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Brown marks on EGGPLANTS ?

Irving, TX(Zone 8a)

This year my eggplants have those strange brown marks on their skin.
Their taste is great and there is no brown area inside the eggplants. Production is also good.
They just don't look as pretty.
Off course they are attacked by Flee Beetles, like every year. In fact I think those marks are caused by the Flee Beetles.

I'd like to hear if anybody has experienced those spots on their eggplants before.

Thumbnail by drthor Thumbnail by drthor
Central, TX(Zone 8b)

Wonder if thrips could've caused this - they've been bad this year.

Irving, TX(Zone 8a)

http://www.infonet-biovision.org/default/ct/116/crops#_1794_724
I actually did some researches after your suggestion Garden_Sass and it looks like they are thrips.
Huum do you have any idea on what to do?
The website I found says I can use Neem Oil, but I never use anything on my veggies.

Deep South Coastal, TX(Zone 10a)

Spinosad works well on thrips, especially if you add a little Murphy's Oil Soap to the mix.

Johnson City, TN(Zone 6b)

drthor, my eggplant leaves looked like lace and the eggplant had the same brown spots. I used the neem oil this weekend and added a teaspoon of Murphy's Soap to the mixture. I can't believe the difference already in the plants. The neem oil says you can use right up to the day you harvest your veggies. Thanks....

Irving, TX(Zone 8a)

PhyllisJ
thanks for your suggestion.
How did you apply this mixture?

Johnson City, TN(Zone 6b)

drthor

I diluted as directed on the bottle with water and added the Murphy's soap. I put it in a gallon pressurized bottle and sprayed the plant throughly, top and bottom of the leaves. I believe it called for 2 TBS per gallon of water but not sure now without looking. The plants are so improved I wish I had taken a before and after photo. This was my first time using neem oil.

Irving, TX(Zone 8a)

Thanks,
I will follow your suggestion

Johnson City, TN(Zone 6b)

drthor

I hope you see as much improvement as I have.

Fort Worth, TX(Zone 8a)

Treating the soil with beneficial nematodes helps curb thrips and several other soil-borne pests.

Deep South Coastal, TX(Zone 10a)

Stephanie, did you really notice a decline in thrips populations after treating with BN? I found no benefits whatsoever from BN and I tried them several times. I was also afraid they would kill my ground dwelling beneficials like tiger beetles.

Irving, TX(Zone 8a)

I did treat my soil a while ago with beneficial nematodes ... but no changes

I have been spraying the leaves with one drop of Neem Oil and one of Murphy's soap ... I have noticed less flee beetles ...
I think it is too early to see if it is working. Now the plants are kind of dormant for this heat !!

Also I just don't like to spray anything on my veggies ... I am always hunted by the pictures below !

Thumbnail by drthor Thumbnail by drthor
Fort Worth, TX(Zone 8a)

Calla, I did! They love to hang out on my columbines and I noticed a drastic decrease a year after we treated our yard 4 times the previous year.

Liberty Hill, TX(Zone 8a)

Thrips fly in so treating the soil with BN may help but they could fly in from some place else. They also spread diseases like the TSWV. They love roses too.

I really think treating with BNs depends on how big of an area we are talking about. I have 26 acres, where do I stop/start? I can tell when trips have hit a tomato plant because the leaves turn a bronze color and they can distort the blossoms along with carrying diseases.

Deep South Coastal, TX(Zone 10a)

Spinosad works well on thrips. I too am like Lisa, too many acres to treat. Every time I had to treat, it was $30 for the "farm" size packet of BNs. Soil had to be moist when applied, then watered in well.

Irving, TX(Zone 8a)

Flee beetles are still there ... grrrrr###@@@%%^&&*

Johnson City, TN(Zone 6b)

drthor
Sorry the neem oil isnt working for you. Maybe it just needs more time. I will check mine tomorrow and see what is happening.

Irving, TX(Zone 8a)

I think it is just too hot right now ! again !
Weather man said that this year was not going to be like last year !

Right now Okras and Long Beans are producing like crazy ... everything else is taking a "siesta"

Irving, TX(Zone 8a)

The eggplants I harvested today seem a little better.
Still lots of flee beetles in the plant, but maybe the thrips are gone

Thumbnail by drthor Thumbnail by drthor
Johnson City, TN(Zone 6b)

My eggplant looks so much better than the first ones I harvested a few weeks ago. I have become a big fan of the neem oil. The photo was taken with my cell phone so you might see some reflection light spots on them . This is what I got off of one plant this morning. Small but nice.

Nice beans dr. I am on my 3rd picking on my beans. The rain has really brought them on. I canned 19 quarts last weekend and gave away several messes to neighbors and family. I picked a half bushel today then the rain came and had to stop. Pretty good for 2 short rows. I have never seen vines grow like this year. They were late coming on and I was worried I was just going to have all vines.

Thumbnail by PhyllisJ
Irving, TX(Zone 8a)

WOW those are perfect Eggplants!
My Eggplants also did look like yours the first year I planted them ...

My plan for next year is to completely move them to the opposite side of the veggie garden.

I also think that the last 2 years our summers have been so crazy hot and the eggplants are suffering the most. I truly don't remember last time that it rained !

Anyway .. gorgeous Eggplants !

Thumbnail by drthor
Johnson City, TN(Zone 6b)

Thanks for the kind words drthor. I believe treating mine and all this rain is the reason. The plants are loaded. I hope my neighbors like eggplant. Maybe I could try freezing some casseroles.

It is raining here everyday! Too much for my tomatoes. They are looking awful. We had no rain for 3 months and now we can't have a day without it. Wish I could send it your way.

Wow, your eggplants are great looking. It is amazing how we don't know from one year to the next how our crops are going to do. The weather plays such an important role. I really feel for the farmers this year. By the time we did get rain, it was too late for many crops.

Irving, TX(Zone 8a)

The weather will get cool tonight and my eggplants are finally starting to produce again.
Just a few brown marks on them.
I really think they just don't like the hot summer with NO RAIN !

Thumbnail by drthor Thumbnail by drthor Thumbnail by drthor Thumbnail by drthor
Carrollton, TX(Zone 8a)

I have not harvested a single eggplant this summer but just like last year at this time, now the temperatures are down a little, the spider mites have disappeared, and we are getting some rain, my eggplants are covered with eggplants. And my spring tomatoes and peppers have put on new leaves and lots of blooms. This confuses me as I'm about ready to plant my Cole crops but I hesitate to take out producing plants to make room for them. I guess that I can sacrifice a few plants to put in my cole crops but I probably have a few weeks to get them in. What does the moon calendar say about the right days to put out cole crop transplants?

SE Houston (Hobby), TX(Zone 9a)

Eggplants are heavy feeders (plenty of organic amendments), and WATER HOGS...

I grew beautiful Black Beauties in eBuckets with built in reservoirs. Having access to the water at all times is key, I think. No matter about the heat, as long as they can drink when they want to...IMHO...

Linda

#1 - 10" Black Beauty grown in a 5-gallon eBucket with a built-in reservoir
#2 - Eggplant Gretyl, currrently growing in a 5-gallon free-draining bucket (reservoir next time!)
#3 - Eggplant Hansel, currently growing in a 4x8 raised bed
#4 - Eggplant Pot Black, currently growing in a medium planter

Thumbnail by Gymgirl Thumbnail by Gymgirl Thumbnail by Gymgirl Thumbnail by Gymgirl
Carrollton, TX(Zone 8a)

Linda,
eBuckets seems to work great for you. Can you refer me to a thread where you elaborated on ebuckets, ie building or putting one together? Is that all you use?

Irving, TX(Zone 8a)

hrp50
I do have all my cole crops already in the ground (broccoli, cauliflowers, bok-choi, kale, collards and carrots). They are surviving this heat ... but waiting for the rain !

Look at those radishes !
I threw lots of old seeds at the beginning of August (one month early and wrong germination temperature); they all came up !!

This year I am trying something different NOT by choice.
I will be gone from mid September to the beginning of November !!
sooo ... I have to plant everything NOW ... and I am discovering new things ....

Also, peas are germinating outside (I want to grow peas like StephanieTX)
Inside I have Fava Beans and Kohlrabi.

Arugula and Parsley are re-seeding by themself.

Next week before I leave, I will throw out lettuce seeds and hope they will germinate !!

Wish me luck !

and yes, going back to EGGPLANTS. Mine are also full of flowers !

Thumbnail by drthor
SE Houston (Hobby), TX(Zone 9a)

Hrp50,
I've just built 3 raised beds and will be using them for the first time this fall/wtr. Before, when I lived at the DHs home, he had a love affair with St. Augustine grass, and I had to become creative with my growing spaces on the FRINGE of the huge yard. Hence, I became proficient in growing just about everything in 5-gallon buckets, and homemade and patented earthboxes.

Slowly, I've been weaning myself from the buckets and into the raised beds. It's a hard process, but, I'm seeing the benefits of growing in the beds. But, I still keep the benefits of those built-in reservoirs in the back of my mind, especially where the water hogs are concerned! I grew lovely broccoli and cabbages in buckets last season, so they still very much have their place, especially in space restricted areas.

Here's the pictorial I put together for constructing ebuckets and one for converting large planters into self-watering planters with reservoirs (exact same concept as the eBuckets).

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1094601/ (ePlanter Conversion)

Linda

Carrollton, TX(Zone 8a)

Linda,
I was conversing with RickCorey_WA over on a High Yield Gardening thread about how he waters his raised beds since Iím still watering mine by hand and it takes a long time. I believe you posted there a link to a website on drip irrigation using PCV pipe that I printed but have not yet read. Is that the system you use, or something like it, for your raised beds? I donít believe Rick thought much of the method I was thinking of using but I did ask for his opinion and I listen to all ideas and then ďstealĒ (or borrow) the ones I think will work best for me, and he did provide some good ideas.

I wish gardening didnít have such a long learning curve to get it right because Iím starting to run out of time and years! (ha)

SE Houston (Hobby), TX(Zone 9a)

Hrp50,
I'm still working to get a watering system in place. Been watering by hand, and hadn't minded before this summer's heat. Have components for an Auto drip system on a timer, and also have smoker hoses. Will put one system in place in each raised bed this coming fall/winter, and see which works best.

Need something in place for the spring veggies, too.

Look in the tags for ez link:auto watering system, or ez link:WAS

Brooksville, FL(Zone 9a)

OMgoodness, all the different eggplant varieties. I just started eating eggplant a few years ago and started growing (only one variety) the last two years.

Where do you all recommend as the best place with the various varieties that yall have listed?

Thanks so much.

ps. Neem oil by itself is an excellent oil to use against bugs all by itself. I use it in my soaps and lotions, and balms that I make. I haven't found anything yet that it hasn't cured.


Jan

Gainesville, FL(Zone 8b)

Quote from meadowyck :
OMgoodness, all the different eggplant varieties. I just started eating eggplant a few years ago and started growing (only one variety) the last two years.

Where do you all recommend as the best place with the various varieties that yall have listed?

That's a tough call. A lot depends on what you intend to do with it. Here's some experiential and anecdotal info:

The long oriental types are widely believed (and advertised to) handle extreme high temperatures better than the big egg-shaped Italian types. But at the same time, one of the most heat resistant I've seen is Kermit, a small green-when-ripe variety popular in SE Asia - so shape alone is not the deciding factor. Kermit has an entirely different texture from the larger fruited types - much more "substance" even when cooked. Probably the other similar small-fruited types are similar, since they are used interchangeably in the same dishes.

Some people prefer the big European types for dishes that call for cubes. Certainly there is less skin to deal with if that bothers you. For stir-fry, the long types can't be beat.

The biggest "issue" I think most American cooks have is with the bitterness that eggplants often develop. In some countries, the bitterness is actually considered desirable. White-skinned types have a reputation for milder flavor (though I can't personally verify this), and the long types seem slower to develop bitterness (which I have noticed).

I recommend you avoid letting eggplants over-ripen - it is almost always a recipe for disappointment. The seeds in many can get quite hard, the texture of the flesh gets pithy, and the bitterness more pronounced. When in doubt pick them young - they will still be edible and if you find you want them a little more ripe there is always next time - and you still get a meal. This also means (by inference) you really need to check them EVERY day. The fruits can develop extremely fast, especially in hot weather, and go from barely ripe to overripe in a day.

-Rich

SE Houston (Hobby), TX(Zone 9a)

Adding about a teaspoon of sugar to the recipe will take care of most of the bitterness...

"Ancient Louisiana secret..."

Brooksville, FL(Zone 9a)

rjogden

wow great explanations on them, thanks so much, very much appreciated.

Jan

Liberty Hill, TX(Zone 8a)

I've had great luck growing the Thai types of eggplant, they thrive in our environment and they are cool looking. Baker Creek has a fantasic selection. Just a heads up eggplant can be difficult to germinate. They aren't really difficult they just know what they like, heat and moisture. Even then they can take a long time to germinate. When I grow market plants o/p green, round Kermit types are the most popular.

Irving, TX(Zone 8a)

I took this picture on a farmer market near Rome (Italy).
Beautiful eggplants ... even with some brown marks like on mine ...

This message was edited Nov 27, 2012 5:43 PM

Thumbnail by drthor
Saint Louis, MO

Eggplants with scars on blossom end. See photos. Some of my eggplants have ugly brown scars on the blossom end. The scars or large blemishes come off smoothly when I peel the eggplant; but they are unsightly. What are they? What causes them?

Thumbnail by parislew Thumbnail by parislew
Hummelstown, PA(Zone 6b)

http://growingsmallfarms.ces.ncsu.edu/growingsmallfarms-eggplantproblem/

looks like something physiological...maybe heat related?

SE Houston (Hobby), TX(Zone 9a)

I'm sure it's not sunscald because my Hansel eggplants (white) have tan splotches on them, and they're growing on my patio under cover. No direct sunlight whatsoever.

They get bright light angled in on the edges of the patio...

Hummelstown, PA(Zone 6b)

Quote from parislew :
Eggplants with scars on blossom end. See photos. Some of my eggplants have ugly brown scars on the blossom end. The scars or large blemishes come off smoothly when I peel the eggplant; but they are unsightly. What are they? What causes them?


its not sunlight related rather heat related by high temperatures? Or something else physiological? Im just not sure what could cause the corkyness seen on the blossom end like that. They arent rubbing up against anything? or along the ground or against a branch?

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