Photo by Melody
Congratulations to all our photo contest participants! Check out the winning photos here. We will have the 2015 calendars available to order from Zazzle soon.

Aroids: No rambling roses here

Communities > Forums > Aroids
bookmark
Forum: AroidsReplies: 10, Views: 147
Add to Bookmarks
-
AuthorContent
tropicbreeze
noonamah
Australia

June 30, 2012
5:52 AM

Post #9187208

Of course here roses wouldn't have "a snowflakes chance in hell" of surviving. So the job of 'rambling' has to be done by other plants.

And to paraphrase another saying, 'One man's house plant is another man's garden plant'. This thread is to show some of the potential of a number of the vining/climbing/epiphytic aroids which some people are used to seeing as house plants and others have as garden plants.

They are a bit like kids kept indoors - confined, subdued, looking longingly out of the windows.

But when released into the outdoors they explode into a riot of fun and activity. Except, no noise! What a blessing!

So here's some photos of my rampant Aroids, not in any particular order other than the sequence they were taken.


The first is Philodendron erubescens, a reasonably fast grower but not overwhelmingly so. Once it clumps up on a tree trunk it looks quite nice.

Second isn't a fast grower but is still moves along. Can't remember it's name, I think it was something like Philo. "Black Knight", but don't quote me on that.

Next is Golden Pothos, my second most prolific rambler. The tall trees in the photo are between 20 to 25 metres tall, the Pothos is up around the 18 to 20 metre height and still moving up. In the fore ground are 2 palms with their trunks entirely covered with it.

Then there's Syngonium, my most invasive one although it doesn't get up as high as the Pothos. This is a young plant with juvenile leaves. Later the leaves become more palmate.

Thumbnail by tropicbreeze   Thumbnail by tropicbreeze   Thumbnail by tropicbreeze   Thumbnail by tropicbreeze
Click an image for an enlarged view.

tropicbreeze
noonamah
Australia

June 30, 2012
5:59 AM

Post #9187209

This first photo shows what happens when Syngonium is ignored. The tree trunk (Swamp Mahogany) is completely covered by the stems and roots of the Syngonium.

Here's a mature Syngonium with adult leaves.

Then Philodendron tenue. Not a fast grower but the leaves get quite large. This is still a young plant.

Next is Philodendron pedatum. When first bought, it was a much darker colour but growing in a lot of shade seems to have made it paler. The stems and petioles are sort of furry. Looks quite good. Still in its pot but once it puts out a lot of roots by-passing the pot I'll cut it off and move the pot to another place so it can start a new one.

Thumbnail by tropicbreeze   Thumbnail by tropicbreeze   Thumbnail by tropicbreeze   Thumbnail by tropicbreeze
Click an image for an enlarged view.

tropicbreeze
noonamah
Australia

June 30, 2012
6:05 AM

Post #9187212

Another Pothos starting out on a new palm trunk.

A small Philodendron erubescens getting a hold on a Ficus.

Pothos again, making good progress on a tree trunk.

A native Epipremnum pinnatum from Queensland. You can see the juvenile leaves right up the top of the photo and the adult leaf at the bottom. This is another I'll cut off from the pot and get a new one going somewhere else.

Thumbnail by tropicbreeze   Thumbnail by tropicbreeze   Thumbnail by tropicbreeze   Thumbnail by tropicbreeze
Click an image for an enlarged view.

KayJones
Lee's Summit, MO
(Zone 6a)

June 30, 2012
6:07 AM

Post #9187213

What climate zone are you in - 9 or 10 or 11? I know you don't have the same zone designations as we do, but what would yours compare to?
tropicbreeze
noonamah
Australia

June 30, 2012
6:12 AM

Post #9187220

This one's called "Little Monster" because it resembles Monstera deliciosa but it's not closely related at all. I've forgotten the proper name. It grows much faster than the large Monstera.

A view from further back of the Little Monster and its surrounds.

Philodendron melanochrysum. Once it gets properly established the leaves get quite a bit larger,

Once Pothos gets right up into trees this is all you see below. Thick stems going up the tree trunks. The Pothos stems are 25 to 30 millimetres thick.

Thumbnail by tropicbreeze   Thumbnail by tropicbreeze   Thumbnail by tropicbreeze   Thumbnail by tropicbreeze
Click an image for an enlarged view.

tropicbreeze
noonamah
Australia

June 30, 2012
6:20 AM

Post #9187227

Kay, apparently everyone is using the same system now, because it starts from a base zone 1 from which there is no climate lower. But at the top it's open ended. We're 12 or 13 here, although we're going through one of our coldest winters ever, so this year it'll be 12 for sure and not higher. For Palm Zones we're 5b which is the Lipstick Zone.
tropicbreeze
noonamah
Australia

June 30, 2012
6:26 AM

Post #9187230

And when the Pothos is up high it drops down long runners which on reaching the ground take off looking for other trees to take over.

The taller the plant the larger the leaves. So you only get a close up view of big leaves when they eventually fall. This one is 73 centimetres along the mid rib.

This side of the palm trunk is Amydrium zippelanum. When the plant is on ground level it sends out thin runners which sprout a few leaves along the way, probably to provide an extra bit of nourishment for the runners. When they find a suitable tree they go up and then establish a mature plant. Seems an adaptation to a plant falling with a dead tree then having to find a new tree to grow on.

A Syngonium taking over a small termite mound. They're not particular, they'll climb on anything. One of my water tanks has Syngonium all over the sides.

Thumbnail by tropicbreeze   Thumbnail by tropicbreeze   Thumbnail by tropicbreeze   Thumbnail by tropicbreeze
Click an image for an enlarged view.

tropicbreeze
noonamah
Australia

June 30, 2012
6:33 AM

Post #9187237

An Epipremnum with some Syngonium growing through it. I'm not sure but the Epipremnum might also be a pinnatum, but different variety to the Australian native one.

Philodendron lacerum. I had a huge one on a Coconut, but a couple of years ago lightning hit the Coconut (plus 5 others nearby) cooking them all and the Philo. Luckily I had a few other plants around the place and have put more cuttings around as insurance against further lightning strikes.

And Syngonium again. This area will probably have to be cleared out a bit as it will end up smothering other plants.

Thumbnail by tropicbreeze   Thumbnail by tropicbreeze   Thumbnail by tropicbreeze
Click an image for an enlarged view.

tropicbreeze
noonamah
Australia

June 30, 2012
6:35 AM

Post #9187241

After having uploaded all those and tried to make sure text lined up with photos, I realise there's some I've left out. Perhaps another day. Meanwhile, hope you enjoy these as much as I enjoy growing them (or really, letting them grow themselves).

RachelLF

RachelLF

July 26, 2012
7:31 PM

Post #9219940

It's been a while since I've got to visually tour your garden Zig but I sure have enjoyed it and it appears that they all are still thriving. I do believe the one you are calling "Little Monster" is actually a Rhaphidophora and may be tetrasperma. I will look forward to viewing any more photos you would like to add and I hope your Winter months are being kind.

I

tropicbreeze
noonamah
Australia

July 27, 2012
12:38 AM

Post #9220083

Thanks Rachel. Yes it is Rhaphidophora tetrasperma. You identified it for me some time ago. I remember seeing the photo of yours, in a hanging pot.

You cannot post until you register, login and subscribe.


Other Aroids Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
How to ID elephant ears!!! bwilliams 37 Jul 5, 2012 11:15 AM
Colocasia Thai Giant- pics please AuntB 54 Aug 23, 2008 3:03 PM
Aroids to trade: skilledwithands 23 Jun 13, 2008 12:41 AM
The most over looked aroid in the araceae family. bwilliams 17 Apr 29, 2010 8:18 PM
Which of these is A. podophyllum and what's the other? Carter 7 Oct 1, 2007 3:24 PM


We recommend Firefox
Overwhelmed? There's a lot to see here. Try starting at our homepage.

[ Home | About | Advertise | Media Kit | Mission | Featured Companies | Submit an Article | Terms of Use | Tour | Rules | Privacy Policy | Contact Us ]

Back to the top

Copyright © 2000-2014 Dave's Garden, an Internet Brands company. All Rights Reserved.
 

Hope for America