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Peppers: Chiltepin peppers

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Forum: PeppersReplies: 12, Views: 116
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Joyous1
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4b)

June 26, 2012
8:08 PM

Post #9182795

I'm really intrigued with this particular pepper, I have not grown it and don't have seeds,
but I would love more info. from those who have on taste, culture, and soil mix recommendations.
Possible seed swap as well? Thanks in advance to any who respond.
smokemaster
North Hills, CA

June 26, 2012
11:06 PM

Post #9182919

There are a lot of different "Wild Bird" type peppers out there.
Chiltepe , Chiltepin , Pequin , Petines , Tepins ...

Here are a few names you can look up:
African Pequin , Bailey's Pequin , Bird Pepper , Bolivian wild , Chile Petine , Chile Pequin , Firecracker Pequin , Purple Pequin , Florida Wild Bird , Guatamalian Chiltepe , Key's Bird , McMahon's Texas Bird , Sivuli (tepin) , Sonoran Chiltepin , Tepin , Texas Bird , Texas Black , Texas wild pequin , Wild Bird , Wild Brazil , Wild Grove , Xigole , Zimbabwe Bird , Zualas Chiltepin.

All are Annuums.

There are other similar looking wild ones-Chacoense , etc.

Nothing special about getting seeds to germinate except do not put them too deep.
They grow like most other peppers/Annuums.
Fresher is better as far as any seed goes.
I've never treated any of the above with anything to get them to grow.

1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 27, 2012
3:16 PM

Post #9220764

I know I'm late to this thread but what is that proper name for the one that is native to this area and grows wild? I've always been told it is Chiltepin. It is a slow grower but very productive. I think some times the names are used interchangeably...? And it makes it rather confusing. The pods are pea size and round.

I also have seeds, from a trade, that are called Thai Bird peppers.
cyberageous
Everglades, FL
(Zone 10a)

July 30, 2012
2:45 AM

Post #9223256

I was in the Hispanic isle in Walmart Grocery store the other day and they have quite a selection of dried peppers, including Chiltepin. I have grown peppers before from getting the seeds that way and it's a whole lot cheaper than ordering seeds. I don't think you can guarantee freshness but even if you get a few plants out of the $1 investment, it's worth a try. Some of the "fresher" markets might carry the fresh pepper in their produce dept.
smokemaster
North Hills, CA

July 30, 2012
9:06 AM

Post #9223561

I don't know if there is just one name for the wild peppers growing around different parts of Texas.
Some are called Petines,Tepins ,wild pequin or Chiltepin.
Then there are the ones that go from green to black to red.
The different names might be given by whoever lived in that area when they were named...Spanish , Mexicans or whatever.
Though in South America a lot of them are called Chiltepe.They can be Pequin or Tepins.
Like a lot of other peppers that could have been originally from the same source but adapted to the land they now grow on.
I just go by whatever the pack called it... like they do with super hot crosses these days. :)
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 30, 2012
12:21 PM

Post #9223794

Smokemaster or anybody lol -go you know what Landrace means?
smokemaster
North Hills, CA

July 30, 2012
4:00 PM

Post #9223998

Landrace varieties are a pepper variety that has been grown in the same place for a long time and has adapted to that specific area,climate etc.

I believe it has to do with what happens to any specific plant that through inbreeding or crossing with other native varieties living in that area until it becomes specific to that area.

A discussion I found.
There are several on the net.

http://alanbishop.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=banter&action=print&thread=4940
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 30, 2012
9:32 PM

Post #9224418

How are they different from Wilds? I haven't checked out your link. I'm in a pepper group on FB and there is a huge discussion about it comparing them to heirlooms. I found some stuff on the net that was contradictory imagine that lol. So are chilitepins wilds or landrace?
smokemaster
North Hills, CA

July 31, 2012
12:35 AM

Post #9224461

I think landrace is mostly used as a reference to cultivated varieties.
Like Heirlooms.
But I don't think Heirlooms are specific to a geographical location.It referes more to a species in general.
A landrace variety can be an heirloom but an heirloom doesn't have to be a landrace -variety specific to an area.
Heirloom "A" might be grown in many places but aren't necessarily specific to any one area.
For instance,Some New Mex varieties can be considered Landrace to a place in New Mexico but are Heirlooms when grown in another place.
Kind of like all Habaneros are C.Chinense but all C.Chinense aren't Habaneros type thing.

At least that is how I understand it.

I think wilds are in another ballpark.Wilds aren't cultivated to bring out specific traits or whatever.

Padron peppers for instance are considered Heirloom peppers but are a Spanish Landrace variety.


Patti1957
Eagle Point, OR
(Zone 8a)

July 31, 2012
9:35 PM

Post #9225602

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Landrace
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 1, 2012
12:24 AM

Post #9225638

Thanks Patti I just made a copy of the link, before you posted it. The problem is there are many contradictions in this definition, compared to other definitions.
Patti1957
Eagle Point, OR
(Zone 8a)

August 1, 2012
12:16 PM

Post #9226126

See if these links help:

http://garden.lofthouse.com/adaptivar-landrace.phtml
http://cubits.org/ellasgarden/db/hogwildseedswap/view/17649/

This message was edited Aug 1, 2012 11:21 AM
Garden_Sass
Central, TX
(Zone 8b)

August 8, 2012
5:38 AM

Post #9233938

I've never had to purchase Chili Petin (and variants) seeds - the birds plant them for me, AKA Bird Pepper! They form an attractive small bush, more open in the shade, more compact in sunny locations. It's covered in small white flowers, and copious green peppers turning red at their most handsome phase - Christmas colors on a bush. They make a nice landscape plant although in winter they loose their leaves and in mild winters don't die back. In MN they wouldn't survive frozen ground.

Always wear disposable gloves and never touch eyes or sensitive places when handling. Learned this the hard way many decades ago - us kids used to get a quarter for picking a lunch bag full of wild CPs, no gloves then but it only took one painful experience to know you don't rub your eyes after picking CPs. My fingers used to feel the burn, extra warm feeling, for a short while after picking lots of peppers, and then there were the "double dare you" incidents!

My Dad was the hot sauce lover while I choose to dry them and crumble into dishes for an extra zing, provided the birds leave any for me.

Deer and rabbits browse the foliage and wild turkeys love 'em too, if hunters bag one that been stuffing on chili petins the meat will be hotter than Hades!

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