Snip to get more?

(Zone 4b)

These two Bobo hydrangea have been in the ground for exactly 3 weeks and in that time have shown (almost) *no* growth. They appear to be healthy and look identical in every way but for all intents and purposes there has been very little growth on either plant.

The longest stem of each is 13" in length.

Luis et al, would you recommend that I snip 4 or 5 inches off the longest stem to hopefully encourage multiple shoots to come from below?






This message was edited Jun 14, 2012 1:27 PM

This message was edited Jun 14, 2012 1:30 PM

Thumbnail by rouge21 Thumbnail by rouge21
(Clint) Medina, TN(Zone 7b)

I'd cut the tallest stem and root it! It'll bush out when you cut the top off.

(Zone 4b)

How much would you suggest I cut off?

Given that there isn't really much plant (in mass) for either 'Bobo' I am a bit nervous to snip i.e maybe I should leave well enough alone as they are alive ;).

(What is involved in rooting the cutting echinaceamaniac?)

(Clint) Medina, TN(Zone 7b)

This works almost every time.

http://www.gardenguides.com/84882-propagate-paniculata-hydrangea.html

(Zone 4b)

Thanks 'echinaceamaniac' for the link. And while I have you 'on the line'...

I am curious as to your "Hot Summer" coneflowers in this their second summer. I bought several of these plants based on your recommendation but it is too early yet for mine to show flowers (but they all survived their first winter).

(Clint) Medina, TN(Zone 7b)

Last summer was their second summer. An animal dug mine up and it died this year. I will get another one. It's one of the best Echinaceas ever. You will love it!

(Zone 4b)

I have my fingers crossed as I have lots of them in various parts of my garden.

Dublin, CA(Zone 9a)

I wouldn't worry about the lack of growth--three weeks is not very much time, plants will always take some time to get their roots going first before they put out any new top growth. There's a saying that holds true for many shrubs and perennials "first year they sleep, second year they creep, third year they leap". Some plants will get to the "leaping" stage faster than 3 yrs but it will still take a lot longer than 3 weeks. I would probably leave them alone for now rather than trying to prune (unless you want more plants and need the cuttings for that). Once they've had a chance to grow for a year or two then you can prune for shape if they're not growing how you want them to.

(Clint) Medina, TN(Zone 7b)

Sorry I'm so propagation oriented. I always take a cutting of each new plant in case the original dies. Last year a Hydrangea I planted died suddenly. The cutting I took bloomed this year in its pot. I would have lost it otherwise. They are so easy to root. I find that sometimes the cuttings grow faster than the originals.

Dublin, CA(Zone 9a)

That's not a bad idea--I should probably do it more often! LOL I kill plenty of stuff. Of course I have never been able to get cuttings of anything to root so I gave up :(

(Zone 4b)

UPDATE

Of course what a difference a year makes.

Here is the same "Bobo". There will be a mass of flowers on what seems to be sturdy stems.

Thumbnail by rouge21
(Arlene) Southold, NY(Zone 7a)

Great! Looks so good!

Syracuse, NY(Zone 5a)

Oohhh!!! That's lovely!

(Zone 4b)

Thanks pirl and 'Outlaw'. I will post a picture when it is in full bloom.

(Arlene) Southold, NY(Zone 7a)

Did you root the cuttings?

Hannibal, NY(Zone 6a)

If you did don't answer here, it's patented
BoboŽ Hydrangea paniculata 'ILVOBO' PP: 22782 Can. PBRAF


Now I realize the patent police are not running around looking in everyone's back yard, but I do know Proven Winners made a stop at a roadside nursery stand and saw they were using the Proven Winners containers for other plants, and gave them a talking to.

Seems to me most paniculatas throw up a long stem in the beginning. They always seem to shape up beautifully.

Your Bobo is beautiful!

(Arlene) Southold, NY(Zone 7a)

Just spoke to a hydrangea person who said if we propagate for our own personal use and not for sale, there is no problem.

I agree with Proven Winners being upset at others who use their pots to sell plants that aren't Proven Winners. I'd feel the same way.

All the Limelights you sent me are exceptional plants and all layerings I did worked out beautifully. The best, of course, is the one the deer munched on last year - such a lovely form! I moved it to safety and it's just stunning. Thank you SO much. I'll take photos when it's not so hot.

Hannibal, NY(Zone 6a)

Don't know who you spoke to, but it wasn't a plant patent person. This has been a long standing conversation, it's just not legal to propagate for any use, by any means, except seeds of course, a currently patented plant, unless you are licensed to do so.

Glad your Limelights are doing well, it's a beautiful plant.

http://rainyside.com/archives/PatentedPlants.html

http://mosswoodgardens.blogspot.com/2008/03/plant-propagation-and-law.html

http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/hydra/msg081155413126.html

And look here for the types of asexual reproductions.

http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/pac/plant/#4

Sorry, whomever you spoke with, Pirl, is not up on the patent laws. You may wish to inform them of same. BTW, Limelight was patented in 2002, and is not up to expire until 2022.

This message was edited Jul 6, 2013 7:10 PM

(Arlene) Southold, NY(Zone 7a)

It wasn't a plant patent person - you're right.

Syracuse, NY(Zone 5a)

Thank you! My limelight has no blooms this year but it; like your bobo, is double it's size from last year, I have faith that next year I should see some flowers! I love paniculatas! :)

Hannibal, NY(Zone 6a)

And they do so well for us here in the north.

There are some that are beauties, and not patented.


http://hydrangeasplus.com/Paniculata/

No offense meant, Pirl, but they seem to be getting more stinky on these patents. I no longer sell Proven Winners, as you have to pay the patent, buy Proven Winner containers, and then Proven Winners checks you out. And honestly, most, IMHO, are no better then the unpatented plants.

(Arlene) Southold, NY(Zone 7a)

Two years ago I bought Quick Fire and it's been in full bloom here for the last few weeks. There is something so special about the entire paniculata family.

I don't search out Proven Winners but just tend to buy the best plants I see and those recommended by others, regardless of the name on the pot.

Just out of curiosity, what would you do if a patented hydrangea layered itself? Would you put it in the compost? I can't bear to do that.

This Limelight grew this way so I just separated it and it's thriving. I'll keep an eye out for the PW police!

This message was edited Jul 7, 2013 9:45 AM

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Hannibal, NY(Zone 6a)

You probably wouldn't even notice the plant police with people looking at your lovely gardens.

With my type of gardening, if I had one layer itself, it would probably just be left there, LOL

I don't want people to think it's probably going to happen, that the patent police will come out. I just want people to be aware it might. I bet my friend didn't make 20.00 a week on her little roadside stand, and they found her out, somehow.

(Arlene) Southold, NY(Zone 7a)

Thank you. Just spent over an hour out there but the heat drove me back inside.

My mophead and lacecap self-layerings just stay put yet I can't allow the paniculatas the same freedom. When we bought the one in this photo, in 2006, it wasn't as high as my knee. With all the self-layering it has done it now takes up a width of 12'.

Energy has a limit and age is not always a friend.

Your friend's experience reminds me of Allen Funt and his Candid Camera show...When you least expect it here comes the Patent Police!

Thumbnail by pirl
Vashon, WA(Zone 8a)

Beautiful pictures!! Any of you have any cuttings to share ?

Powder Springs, GA(Zone 7b)

yad,

What have you got to share back?

(Zone 4b)

UPDATE

"Bobo" has been a great hydrangea for me this season. It is in full bloom starting sometime in the first half of July and these same blooms have pinkened up nicely even this late. As well it is quite compact and it is easy to look after as it blooms only on new wood.

(The first picture was taken on July 15 and the second (the same plant is from September 9th)).

This message was edited Sep 16, 2013 1:55 PM

Thumbnail by rouge21 Thumbnail by rouge21
(Arlene) Southold, NY(Zone 7a)

Patience really is a virtue. Many of us extend our mothering/nurturing instincts to our plants so we expect more from newly planted shrubs than they can possibly provide.

I'm so happy for you!

(Zone 4b)

Thanks Pirl.

Because I was so pleased with the performance of this particular hydrangea I just replaced an existing garden border with 5 of these "Bobos".

(Arlene) Southold, NY(Zone 7a)

I hope you enjoy them all. They should make a wonderful border and you can look forward to the blooms all summer long. It's so nice to have something you enjoy so much.

Syracuse, NY(Zone 5a)

the "only on new wood" part is all that's keeping me from trying to get one of my own, who knows what kind of winter we'll have here. :( too risky....though I suppose as compact as it is if it didn't bloom on occasion it would make a cute shrub... :)
are there any blue paniculatas?

Hurst, TX(Zone 7b)

Nope. Well, at least, not yet. As of now, all we can do us sray paint them blue or in Halloween Colors when the blooms fade to brown! I actually saw once a picture of an unknown early flowering paniculata (blooms were brown) that looked quite sharp that way besides the new white blooms of a Tardiva (photo taken in the Fall).

Hannibal, NY(Zone 6a)

Outlaw Heart, the paniculatas are perfectly hardy in Syracuse. I live out near Oswego, and have tons of them.

They don't come in blue.

(Zone 4b)

the "only on new wood" part is all that's keeping me from trying to get one of my own,

I am confused. Isnt "on new wood" the way to go for a harsh climate ie significant die back doesnt matter as blooms will come with the new growth??

This past winter and spring was much more severe than has been the case for the past several years. And so the two "Bobos" I had started almost from nothing in terms of old growth and yet they were covered in blooms by mid July (see pics above).

Hannibal, NY(Zone 6a)

rouge, yes.

(Arlene) Southold, NY(Zone 7a)

Dittto.

Syracuse, NY(Zone 5a)

hahahhahah!! oh man! i am so used to getting bummed about "only on OLD wood" that i misread, and even retyped the mistake! this is way i love paniculatas hahahaha

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