, I'm not a scientist. My college majors are business and graphic design. As for the bark dust you might try using it on one plant and see if it thrives. I miss the evergreen forests of the Northwest, and I do remember how popular bark mulch was in my Beaverton, OR neighborhood.

DoGooder
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

August 24, 2012
4:54 PM

Post #9252593

I think this is way over my head. I am still trying to wrap my mind around pine bark and now vinegar! How do you know how to do that? I need a crash course in plant biology!
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

August 24, 2012
5:45 PM

Post #9252644

Sharon, I add 1 tablespoon vinegar to 1 1/2 gallons of tap water in a watering can. I also add 1 teaspoon hydrogen peroxide (drug store variety) or a few drops of food grade 35% hydrogen peroxide. That solution worked on all my plants except Monkshood and Gerbera Daisy. Here's a thread that discusses vinegar solution to decrease the ph of water:

http://forums2.gardenweb.com/forums/load/contain/msg061311472086.html

Outdoors my plants get natural rain which is highly acidic, so it's not necessary to add acid to the water that goes to the outdoor plants unless there's a drought and all or most of the water they get is town water from the pipes. One of the many reasons rain water is so healthy for plants is because it has so much acid. Some people will go to great lengths to collect rain water such as installing rain barrels outdoors.

DoGooder
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

August 24, 2012
6:17 PM

Post #9252683

Who knew? I always thought acid rain was bad! Lol! Well knowledge is power, so next year's crop better watch out. Oh, I bought some seeds for an Italian heirloom, an oxheart, Cuore Di bue. It's 70 days, which is right up my alley. There's another one, Cuore Di Toro.
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

August 24, 2012
7:12 PM

Post #9252745

Sharon, when journalists say acid rain is bad I think they're referring to rain that has more acid than usual. I guess pollutants increase rain's acid level which the scientists say destroys the tops of trees. But I'm not sure how the more acidic rain affects plants at the understory of the forest.

The Cuore Di bue tomato you mentioned looks very interesting, almost pumpkin-shaped. It would look great in a Thanksgiving cornucopia.

DoGooder
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 24, 2012
10:33 PM

Post #9252869

Sharon, don't mess with peroxide. Just use the stuff you get in the GROCERY store. Nothing else until you are a science major. :0) No, that is not necessary, but just use what I said until you get a good grasp on what you are doing. Unless you know a lot about the stronger stuff, it is dangerous.

Jeanette
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

August 25, 2012
4:09 AM

Post #9252940

Jnette, yes the stronger 35% solution is dangerous. I buy it in bulk and use it for household cleaning as well as for watering plants. I have to be very careful when handling it because even a small amount burns my skin. Of course it's fine once it's diluted in a gallon of water but getting it from the bottle to the watering can has caused many accidents.

DoGooder
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

August 25, 2012
6:58 AM

Post #9253036

Just explain to me the benefits of using peroxide. I wouldn't even go there with the stronger stuff!
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

August 25, 2012
9:16 AM

Post #9253169

Sharon, hydrogen peroxide aerates soil. It helps prevent fungus, etc. Some people put it in the soil after a long rainshower to avoid root rot. Adding a small amount to the water on a regular basis invigorates plants because it helps their roots absorb oxygen.

Nancy G.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 25, 2012
4:41 PM

Post #9253646

DoGooder!! You do have a name!! NANCY G. I like that.

Sharon, many years ago I used to buy some stuff called Oxygen Plus. You put 2 squirts of it in a gallon of water when you watered your houseplants. My plants were beautiful. I used it every time I watered. Little did I know until a few years back, that all it was was regular Hydrogen Peroxide.

Like Nancy says, you use it in your watering and it adds oxygen to the roots. That is why it is a real help for houseplants because they die of over-watering more than any other thing. Even plants that have been over-watered can be given some water with the HP in it and that will save them from root rot. BTW, root rot can start within hours of watering, I understand.

So, I use it in any container plants I have. Like on my decks. That is where I grow most of my flowers in the summer. I use it about once a week or so when I water them.

But, even as many years as I have been using it, I haven't gone to the stronger stuff. A lot of people use it for cleaning like Nancy does. One lady who raises dogs uses it to clean their area. Food service people use it for cleaning kitchens etc. Restaurants. But, it is very powerful. I was using the regular HP one time and splashed it when I poured it in the water. It splashed just a few dot on the shirt I was wearing and it turned them white. It was a burgundy colored sweatshirt. First time I had worn it. That was just the stuff you get in the grocery stores. So, you know how it works.

Also, it is a good disinfectant, again like Nancy said. It really has tons of uses. You can buy books of them. Just like you can vinegar, or baking soda. All of them have many uses you would never think of. Jen
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 25, 2012
4:42 PM

Post #9253648

Forgot to mention one more thing. You can soak hard shelled seeds in water with some HP in and it helps to germinate them.
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

August 25, 2012
6:34 PM

Post #9253740

What a wealth of information. Growing up, we always used HP for infections, etc. but would you ever use it in container plants with tomatoes for any reason? Hell if I known about this, I might have saved my cucumber plants!
The only house plants I have are 3 orchids which I am proud to say have now survived 6 years with me and one cyclamen. I'm not a houseplant person, I love my perennials, clematises, peonies, etc annuals but not in the house.
So I want to concentrate on my tomatoes herbs, beanc and cukes. My eggplants have been a complete waste of time this year.
So far my Tigerella is starting to ripen as well as the Japanese black triefle. I'm actually changing my mind about that one. Might save some seeds. The cherries are still going strong.
If I keep some of my pots, I'm cleaning them with hydrogen peroxide. I usually wash them out with hot water and Clorox.
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

August 25, 2012
8:26 PM

Post #9253834

Jnette, yes hydrogen peroxide is great for starting seeds and I was planning on using it for that purpose this year but I haven't yet. Today I planted lettuce in an outdoor container with seeds straight from the package. I left some to put in the fridge to test the bag method with hydrogen peroxide.

Sharon, I don't have many plants indoors now either. We just have a Big Begonia and an Umbrella Plant. The gnats were taking over so the plants went outdoors and in the winter I'm not planning to bring them indoors again.

Nancy G.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 26, 2012
9:58 AM

Post #9254343

What is the big begonia Nancy? Do you mean gnats like fruit gnats? Why would they hang on the begonia? That is weird. Have you tried getting rid of them with vinegar? Just a little in a container in the kitchen and it doesn't take long. We had a thread on here somewhere about that. Had a lot of good suggestions. Might look for it and try some of them.
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

August 26, 2012
4:01 PM

Post #9254623

Jnette, I planted Begonia benariensis seeds this spring. It's a new wax begonia cultivar that has taller plants and bigger flowers:

http://www.myflowerfinder.com/FlowerPhoto.aspx?IDS=5318&UI=en

However, my biggest one is only about 6" tall so I plan to overwinter it in my kitchen. Wax begonias perform much better indoors in my climate. Outside they become moldy no matter where I put them, so I won't be planting any more outdoors. As for the gnats they were all over the place and the wax begonias were very infested.

Thanks for the vinegar solution for eliminating gnats! Today I sprayed neem oil on my tomato plant and that eliminated the white powdery mildew on most leaves. I took some photos of my plant which looks much healthier (attached pictures). However, the spray canister I bought didn't work so I had to fill about 15 small bottles non-stop to spray the whole plant. - DoGooder

Thumbnail by DoGooder   Thumbnail by DoGooder         
Click an image for an enlarged view.

Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 26, 2012
11:00 PM

Post #9254959

Well, what can I say? They really look good, no matter what you had to do.

Have any of you guys tried Messenger? Hate to throw another wrench into the subject. But, just curious. I haven't used it in a couple years, and yet I know it is really good. Jen
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

August 27, 2012
1:42 AM

Post #9254989

Jnette, I haven't tried Messenger. However, I added some Jobe's tomato plant spikes today to the plant. It's probably too late for organic fertilizer spikes to make much difference but I was so scared after seeing my plant rapidly being taken over by the mildew that I bought the Jobe's hoping for a miracle. The mildew had spread to the surrounding plants but the neem has helped them also.

Nancy G.

This message was edited Aug 27, 2012 3:43 AM
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 27, 2012
8:31 AM

Post #9255378

I think the mildew is caused from not enough air circulation and shade. I had a petunia that was beautiful but I couldn't see it very good so I moved it out to my other deck where I could. Well, the only place I had to hang it was from the hook on the house, and not even thinking, it was in the shade. The place I had taken it from was in the sun. Well, within 5 days in the shade, it was covered with mildew. I put it out in the sun, but it never did recover completely. Never looked that nice again all summer.

I don't remember where your tomato is. In my mind, I think I remember it being in the sun when you took those pictures, and not a whole lot of leaves on it. Am I right? If so, I don't know why it would have mildew.
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

August 27, 2012
10:20 AM

Post #9255550

Jnette, my tomato plant is in part shade growing next to our front wall and porch. It gets very bright afternoon sun. After I cut most of the leaves they grew quickly, so it's covered with leaves once again. The mildew infestation happened when we had a serious of powerful rain-showers earlier this month.

DoGooder
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 27, 2012
5:32 PM

Post #9256234

Yes, that will do it. Too wet. Some people use soda I think for the mildew. Not sure how they use it. You could google how to cure mildew on tomatoes. Let us know if you do and what you find. Wonder if you could spray, spritz, them with the HP. Peroxide. Wonder if the Messenger would get it.

Do you want me to send you some Messenger? If you promise to use it, I will send you some.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 27, 2012
5:33 PM

Post #9256237

I don't know if it will help the mildew, but it certainly won't hurt. Jen
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

August 27, 2012
7:28 PM

Post #9256395

Jnette, the powdery mildew is almost gone, so I don't need Messenger for it, but thanks for the offer!

Nancy G.
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

August 30, 2012
7:26 PM

Post #9259937

Well folks, I would like to announce my tomato plant reached the 400 mark! After today's 35-tomato harvest I've harvested a total of 403 tomatoes. Production is not as fast as during early August and I noticed a mutant "2-headed" tomato (see photo). I also noticed branches starting to wither and die surrounded by healthy green stems and branches, so I guess the tomato plant knows that winter is coming and has decided to conserve energy?

DoGooder

Thumbnail by DoGooder
Click the image for an enlarged view.

hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

August 31, 2012
8:57 AM

Post #9260377

Hey Nancy, that's amazing!! I really keep track on my sweet 100's but it's doing better production wise but it still looks frail. I'm removing leaves like crazy. A lot of my plants are showing the mildew and I don't plan on doing anything at this stage. I think it's probably due to being near the end of a long hot summer.
Jen, I am going to consider HP in the future.
I have a volunteer cherry tomato growing that's just starting to ripen I think it's a sweet 100. It's so healthy looking and the fruits are large. But from what I have learned if its a sweet 100 it's a hybrid and won't be true to the original plant from last year and it could be a cross pollination. I'll let you know. I just can't remember for sure what I planted in that area last year other than the black cherry and for sure this isn't that one. So exciting! Because summer started so fast and hot this seedling got a great start. Can't wait to see, because it looks way better than the sweet 100 I planted this year.
By the way, how's the weather everyone? We had high winds yesterday, it's very humid now, overcast. We did have rainand it looks like more rain down the road and cooler temps. Just keeping my fingers crossed for the go,d medals to ripen.
Sharon
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

August 31, 2012
9:08 AM

Post #9260389

Sharon, we've had sunny days and cool nights. My aloe is starting to suffer from the cold so I brought it into the kitchen, but my cabbage sprouts are doing well. I have no idea how big they'll grow this year as I've never grown cabbage before. They're just for ornament and I put them in the porch basket where the begonias used to be (see July 3rd photo).

Nancy G.
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

August 31, 2012
9:17 AM

Post #9260395

I'm still waiting to see if my Japanese eggplant is going to do anything this year. What a disappointment!
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

August 31, 2012
9:23 AM

Post #9260401

Sharon, I hope your eggplant produces something tasty to eat! I love baked eggplant and my mom makes great rice-stuffed eggplant.

Nancy G.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 31, 2012
4:12 PM

Post #9260857

I had two Tomontaros almost ripe but both had Blossom End Rot. DH couldn't stand it so he picked them. Last night he cut the bottoms off and made BLTs. Gosh they were good. We had left them on the counter a couple days to finish ripening. He also had bought a Celebrity from a lady that brings her produce over to sell, from about 45 miles away and they have hotter weather than we do. He made one sandwich out of hers, and he said the Tomonaros were better. I only had a half of one made from the Tomontaros so didn't compare.

Well, I should have both, Celebrities and Tomontaros ripen at the same time, when they do, so that would be a better comparison since they would be growing under the same environment.

DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

September 6, 2012
8:20 AM

Post #9266882

Folks, my Super Sweet 100 achieved the 500 mark today when I harvested 23 tomatoes (attached picture) for a total of 501 tomatoes. So, I've harvested about 100 tomatoes the first week of September. I was worried this week's rain-showers would hurt the tomatoes but production is going well and only a few cracked. I wonder what's the latest I can expect to continue to harvest tomatoes in my zone 5b region.

DoGooder

Thumbnail by DoGooder
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 6, 2012
6:45 PM

Post #9267500

How is it blooming? Until it freezes, or runs out of blossoms. Jen
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

September 6, 2012
9:03 PM

Post #9267631

Jnette, I don't recall seeing any blooms on the tomato plant, but there're many green tomatoes which I guess will continue to ripen until the freezing weather.

Nancy G.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 6, 2012
9:18 PM

Post #9267639

LOL, just answering your query about how long you can expect to get tomatoes from it. No biggie. jen
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

September 6, 2012
9:40 PM

Post #9267648

Jnette, I am interested to know if tomatoes will grow year-round and keep producing as long as they don't freeze or if tomato plants always die in the fall regardless of the weather. Other than rain we are having balmy weather and my tomato plant is going about its business like there's no tomorrow. Production is increasing and there're fewer dead branches, so if winter never arrived I wonder if it would keep producing 100 tomatoes per week on and on.

Nancy G.

This message was edited Sep 7, 2012 7:43 AM
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 7, 2012
11:16 AM

Post #9268056

You would have to talk to some of the folks in the south I think for that. Altho, I think they do use up their strength 'cause some of the people have talked about taking cuttings for new plants etc. You might try that! Now that would be a fun experiment for someone in your area. Try a couple and have one in the house!! You might have tomatoes all winter long right in your windows. :0)
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

September 7, 2012
3:36 PM

Post #9268317

Jnette, great idea! Thanks!

Nancy G.
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

September 7, 2012
5:17 PM

Post #9268382

Hi Linda and Jen, I agree with Jen, I think the plants eventually run out of steam and you have to start new ones. They are heavy feeders. My Sweet 100's are finally really producing and are actually sweet! I'm sure I've had at least 200 and it's still producing, so as long as the weather continues. I'm zone 5b too. All my tomatoes are still going, but they are showing signs of slowing down. Even the cherries, the leaves aren't quite as lush on the new growth, not to mention there is some powdery mildew. My Gold medals are finally turning, weighing in at one and a half pounds! I have never seen anything so big!
I had to bring some in to ripen as some animal is trying to eat them! So good luck all. The weather is supposed to get cooler. I think as long as temps don't drop too much at night and it stays warm, we could get cherry tomatoes until October.
Sharon
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

September 7, 2012
6:13 PM

Post #9268438

Sharon, we are still getting 80 degree days in Hopkinton and the tomatoes like it but it's not so great for all us humans who have to work in the heat. I'm glad your tomatoes are doing well and it seems a smart idea to plant different species for variety and more consistent tomato harvests.

Nancy G.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 7, 2012
6:52 PM

Post #9268476

Our temps are running 86 during the day, but down into the 50s and even some 40s at night. Getting pretty cold. I think that might be helping ripen the tomatoes. Also cutting back on the water. Anyway, I picked about 5 different kinds of tomatoes today. Not counting the cherry tomatoes, Sun Sugar, which DH keeps picked more to eat and once in a while in salads. They are too sweet to put in Salsas or sauces etc. But good. Also the squirrels love them. Keeps them away from the bigger ones.

Yes, I had a pretty big Omar's Lebonese. Never heard of them and someone sent me the seeds. Haven't tried them for flavor yet. Will this weekend tho. Having BLTs for dinner.

Let us know if you decide to take a cutting, I would take several, to make sure you get a good one.

hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

September 8, 2012
6:37 PM

Post #9269361

Hey Nancy and Jen,
Well we had one wicked storm this afternoon. I'm afraid to go out to see the damage. Luckily I had tied some of my tomatoes yesterday, but man oh man, the wind was wicked. So I expect to find some injured tomatoes tomorrow!
Jen, let me know about the Omar's Lebanese. I can't believe your temps are dropping that low at night. Yep, that for sure will make those tomatoes ripen. Looking forward to those sun sugar seeds.
Nancy, I agree the heat is tough for us humans. Apparently it was tough for my Better Boys, almost everyone has cracked on the shoulders and I left lots of foliage to protect them from the sun, but it didn't matter. Very discouraging...
I'm investigating Smart Pots for next year. Any advice?
Sharon
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

September 8, 2012
8:55 PM

Post #9269475

Sharon, when I ordered 18" jute pots online I thought they would be like smart pots made of fabric that breathes, but instead they had plastic lining inside the pot which was permanently attached to the fabric. So they were just like plastic pots except the material was flexible. Therefore, I cut about 40 holes on the outside and bottom of the tomato pot for aeration and drainage.

Also the jute pot was so big I only had enough potting mix to fill half so when I transplanted the tomato plant half the paper pot was sticking out of the soil. So I don't have any experience with smart pots, but I know some people sew their own pots with jute fabric to save money. Trees and shrubs grow well in burlap wrapping because the burlap air prunes the roots and provides excellent drainage. Almost everything I plant in the coir basket on our porch grows well because the coir lining provides a lot of air and drainage like smart pots.

Nancy G.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 8, 2012
9:01 PM

Post #9269480

Sorry, I have no experience with, or even know, what smart pots are.

Sorry Sharon, I didn't realize you wanted the SS seeds right away. Thought I had until next spring. Will look for them tomorrow. Will let you know.

Jen
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

September 10, 2012
5:19 PM

Post #9271315

Jen, no rush on the seeds! Please I can't do anything with them now anyways. Do not give it a thought!
Nancy, I never thought about jute bags thanks, I'll look into it.
The season isn't over yet and already thinking about next year!
Sharon
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 10, 2012
6:00 PM

Post #9271358

One thing you have to be careful with using burlap, is that like on shrubs or trees, some of the growers actually grow them in CLAY!! If you plant them like that and don't get the roots out of the clay they will die after a few years.

I did that. I bought a dozen of the pyramidalis one time, in the burlap, and planted them thinking the same as what you said. After about 3 years they started dying. After losing a couple of them I dug one up and looked at the roots. They were all just exactly as I planted them. I didn't realize they were in clay and the roots couldn't get out.

Live and learn. I was pretty naive then. LOL

DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

September 10, 2012
8:08 PM

Post #9271493

Jnette, this summer I planted a calycanthus that was sold in clay soil wrapped in a burlap bag. It's doing okay, but I should water it more. Maybe next spring I should remove it from the soil and replace the clay with surrounding soil?

Nancy G.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 11, 2012
1:23 PM

Post #9272141

I don't know what that plant is but I would never again leave plants in clay. At the very least, depending on the plant, I would get the ends of the roots out into other soil. Other than that I would get it out of the clay. And I am talking clay like you have to use a screw driver, or something like them, and water and really work. Had to do that with a peony last year, but ended up losing it anyway. jen

My shrubs lasted 2 years but died the 3rd. More water doesn't do much good in the clay. If they get wet they probably will rot. Don't know.
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

September 12, 2012
12:38 AM

Post #9272765

Jnette, calycanthus is also known as Carolina Allspice. It's a flowering shrub. The rootball was clay but there were roots sticking out of the clay so I guess they will grow into the surrounding soil.

Nancy G.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 12, 2012
5:59 PM

Post #9273462

They might. Hope so 'cause digging shrubs is a job. Sounds like a neat plant.

DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

September 13, 2012
10:47 AM

Post #9274083

Jnette, yes the Carolina Allspice is wonderful and has a pleasant smell all year round. Also, my tomato plant achieved the 600 mark today. I harvested 16 tomatoes today for a total of 607 tomatoes. I got my biggest harvest five days ago-58 tomatoes (attached picture)!

Nancy G.

Thumbnail by DoGooder
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Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 13, 2012
4:59 PM

Post #9274373

Those are beautiful. Where are you getting your Allspice plant? I will look at it on PF. Jen
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 13, 2012
5:03 PM

Post #9274377

Nancy, It looks like there are a lot of them. What color is yours? The flower? Which one did you get? Jen
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

September 13, 2012
6:21 PM

Post #9274446

Jnette, thanks for the compliment on the tomatoes! I got my Carolina Allspice on sale at Weston Nurseries in my hometown, Hopkinton, MA. It was about 5 1/2 feet tall when I got it (attached picture), but it's grown since then and has been pruned. I needed a large shrub to cover the air conditioning unit behind our home. However, I was thinking of getting a small one at Hirt's Gardens to see how it does in a sunnier location.

Nancy G.

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Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 13, 2012
6:30 PM

Post #9274456

Sharon, I have, right now, 3 Sun Sugar seeds. You see, I buy them and give them away, but unfortunately I think people think I am stingy to give them only 3 seeds so end up giving some of them half of what I have left. :0)

I am going to give you your option. I have those 3 seeds, and I know you said you would be happy with 3, or, when I buy a new pack, (I always do) I will send you some, they will be fresher, or I can send you the ones I have. They are packed for 2010. Jung Seeds.

I also have 2 other kinds that I like, 'cause they are large, ripen early, have quite a few on them, and are meaty. I like the flavor of them. I would like to send you some of those too. They are Early Bush Beef Steak, and German Johnson. But, I know you have a long list of ones you are going to try. What do you think?

I have your name and address in a folder in my computer for them.

Let me know. Jen
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 13, 2012
6:34 PM

Post #9274460

Nancy, I really like the shrub. They said the only drawback on it was that it suckers a lot. Is your AC in the window, or lower? It sounds like it grows a lot like Lilacs. I love those too. Jen
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

September 13, 2012
7:05 PM

Post #9274496

Jnette, our AC is a box on the ground about 2 feet away from the house.

Nancy G.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 14, 2012
9:19 AM

Post #9274999

Well then if it wouldn't be blocking the vents etc. you might want to give it some bushiness on the bottom. I don't know how you would do that without getting a lot of trunks tho. Think about it.
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

September 14, 2012
11:49 AM

Post #9275137

Jnette, do you mean put small bushes under the Carolina Allspice or surround the AC with bushes?

Nancy G.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 14, 2012
4:50 PM

Post #9275410

Nancy, you said you wanted to cover the AC. Didn't you? If not forget what I am saying. LOL. I just meant put a short bushy something to cover it. Or, Let a couple suckers of the Allspice grow and cut them low so they will bush out right near the ground without making more suckers.
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

September 14, 2012
6:28 PM

Post #9275498

Jnette, I had said the Carolina Allspice was to cover the AC. And I had mentioned that I had already transplanted it in front of the AC. It's taller than the AC so it does cover it on one side.

Nancy G.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 14, 2012
9:26 PM

Post #9275650

That is what I thought. It appeared that it had been pruned so there were no branches on the bottom. That is why I asked where the AC was.
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

September 15, 2012
5:32 AM

Post #9275763

Jnette, I see what you mean now. I guess the nursery pruned the bottom branches. However, after I planted it in the ground the bottom stems don't show much. Eventually it will leaf out and the leaves will cover it from ground level to the crest.

Nancy G.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 15, 2012
9:13 AM

Post #9275883

Well, if that's the case I would not do anything. Just wait and see how it looks in the spring. Good idea. I looked it up in PF and it sure sounds like a nice plant. Good smell.

Where did Sharon go? She hasn't been on here for several days.
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

September 15, 2012
2:21 PM

Post #9276075

Hi guys, I'm back! I've been busy with family stuff, so you know how that goes. Jen as far as the seeds go, I'm happy to take the sunsugar, doesn't matter which pack you give me, and I won't take any others cause I bought so many seeds. But ladies, if you want, I'll resend my list and if you want to try any of mine, please let me know and I'll be more than happy to send them to you.
Weather has gotten cool again and I'm caught between picking the tomatoes or seeing if they can hang in there a couple of more days. The Tigerellas bit the dust when it got cool a few days ago.
Sharon
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 15, 2012
2:49 PM

Post #9276110

Well Sharon, we missed you. Yes, know how that goes.

What are Tigerellas? Tomatoes?? Boy, they must be awfully tender. How cold did it get? I am going to make some Gazpacho with some of mine. I know it doesn't take much, but it will get rid of some and it has turned warm again here. In the 80s. Bob doesn't like the Gazpacho so I will freeze some of it and have it warmed up later in the year. Don't know why it wouldn't be good that way too.

Ok, I will go ahead and send the SS seeds to you now. They are awfully good.

I don't have enough tomatoes to can, maybe to make sauce or salsa out of, but we still aren't tired of the BLTs, LOL, so I don't dare roast them all.

BTW, did you ever try the cuttings off of your tomato plant? Really curious to know how it works.

We cleaned off the biggest deck today, chipped up the plants and have a pretty good load of compost in the trailer. So, all I have left are the dahlias and begonias and will leave them for the frost to hit and then I will put the tubers in the pantry. Other than mulching that should be it for now. I did want to make the garlic bed. If the weather keeps up the way it is I should be ok for another couple of weeks.

No thanks on the tomato seeds Sharon, I am thru trying and experimenting. I have decided to make EarthBuckets for my tomatoes for next year and those take so much mix that I am going to hold it down to just a few that I know do well here. But, you have fun with them anyway. I have done that every year for years. Tried so many different ones. It is fun, but a lot of work when they end up with only a couple tomatoes on a whole plant.

ttyl,

DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

September 15, 2012
3:22 PM

Post #9276131

Sharon, I don't feel confident starting tomatoes from seed. Next year I will get another tomato plant. The cabbage I started from seed are only 1 1/2 inches tall and I was hoping to get big 1 ft. tall flowers but I doubt that will happen.

Nancy G.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 15, 2012
3:55 PM

Post #9276147

That's too bad Nancy. Starting seeds is so great!! Yeah, some don't make it, but if you lose one here or there and you have planted a couple extra, it doesn't matter.

When did you start your seeds? Goodness, in MA, are you planting for a winter crop, or? When would you expect to be able to harvest them? Where would you have gotten large plants like that now?
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

September 15, 2012
4:45 PM

Post #9276168

Jnette, I don't know much about cabbage. I planted ornamental kale and all the web sites I searched for information said it's a cold weather vegetable and that I should plant seeds in late summer or early autumn. I just did what I was told. Last year I planted purple lettuce plants about 6 inches high in that basket and they did very well thriving in the snow, so I figured the cabbage would thrive too since it's also a cold weather vegetable.

Nancy G.
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

September 15, 2012
9:34 PM

Post #9276353

Hi ladies, back from a late night. Can't handle too many late nights. Tigerellas are like Green Zebras but red with some striping. Not too big. They must be super sensitive to cold because they got kind of shrivelly in the skin and the whole tomato was very soft. It got to about 42-45 degrees one night and that was that. I wasn't impressed with it in the first place.
Nancy, starting from seed can be work and when it does work its great, but it's definitely a challenge. I personally plan on only doing a few seeds from each packet, which I would start late February, early march. If nothing works, then I'm back at the framers market buying plants!
Je I think you gave me instructions on the earth buckets. When you have time, could you give me a refresher on them?
Nancy, in terms of hiding Ac have you considered the miniature lilacs "bloomerang"? It keeps reblooming and has a wonderful scent and can be kept controlled size wise. It would make an great foil for the AC. Another suggestion is the yellow leaved bleeding hearts called "golden heart". Its beautiful inthe spring when it emerged lime green and then pink flowers.


Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 15, 2012
10:42 PM

Post #9276380

Good suggestions Sharon.

Regarding Earth Buckets, go to the container gardening in the forums and Gym Girl has a complete how to on them. She even posts pictures if I remember correctly. But, I couldn't do it nearly as good as she did.

I have never planted cabbage plants either Nancy, are you suppose to plant them in a warm temperature, or cool?

I see Kale plants in the nurseries, but never cabbage. Regular cabbage. I was thinking you meant cabbage to eat??

DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

September 16, 2012
1:20 PM

Post #9276777

Sharon, I like your Wait and See approach-buy plants if the seeds don't work out. I planted 15 Begonia Big seeds this year and only one has grown into a sizable plant with flowers (attached photos), but that one was worth the time and few dollars for the seeds. Regarding the bloomerang, the AC is in a mostly shade area that recieves 2 hours of direct sunlight per day, so the bloomerang won't survive there but the golden heart is a great idea!

Jnette, I read that cabbage seeds should be planted in cooler weather. Also, Kale is a type of cabbage and it can be eaten even though it's mostly grown for its colorful flowers. If the seedlings continue to grow for a few months then I might get a few nice flowers.

Nancy G.

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Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 16, 2012
4:28 PM

Post #9276969

That's a nice plant. From seed huh? Very nice. J
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

September 16, 2012
5:57 PM

Post #9277087

Nancy, starting begonia from seed! Very ambitious. Wouldn't touch that one with a 10 ft pole. I've done annuals from seed. Frankly, don't want to waste my time. I just head straight to the garden center. I had another idea for the AC. Hydrangeas like pink diamond like part shade, and they are attractive and produce their blooms on new wood which means you can prune them in spring without worrying about losing flowers. Any of the paniculata hydrangeas fall into that category. Another one is limelight. Great white green flower heads. Just a suggestion!
And yes I'm going to be conservative with how many seeds I start. Don't want to waste my seeds, time and space! Just being practical. I love my perennials as well as my tomatoes.
Jen, thanks for the heads up on the earth buckets.
Sharon
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

September 16, 2012
7:45 PM

Post #9277218

Jnette, thanks for the compliment! I put them in germination mix and the tiniest little sprouts pushed up into the light about 10 days later (attached photo-sprouts are on the left). I was overjoyed because I heard how hard it is to propagate begonias from seed and I really wanted this type that I couldn't find for sale anywhere because it's a new species.

Sharon, yes I was very ambitious! I love wax begonias and when I heard there was a new giant cultivar I had to have it, and since it didn't seem to be for sale yet as a plant I was going to plant seeds no matter what. I would ten times rather have bought these because I did agonize over them and now out of 14 sprouts (one never sprouted) there's only a few 1-2 inch tall ones and the big one. That one's my prize and a reminder that "where there's a will there's a way."

As for the pink diamond perhaps that will do well in our South garden where the AC is. However, there is another hydrangea there which actually belongs to our neighbor but its branches take up a few feet of our air space. I think it was the limelight cultivar. It never bloomed this year even though there's more sunlight because the magnolia that used to shadow it is gone.

DoGooder

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Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 16, 2012
8:24 PM

Post #9277284

Nancy!! What is that yarn for?? Sharon, Nancy is a lot like me. She wants to try as many things as she can from seed. My biggest problem is that I don't have patience for those that don't germinate before months. I throw them out.

Nancy, do you do this stuff in the winter? I think it is a great winter pastime. Fun. But, I have to start them in the house. 'course they are handy there. :0)
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

September 17, 2012
3:13 AM

Post #9277435

Jnette, I twined mop threads through the clay watering pot to wick water so the germination mix wouldn't become dry. And actually I don't want to try as many things as I can from seed. As I said in my previous post, I would ten times rather have gotten begonia plants than have to start them from seed. I only started these from seed because I searched all over the Internet but couldn't find anyone selling the new Begonia Big plants.

I've only grown three plants from seed: grass, begonias, and cabbage. I planted all the seeds during warm weather. I don't have grow lights so I depend on the weather to grow seeds.

Nancy G.
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

September 17, 2012
5:55 AM

Post #9277526

My window sill in the breakfast area is where I started my seedlings, hence the sills got wrecked from water, etc. then it all got to be too much and I stopped for years. Now, I am ready to start again, but baby steps. I don't want to make myself crazy waiting for them so sprout, taking care of them, transplanting, and then if they don't make it... It's like having kids! Except they can't talk back, haha!
Oh well, I have good intentions, let's see how I feel come February and March!
I'm debating about planting garlic and daffodils at the moment.
Sharon
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

September 17, 2012
7:05 AM

Post #9277615

Sharon, I guess you're planting garlic for cooking? I think garlic flowers are lovely and quirky, so you will have the best of both worlds when planting garlic, an attractive yard and food as well.

Nancy G.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 17, 2012
9:00 AM

Post #9277737

LOL, wonder if you could plant the daffs with the garlic and tell the difference in bulbs so you don't eat the daffs. If the garlic formed cloves I am sure you can. But, a lot of times, especially the first year, they don't.

Also, they don't bloom at the same time.

Smart move using the mop as a wick. I do use lights, florescents, and heating pads to start my seeds. I don't have a window where they would get enough light without them.

Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 17, 2012
11:29 AM

Post #9277852

Sharon, I was getting ready to send the Sun Sugar seeds to you but had Amish Paste next to your name in my file. I didn't have the Amish Paste. Did you want the SS's? They will not take the place of the Amish Paste. Nothing like them. I am sure you know that so will send them anyway. LOL. I should have changed them in my file. Jen
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 17, 2012
11:31 AM

Post #9277857

Sharon, I was getting ready to send the Sun Sugar seeds to you but had Amish Paste next to your name in my file. I didn't have the Amish Paste. Did you want the SS's? They will not take the place of the Amish Paste. Nothing like them. I am sure you know that so will send them anyway. LOL. I should have changed them in my file. Jen

BTW, will they have any problem with seeds going to Canada from here?
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

September 17, 2012
4:53 PM

Post #9278169

Hi Jen, no only send the sun sugar seeds, thx. There shouldn't be a problem sending them, just slip them into a plain envelop and nobody will be the wiser!
Going to get the garlic bulbs this week. I have yet to have any luck. I guess I'll have to mulch well. Hopefully the squirrels won't like garlic bulbs...
Sharon
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 17, 2012
4:56 PM

Post #9278172

Good luck on that!!

Too late, I already sent the seeds and wrote on the envelope that they were seeds. Hopefully they will be ok. jen
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

September 18, 2012
4:05 AM

Post #9278549

BTW, on another forum someone is looking for Sungold or Sunsugar seeds in Australia. But he can't find a supplier. And it's almost impossible to send them to Australia because of agricultural laws. Any ideas? Heard of any tomato seed companies that send to Australia?

I will be looking for those seeds, thanks, Jen. I'll let you know what happens...

Sharon
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 18, 2012
12:04 PM

Post #9279029

If you knew where he was I would write to him. Jen
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

September 18, 2012
7:34 PM

Post #9279477

Jen I will send you his email address via D mail.
Sharon
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

September 20, 2012
4:40 AM

Post #9280813

Folks, I'm announcing I passed the 700 mark yesterday when I harvested my biggest haul yet-92 tomatoes (attached photo), however a lot of them were cracked because of the long rain shower we had the day before. Now I've harvested a total of 748 tomatoes. I photographed yesterday's haul at dusk symbolizing that this tomato plant produces its biggest harvests toward the end of the growing season. I guess the Jobe's fertilizer worked, but the plant is half yellow, very wilted, dropping lots of tomatoes on the ground, and covered with powdery white mildew again.

Nancy G.

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PeteB7

PeteB7
Trumbull, CT
(Zone 7a)

September 20, 2012
8:45 AM

Post #9281036

Wow! Over 700, that is amazing Nancy!
I think the plants prefer mid to low 60s and don't mind the even colder evenings - most of my plants have done much better during this drop in temp. My very sick looking plant came back, flowered and has small tomatoes on it, lol!
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 20, 2012
3:51 PM

Post #9281398

Think you are right. Until it started getting in the 40s and low 50s at night, they would not ripen. Now they are all coming on at once. The big ones.



edited to add. Very good haul. Hope you are making notes. Add Jobes stakes.

This message was edited Sep 20, 2012 3:52 PM
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

September 20, 2012
4:03 PM

Post #9281419

Wow, I'm impressed. My sweet 100 is still producing fruit but it looks somewhat pathetic. My other cherries are still giving fruit but they don't seem as sweet. And the japanese black trifele is still growing strong in spite of the cool temps. I did have to bring in my gold medals even though they were still green, as something is attacking them and I would not have one to eat! Anyways, I am slowly starting to clean up for the fall.
What a job!
Sharon
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

September 20, 2012
5:05 PM

Post #9281467

PeteB7, I'm glad your tomato plant recovered and is producing fruit!

Jnette, yes I've made a note about the Jobe's. I'm definitely adding the spikes to plants next year. I also put a spike with the cabbage sprouts and the ones on the side of the pot with the spike are taller but maybe that's because they get more shade.

Sharon, my tomatoes also don't taste as rich as when they were growing in warmer temperatures. Oh well, I guess I sacrificed taste for quantity.

Nancy G.

Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 20, 2012
7:24 PM

Post #9281574

Nancy, maybe they were ripening too fast to get the flavor? Maybe the spike had too much of something in them. My take a look at it's NPK and minerals? Jen
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

September 20, 2012
9:56 PM

Post #9281759

Jnette, could be that the spikes made the tomatoes ripen too fast. Jobe's NPK is 6-18-6. I would have gladly left the tomatoes on the vine for several days after they became red like I did at first, but the rain cracks the tomatoes so I have to pick them the day they become red to minimize cracking. I suspect the main reason they don't taste as good is because they get picked too early.

Nancy G.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 21, 2012
10:05 AM

Post #9282112

Could be, live and learn huh? pick and choose. LOL
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

September 23, 2012
2:31 PM

Post #9284166

Folks, I just checking in to say my tomato plant reached the 800 mark today after a harvest of 29 tomatoes (attached photo). So now I've harvested 813 total. The plant looks terrible but it's still producing a lot of maters.

Nancy G.

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meadowyck

meadowyck
Brooksville, FL
(Zone 9a)

September 23, 2012
3:51 PM

Post #9284233

nancy, send that in to guinness world records!

Jan
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

September 23, 2012
4:28 PM

Post #9284253

Jan, GreenThumbGreen would beat me for the title of most Super Sweet 100 tomatoes. He/she harvested 1400 tomatoes in one season:

http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/30540/#b

Nancy G.
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

September 24, 2012
7:11 AM

Post #9284740

Nancy, please tell me you are having some cold nights!!! I finally cut down the sweet 100. The flavor was getting a bit sharp and it looked very sad, mildew and all. actually cutting down all my plants. It's getting too cold here at night.
sharon
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

September 24, 2012
9:35 AM

Post #9284901

Sharon, we are having cold nights and I close my windows in the evening so I don't catch a disease. The average nightly temperature for the next few days is predicted to be about 45 degrees. My tomato plant looks really, really sick but since it keeps producing tomatoes I will let it stand for a while longer. About one third of the branches are dead and hanging on the vine, another third are covered with mildew and/or yellow, and a third are green and producing new flowers.

Nancy G.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 24, 2012
12:38 PM

Post #9285032

Won't make a difference to the plant what she does with it. She is having fun just seeing how many it will produce.

Are you making anything with the tomatoes? Are you noticing a difference in their flavor from when you first started picking them? That would be interesting. Just wondering if the longer days in the summer made a difference between sweet and tart. jen
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

September 24, 2012
1:51 PM

Post #9285107

Jnette, the tomatoes are more sour and less rich-flavored than early days. I've been considering adding them to cooked meals but we're still eating them raw for now.

Nancy G.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 24, 2012
4:44 PM

Post #9285322

Very interesting. Now are you going to grow that same plant next year? Can't remember what it is? See, I don't care for the cherry tomatoes that much. Not even in the flavor. I would rather have the big ones even if I cut them up and clean the seeds etc. out of them. Don't know why. And the Sun Sugars are so good. But if the squirrels eat them and leave the rest alone, that is ok.

I will try to send some of those seeds to the Australian fellow but in the spring when I buy them. By that time they are well into summer with a whole new crop of tomatoes on new plants there. But, that's ok, he can save the seeds.
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

September 24, 2012
5:35 PM

Post #9285364

Jnette, I'm not sure if I will plant the Super Sweet 100 next year. The only other place to plant it is our backyard which is mostly shade so I guess tomatoes wouldn't grow well there. I will probably plant a pretty little dwarf tomato plant in the front yard to keep up appearances.

Nancy G.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 24, 2012
9:51 PM

Post #9285623

You didn't grow any but this guy? No sun? I don't have much either but am going to plant in EArthbuckets and then I can move them if I have to. I think.
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

September 24, 2012
10:13 PM

Post #9285629

Jnette, yes, this was my first and only tomato plant. I hadn't grown vegetables before and I wanted to try it to see if I could get a harvest.

Nancy G.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 25, 2012
10:03 AM

Post #9286053

Lol, and what did you decide? Are you going to plant more tomatoes next year?
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

September 25, 2012
6:11 PM

Post #9286381

Jnette, I'm probably going to plant a dwarf tomato in the sunny side of our yard facing west.

Nancy G.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 25, 2012
6:45 PM

Post #9286410

Hope you have as good a luck as you had with this one. You had fun with it didn't you? I wouldn't expect 800 tomatoes off of a larger fruit plant tho. :0)
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

September 25, 2012
7:40 PM

Post #9286471

Jnette, yes it was fun growing vegetables!

Nancy G.
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

October 1, 2012
10:47 AM

Post #9292288

Hi all! Today I decided it's time to be the Grim Reaper, pick my final harvest, cut down my tomato plant, and place it on the curb for the garbage man to take. Today's 55-tomato harvest includes some green and orange tomatoes (see photo) so I can see how they ripen in a paper bag. I threw away a lot of cracked red tomatoes from the recent rains because those were in such terrible condition I figured it would be a health hazard to eat them.

So I've harvested a grand total of 900 tomatoes! Fortune was with me during my first year of tomato gardening. This tomato plant could have produced more tomatoes because it had dozens of yellow flowers and at least 60 green tomatoes, but it was only producing a few red tomatoes per day, there were a lot of sour tomatoes which I don't like, the autumn rains will continue to crack most of the tomatoes, and the moon was waning which is a good time to end things, so off to the town dump this tomato plant goes. Now I have my West garden back and my hostas at that location are blooming for the second time this year providing lovely lavender splashes of color.

I cut the weeds around my cabbage sprouts which are 2-4 inches high now. Hopefully they will provide plenty of purple hues for my porch garden. My West garden (including the porch) has really outdone itself this year and I hope the cabbage will follow suit. Thanks everybody for all your very valuable advice!

Nancy G.

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Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

October 1, 2012
3:43 PM

Post #9292698

Nancy, put a banana peel in that paper bag with your green tomatoes. Jen
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

October 1, 2012
6:19 PM

Post #9292918

Jnette, thanks for the advice!

Nancy G.
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

October 5, 2012
9:08 AM

Post #9296567

Hi Ladies, I finally went out and put the rest to pasture in the recycling bin! The squirrels were having a field day on the cherries and I had had it. so done for the season. Hope I haven't given those critters a bad habit.
Thanks for all the advice. I still have tomatoes ripening, but even those aren't having such great flavor or texture.
So my ladies, to be continued!!!!
Sharon
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

October 5, 2012
10:09 AM

Post #9296613

Sharon, hope to see you next year on the Tomatoes forum!

Nancy G.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

October 5, 2012
4:30 PM

Post #9296889

Me too, bye you guys. Been fun. Jeanette
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

October 6, 2012
4:32 AM

Post #9297240

Bye Jeanette!
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

October 10, 2012
4:57 PM

Post #9301839

Jen, Linda, don't know if you're still on the forum, but just ordered some more seeds - one is a dwarf,
Tasmanian Chocolate that I! got from Tatiana's Tomatobase. I know I know, it's a pain, but what the heck.
Well, like I said, I am sure we'll be chatting again soon enough. I have cleaned up the garden and what didn't ripen, went into the recycling bin because there was no way they would have been worth saving! I'll miss you guys over the next few months!
Sharon
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

October 10, 2012
10:19 PM

Post #9302098

LOL, Sharon, the winter months are so depressing there is absolutely no reason that we can't keep in touch. Just because we do not grow tomatoes doesn't mean that we have to sign off completely.

That is my biggest complaint about winter. It really is depressing. You know any time you write it will show up on my message list. If others don't want to join in, then all they have to do is click on "unwatch" on their menu. You guys write anytime you want to!!

Don't know that we will have a lot to add to the conversation, but will try. :0) jen
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

October 10, 2012
11:00 PM

Post #9302102

Sharon, I will keep this thread on my watch list so feel free to write any time! Also, are you referring to me as Linda or is there someone else on this thread whose private name is Linda?

Nancy G.
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

October 12, 2012
5:49 PM

Post #9303510

Nancy, sorry. I swear I'm getting senile!!! I went back to school to do some courses in psychotherapy and I think I need psychotherapy. My brain has been on information overload!!!! No, you girls are the best company! We can complain all winter about how miserable it is and commiserate about our gardens! I wasn't going to keep my membership over the winter and then I just couldn't stand it after two days.
Anyways, like I mentioned before, I am sure come early spring, I'll be killing myself for ordering all the seeds, but hey, it gives me something to dream about.
Oh, we had an earthquake the other night! Very exciting! About 4.5! And it's gotten cold, so I'm glad I cleaned up when I did. And yesterday, I threw out all the tomatoes I had brought in to ripen. They just didn't look healthy and they were kind of leathery. Too bad!
Sharon
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

October 12, 2012
6:29 PM

Post #9303551

Sharon, I would rather be named Linda than Nancy! Thanks for the compliment on what great company I am! I enjoy our conversations! I hope your garden or home didn't suffer from the earthquake.

All but one of the cherry tomatoes I put in the paper bag turned red. They tasted great and now I will content myself with canned tomato products for the duration of the cold season because I rarely buy tomatoes at the store. As for my cabbage plants, they're growing very slowly. Next year I will plant cabbage seeds in the spring and hopefully I will have gigantic flowers by autumn.

Nancy G.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

October 12, 2012
6:53 PM

Post #9303572

LOL, Ok ladies, don't leave me out. I will still be here to visit. No Sharon, you will not be sorry you bought all those seeds. I can hardly wait until you start planting them. What time will that be? When is your last frost date? Gosh, can't believe I am thinking about this already. But I am going to be anxious for you.

I brought my house plants in last week and they really have a tough time adjusting to this dry air in the house. I have electric heat so it is dry. Will get the humidifier up here and it normally goes thru a gallon of water a day in here, but this house is pretty big so, it doesn't make a whole lot of difference.

We are in the middle of getting the vehicles ready for winter, but one of them needs a lot of work. And of course tires.

ttyl, bye, Jen

DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

October 12, 2012
8:25 PM

Post #9303627

Jnette, I hope your vehicles are safe throughout the winter.

Nancy G.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

October 12, 2012
9:11 PM

Post #9303655

Thanks. Me too. Jeanette

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

October 12, 2012
10:00 PM

Post #9303676

We all got grandma a 2012 cruise earlier this year Hmmm Do you suppose I could borrow the car!!!?
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

October 12, 2012
10:18 PM

Post #9303681

What is that Juhur? What kind of car is that Juhur? I'll bet you could :0)

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

October 12, 2012
10:23 PM

Post #9303682

I don't know the car is a Chevrolet mid-size sedan And I doubt it! I really doubt it!!!^_^
It would be like asking the mayor to borrow his Cadalliac limo ain't happening lol
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

October 13, 2012
11:18 AM

Post #9303998

Just debating about the winter tires myself, although I don't think I have to worry yet. I stopped brining in any plants from outdoors because I could never get rid of the little bugs that kept flying around no matter what I did. I changed the soil, washed the plants with horticultural soap, nothing. So once outdoors, that's it for me!
Jen, our last frost is usually, hopefully the end of May, but it just varies from year to year. This year I could have planted earlier than I did which was the first week of June. Next year, it's anybody's guess.
Sharon
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

October 13, 2012
7:01 PM

Post #9304336

Well, you know if it isn't at least 50, the soil, the plants won't do anything. Our June the last 2 years have been so cold that nothing would grow out there. Even if you were to put a cover over them they won't do anything. Their little feet are cold. They probably pull them up to keep warm. jen
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

October 14, 2012
2:44 PM

Post #9305004

today has been miserable. wow, the weather turns on a heartbeat! well, just have to keep talking tomatoes to keep me going!
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

October 14, 2012
2:55 PM

Post #9305017

Yes, it does that this time of year. The leaves are falling fast. It rains at night here but is pretty wet all day. It is still only mid October, so hopefully won't see snow for a while. It is a fairly depressing time of year. At least to me. You will just have to start your tomatoes in the house Sharon.

My goodness, on the strawbale forum thre is a lady there that is just starting her plants in her hoophouse and she is high in the Colorado mountains. She is really amazing. She has black drums of water to heat the hh. It is really big and she built it. You should watch what she is doing. Actually, she is very inspiring if you are at that stage in life.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

October 14, 2012
3:02 PM

Post #9305021

Sharon, besides the strawbale forum she is on, here is her thread, just kind of a short one where she tells about her project. http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1279134#new

In case you want to look. I don't know what that #new is all about on the end. I just looked and this one has it too.
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

October 19, 2012
1:14 PM

Post #9309868

Hi Jen, interesting, but way way too ambitious for the likes of me! No thanks, I'll stick to my limited space and season and do my thing in the spring and hope for the best! The weather has been so weird, it was warm yesterday, rainy today but not really cold. I'm looking at all those leaves falling and hoping my DH plans on raking them cause I am not!!!!

Sharon
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

October 19, 2012
8:16 PM

Post #9310191

LOL Sharon, me too. I would have done it years ago when I was younger, and probably in her situation. But not now.

The leaves will make really good mulch. Do you have a way to shred them? That just helps them rot. Do you have a compost pile? If not, just putting them on some of your more tender plants helps.
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

October 20, 2012
7:44 AM

Post #9310432

I've used leaves before in bags to keep some of my perennials from heaving out in the spring. I have a spot in my garden that is a small raised bed and it is the first area where the snow melts and I've had a lot of trouble keeping perennials there. Interestingly, I have a couple of clematis that have done unbelievably well there and a peony. This past summer, I had a couple of the clematis moved and planted tomatoes there. Not bad but I would rethink which tomatoes I would plant there again. I might consider my cukes there because they have done well in the past and the squirrels don't mess with them. I don't have a compost pile, sadly. Too lazy!!!!
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

October 20, 2012
7:26 PM

Post #9310917

Yeah, know what you mean. You do have to take care of them.
cathy166
Stamford, CT
(Zone 6b)

October 24, 2012
6:40 AM

Post #9313865

You know the season is over when we've taken in all the trellises that are our tomato supports.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

October 24, 2012
8:04 PM

Post #9314617

Gosh, we are still trying to get the garlic planted you guys. The dead tomato plants are still in the hay bales and need to be chipped up. We got snow in the mountains here night before last so it will be down here any time. Darn, it is early.

Finally bought a car which I was trying to do before winter. I hate being up here so isolated with only one car. Even tho my sisters are nearby, they are always busy too so hate to call them when we have a problem. But, when we need something and have a problem with the vehicles we need another one. Now, we need tires on the first one. LOL Always something.

Just got my wash machine fixed today. Pump went out. So much money. Wish I were younger. I used to fix those things myself. But, too old to wrestle those machines around any more. Plus, it was easier when I was closer to the repair shops etc. Too far away now to go get parts.

Well, guys, gottta tell you one quick thing, we have had several head of cattle show up in the yard since the snow has hit the mountains they are looking for green stuff to eat. Bob called the Sheriff yesterday and told him we wanted them out of here. We had run them off several times, but I don't want them eating my expensive plants when we aren't home, or are sleeping. Anyway, we saw a cattle truck at the end of the driveway today about 4 o'clock and Bob went to see what was going on. A farmer/rancher had been woke up last night at 11 o'clock by the sheriff and said to come get his cattle. He had been after them ever since. He finally had them rounded up and come to find out they were his neighbor's cattle, who had been home sleeping soundly while he was out chasing his cows. Bob didn't dare tell him he was the one that called the sheriff. LOL

Just a little side note. :0) ttyl, Jen
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

October 27, 2012
8:59 PM

Post #9317511

Jen, you're a hoot! My dryer broke the other day. 3 years old! They sure don't make anything to last anymore. I've been so busy I completely forgot about planting garlic! Hope it's not too late!
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

October 27, 2012
10:27 PM

Post #9317543

Sharon, I kind of got carried away on that last post. Sorry.

But, my machine is 17 years old and this is the first time anything has gone wrong. Not even a belt. I did have him put on a new one. So, guess it pays to pay for an expensive machine. What I paid for the repair is about what I paid for the machine at that time. Oh well. He did tell me that I am better off fixing this machine since the new ones aren't nearly as good.

But, I will admit that I felt paying a lot and getting a good machine because we live so far up here and no repair people, that we better have a good one. Guess it was worth it. Just a bad time to go out is all. What with taxes, house and vehicle insurance etc. all due in November. Then the holidays!! Oh well, guess we will make it.

Nope, I am still trying to get my garlic bed ready. I will plant mine even if it snows. Go ahead Sharon. :0) Jen



hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

October 28, 2012
3:36 PM

Post #9318255

Don't worry about getting carried away. My old washer lasted over 20 years. The repair man told us 5-7 is the average now! And everything always comes at the same time!

Still thinking about the garlic.. I swear I don't know if I have time. Not to be morbid, but I still have my dog's ashes to think about. He's currently sitting in a lovely velour bag in a box in my garage... The brat used to eat my tomatoes! Oh well...
Sharon

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

October 28, 2012
4:01 PM

Post #9318275

That is rather morbid about fido interesting but morbid,I suppose if you had a square base that was hollow with a small statue of a dog on top you could set that in the garden facing the tomatoes and fido could remember what a good time it was eating tomatoes.
"Ain't it a pain a be in without a dryer" Oh well then, the laundromat or the clothesline? it is!!lol

You know ,! the way I felt about a pet or two, I will feel like I was keeping one my brothers or sisters ashes in the garage!! man that is a strange thought??
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

October 29, 2012
11:22 AM

Post #9319133

Yes Juhur, that is morbid. Really morbid.

Yes, it is a pain to be without a machine. either one. Actually, we were lucky to have a laundromat in this little town. They have one attached to the motel. I am sure for their customer's use more than anything. But it sure was nice having it.

Are any of you in danger of this hurricane? Sure hope not. If so, you take care and do as they say. Evacuate if you have to.
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

October 29, 2012
3:17 PM

Post #9319424

Didn't mean to be morbid! my dog, Hugo, had a lovely life. He was a couch potato black lab. I'm coming back in my next life as him!! lol

We are starting to get winds and apparently some heavy rain over the next few days. All I know is that all the raking I did to make nice piles of leaves to be picked up are probably going to be right back where they were this morning. Oh well, at least I got some exercise!!!
Sharon
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

October 29, 2012
7:35 PM

Post #9319658

Well your leaf raking is probably the least problems of the storm. But not to you. :0)
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

October 29, 2012
7:35 PM

Post #9319659

Well your leaf raking is probably the least problems of the storm. But not to you. :0)
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

October 30, 2012
6:17 PM

Post #9320585

Well, I think we missed that one. Other than very high winds last night and some rain today, we ended up having a beautiful warm day. I felt so badly watching the devastation on the news. One thing we can't control is good old Mother Nature, who can be harsh!
Sharon
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

October 30, 2012
8:35 PM

Post #9320716

Yes, you are right. So sad. Just don't know how some people can go thru it year after year. Not talking about the ones in NJ. Can't remember the one guy, where he was from, but he said they do go thru it every year. Guess they are putting all their stuff on stilts. The need gondolas.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

October 30, 2012
9:25 PM

Post #9320754

At least their still around to feel it!! What is it up to now 10 or 15 dead , how awful.; prayers to loved ones lost
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

October 30, 2012
9:35 PM

Post #9320759

I heard in the 20s so far Juhur. Terrible. I just could not live like that. There are so many other nice places to live.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

October 30, 2012
9:46 PM

Post #9320763

I use to love the gulf ,couldn't take the storms, Texas was delightful ,the heat and fires weren't, And as you see by the address ; Back home again in Indiana , The state song sing along!!! Only the floods ,tornadoes and fires haven't been all that great here the last few years either... booooooo!!!!
Yes Midwest or Mountains I can take ,very limited these days!!lol
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

October 30, 2012
10:15 PM

Post #9320766

Oh Juhur, are you serious? You have all that, "floods ,tornadoes and fires haven't been all that great here the last few years either... booooooo!!!!" No, I cannot believe that of Indiana.

You really are kidding me aren't you. I have been there, but just for a 2 week training session on computers. Many years ago. But like I said, I cannot imagine it. All I saw were corn fields.

It really is getting late for you. jen

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

October 30, 2012
10:33 PM

Post #9320770

Yes have all that we do
early late yes it is
Happy Halloween'

Thumbnail by juhur7
Click the image for an enlarged view.

DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

October 31, 2012
2:23 PM

Post #9321326

juhur7, thanks for the Halloween greeting! That's a funny photo of gladiator skeletons! Happy Halloween to you too! Here's a picture of our "Hurricane Sandy" pumpkin.

DoGooder

Thumbnail by DoGooder
Click the image for an enlarged view.

hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

October 31, 2012
5:19 PM

Post #9321458

Hi Everyone, Happy Halloween. Juhur, don't think I could live in a tornado corridor either, or the coast where there are floods! I guess every area has it's thing. But seriously, some areas are way more prone to weather systems than others and frankly, I agree with Jen, I don't know how people can continually live with the fear of floods or whatever! How were things in Massachusettes?
Sharon
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

October 31, 2012
7:03 PM

Post #9321547

Sharon, Massachusetts fared much better than New York and New Jersey. Two fatal accidents were blamed on the storm, but other than that no injuries. In my town we just experienced 1 day of rain then sunshine and then some rain the next evening. We have the same number of trick-or-treaters as last year it seems and there's lots of children's laughter. MA did have power outages, but not in my neighborhood. Hopkinton is inland so maybe that's why the storm didn't do much damage here. The weather is warm enough to go out with a light jacket.

DoGooder

This message was edited Oct 31, 2012 9:06 PM
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

October 31, 2012
8:48 PM

Post #9321630

Well, for some reason it has warmed up here too. When I say warm, I mean in the 50s. LOL, may not be warm to some. But at least it isn't freezing.

We don't get trick or treaters here. Too isolated. We used to have so much fun with them in Seattle. Oh well. Makes me sorry sometimes that we moved here.

However, so glad to hear you all have done so well. The news of the storms is just awful. So sad what people are going thru. Hopefully they will get things cleaned up and it won't drag out like Katrina did. Those poor people never did get things back to normal did they?

Well, have an early appt. in Spokane in the morning so guess I will close it down early. Happy Halloween everyone. Jen
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

October 31, 2012
9:05 PM

Post #9321636

Jnette, I too hope the government does a better job now than during Katrina and the aftermath.

Nancy G.
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

November 2, 2012
6:23 AM

Post #9322621

I think it's going to be a struggle, but I hear everyone is being very helpful to their neighbours, hello, and NYC will pull through, but it can't be easy. Oh we'll the election is right around the corner!!!!
Sharon
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

November 2, 2012
11:58 AM

Post #9322863

I can't imagine how all those people are suppose to get to their polls to vote even if they do as they say and use battery operated poll booths if they don't get the power up. Doesn't make sense. Aren't a lot of them in Red Cross tents or whatever? And will they have their voter ID with them? :0)

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

November 2, 2012
1:39 PM

Post #9322939

Haiti??
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

November 2, 2012
1:59 PM

Post #9322954

juhur7, Sandy's tail hit Haity, but the country was more vulnerable so they suffered more than New York/New Jersey.

Nancy G.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

November 3, 2012
4:00 PM

Post #9323828

Hey Sharon, your thread, if you guys want to keep this going thru winter, you better start a new chapter. :0) It makes it difficult for people with dial ups to get past 200 replies, and we are over 300!! Jen

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

November 3, 2012
4:26 PM

Post #9323854

My goodness!!! I am on an old ,old, Acer .what is anyone doing using dial up,,!!lol I thought I was behind the times!!!??LOL!!!!
I hadn't even thought dial up was still in use!!!
Are you using a sewing machine realistic from the mid 90's? We have one or two of those ,but man oh man are they difficult to use!
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

November 3, 2012
6:52 PM

Post #9323943

Juhur, Some people do not have the option. I used it until a couple years ago. Yes it is a pain. But, yes, there are still some people using it, but not by choice. I finally got satellite. I do not have broadband, or dsl. You need to get out in the world juhur and find that there are rural areas that are not covered yet by the modern conveniences. I tried to get caller ID but was told several times by different people that my phone lines were too old. They are stringing dsl but to what? My old phone lines??? Jen

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

November 3, 2012
8:00 PM

Post #9323979

Jnette; modern conveniences; You mean we are back to outhouses. oooooooh magazines and corncobs!!!! oh no !!!

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

November 3, 2012
8:09 PM

Post #9323986

Yes,, all because ,, I wanted to be Buttons the Clown!!!! as you know ,LOL
Really a wanna be Buttons the Clown, oh dreams!! goodness my.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

November 3, 2012
9:18 PM

Post #9324020

juhur, you are crazy. Just because you are in an area where you have all the modern conveniences, doesn't mean that everyone else does. It has nothing to do with what they can afford.

You see, several years ago the telephone companies were given a lot of money by the Federal Gov't to update the rural areas to bring them up to date with the outside world. But, the phone companies couldn't see spending all that money on areas where people were so far apart, it would be too costly, so they used the money for other things. So much for the rural areas. Now, the phone companies are trying to make up for that a little at a time. They should have been sued. They were thieves. They took the money but didn't use it for what was agreed upon.

Now you, since you are in an area where you and your neighbors are many and nearby, are reaping the rewards of the money that was meant to be spent in the rural areas.

So, now get out your corncobs and Sears Roebuck catalogs and help out the people that you stole from. LOL how about that!!

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

November 3, 2012
10:04 PM

Post #9324045

Who said anything about affording anything??? A you know companies are going to spend where they want, the bigger the more monopolized the more that seems to be.
Per capita I pay the same as you and yours,(roughly)
The only rewards around here are for people that are Wanted, yes like dead or alive! So rurals have their moments.
It all only comes around in usage like trying to make up for lost time ,it "ain't happenin"
If it ever went that far you would have to hold on to your wash bowls and sponges ,I have heard stories from old ones about corncobs that would make your hair stand on end (another happy belated Halloween to you ). Not me .!!! ain't no way,, no how!!! ^_^ ^_^ ^_^
JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

November 3, 2012
10:27 PM

Post #9324053

Am I just dense? I am not getting this thread at all- guess I'll come back when it gets bumped up to a new one.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

November 3, 2012
10:33 PM

Post #9324056

No Jo, I don't get it either. 'nite juhur. jen
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 3, 2012
10:37 PM

Post #9324057

I don't get it either, BUT they had "party lines" here until the early 80s, no joking. Rural area.
JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

November 4, 2012
8:20 AM

Post #9324316

Oh, well- this thread is taking forever to open anyway, so I'll just skip it until a new one is started.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

November 4, 2012
9:23 AM

Post #9324354

LOL, 1lisac, a lot of people don't know what a party line is.

How come it is taking so long to open Jo?
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

November 4, 2012
9:53 AM

Post #9324370

JoParrott, I started this thread to find out how to cure my tomato plant, but since the season is over and my plant has gone to the afterlife, I'm not going to restart the thread. I will probably have more problems with next year's tomato plant and post a similar topic next spring when I start vegetable gardening again. I live in zone 5b and we have strong winters that keep many gardeners indoors for the entire season. Soon I will bring in the hoses and start chopping the dead growth and arranging, then watch the snow cover the yard.

Nancy G.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

November 4, 2012
11:47 AM

Post #9324428

:0) Like a lot of us Nancy. Been fun. See you in the spring. Maybe. Jen

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

November 4, 2012
1:09 PM

Post #9324483

That plant at the beginning with mold like substance still looked like the wilt that appears as mold on the leaves and by the time you see it the plant veins are already being clogged, No cure and my cucumbers had that one year.
Two of my tomato plants died this year and that does not happen to mine, first ever for me as to losing large tomato plants.How ever mine were from drought not the likely of disease.
I don't want either!!
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

November 4, 2012
1:45 PM

Post #9324502

That plant, if I am not mistaken, is the one that she got 800 tomatoes off of. Jen

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

November 4, 2012
1:50 PM

Post #9324505

she got 800 tomatoes' Eventually of mine that lived about that also^_^

I should know better than to make with the jokes at Jen ; the power was off the first thing this morning,Sunday morning first thing thank heavens for kerosene heaters and garages!!^_^ ^_^
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

November 4, 2012
3:44 PM

Post #9324589

juhur7 and Jnette, I got 900 tomatoes from the plant but the mold never went entirely away. It would resurface after a rain. I hope the winter destroys it or it might infect my West garden next year.

Nancy G.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

November 4, 2012
4:50 PM

Post #9324631

That'll teach you Juhur!! How do you like that? No power huh? ohhhhh so sorry :0)

Look at that Juhur!! 900 You should have left that plant you had and maybe you could have as many tomatoes as she had. LOL

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

November 4, 2012
4:58 PM

Post #9324638

well it was good while it lasted^_^ !!!

Thumbnail by juhur7   Thumbnail by juhur7   Thumbnail by juhur7   Thumbnail by juhur7   
Click an image for an enlarged view.

Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

November 4, 2012
5:43 PM

Post #9324672

Yes, I would say. Looks great. What kind are those?

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

November 4, 2012
5:56 PM

Post #9324684

Ester Hess ,Broad Ripple currant and Sugar lump, (gardeners delight) Taste could of been better with drought and and 115 degree temps.At least things grew this year !!!
These took that smiling!!!


Posted before this is Ester Hess plant and august tomatoes

Thumbnail by juhur7   Thumbnail by juhur7   Thumbnail by juhur7   Thumbnail by juhur7   
Click an image for an enlarged view.

DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

November 4, 2012
6:50 PM

Post #9324764

juhur7, those tomatoes look great! I've never eaten a yellow tomato variety.

Nancy G.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

November 4, 2012
9:13 PM

Post #9324888

Nancy, aren't they a yellow tomato like yours? I think they look bigger because of the angle of the camera or the way it was taken. Don't you? jen
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

November 5, 2012
10:29 AM

Post #9325362

so seriously, Let's start a new thread!!!! we can always talk tomatoes and politics all winter! Tomatoes are definitely more rewarding! Sharon
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

November 5, 2012
10:32 AM

Post #9325367

Jnette, this thread is covered with photos of my red tomatoes. Were you joking that I grew a yellow tomato variety?

Nancy G.
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

November 5, 2012
10:34 AM

Post #9325371

Sharon, I agree growing tomatoes is far more rewarding than talking politics with friends. I try to avoid talking politics with friends because I've found it sours relationships. As far as starting a new thread I've said my reasons as to why I don't think it should be done for my deceased tomato plant but it's fine with me if anyone in our group wants to start their own thread to continue conversations begun here.

Nancy G.

This message was edited Nov 5, 2012 1:40 PM
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

November 5, 2012
10:40 AM

Post #9325377

I started a new thread. Politics also ruins family relationships!!!
DoGooder
Hopkinton, MA
(Zone 5b)

November 5, 2012
10:42 AM

Post #9325378

Sharon, good luck with your new thread! Hope it has a lot of pleasant conversation!

Nancy G.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

November 5, 2012
6:19 PM

Post #9325645

LOL, maybe I meant Nancy. Sharon, I thought you grew the one with 900 tomatoes. Those were yellow weren't they? Were they yours or Nancys?

Sharon, weren't you the one that said politics causes trouble between families? Well, you are right. I have 2 sisters living nearby and we just stay away from each other now. Maybe after tomorrow. LOL, we'll see.

Ok, so where is the new thread, and what is it about? You didn't give us the link, so maybe you don't want us to join?? :0) Jen
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

November 6, 2012
3:33 PM

Post #9326390

Hey Jen and Nancy:

Sorry about that! The link is: Winter and getting ready for spring! It's on the Tomato forum. Other than that, I don't know how to send a link! I'm lucky I knew how to start a thread! LOL

Watching the election returns, and hoping my brothers don't call from Syracuse because we just agree to disagree... It's the best way otherwise, forget it!

Come to the new link! At this time of year, there's not much gardening to really get into, but you never know!
Sharon
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

November 6, 2012
10:27 PM

Post #9326619

:0) will look for it tomorrow and post it here. jen

PeteB7

PeteB7
Trumbull, CT
(Zone 7a)

May 1, 2013
7:36 PM

Post #9504803

Hi Nancy, I wanted to get an early start this year, was at Home Depot and decided to try the 'Super Sweet 100' since yours did so well. I got 2 and they are going in the ground since I forgot how tall they get while I was in the store. Then I took the time to look back at smaller cherry plants that I researched, had the Husky Cherry in mind and found 2 nice looking plants at the first supermarket I went to. Planted them today in the E-buckets from last year. Lowe's online says that our local store has the very small "Sweet'N'Neat" plant that I looked up last year.

Hope everyone is doing well!
sweetie77
Kankakee, IL
(Zone 5b)

May 2, 2013
3:14 PM

Post #9505765

without reading all the posts... could it be tobacco mosaic virus? Mine looked like that and eventually died completely. After some research I found pictures of the virus and it looked just like mine! I pulled and burned ALL my tomatoes and peppers and started over as it is incurable! There were picture of similar viruses too. Cucumber virus and another. The only way to know is to have them tested which I would have done, but I already burned them all! The looked similar to yours and then the bottom leaves started falling off and it seemed to move up the plant. When it was all said and done it had infected about 60 tomato seedlings and 30 or more peppers.


This message was edited May 2, 2013 4:28 PM
sweetie77
Kankakee, IL
(Zone 5b)

May 2, 2013
3:32 PM

Post #9505781

oops... nevermind, I see your mators turned out fine and jus realized this is an old thread. LOL! Hope I didn't burn mine prematurely, but I got scared...

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