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Florida Gardening: All Florida (and anyone that wants to join us) Chat Thread 4

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JaxFlaGardener
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

June 30, 2012
12:31 PM

Post #9187635

This is a continuation of our previous Florida chat thread. All are welcome!

We try to refresh the thread every few weeks so that those with dial-up Internet connections don't have to wait so long to load a loooooooonnnnnggggg thread.

We came from here: http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1264037/

Photo: Passiflora incarnata, hardy native passionvine, growing in an empty field near my house. Come see me and we can join in some pilfered propagation! LOL Passionvines are larval host plants for Gulf Frittilary and Zebra Longwing butterflies.

Jeremy

Thumbnail by JaxFlaGardener
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JaxFlaGardener
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

June 30, 2012
1:19 PM

Post #9187705

BonnieGardens: I forgot to answer your question about how to propagate the Yellow Cestrum (Cestrum aurantiacum) that you got from me.

Best way: It will occasionally send out suckers from the roots within the immediate area of the parent plant (usually within about 1 ft from the main stalk). You can sever the root between the parent plant and the sucker, then transplant the sucker to a pot to stabilize it for a week or two, then plant in the garden.

Also works: You can propagate stem tip cuttings as with most greenwood shrubs. Choose a stem tip of about 12 to 18 inches in length. Try to find a stem tip that is not flowering or has already flowered (difficult to do because the shrub is generally covered in flowers from the first warm days of spring until the first hard freeze of winter). I then use the method of stem propagation that I do with everything:

1. Fill a plastic pot or other container (taller rather than wider, if possible) with potting soil. Tamp the soil down tight with your fist, then add more soil, repeat tamping and adding soil until the container is nearly full (about 1/2 inch from top of container).
2. Use a bamboo stick (or your preference for a magical propagation wand about 1/2 inch in diameter) to poke a hole into the tightly tamped soil. Poke the hole all the way to the bottom of the pot. Make this hole immediately adjacent to the interior wall of the pot.
3. Remove the bottom side branches and leaves of your cutting so that you have a bare stem about equal to the height of your container of soil. I don't pull off all the leaves, or topmost leaves, as do some propagators, but this may be an individual choice for what works best for you.
4. At the bottom end of your cutting (the end that will go into the soil), use your thumb nail or a sharp knife or other instrument to scrape off the top layer of bark/skin of the cutting to expose the bright green cambium tissue. Scrape the cutting to just about the height of the soil level of your container. Do this on two or three sides of the cutting. Especially ensure that you peel the skin/bark off the nodes (the points where the side branches or leaves had been on your cutting stem) as these are the most likely places where roots will form.
5. Sprinkle some rooting hormone into the hole you made in the container soil. I don't dip cuttings into rooting hormone because the hormone is an organic material that can pick up, grow and transmit virus, fungal and bacterial infections if you happen to stick an infected cutting into the hormone.
5a. (alternate step) If you happen to have Clonex or other gel type rooting hormone, this seems to work best for woody stem or somewhat woody stem cuttings, but Clonex can be expensive and I've only been able to find it online. I get fairly good results with just the powder-type rooting hormones.
6. Use your thumb or fingers to press the soil tightly around the stem of your cutting.
7. Repeat Step 2 to make another hole along the interior side of your pot within an inch or two of your last hole where your cutting now stands. Repeat Steps 3 - 6 for another cutting. Keep repeating until you have cuttings all around the interior circumference of your container. I use compressed potting soil and place cuttings around the interior wall of the container to help stabilize the cuttings. When the tiny root hairs begin to form, they can be easily broken if the cutting sways a little bit in the wind or a curious pet or child or other critter touches or moves the cuttings. Once your pot is full around the interior edge, you can add some more holes and cuttings toward the center of the pot, if you wish. I put a lot of cuttings in one container in order to use less potting soil.
8. Water the cuttings until you see water coming out the bottom holes of the container. If you have any magical willow water (fresh willow tree branch tips allowed to soak a few days in a tub of water), you can use this to water the cuttings, but I get fairly good results with just captured rain water.
9. Place the pot of cuttings in dappled shade/filtered sunlight (such as under a large old Live Oak tree).
10. Continue to water daily so that the soil in the pot is consistently moist, but not soggy (you may need to water more often in hot, dry weather). If you have a misting system in your propagation area, that may help the cuttings to root, but I get fairly good results without a misting system.
11. Keep watering daily until you see new leaves begin to form on the cuttings. At this point, I usually just spray city water from a hose in the direction of the propagation container. New leaf formation is generally a good sign that the cuttings are taking root. Gradually begin to reduce watering. If the new leaves show signs of wilting, add water; if they are standing and not wilting, withhold watering.
11a. (alternate method) Some cuttings (Azalea, passionvines, etc.) seem to benefit by having the container stand in about 1/2 inch of water. I'm not sure if this would help or hurt the Yellow Cestrum cuttings because I generally root them without standing water.
12. At the point you see new leaves and can tell which cuttings took root and which didn't, pull out the non-rooted cuttings. Leave the rooted cuttings in the pot for a few more weeks, then turn them out of the pot and separate them into new pots of soil. Wait another month or two before putting the rooted cuttings out in the garden.

Hope this helps! I think I may have a few rooted cuttings of the Yellow Cestrum (and other plants) to give away if anyone wants to come visit.

Jeremy

wren107

wren107
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

June 30, 2012
1:46 PM

Post #9187746

Jeremy thanks

I do have a extra white Texas Star, it is blooming, a good size plant, will have the yard guys pot it up for you this fall. It is in a large pot with a number of other hibiscus
LoveBrug
Fleming Island, FL
(Zone 9a)

June 30, 2012
3:21 PM

Post #9187880

Hi all ,
Wow after this dry spring in NE FL the Gingers are having a comeback . I have a few that have never bloomed that are budding now. At one time these were all named but the tags ether floated away or are in squirrel nests now !
Hope everyones gardens are drying out and guessing this is not the last storm we see this summer.

Thumbnail by LoveBrug
Click the image for an enlarged view.

wren107

wren107
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

June 30, 2012
4:15 PM

Post #9187945

mine has dried out so much that I am back to watering, but I am on kind of a hill
LoveBrug
Fleming Island, FL
(Zone 9a)

June 30, 2012
4:43 PM

Post #9187968

wren I'm beside myself as it's water day here and had to water too ! With another 100 degree day tomorrow everything would be bone dry and no way wait till next water day.

wren107

wren107
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

June 30, 2012
5:08 PM

Post #9187993

I use a hose as most of my plants are either in pots or new plants and that is allowed.
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 30, 2012
5:15 PM

Post #9188001

Are we all having problems with the heat? It has been 100+ here in North Central Texas for the last week. My water bill will be astronomical. Just can't stand to see everything wilt, never to return. The heat doesn't seem to be as bad as the ray of the sun. Everything is just singed. We did this last summer and I was hoping this year would be different. Have gone almost all Texas natives and even they are dying.
BonnieGardens
Clermont, FL
(Zone 9a)

June 30, 2012
5:41 PM

Post #9188039

I'm also back to using the hoses. That few days of rain from storm Debbie really did make the plants pop up and look great. We can water 2 days a week and every day on new stuff which I just set out around new pond.

Jeremy I did the cutting about the way you said except I make my own potting soil as I have composted cow poop a plenty. I use Root Tone. The cuttings have been in the pot for about 2 weeks so we shall see of some root. I never thought to skin some bark off so if they don't take I'll try that next time. Thanks for your taking the time to explain it all.

Bonnie
sugarweed
Jacksonville & Okeec, FL
(Zone 9a)

June 30, 2012
5:45 PM

Post #9188048

Nice Ginger show LoveBrug.
Thanks for the new thread Jeremy.
We had 21" in 4 days but it just perked right on thru.
Everything got spoiled and wants water now.
I used to spend $200 a month on water.
No plants, no spend $200.
Sidney
Hi Bonnie.

LoveForests

LoveForests
FU
United States
(Zone 9b)

June 30, 2012
11:44 PM

Post #9188375

Jeremy, .. please do take my Racer Snakes, (I just can't bare the thought of them eating my anoles, lizards or frogs).
As far as the raccoons I've seen at 3:00 in the morning, they are huge. The are tall and long, but will run away if you bang on the window.

I love the flowers near your home.You always have 'gorgeous' photos of flowers of yours and those around you. Always a joy to look at.

LoveForests

LoveForests
FU
United States
(Zone 9b)

June 30, 2012
11:53 PM

Post #9188378

My white 'Pentas" have grown into 2 foot wide and 2 1/2 foot high plants since the rains started heavely. What awesome plants they are. I want to get more of them.


HUGS EVERYONE !

JaxFlaGardener
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 1, 2012
10:42 AM

Post #9188726

Despite several feet of rain per square inch (literally!) during TS Debbie, my sandy garden soil is dry already and plants are wilting. I'm running the sprinklers today to keep the plants fresh.

Bonnie - glad to help with the propagation efforts. I hope the Cestrum root for you. Scraping the top layer of skin/bark off the portion of a cutting that goes in the soil was a trick taught in Master Gardener training by the Extension Office. It had never occurred to me either to do it, but it does sometimes seem to help spur the stem to send out roots.

Christina and I were walking back from the Winn-Dixie yesterday (no working vehicles currently, and the city forced me to get rid of the van that I had hoped to repair). I was sad to see the empty field with the sun-loving ferns, Coreopsis, Drummond's Phlox and native Passionvine getting its once or twice a year mowing. I know the Passionvines will pop back up soon after the mowing, but I was hoping to get some of the sun ferns before they were mowed down. Oh, well. I'll wait a few weeks and hope the ferns return.

Too hot to be outside! I go through clean T-shirts about one every 5 minutes from sweating when I try to do even simple tasks in the yard. Was soaking with sweat from a few minutes waiting for the bus to bring me downtown today. Off to Lowe's later to return a post hole digger handle that doesn't fit my digger (and of course, raid the 75% off plant sale distressed plants rack!).

Jeremy

wren107

wren107
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 1, 2012
11:57 AM

Post #9188797

Jeremy the Bracket fern is poison and very invasive at times. Loves it dry and hot

Pentas explode when they freeze.
sugarweed
Jacksonville & Okeec, FL
(Zone 9a)

July 4, 2012
11:12 AM

Post #9192833

I did some checking about Sylvain and this is the latest from last night.
"Sylvain is having a tough time of it. He developed some kind of skin problem which was operated on and is waiting for skin grafts to help heal the situation. He has been in the hospital almost two weeks and doesn't seem to be getting the treatment he needs. And , of course, he has diabetic and weight problems which make the situation more difficult."
I hope it doesn't upset Sylvain that I posted this. He will appreciate all the prayers he can get.
As for me I had my 2nd physical therapy yesterday. I have a broken tip-toe button. I sure hate to think I can't get on my tip toes to get things from top shelves for myself and those not so tall.
Life is wonderful,
Sidney
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 4, 2012
12:12 PM

Post #9192889

Thank you, Sidney. Sylvain is a friend to all and doesn't deserve to be so ill. Will continue prayers for both Sylvain and Gail.
sugarweed
Jacksonville & Okeec, FL
(Zone 9a)

July 4, 2012
12:33 PM

Post #9192913

Yes, I don't know how Gail is getting along without him. I will inquire as to how she is doing also.
Sidney

wren107

wren107
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 4, 2012
12:56 PM

Post #9192942

Sidney thank you for finding out for us.

Send him some {{{{{{{{{{HUGS}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}} from us

Sandy
sugarweed
Jacksonville & Okeec, FL
(Zone 9a)

July 4, 2012
1:43 PM

Post #9192987

Sheldon's wife is helping Gail and watering his plants. Just pray all is well for both of them.
Sidney
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 4, 2012
1:51 PM

Post #9192993

thank you
jbhomosassa
Homosassa, FL

July 4, 2012
10:33 PM

Post #9193489

Hi Guys: I have 2 Nandinas in huge pots next to my front entrance. One is in semi-shade which is doing great, and the other one is in full sun, which is not doing so well. It looks like something ate a lot of the leaves off, but I can't see any bugs on it. Anybody have a similar experience? I don't know what to do for it. It looks worse every time I look at it.

wren107

wren107
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 5, 2012
3:35 AM

Post #9193551

Good morning everyone, thankfully World War III is over for another year

jbhomosassa Go out after dark with a flashlight and check, and show a picture maybe someone can tell from the picture

Sandy
Qwilter
Fleming Island, FL
(Zone 9a)

July 5, 2012
4:16 AM

Post #9193577

Anyone else get that great rain last nite? Almost 2" in my gauge this AM. When the fireworks around us were going off ~9:30 it was still raining out. Of course I hadn't finished the front bed & again had a moat. Hopefully I'll be able to get the lava rock delivered & spread out by early next week.

wren107

wren107
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 5, 2012
4:18 AM

Post #9193581

We get the rain up here but it cleared out in time for World War III to start.
flaflwrgrl
North Central , FL
(Zone 8b)

July 6, 2012
6:35 AM

Post #9195064

Thanks for the update on Sylvain & Gail Sidney. Will continue to send positive energy for them both. Sylvain is such a good guy; I hate to hear of his troubles.
We can all bet he's givin' 'em hell! And charming the nurses no doubt. THAT'S our Sylvain!

wren107

wren107
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 6, 2012
7:37 AM

Post #9195136

Good morning everyone

{{{{{{{{{{Sylvain & Gail }}}}}}}}

Waving at everyone else

Sandy
JaxFlaGardener
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 6, 2012
1:46 PM

Post #9195572

Thanks for the update on Sylvain, Sugarweed! I do hope he recovers soon and that all will be well.

We got the downpour also that ended just in time for the July 4th fireworks (including those around the neighborhood). Was glad for the rain because everything was drying up even after the gallons per hour downpours of TS Debby.

Anyone tried the plant in the attached photo? A new find on the 75% off bargain plant rack at Lowe's (final price, $1.50 for 1 gal). It is Otomeria genus, O' Primiera series. From what I see from brief research online, it is native to east Africa and "thrives with extreme heat and high light." I hope it does well. Would hate to waste a buck-fifty. LOL

Jeremy

Thumbnail by JaxFlaGardener
Click the image for an enlarged view.

floridabunnie
Cape Coral, FL
(Zone 10a)

July 6, 2012
6:09 PM

Post #9195860

Hello All -

We've had consistent rain for the past few weeks here in Cape Coral. It's nice to see the plants and grass stand tall after the rain.

JaxFlaGardner - Sounds like you got a good deal! Love those last chance plants. I just bought an Echinacea today for $.99. I don't know if it will actually grow down here, but figured it might be worth a shot for that price.
denisemb
Ocala, FL
(Zone 9a)

July 6, 2012
6:36 PM

Post #9195887

Jeremy & floridabunnie - I hear ya on Lowe's clearance rack. Scored two magenta Sunpatiens yesterday for $1 each that were in surprisingly good shape. ALMOST picked up some pitiful caladiums, but never grew caladiums and not familiar with how they bounce back with some TLC.
floridabunnie
Cape Coral, FL
(Zone 10a)

July 6, 2012
8:01 PM

Post #9195974

Hi Denisemb -

I have had pretty good luck with Caladiums. We have them planted around a tree in our backyard. The only problems I have had is when the neighborhood armadillo decided to dig some of mine up. Happiness Farms in Lake Placid has great caladium bulbs at pretty good prices.

Thumbnail by floridabunnie
Click the image for an enlarged view.

denisemb
Ocala, FL
(Zone 9a)

July 8, 2012
8:46 AM

Post #9197698

Oh, those caladiums are gorgeous! Guess I'll have to start educating myself on another new addiction. ;)
JaxFlaGardener
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 8, 2012
10:44 AM

Post #9197801

Caladiums seem to be hit or miss for me, but I have a few that returned from last year. I have a difficult time finding a spot with enough sun to make them robust, but not so much sun that they burn up.

If it weren't for Lowe's 75% off distressed bargain plants, I would be in serious plant addict withdrawal on our current household budget. I do tend to come home with more plants than I can reasonably carry on a city bus, but just consider it as my temporary landscaping gift to the other bus passengers. LOL

Did anyone in Jax get the rain last night? Thunder rumbling off to the south, severe thunderstorm warning scrolls for Duval County at the bottom of Channel 12 TV shows, but not a drop at my house. Will be running the sprinklers today to keep plants alive.

Some more bargain plant finds in the photos:
1. Red Hot Poker - Kniphofia 'Creamsicle' - $1.50 - have had trouble growing these in the past, but I do know they will grow and return here from year to year because they are growing at the Jacksonville Zoo and Gardens in the Savanna Blooms area.
2. Obedient Plant - Physostegia 'Pink Manners' - $1.50 - never tried these here, but I grew them in a NYC rooftop garden that I tended for artist, Lowell Nesbitt. The common name of "Obedient Plant" comes from the fact that you can move the small flowers in any direction along the stem and the flowers will stay put.
3. This was labeled as Penstemon 'Lavender Ruffles', 62 cents - but I think either the grower got the tags mixed up or the tag got switched around at Lowe's. It looks and smells like a true lavender (Lavandula species).
4. Bat Face Cuphea - Cuphea llavea - $1.50 (there were a lot of these available a few days ago) - I've grown these before, but I think they died out from the severe winters of 2009 - 2010 or for other reasons.
5. Salvia greggii 'Heatwave Series' - $1.50 - I've not tried this cultivar of sage before, and not sure which color I got (the Heatwave Series ranges from white-pink-and a few reds). Some sage cultivars do great here and others croak within a few days or weeks. I've been told by a Facebook friend that hummingbirds love this one -- hope it makes it!

Jeremy

This message was edited Jul 8, 2012 12:45 PM

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MollyMc
Archer/Bronson, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 8, 2012
11:53 AM

Post #9197854

Jeremy,

The bat faced cupheas die out here from the heat, they never get to the cold of winter.

This year I have found what does well in the heat of summer. Planted them in the spring and they are still doing well: Gazanias, periwinkles, portulacca, sedum, in shade, oh and not to forget the dianthus. I thought they would all be dead by now, but happily, are not.

Spent several hours out today pulling weeds. We have had the rains too and the weeds certainly do thrive from it. It's one thing trying to take over the flowerbeds, but they get my ire up when they trip me on the pathways. Came away with hitch hikers stuck to my clothes and even my bare legs. Mosquitoes are very bad right now. But I try not to let them run me into the house until the sun beats me down.

On my way over to ds's house for steaks on the grill and a dip in their clean pool. Haven't seen my dgd's for 3 weeks as I was sick for a while. Doing better, still have a cough but not contagious. It will be a nice play day with the kids. Better move now, they are waiting for ice.

Molly
floridabunnie
Cape Coral, FL
(Zone 10a)

July 8, 2012
6:38 PM

Post #9198267

Hi Jeremy -

Wow, you really hit Lowes at the right time! I have been looking for red hot pokers around here - but no luck yet. Guess I'll check at Lowes, maybe they'll have some. I just purchased a plant there yesterday on their sale rack for $3. It was not labeled, but almost looks like mini sunflowers. I love finding deals like this!

wren107

wren107
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 8, 2012
7:25 PM

Post #9198326

Looks like I need to start a bounce of Red hot poker plants from seeds for next years RU. LOL

meadowyck

meadowyck
Brooksville, FL
(Zone 9a)

July 8, 2012
8:31 PM

Post #9198392

those red hot pokers are very easy to grow from seeds, floridabunnie, give it a try.

Jan
JaxFlaGardener
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 9, 2012
1:39 PM

Post #9199338

Sandy -- what is the trick to getting the Red Hot Pokers to survive? I can't seem to get them to last long. I know they like dry conditions, but even when I provide that, they are not happy.

Dern! It seems I've lost my trait that made me distasteful to mosquitoes. I haven't worried about mosquito bites for years (some people do have a natural chemical makeup that mosquitoes don't like, but my body repellent seemed to have built up over time). Last night about dusk, I was trying to pot up some Golden Cestrum pruned limbs for propagation and was surprised to find mosquitoes swarming in all around me and trying to devour me. The only thing that has changed is that I started taking fish oil and omega 3 supplements as part of a trial test program from Harvard Brigham & Women's College. Maybe the fish oil makes me edible again by mosquitoes?? If so, I may have to drop out of the study. It has been great for several years to be outside all day, any part of the day and never get a mosquito bite.

Jeremy
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 9, 2012
2:57 PM

Post #9199427

Come to my house...mosquitos, fire ants and chiggers. I am covered with bites. Even DEET does nothing.
floridabunnie
Cape Coral, FL
(Zone 10a)

July 9, 2012
4:45 PM

Post #9199527

Meadowyck - Thanks for the tip, I will try it. I've been trying my hand at seeds lately. Have had a little luck, but I'm not Johnny Appleseed yet. Looks like this will be my next test - LOL!

JaxFlaGardner/Lou C - I was the same way - almost immune. My husband was the one that ran around the yard swatting like a madman to get away from the bugs. However, this year, I have found that they are feasting on me. I've noticed that we have some mosquitoes that I don't remember seeing before though. The ones that have been biting on me are black with white markings. A lady that flies a plane for mosquito control goes to my gym and she said there are over 3500 different types of mosquitoes!! I had no idea.
Lovemygarden13
Milton, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 9, 2012
10:22 PM

Post #9199904

Hi I am new to this thread and fairly new to Dave's Garden. I live in Northwest Florida, Zone 8b, however a little too far inland for the warm seabreezes to reach. I have had great success with 'Lavender Ruffles' but have not been able to find it recently. My blueberry bushes, African iris, blue daze, Bulbine frutescens and bottlebrush do very well. I have never heard of the Red Hot Poker but have a couple firecracker plants which thrive. One of these I found on the Lowe's clearance rack!

I could use some advice on how to get Bromeliads to bloom and also wonder if anyone in this zone has had success with growing citrus. I have a meyer's lemon and Persian lime in pots. They have produced fruit despite the container being a bit small but recent drought followed by deluges have taken its toll on both plants. I consistently remove the orange dog catepillar, relocating them to somewhere else in the yard and have already seen a few Swallowtails this year. Look forward to any responses and hope to contribute in the future. Thank you! Kristal
Qwilter
Fleming Island, FL
(Zone 9a)

July 10, 2012
3:29 AM

Post #9199973

Welcome Krista!!!! I'm new to FL so can't provide much help but I'm sure those with experience will give you much great advice. They sure help me out.

As for bromilliads...some only bloom from the pups. Once the Mom blooms once, she will put out the Pups and Mom eventually dies off. It can take the pups awhile to mature enough to blooms. Others HAVE to be root bound. I have 2 HUGE ones the bloom almost constantly. Long bright pink blooms with some purple tips. They are so crammed into their pots I doubt there is any soil left in there. They do get a bit of afternoon shade. I hit them with the hose every couple days.

My Myer's Lemon would be full of fruit but the squirrels seem to LOVE the blossoms and I keep forgetting to put a cage around it.

meadowyck

meadowyck
Brooksville, FL
(Zone 9a)

July 10, 2012
5:38 AM

Post #9200042

welcome lovemygarden to DG.

Jan

wren107

wren107
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 10, 2012
9:34 AM

Post #9200342

Lovemygarden welcome

Jeremy , I have mine in pots, but someone a few blocks from here had them in the ground and they bloomed. It was a very hot, dry sunny spot.
I do water mine daily. But these I have not had long. Lost the others to too much water.

Sandy
sugarweed
Jacksonville & Okeec, FL
(Zone 9a)

July 10, 2012
1:19 PM

Post #9200582

Jeremy, when I worked 12 hr shifts often we would get off at dawn or dusk. The mosquitoes were terrible at that time. We could work outside all night or all day with no swarms. At dawn and dusk those buggers were terrible.
Someone suggested spraying a bandana with Off and the tying it around you head. Knock on wood, they aren't too fond of me.
I also noticed a fancy red mosquito this year.
I was told that love bugs were introduced to Fl to eat mosquito larvae. They don't like that larvae and are too bitter for any bird to eat. Who was the fellow that found out about the bitterness? LOL Not I.
Sidney

wren107

wren107
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 10, 2012
1:30 PM

Post #9200593

This year I am having problem with the tiny skeeters.
BonnieGardens
Clermont, FL
(Zone 9a)

July 10, 2012
2:54 PM

Post #9200667

We have 3 kinds of mosq. this year. Large black & white, tiny all black and some gray. They are really out this year. I ordered some oil of citronillla from drug store and rub that on and yes it stinks but it sure helps. I got it from a little country drug store -small bottle for $12. but its worth it to me. I rub it all over my gardening hat brim also.
Bonnie
sugarweed
Jacksonville & Okeec, FL
(Zone 9a)

July 11, 2012
5:52 AM

Post #9201335

Morning all just noticed we have a new FL DGer. http://davesgarden.com/members/disneydoc/
He too is from Clermont, FL. Do you know him/her Bonnie?
Love the screen name.
;)
flaflwrgrl
North Central , FL
(Zone 8b)

July 11, 2012
7:11 AM

Post #9201423

Lovemygarden13,
I'm in Lake City -- zone 8 & there are citrus trees all over the place here. I understand that they grow just fine but if we get a hard y ear for freezes at the wrong time then you may not get fruit that year yet the trees survive. Hope that helps answer your question.
I am THRILLED to hear you have bulbine & it does well. We moved up here a year ago from south Fl. zone 10 & I couldn't bring my bulbine with me. I didn't know if it would survive the winters here --- even checking diff. data bases it was hard to know as they differed. Now I won't be afraid to get some up here.
Lovemygarden13
Milton, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 11, 2012
6:08 PM

Post #9202085

Thanks and your welcome, flaflwrgrl! I had not seen bulbine in this area until a few years ago and then only at extension service plant shows. It is now sold in our local home improvement stores. I have been hesitant to plant my lemon and lime trees in the ground because usually once a year, we will have 20 temps for 2-3 days in a row. I move them in and out of the greenhouse. My plants seem to flower and produce fruit at all times of the year even though they are not perfectly healthy. Even now, I have new blooms and very young fruit all over both trees, so I will wait until January to transplant. My navel orange tree is in the ground now for 2 years but the small fruit fell off during heavy rains back in February. Look forward to talking more!
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 12, 2012
9:49 AM

Post #9202745

West Nile has been discovered in the mosquitos in our community. The city sprayed a couple of days ago and are going to spray again tonight. We are staying inside because they attack the minute you stick your head outside. I hate the spraying as it is not discriminate and will my butterflies as well.

meadowyck

meadowyck
Brooksville, FL
(Zone 9a)

July 12, 2012
11:00 AM

Post #9202818

sorry to hear the news LouC, that is my main objection to chemicals. Now if they would do research on making a chemical that only harms one thing and not all things around, I might, I said might consider them.

Jan
JaxFlaGardener
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 12, 2012
1:02 PM

Post #9202913

Thanks, all, for your comments on the mosquitoes. There does seem to be one type, possibly a newer one, that finds me delicious despite my several years of not worrying at all about mosquito bites. It looks like I will be forced to start using bodily bug spray to keep away the skeeters. I may start with the Avon "Skin So Soft" because it has the least objectionable smell (and may remove a few wrinkles while keeping away the skeeters). It is expensive though, so I may also try some DEET products.

Welcome, Lovemygarden! Glad you came in to join our chat. My Meyer's Lemon is in the ground (has been for about 8 years) and does great. Most citrus trees are hardy well below freezing (they are grown on freeze hardy root stock) -- it's the fruit that you need to worry about because freezing temperatures will generally ruin the fruit. There are some species of citrus though (like my Buddha Hand Citrus, Citrus medica var. sarcodactylus http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/54295/ that are not cold hardy)
Here's the UF pamphlet that provides details about citrus for north Florida: http://polkhort.ifas.ufl.edu/documents/publications/Citrus (cold hardy).pdf
This will help with what to do with your citrus trees the first few years in the ground if we have severe freezes: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs121

As mentioned above, most Bromeliads will often only bloom once from a single plant, then make pups around the edges of the mother plant and the pups will then bloom, and so on. A really dependable Bromeliad for north Florida is Queen's Tears - Billbergia nutans ( http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/2116/ ) (freeze hardy with a little protection, even if the protection is just overhanging vines that don't lose their leaves in winter, such as Cross Vine - Bignonia capreolata, or Carolina Jessamine - Gelsemium sempervirens -- both native vines). I've also had luck with the Painted Fingernail Bromeliad (Neoreglia spectabilis) http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/2116/ and even some of the more tropical types. Flowering can probably be increased by watering them about once a week with half strength "bloom booster" fertilizer (those with a high middle number for Phosphorus on the label, such as 10 - 54 - 10 or so -- MiracleGro and other companies make these). But you can also probably get more blooms with any balanced fertilizer (such as 10 - 10 - 10) applied half-strength about once per week. Flowering will also depend on whether the light and temperatures are right, but most Bromeliads will bloom without too much effort. For a special treat, trying growing pineapples! Just cut the leafy crown off and stick in sandy soil and forget it (except cover it with a blanket or something during really cold weather). It may take about 3 - 4 years to get a flower or fruit, but it is well worth the wait!

Jeremy

meadowyck

meadowyck
Brooksville, FL
(Zone 9a)

July 12, 2012
4:53 PM

Post #9203175

JaxFLaGardener, I know from first had experience the skin so soft will keep sand fleas out of your ears and off your face... my DH uses it for the mosquitoes and he has some success, at least it is better than putting straight poision on his skin...
BonnieGardens
Clermont, FL
(Zone 9a)

July 13, 2012
2:37 PM

Post #9204142

These 2 datura just opened up this morning.

Thumbnail by BonnieGardens
Click the image for an enlarged view.

JaxFlaGardener
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 13, 2012
2:51 PM

Post #9204158

Does anyone have the Ornamental Sweet Potato 'Tricolor' http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/54407/ Sugarweed gave me some at one time, but it seems to have died out in the severe winters. I will give it winter protection in the greenhouse if I can find some more of it. I will buy or trade for the Tricolor vine. It seems to be out of season/out of stock with all the online garden centers.

Any further word about Sylvain? I hope his health is improving.

Jeremy
mistressgardenr
Jacksonville, FL

July 14, 2012
4:12 AM

Post #9204663

Jeremy--I have the Tri-color sweet potato vine and it is growing nicely. You are welcome to some cuttings.

I have pretty well completed the Pergola but it is impossible to sit out there due to the mosquitoes! It is next to the woods and they are heavy out there in the back. I have been fertilizing, repotting plants and trimming plants this week but have to get out early before it gets too hot.

meadowyck

meadowyck
Brooksville, FL
(Zone 9a)

July 14, 2012
11:22 AM

Post #9205044

mistressgardenr is it possible to screen in your pergola? that way you could enjoy it more.

Jan

wren107

wren107
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 14, 2012
11:52 AM

Post #9205077

I went to Lukas nursery Wed. Get some nice butterfly and hummingbird plants. Plan of going back-need to look through the rest of the nursery. Rain kept me from spending more than I did

http://www.lukasnursery.com/service.php?service=3
youngershirl
Orange Park, FL
(Zone 9a)

July 14, 2012
6:13 PM

Post #9205379

Hey everyone, it has been a while since I have visited Dave's Garden. I see a few familiar names, and a lot of new ones. Good to see that Dave's is still going strong.

I have a question that I am hoping someone will be able to answer for me. I have this beautiful (at least it used to be ) Passion Vine that has some sort of bug(not sure if it is a bug) on it that is causing the leaves to become very mottled looking. I have noticed a lot of the vine is beginning to die. What I see is this large red colored (looks almost like time mites) on the end of leaves and then some sort of web, that has a few of these tiny red things in it. I know my description stinks, and I may have to post a photo, but I thought I would take a chance and see if anyone else has experienced something like this.

I would really appreciate your feed back. : )

wren107

wren107
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 14, 2012
6:25 PM

Post #9205385

Glad to hear from you. sorry that I can not help you on this.
mistressgardenr
Jacksonville, FL

July 15, 2012
5:20 AM

Post #9205652

Shirley--you might try some of the Sevin spray--It has helped me with spider mites and many other unwanted bugs. Good to hear from you and hope you and family are doing well.
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 15, 2012
7:41 AM

Post #9205775

Oh no, no, no spray. Passeflora is the host plant for Gulf Frittilary butterflies. The "bugs" are caterpillars of the butterfly. The vine will survive and you will have a yard filled with gorgeous orange butterflies.

wren107

wren107
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 15, 2012
7:58 AM

Post #9205792

LouC what she is descriping is not caterpillars but tiny mites and webbing. The Cats do not use webbing
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 15, 2012
8:16 AM

Post #9205810

http://www.dallasbutterflies.com/

This is a wonderful site for all things butterflies. mistress, you may id the caterpillars and then the butterfly it produces.

lourspolaire

lourspolaire
Delray Beach, FL
(Zone 10a)

July 15, 2012
9:54 AM

Post #9205896

Hello, everyone


I haven't been here for a whole month. My sincerest thanks to everyone who sent prayers, encouraging words, good vibes, etc. to Gail and I while I was in the hospital.

This is a copy of what I posted this morning on the Coconut Wireless thread way earlier today. I thought I might share this with you. Those who know me personally won't be one bit surprised.

I am writing this from my house. I returned yesterday (Saturday).

The hospital had discharged me as of Friday, 5PM. We had arranged for one of my neighbors to come pick me up at the hospital. When he arrived, he loaded my stuff into his pick-up truck. The nurse wheeled me to the truck. It's one of those trucks that you have to climb onto a high footboard before you can drop your behind on the seat. After a month sitting almost motionless on my back, I didn't have the physical strength to climb that step, so I had to abandon my project and return to my room.

By that time, they removed all bedding from my bed. First order of business was to feed me supper and find sheets. Now, one wouldn't think that finding clean sheets in a hospital would be a herculean task. It only took 3 hours to scrounge all over the hospital until a set of sheets could be obtained for the bed. Someone came in and started installing the fitted sheet. She was called away for 45 minutes. When she returned, she finished installing the fitted sheet. I got out of the wheelchair and into bed.

I spent a month in a deffective bed that was basically possessed by the forces of evil. It would raise me, lower me, change position, inflate the mattress, fully deflate the mattress, left me on my back on the bed's metal base when the mattress deflated, then it would over-inflate one side and not the other. Space Mountain and the best torture implements of the Holy Spanish Inquisition had nothing on that bed.

By the time I climbed into the bed with a fresh bottom sheet, it was past 11PM. I could finally undress. I was also tired beyond measure. I get cranky when I get that tired. There are a few things in life I try not to do, but when crankiness sets in... all manners go out the window. I don't like that. I fell asleep naked, resting on my left side. The attendant threw a sheet and a blanket over me and let me be. A nurse woke me around 1AM to give a pill. That didn't help my crankiness. The empty side of the bed had over-inflated, whereas the side I slept on had not inflated at all. It took all of the wee bit of strength I could muster to climb onto the inflated part of the bed to take my pill.

So, the pill was presented in one of those little paper cups. The nurse reached for my water pitcher. I told her:
- I have to tell you something. Grin and bear with me.
- I own a pet snake, a creature we dote over every day the Good Lord brings about.
- My snake gets a bowl of fresh water every day the Good Lord brings about.
- It's not as if Lucy can get out of her locked enclosure to go to the sink, fill her own bowl and return home.
- A good snake owner knows to do that for his pet.
- The water in that pitcher is now 3 days old.

She tried to object, but I raised my hand and I told her to talk to the hand because the brain wasn't willing to listen anymore. I continued with:

- It's not like I could get out of bed, walk over to the sink and refill it myself. I can't stand on my feet more than 10 seconds without fainting. It is abundantly documented in my file. I am not making this up.
- Yet, here I sat many times over the course of a month with a pitcher of 3-day old water.
- What's your excuse: are we in a drought? Is the water bad? Is it just a case of plain neglect? Say nothing, I don't want to hear it.
- Next time I go to the hospital, I want a nurse who owns a pet snake to care of me.
- Now, darling, wipe that disdainful look off your face and get me a clean pitcher filled with fresh water and ice. Resist the impulse to spit into it. And for the love of everything that is Holy, do find the means to secure some clean cups, too. Come on now, move along.

While I was saying this, the bed became possessed again. Of its own volution, it completely deflated on my side and started inflating again on the full width of the bed. It finally stopped at some random point, which turned out to be almost fine. I could live with that until a new round of possession inevitably manifested itself.

Early Saturday morning, a case worker came to see me and told me it would cost me $45 for a wheelchair transport van to take me home around noon. All that trouble when a few bills could have taken care of the whole thing? Transportation was arranged quickly. At noon, I was laying naked in bed. I had been waiting since 9AM for someone to come help me get dressed. The driver was none too pleased and I was getting crankier by the minute. He went and got someone to help me. So, there this attendant arrived to help me get dressed dressed without falling, while the driver waited in the door's frame. I told him: Please do the hall a favor and close the door whilst I hide my shame.

I finally got home (2 miles away) at the beginning of the afternoon. I am so glad to be here. It's far from being completely over, but at lease I am home and that's a big part of healing.

Stay healthy my friends... At one time, I told myself that there are worse things than dying on the operation table. Staying alive and suffering through these demeaning situations I endured for a month is worse than death. Death is swift and final. Hospital stays are akin to cruel and unusual punishment. I have cried a lot in the last 4 or 5 days. Funny, since I returned home, I haven't felt like crying. I must be getting better.

Take care, all.
Sylvain.

wren107

wren107
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 15, 2012
10:19 AM

Post #9205916

{{{{{{{{{{Sylvain}}}}}}}}}}

Sandy

meadowyck

meadowyck
Brooksville, FL
(Zone 9a)

July 15, 2012
12:35 PM

Post #9206079

Sylvain even though I don't know you to hear of what you had to endure, I'm so sorry for that for you. If hospitals and most of the folks that work in that to go through an entire week of being in them as a patient and the staff not know who they were, there would be changes asap!

Heres to you getting back to a more normal life. sending prayers of healing and rebuilding your spirit.

Jan
youngershirl
Orange Park, FL
(Zone 9a)

July 15, 2012
1:34 PM

Post #9206160

Thanks, but I like Wren don't think they are caterpillars. They are teeny tiny red looking mites. I guess I will just let them run their course. This vine is very prolific, so hopefully it will come back. Thank you again.
Linda, I am doing great and so is the family. Hope you are doing well too. Need to have a catch up one of these days, maybe when the weather cools we can have another meet up. I would like that. Take care and talk to you soon.

flaflwrgrl
North Central , FL
(Zone 8b)

July 15, 2012
4:00 PM

Post #9206304

Awwwww Sylvain! What an ordeal of the first order. Shame on that hospital, shame on the nurses, shame on them all for being so remiss! And shame on that damned bed! I would have cried too & most likely a whole lot more than you did. At least you are home now with your beloved Gail where you belong & let's not forget Lucy either. I'm delighted to know that miserable month is behind you & hopefully never to be repeated again.
Speedy healing Sylvain!
Good vibrations are still being sent your way.
Ann
JaxFlaGardener
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 16, 2012
1:42 PM

Post #9207567

Sylvain --- so glad to have our Poet Laureate and Regal Versificator back with us here, and still amongst the living. Having spent extensive time in hospitals in the past, I can certainly empathize with your situation. It is a horrible state to find one's self mostly helpless and dependent upon the kindness of strangers and the strangest of kindnesses. I, however, lack most of your polite veneer and have been known to fire doctors that wanted to treat me with disdain from my hospital team, and raise unholy Hell with nurses. There is always that feeling when you ring the call button for the nurse, doctor or attendant that you may be actually in some alternate universe where calls of distress or discomfort are somehow in a foreign language. I am very glad that the hospital portion of the ordeal is over for you. I'm sure you will progress more quickly toward health now that you are home with Gail and Lucy.

Linda -- I would very much love to have some of the Tricolor Ornamental Sweet Potato! If you are headed my way, let me know. I am still without any transportation other than the city bus. If you come by, I will load you up with whatever plants I have to share.

I lost my cell phone earlier today. It probably fell out of my pocket on a neighborhood shuttle bus. I will check with the driver later when he comes back around our way. I didn't have a cell phone for years after they became seemingly essential and didn't think I needed one, but now feel alone and out of contact without it. Boo Hoo!

Jeremy
starsplitter7
Tampa, FL
(Zone 9b)

July 16, 2012
5:28 PM

Post #9207845

Hello all,

I have been gone about a year and wanted to say hello again.

I have missed being here. :)

Tanja

wren107

wren107
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 16, 2012
5:29 PM

Post #9207849

Welcome back
starsplitter7
Tampa, FL
(Zone 9b)

July 16, 2012
5:42 PM

Post #9207887

Thank you. Glad to be back. :)
Lovemygarden13
Milton, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 16, 2012
7:27 PM

Post #9208047

Thanks, Jeremy and others for the info about bromeliads and citrus. Coincidentally, after I posted the message about my bromeliad not blooming, I walked out on the porch the next day and there it was!! I've attached a picture although I am not sure what type it is. This is the only type of bromeliad I have and I keep all of them in pots. I have enough now that I could try a few in the ground. I also attached a picture of my bulbine for FLFLWRGRL! I am still getting familiar with the site. Is there another place that I should be posting pictures, like in the Plant ID section? I know I will be going back to work in the next week or so and my participation time will bottom out. I have another grass that I really love to use for its drought and cold resistance but I have lost the name of it. It has small, little prickly-type "blooms" that shoot out from its center. Do you know it?

And, Sylvain, from what I've read in the last couple weeks I have joined this group, the chat alone is a huge testament to you! Hope you feel better soon. I know what it's like to spend many weeks in the hospital and return home, so like they say, "there's no place like home". Kristal

Thumbnail by Lovemygarden13   Thumbnail by Lovemygarden13   Thumbnail by Lovemygarden13
Click an image for an enlarged view.

Lovemygarden13
Milton, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 16, 2012
7:34 PM

Post #9208058

I think my bromeliad is a Guzmania. Good night!
flaflwrgrl
North Central , FL
(Zone 8b)

July 17, 2012
4:11 AM

Post #9208326

Oh Thank you for the bulbine photo. The bees surely love those flowers!

Could you describe the bloom on the other grass a little better? What color are they? Is it blooming now? Can you get a photo of the bloom?

You can post photos here or on the Fl. Gardening pictures of the day thread.
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1230499/


And if you want to ID something you can post it here OR on the Plant ID forum
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/f/plantid/all/

lourspolaire

lourspolaire
Delray Beach, FL
(Zone 10a)

July 17, 2012
8:45 AM

Post #9208701

Hi, all.

Amazing news, everyone: I can now stand on my 2 feet from a sitting position without by blood pressure dropping to dizzying (literally) lows. I can walk with the aid of a walker, which is hopefully temporary. Today's projects: open the front door and walk a bit under the carport to assess the state of my full shade garden. It has been watered on a regular basis by a dear friend of ours, but there are still some old friend plants that I want to visit in person.

I'll also take advantage of my being outside to get myself a few deep breaths of fresh air, which I haven't inhaled in over a month. Wish me luck.

Take care.
Sylvain.

wren107

wren107
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 17, 2012
8:53 AM

Post #9208704

{{{{{{{{{{Sylvain}}}}}}}}}}}

meadowyck

meadowyck
Brooksville, FL
(Zone 9a)

July 17, 2012
9:05 AM

Post #9208718

hurray Sylvain, thanks for giving us an update, will continue to pray that each day brings more success for a full recovery for you. Enjoy your old friend plants, they are a great comfort aren't they.

Jan
Qwilter
Fleming Island, FL
(Zone 9a)

July 17, 2012
9:52 AM

Post #9208770

Sylvain - being back home seems to be agreeing with you. Just don't over do it. Perhaps a chair out in your garden would be a good idea. A resting spot.
I'm sure the plants will be thrilled to see you up & about.
flaflwrgrl
North Central , FL
(Zone 8b)

July 17, 2012
2:12 PM

Post #9209169

Sounds like happy days are on their way for you Sylvain! I know you'll enjoy visiting your plants. Qwilter has a good suggestion with a chair in your garden.
Keep healing Sylvain!

wren107

wren107
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 17, 2012
3:54 PM

Post #9209309

This is really odd. Wed. we saw a Lubber grasshopper in my African Basil, no signs that the plant had been chewed on. It get away.
Today twice I have seen it in another group of African Basil, once again no sign of if eating on the basil. Wish I could catch it but. it moves a little to fast for me. But there is no signs that it is feeding on any of the plants around these basil plants.
floridabunnie
Cape Coral, FL
(Zone 10a)

July 17, 2012
6:43 PM

Post #9209495

Sylvain -

I think I've seen you post in threads now and again, but an a newly returned Daves' Gardener. I wish you well, I'm sure being home and with your plants will bring you great comfort. I know I am always itching to get home to see what my plants and flowers have in store for me. Sending warm wishes your way :)
amygirl
Miami, FL

July 18, 2012
3:06 AM

Post #9209752

Lovemygarden13 wrote:Thanks, Jeremy and others for the info about bromeliads and citrus. Coincidentally, after I posted the message about my bromeliad not blooming, I walked out on the porch the next day and there it was!! I've attached a picture although I am not sure what type it is. This is the only type of bromeliad I have and I keep all of them in pots. I have enough now that I could try a few in the ground. I also attached a picture of my bulbine for FLFLWRGRL! I am still getting familiar with the site. Is there another place that I should be posting pictures, like in the Plant ID section? I know I will be going back to work in the next week or so and my participation time will bottom out. I have another grass that I really love to use for its drought and cold resistance but I have lost the name of it. It has small, little prickly-type "blooms" that shoot out from its center. Do you know it?

And, Sylvain, from what I've read in the last couple weeks I have joined this group, the chat alone is a huge testament to you! Hope you feel better soon. I know what it's like to spend many weeks in the hospital and return home, so like they say, "there's no place like home". Kristal


Your grass looks like a Tripsacum...either Tripsacum floridanum (grows to ~ 2') or Tripsacum dactyloides (grow to ~ 5').
mistressgardenr
Jacksonville, FL

July 18, 2012
3:44 AM

Post #9209758

Sylvain--So glad you are home after your debacle {{{{Hugs}}} You will heal much quicker at home and be able to enjoy your plants and Lucy!!

Lou C--I have many plants that are hosts to butterflies including Passionvines and Pipevines. I do not normally spray any of my plants unless I see signs of mites or aphids and I do spray my brugmansia when the green worms start eating the leaves and turn them into lace! The spider mites can infect other surrounding plants so they need to be kept in check.

Jeremy--send me a d-mail and let me know the best way to contact you.
starsplitter7
Tampa, FL
(Zone 9b)

July 18, 2012
4:58 AM

Post #9209791

A quick question about posting. I have 3 ducks I need to place (loves of my life, but I may not be in my home long). I know this is a garden forum, but I was hoping someone would know how to help me place them. I posted them in livestock, but that is a national forum, and so I am not reaching Florida people. Do we have a Florida offtopic place where I could post about my flock? Thanks.

lourspolaire

lourspolaire
Delray Beach, FL
(Zone 10a)

July 18, 2012
7:09 AM

Post #9209961

Starsplitter, I can think of 2 forums: pets and livestock and poultry. I know, ducks are not poultry per se, but it's worth a try.

a link to livestock & poultry:
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/f/animals/all/

Good luck
Sylvain.
Qwilter
Fleming Island, FL
(Zone 9a)

July 18, 2012
9:06 AM

Post #9210109

Spent 5 hours over the last 2 days weeding the front flower bed. I have these nasty weeds - ferny looking, stem with tiny leaves - that have an immense root system. Had to take out huge clumps of dirt with a lot of them. Hopefully I got the roots. They make the Dollar Weed look tame. Filled 5 large trash bags with weeds. Did a quick clean up of the back yard.
Front of the house now looks presentable.

Still need to get the landscape fabric down in the new bed but that isn't happening today.

A Mallow Hibiscus with bright pink flowers followed me home from Hagan Ace yesterday!!!!

lourspolaire

lourspolaire
Delray Beach, FL
(Zone 10a)

July 18, 2012
11:54 AM

Post #9210292

Qwilter, plants don't just follow me home; they hang on to my car's rear bumper. But it doesn't happen often. Check all around your before starting tthe engine.

Sylvain.
JaxFlaGardener
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 18, 2012
12:41 PM

Post #9210330

Sylvain! So wonderful to know you are moving around! Hope your recovery and wellness continue to speed along.

Linda - I sent you a D-mail with contact info.

A couple of Facebook friends want to come by my place for a garden tour. I will post here what day/time that turns out to be. We can have a mini-impromptu-Round Up/Plant Swap if anyone is interested in coming by.

Lovemygarden -- My first impression was that your Bromeliad was likely an Aechmea genus, "Living Vase," type, but it could also be a Guzmania. We probably won't know for sure until the flower completely opens. Very nice that it flowered for you! Your Bulbine is amazing! I can only get them to grow about 1 ft high, but it is probably due to them being knocked back by winter freezes.

Aechmea search in DG Plant Files: http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/adv_search.php?searcher[common]=&searcher[family]=&searcher[genus]=Aechmea&searcher[species]=&searcher[cultivar]=&searcher[hybridizer]=&searcher[grex]=&search_prefs[blank_cultivar]=&search_prefs[sort_by]=rating&images_prefs=both&Search=Search

Tanja/Starsplitter - about your ducks, you might try the local Craig's List for Tampa: http://www.tampa.craigslist.org/ There are two categories there where you might list the ducks - Under "For Sale" - farm+garden (even if you want to give the ducks away, you can offer them in an ad for free), or under "Community" - pets You will probably need to specify whether you are putting the ducks up for adoption, or (as a former duck owner myself, Heaven's no!) if you don't mind the ducks ending up as someone's meal. You can include photos in a Craig's List ad. If you have any trouble making the ad, let me know. I've done CL ads before for various items.

Sandy -- Lubber grasshoppers only eat poisonous plants once the grasshoppers reach maturity (most of the Lubbers are mature and currently breeding). In my garden, they tend to eat Crinum lily leaves and will eat an Amaryllis plant leaves and then chew up the bulb down to soil level. They also sometimes eat Split-Leaf Philodendron, but they prefer the Crinum & Amaryllis. The Lubbers are toxic to all potential predators (birds, reptiles, etc.) as a result of eating poisonous plants. So, they probably aren't interested in eating your Basil, but may be climbing on it to get in a good location to lure a mate, or they also seem to climb plants to avoid being on the soil during rain storms or irrigation.

Here's a few photos of what is happening currently in my garden:
1. One of my favorite weeds/wildflowers - Cupid's Shaving Brush, Emilia fossbergii http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/2736/ I have had the urge to do some selective breeding to try to make the red tassel flowers larger, but then I found out there is a species, E. javanica, that already has larger flowers. Sandy - did you get any of your E. javanica to grow? You gave me some seeds, but I couldn't get them to grow to flowering stage.
2. Night Scented Jasmine - Cestrum nocturnum http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/2128/ . Sometimes referred to as "Night Blooming Jasmine," but that is a bit incorrect because it flowers both day and night, but only releases the aroma a few hours after sunset or later. I take the dogs for a late night stroll around the garden and encounter the aroma -- heavenly! (though some people, like my wife, Christina, find it too strong perfumey). It is not a true Jasmine (not in the Jasminum genus) but is one of the many plants with the common name of "jasmine." It is not entirely winter hardy in my area, but has survived for several years, even during the sustained 20s F winter temperatures a few years ago, by being in a somewhat protected area.
3. Small Orange Morning Glory - Ipomoea coccinea http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/51759/ The best hummingbird attractor I have in my garden. The vines can be a bit overwhelming because they self-seed freely and can be invasive, but worth it to help bring the hummers, I think.
4. Orange Bottlebrush Ginger - Hedychium coccineum http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/1967/ It doesn't seem to have the wonderful aroma of the more familiar White Butterfly Ginger (Hedychium coronarium http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/1297/ ) but interesting to grow.
5. Peregrina - Jatropha integerrima http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/2447/ Also not winter hardy, but will survive with some freeze protection.

Jeremy

Thumbnail by JaxFlaGardener   Thumbnail by JaxFlaGardener   Thumbnail by JaxFlaGardener   Thumbnail by JaxFlaGardener   Thumbnail by JaxFlaGardener
Click an image for an enlarged view.

wren107

wren107
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 18, 2012
12:59 PM

Post #9210348

Jeremy yes I did but I did not save any seeds.

Sandy
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 18, 2012
1:40 PM

Post #9210384

So happy to see you back to your old self, Sylvain.

PK
JaxFlaGardener
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 18, 2012
3:52 PM

Post #9210509

Sandy - how big did the Tassel Flowers (E. javanica) turn out to be? It's hard to tell the size from photos in Plant Files.

Jeremy

wren107

wren107
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 18, 2012
3:54 PM

Post #9210520

Tiny but I did not ready get it planted out in the garden
I may order some more of the seeds.
Qwilter
Fleming Island, FL
(Zone 9a)

July 18, 2012
6:22 PM

Post #9210711

I had 1" of rain this afternoon. My cousin, 4 mi up the rd, had over 5" in 2 hours. Roads in her neighborhood were all flooded.
floridabunnie
Cape Coral, FL
(Zone 10a)

July 18, 2012
6:50 PM

Post #9210745

JaxFlaGardener -

I too love the Night Scented Jasmine. It is one of my favorite plants in the yard (actually, I have a small obsession with jasmine). We have a large oval in our backyard around a large palm tree that is full of various types. I have two of the Night plants, but have a terrible time keeping the lubbers from chewing them to stubs. I have had some luck with Neem this year, so I'm keeping my fingers crossed. Our jasmine seem to scent the neighborhood, we've had neighbors come over and ask what the perfume was in our yard :)

Also, your little orange morning glory is adorable! Did you grow this from seed?
Lovemygarden13
Milton, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 18, 2012
7:40 PM

Post #9210811

Here is another pic of my bromeliad bloom but I don't think it is fully open yet. Thank you for all the great info!

Thumbnail by Lovemygarden13
Click the image for an enlarged view.

starsplitter7
Tampa, FL
(Zone 9b)

July 18, 2012
7:54 PM

Post #9210819

Jeremy, Oh goodness no. These are not dinner ducks. Plus they are muscovies, super gamey and not tasty. I love these guys and do not want to give them up, but if I have to move, I will have to. I want to list in Florida, because under livestock lovely people are replying with words of encouragement from Texas and other far reaching places. I need to place them with someone in Florida, Georgia or Alabama.

I would be afraid to list in Craig's list, because people troll websites like that for dinner for their pets. I couldn't bare the thought of these guys eaten by a python or dog.

meadowyck

meadowyck
Brooksville, FL
(Zone 9a)

July 18, 2012
8:49 PM

Post #9210859

Starsplitter7

I wish I was in a place that I could take them, I use to many moons it seem like now had ducks.

I would suggest you post on all florida forums, who cares if it is off topic, Start a new thread in the FL forum about your ducks, I'm sure someone will know someone who knows someone that might be able to help.

If not let me know as I know a lady that does rescue for wildlife (I know yours are pets) but she might be able to take them to then place them, or know of someone who does.

Jan

wren107

wren107
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 19, 2012
4:24 AM

Post #9211000

Try the pet forum. We have a number of members on there form Florida
starsplitter7
Tampa, FL
(Zone 9b)

July 19, 2012
6:41 AM

Post #9211170

Hello there,

I will try the pet forum. Thanks! :)

And Jan, could you let me know if your local rehabber has a website? Mine went on vacation, and I like having a number and address in case I find an animal in need. My rehabber has taken dozens of injured wildlife from me over the years. (I even rescued a baby otter in my neighborhood after her mom and sibling were hit and killed by a car outside my neighborhood. She now lives at the Florida Aquarium. She was too young and could not be returned to the wild.) Unfortunately, I think most rehabbers are not allowed to take "livestock" and it is rediculous because these are wild born muscovies, but I understand -- their ancestors were probably livestock. I think technically, people would rather the eggs destroyed because the muscovies are such an impact on Florida wildlife. I just can't do that (they were chirping in the shell), so I have been responsible and kept the ducks out of the wild. Could you ask your rehabber if she knows anyone who places muscovies?

Thank you. Tanja

lourspolaire

lourspolaire
Delray Beach, FL
(Zone 10a)

July 19, 2012
8:08 AM

Post #9211291

This is going to sound heartless.

Insert Serenity prayer here.

Your ducks are Muscovy (Cairina moschata). That changes everything. They are edible, but definitely not to everyone's taste. That's not something you would use to prepare canard ŕ l'orange. There are not enough oranges and Cointreau in Florida for me to attempt it with that species.

Before you burn me at the stake as a heretic, please consider this:
The chinese peasants of old kept ducks rather than chickens because ducks are self-sufficient, whereas chicken require daily attention and don't really fend for themselves. So, ducks are autonomous.

The peasants also realized that the meat to bone ratio is higher in a duck than a chicken, whereas the investment in feeding them is just about inexistant.

Some people will interject: But chicken lay eggs! So do ducks, me hearties.

Others will ask: what came first, the chicken or the egg? Trick question. Dinosaurs were laying eggs millions of years before the modern chicken appeared.

An easier and correct solution would be to leave them behind when you leave. It's not like abandoning a dog, or a cat, or a caged song bird, or an aquarium full of fish, or a prized pet snake. Basically, these ducks don't need you. Left to their own devices, those ducks will fend for themselves, become feral, and most likely have long, happy and prosperous lives by muscovy duck standards.

Sylvain.
starsplitter7
Tampa, FL
(Zone 9b)

July 19, 2012
9:11 AM

Post #9211363

Twister can not live on her own. She is crippled. I hatched these ducks from eggs, worry over them, researched their diets, turn over a compost heap so they can find worms -- I have dedicated my last year to their care.

It is illegal according to Florida law to release these ducks into the wild no matter how many are already wild.

Eating these ducks appeals to me as much as eating a kitten or puppy. They are my pets; not to be eaten or turned loose.

I need a loving home for them.
Qwilter
Fleming Island, FL
(Zone 9a)

July 19, 2012
9:18 AM

Post #9211368

Is there a local 4-H you could contact?
starsplitter7
Tampa, FL
(Zone 9b)

July 19, 2012
10:55 AM

Post #9211440

Thank you. I will look into 4 H. :)
JaxFlaGardener
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 19, 2012
12:33 PM

Post #9211562

Sylvain - one correction to your polite rant (glad to see you back in true form and that your wit was not surgically removed): In the view of contemporary Paleontology (how's that for an oxymoron!), all birds, including chickens, evolved from dinosaurs. So, I am of the belief that the unanswerable Zen question of which predated the other -- chicken or egg -- must remain a mystery.

I know how you feel about your ducks, Starsplitter. Even though I had Pekin ducks, which would have made a tasty dinner, I could not have even considered eating them (at any time short of the famine to follow the apocalypse, still on schedule for 12/21/12, if the Mayans were correct). Christina and I were invited for Christmas dinner at a good friend's house one year and I was a bit alarmed to find the main course was a wonderfully prepared, crispy Pekin duck. But my "Miss Manners" alternate personality kicked in and allowed me to amiably eat the offering without sobbing for a lost cousin of my duck pets at the Christmas table.

And Sylvain, I've heard that bar-b-cued python can be scrumptious. Would you consider eating Lucy?? LOL And since you can't turn her loose into the wild, it would seem you and Tania share the same ark with your somewhat exotic pets.

We had a fairly heavy rain a few hours ago, while I was outside trying to wrestle a wisteria root out of its entanglement on ginger rhizomes. There has been a fairly steady sprinkling drizzle of rain the rest of the day. I usually consider this the perfect weather to be outside, doing transplanting and planting, but somehow the downpour of rain didn't cool things off much -- it was still hot and muggy humid. So, I got the bus and headed downtown to hole up on the library computers for a while. President Obama is in town, but fortunately at a more remote location so that my travel plans were not interrupted.

Jeremy
BonnieGardens
Clermont, FL
(Zone 9a)

July 19, 2012
4:10 PM

Post #9211756

Tanja,
We like ducks and used to have 4 beautiful mallards. DH built a large wire pen with a bathtub sunk in the ground for their swimming pleasure while they were babies. When they grew up I let them out every morning to fly to our canal where they spent their days and would fly back up to our house at 4PM on the dot for their supper. They disappeared over the years one by one and now we are told we would have to have a permit from Game & Fish to have any again. They can go pound sand. I have a lab so she would torment and chase ducks I'm sure so we can't take them otherwise I would. BTW we don't eat ducks. We raised chickens for table use and their eggs.
Have you thought of a petting zoo. Often they have ducks. A child that lives in the country would really love them I'm sure. My kids always wanted to keep any and everything that came in sight.
I hope you find a good home for them.
Bonnie
cyberageous
Everglades, FL
(Zone 10a)

July 20, 2012
6:37 AM

Post #9212228

My hubby found a 15' long frangipani branch in a trash pile and is bringing it home tonite! For joy, for joy! and a big yipppeeee!
Uh-oh - I'll need more pots!
cyberageous
Everglades, FL
(Zone 10a)

July 20, 2012
6:46 AM

Post #9212235

Jeremy, is the Passiflora incarnata the passionfruit that is edible? I have one and love it. I read online somewhere that it can't be rooted that you must propagate by see half my cutting rooted. Now I have umteen seed trays too of sprouting passionfruit seeds. I am tickled.
Oh- the reason I am asking about edibility is that a lady working at a garden store told me there are some varieties that aren't.
I can't roll those big names off my tongue like you guys can . I have a memory disorder and it can be embarrassing. At least my plants don't make fun of me.
I lended out my FL gardening book and forgot to whom- good thing for the internet! I loved my book tho.
We are moving to central FL when and if we sell this property and that book was terrific for what to grow where.

wren107

wren107
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 20, 2012
7:12 AM

Post #9212261

cyberageous Passiflora incarnata is the Passion vine from Hell!!!! It can and will try to take over your yard and neighbor's yard . It sends out runners underground. The only true way to keep it some what under control is get lots of hungry caterpillars!!!

Oh I also have that disorder, can not remember crap

lourspolaire

lourspolaire
Delray Beach, FL
(Zone 10a)

July 20, 2012
10:32 AM

Post #9212471

Hi, everyone.

Jeremy, how pleasant it is to read yu, as always.

I have eaten snake many times before. During Montreal's 1967 world fair (Man and his world), I had discovered the Mexican pavillion's restaurant. It consisted of a terrace with Mexican music, overlooking a lake and the entrance to the St.Lawrence seaway. Food there was always good, specially for an adventurous foodie such as myself. I was 12 years old in those days. I spent my summer at Man and His World. They served snake, iguana and that's where I tried chicken molé, pico de gallo, guacamole, refried beans, tacos, burritos and so many other foreign dishes we had never heard of before.

Montreal, in those days, had a mostly French cuisine tradition. That's where I learned to try anything from all over the world. I could brown-bag my lunch, or take a bit of money for lunch and go eat Mexican, Belgian, Tunisian, Thai, etc. The Belgian pavillion also served absolutely decadent caramel-encrusted waffles, where the homemade caramel bits are cooked right into the batter and slathered with melted butter. Ahhhh... good times.

As far as barbecuing Lucy is concerned, I believe I could dispatch, cook and eat Lucy, but we are talking about dire straits here, circumstances that would make the Appocalypse look like a walk in the park, life or death situations here. I pray we never see those days. I tell myself that if the Doner party finally resorted to eating their dead, anything is possible if pushed hard enough. Also, that means that I would have to pry Lucy from Gail's cold dead fingers; providing I made it that far. Gail is a force to be reckoned with. You have been warned; I kid you not. The woman utters no idle threats.

As far as finding Lucy a new home is concerned, the owner of a reptile pet shop around here has made 2 offers to buy Lucy. It turns out Lucy exhibits very desirable traits that would be prized by breeders. But Lucy is a pet in every sense of the word. She wouldn't be happy in a snake mill. Perish the thought.

Take care, all.
Sylvain.
floridabunnie
Cape Coral, FL
(Zone 10a)

July 20, 2012
3:45 PM

Post #9212703

Hi Wren - You have me scared - I replaced my Lady Margaret (that my fur kid dug up - ugh) with an incarnata. . . I guess I will have to keep my eye on it!

Sylvan - you are making me hungry! The carmel-encrusted waffles sound wonderful!

wren107

wren107
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 20, 2012
4:17 PM

Post #9212731

The incarnata is the favorite passion vine of both the Gulf Fritillary and the Zebra Longwing butterflies
floridabunnie
Cape Coral, FL
(Zone 10a)

July 20, 2012
4:51 PM

Post #9212759

Thanks wren, this makes me feel better - maybe they will come a munchin and keep in it line for me:)

wren107

wren107
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 20, 2012
5:53 PM

Post #9212821

Gulf Fritillary will, they managed to kill a couple of mine. I am planting a lot of them so I will have more plants than caterpillars. I hope
floridabunnie
Cape Coral, FL
(Zone 10a)

July 20, 2012
6:35 PM

Post #9212859

I have two pipevines and now the passion vine. I have two other seedlings and have started a couple of others from seed, so if they all make it maybe I'll have a butterfly army (I could only hope).
starsplitter7
Tampa, FL
(Zone 9b)

July 20, 2012
7:21 PM

Post #9212908

I grow my passion vine for the butterflies. I think Passion vine is beautiful, but I love the butterflies more. :)

wren107

wren107
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 20, 2012
7:56 PM

Post #9212941

I am slowly turning my yard into a wildlife habitat, in fact it is already certified as such.
I have 3 kinds of pipevines, have seen the Gold Rim butterfly here, hoping to get the Pipevine Swallowtail here soon.
Just get 2 of the Purple Giant Milkweed to go along with my other milkweeds for the Monarchs.
Found that the native bees have started using my Native bee houses with the reed straws in it.
Saw 2 Giant Swallowtails flying around the yard this morning.
A yellow Butterfly one of the Sulfer butterflies has been laying eggs on my Cassias
Saw a pair of Monarchs mating today.
Also saw some skippers, what I believe was a American Painted Lady and a couple of tiny blue butterflys
floridabunnie
Cape Coral, FL
(Zone 10a)

July 20, 2012
8:21 PM

Post #9212950

Wren - how exciting! How long has your yard been certified? It sounds very interesting. I just found the NWF website and videos on YouTube that were very informative. I only have to provide water and shelter and I will be able to apply. Wait until my hubby hears what I have in store now - LOL. We are the most planted house in our neighborhood and always have tons of frogs, butterflies, birds and lizards (even snakes). We have two big Mahogany trees and I noticed that we've had nests the last two years. I even have a fairly large pencil tree succulent (i honestly did not think this thing would live in the yard and now it is huge, I've had to cut it back twice already) and there was a nest made in that :)

Where did you get your native bee houses? I've seen the bee skeps, but the ones I saw looked like they were mostly for show and not use.

Debijaynes

Debijaynes
Marco Island, FL
(Zone 10b)

July 21, 2012
3:39 AM

Post #9213074

I would love to know about the native bee houses as well! Don't know if we are too far south for that or not. Have thought about the yard certification as we have quite a few critters as well including gopher tortoises that tour thru, but not sure if the fur children would negate the certification! We have several un-built lots around us and a neighbor even saw a bob-cat early one morning walking down our drive.
Debi

wren107

wren107
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 21, 2012
3:41 AM

Post #9213076

I have only had the yard certified for a couple of months. I get the native bee houses and the reed(they like the nature reeds best) from here
http://www.crownbees.com/crown-bees-store-supplies/. The native bees do not use a bee skeps they lay their eggs in holes. The shelve kind in which you put the reeds are the kind I have. We have a number of native bees here in Florida. I have 2 kinds of Carpenter bees, and a few kinds of the smaller native bees. I just placed smaller reeds in one of the houses for the very tiny bees. But I some of my larger reeds are full already. I need to plant more pollen producing plants next year. Sunflowers are a favorite flower of the native's
We are working on the front yard right now. This winter we will start working on the rest of the yard. Still have not decided on what to do with our tiny back yard.

wren107

wren107
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 21, 2012
3:52 AM

Post #9213079

Debi cross posted with you. I have a large dog and there are a number of cats in the area, plus there is no question asked about pets.

Here is where you go to certif(?) you yard
http://www.nwf.org/Get-Outside/Outdoor-Activities/Garden-for-Wildlife/Certify-Your-Wildlife-Garden.aspx
mistressgardenr
Jacksonville, FL

July 21, 2012
6:06 AM

Post #9213163

Sandy~The Passie Incense I know takes over the world but never had heard of the Incarnata being invasive. I don't have that one--just the Lady Margaret and Incense right now and one that has not flowered yet that I had last year and lost tag.
Had a disaster here yesterday! My neighbor came over to visit and was admiring the gazing ball I had painted and made into a gazing ball. It was sitting in a stand on top of my smoke glass top patio table and he decided to pick it up! Well, it slipped, shattered the glass top, 2 large owl statues, a ceramic ashtray I had made 35 yrs ago and a large donkey flower pot with a good size Jade plant ~~needless to say I had a mess to clean up. Filled 2 large trash cans and I think I got all the shards up but will have to be careful and NOT go barefoot out there. He felt terrible about it but I just brushed it off tho I am broken hearted at the loss of items I cannot replace. Will get another piece of glass but can't afford the thick smoke glass that was on the table so will just get something to suffice for now. The Gazing ball will have to be repainted and will be in the garden somewhere ON THE GROUND!!!

wren107

wren107
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 21, 2012
6:37 AM

Post #9213195

Ok my bad, get the names mixed up-it has been that kind of a week. But I do have a couple of other passion vines here that are trying to take over.
I really need to get that red one dug up and out of here!!

sorry about the lose

lourspolaire

lourspolaire
Delray Beach, FL
(Zone 10a)

July 21, 2012
8:09 AM

Post #9213274

Hi, everyone.

When I left for the hospital, 5 weeks ago, the passionflower trellis was covered with beautiful passion vines and more blooms than you could shake a stick at. I don't really get the meaning of that expression. What benefit is there in shaking a stick at something? But I digress.

That was 5 weeks ago: an eternity of uninterrupted peace for those pesky caterpillars who devoured my vines like candy. Upon my return, the trellis was a picture of desolation. The trellis is now bare again, with only the stems showing. I have now come to consider passionflowers as seasonal. The vines will recover; they always do. I used have a red one in Lauderhill (coccinea?) that the caterpillars left alone. I haven't been able to find another one since we moved here. It grew very quickly and bloomed and bloomed. I'll keep my eyes open.

I almost bought a Lady Margaret the other day, but the $145 price tag stopped me. That's too much money to feed to the caterpillars.

Take care,all.
Sylvain.
cyberageous
Everglades, FL
(Zone 10a)

July 21, 2012
8:58 AM

Post #9213320

Hey Sandy! I love my passion fruit and next season hope to develop to recipes to use for the nectar. I trim mine often. So far, so good! Actually it needs a good trim now. It's so prolific and I live in such a harsh area, it is one of my favorite plants! Now I need to concentrate on hot peppers!
I had to make a pepper list of what i have because my memory is so bad!
Do you have any good "tricks" for remembering things?

wren107

wren107
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 21, 2012
9:23 AM

Post #9213343

Sylvian remind me when it cools down and I will dig up one of the red passion vines and send it to you

Debijaynes

Debijaynes
Marco Island, FL
(Zone 10b)

July 21, 2012
10:50 AM

Post #9213404

Write down EVERYTHING!!!! It helps me tremendously!
floridabunnie
Cape Coral, FL
(Zone 10a)

July 21, 2012
11:53 AM

Post #9213438

Hi Wren -

thanks so much for all of the information on the mason bees and wildlife habitat cert. Once I get my succulent garden finished, this is my next project. I even spoke with my garden center guy about it this morning. He was excited and offered to help me with all of the native plants and information. I am looking forward to this and have even forwarded the information to my parents who own several acres in Indiana.

Mistress - I am sorry for your terrible accident. We have one of the very same tables with the smoked glass and I always cringe when someone bangs something on the top - if we ever lost the glass the table would be gone. It would cost as much to replace the glass as it would to buy a new set.

Sylvan - $145 for a lady margaret? That is criminal!!
JaxFlaGardener
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 21, 2012
11:55 AM

Post #9213439

There is also a certification available from your local Extension Office/Florida Yards & Neighborhoods program. You can have your yard/garden certified as "Florida Friendly" by practicing the gardening methods suggested (i.e., use native plants when possible, reduce chemical fertilizer and pesticide usage, reduce irrigation water usage, etc.). http://fyn.ifas.ufl.edu/homeowners/recognitions.htm That certification would come in handy if you get cited by your local government or homeowner's association for "nuisance weeds." I think I'm up to about my 4th citation in ten years for "untended growth of weeds" by the city nuisance abatement office. I now just send them a short note stating that I practice Florida Friendly gardening and am thus exempt from enforcement pursuant to FS/SB 2080 http://archive.flsenate.gov/data/session/2009/Senate/bills/billtext/pdf/s2080er.pdf enacted while Gov. Crist was in office, which basically says "hands off" to local governments and HOAs in trying to enforce weed abatement rules for any gardener that practices "Florida Friendly" gardening. Nothing I like better than thumbing my nose at local beauracrats (even though I once was one of them with ten years in the air pollution control office).

I think the passionvine that is most often used for edible fruit is Passiflora edulis http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/1193/ (the "edulis" species name translates as "edible"). There is an empty field near me by a Winn-Dixie grocery store that has P. incarnata (from the best I can determine) running somewhat rampant. I've tried eating the fruit from the vines there and they have very little edible pulp/seeds. My Mom had a passionvine when I was a kid that produced very nice passionfruit. You have to wait until the fruit is beginning to yellow, otherwise the taste is sourer than the sourest persimmon.

Saw my first hummingbird of the year this morning in my garden! It's always a treat to know they find my yard each year.

Jeremy

wren107

wren107
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 21, 2012
2:55 PM

Post #9213614

Time for a new Thread http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1272010/

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