Suggestions for very specific conditions for trees

Magna, UT(Zone 7a)

I have been looking for trees that can take full sun and drought conditions without any problems. Is insect and disease resistant or tolerant, wind and salt tolerant, will grow in amended clay and is a single trunk. Maybe a couple of trunks is ok but not as many as Amelianchier. The hard part; 20 feet tall of mature height maximum. Alkaline soil prefered trees would be great. That way I don't have to keep up with the work to keep the soil acidic. Zone 6 and a tree that does not sucker or self seed badly would be splendid. Does anyone have any suggestions?

This message was edited Jul 7, 2012 1:16 PM

This message was edited Aug 5, 2013 4:21 PM

Magna, UT(Zone 7a)

We have been considering Dogwood's for about a year. Thanks for reminding me of them. The second link isn't loading.
I really, really appreciate your help, themoonhowl.

Prairieville, LA(Zone 9a)

Weedsfree, try clicking on the tab at the top of the page after clicking on the link....some pdf files won't automatically pop up. You are very welcome.

http://www.pocatello.us/pr/documents/acceptable_trees_jan_2010.pdf

Dunnellon, FL(Zone 9a)

Double that, I say dogwoods too. But when they get some size on them, watch out for suckers.... grin
I will look out for other options for you...

Happy Gardening!

Dustin

Magna, UT(Zone 7a)

Thanks Dustin. I look forward to finding out what you have found out.


This message was edited Jul 9, 2012 10:28 PM

Dunnellon, FL(Zone 9a)

The Loquat tree hits all your wants almost perfectly. Just protect it from cold when young, then it may stand the winters up there well when it get some size on it.. Expect no fruit, but this tree has some very attractive features on it. Also, Saucer Magnolia hits the ticket too. It is very rare for them to go past 20 feet. Also, they have great blooms! I am still keeping a lookout for any new trees that would hit the ticket!

Happy Gardening, and I hope this helps!

Dustin

Magna, UT(Zone 7a)

Loquat huh? I haven't even considered that. You are awesome Dustin. It won't hurt my feelings if I don't get any fruit from the loquat. I will have to look into that. THANK YOU.

Prairieville, LA(Zone 9a)

Also check out Pomegranate trees...hardy to zone 7, do well in clay soil, drought tolerant once establishes...and produces fruit...full sun

http://www.willisorchards.com/category/Pomegranate+Trees?gclid=CPCmn8nolrECFcqe7QodHCEijg

Magna, UT(Zone 7a)

Hmmmmm. Read the little blurb about the trees on the site. Checking it out further.

Prairieville, LA(Zone 9a)

The flowers are exquisite. A bright red-orange and they look almost like they were fashioned from crepe paper.

Magna, UT(Zone 7a)

Any other suggestions? I came across another site that someone had basically the same requirements as I do, and someone brougth up fringe tree. Has anyone grown this and can tell me about the pros and cons?

This message was edited Aug 10, 2012 9:48 PM

Prairieville, LA(Zone 9a)

Here is a link listing 20 smaller trees...the Chionanthus (Fringe) is #7. Around here, The cultivar Grancy Greybeard ( Chionanthus virginicus) is very popular.

http://www.bhg.com/gardening/trees-shrubs-vines/trees/popular-small-trees/#page=7

http://www.abnativeplants.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=plants.plantdetail&plant_id=115

Magna, UT(Zone 7a)

Thank you themoonhowl. I got a couple of other suggestions from those links. Also, thank you for your input about the fringe tree.

Prairieville, LA(Zone 9a)

You are most welcome. Glad you are finding what you need.

Dunnellon, FL(Zone 9a)

Alright, I will add some more for you weedsfree! But remember, with all plants, you have to water them until they mature a little.
Take these into consideration...

Lorpetalum chinensis- Common names: "Chinese Witchhazel", "Fringer Flower", or "Loropetalum" - Notes: Perfect except for you have to train it to single stemed, and once trained, will not sucker. Or you could let it grow some trunks. Moderate Salt Tolerance. Extreme Drought Tolerance once mature. Never exceeds 20 feet. Proctect from cold when young. (You live in it's lowest growing zone.) Neat purple new foliage and great unique blooms!

Aesculus pavia- Common Names: "Red Buckeye"- Notes: Moderate-High Salt tolerance. Mainly single stemmed. Tops out at about 20 feet. Very Good Drought Tolerance once mature. You may not have to cover when young. The red flower spikes attract Hummers and Butterflies.

Vitex angus-castus- Common Names: "Chastetree"- Notes: High Drought Tolerance once mature. Great Salt Tolerance. Does not mainly reach any more than about 15-18 feet. Has a few stems, prune for single trunk. Great blue blooms.

Syringa reticulata- Common names: Japanese Lilac Tree.-Notes: Drought and Salt tolerance are high. Most Japanese Lilac Trees top out at about 15-20. Great Blooms!

Hope this will help! I am still on the lookout!

P.S: If you would like to try out Lorpetalum chinensis, just tell me, I will try to root a cutting of it for you! Just let me know!

Happy Gardening!

Dustin



Prairieville, LA(Zone 9a)

I have all those except for the Syringa....Lilacs do not like our heat and humidity.

There are a few cultivars of the Loropetalum, all nice landscape trees. Here is a little more info on it.

http://www.nola.com/homegarden/index.ssf/2009/10/the_colors_purple_in_loropetal.html

Magna, UT(Zone 7a)

Actually, I have been considering witchhazel for my landscape off and on for a couple of years. That and Ephedra.
Thank you for your hard work Dustin. You have found more than I ever have, with my 2 years of actively searching. Most of what I have found, there was almost always one or two things that made them unappealing.
I have been able to only get 1 lilac out of 5 to live for me.
themoonhowl and Dustin, I will look over your suggestions! I love the ones you come up with. They are unusual to me, most of them.

Prairieville, LA(Zone 9a)

Weedsfree...since you have considered Witchhazel, you may want to try another member of the family...Hazelnuts/Filberts...requires two for cross pollination, but they are pretty neat. And they grow in zones 3 to 9.

http://www.gardeningblog.net/how-to-grow/hazelnuts/

Dunnellon, FL(Zone 9a)

Smart, moon! Never would of came up with that! I have never tasted a Hazelnut... I heard they are very sweet!

Happy Gardening!

Dustin

Prairieville, LA(Zone 9a)

Yup...right tasty nuts....and they mix beautifully with dark chocolate....GRIN

Dunnellon, FL(Zone 9a)

WHA...WHA....WHAT MOON? WHAT DID YOU SAY???? Mix...good....with.....DARK CHOCOLATE? Whaooooo... Sounds way to good to be true! I Really Want One Now...GRIN

Dustin

And by the way, did you see my thread in this same forum? It is the "Need help with picking out vines for the garden" thread. Let me know of any vines you think would be good, and thanks in advance!

Prairieville, LA(Zone 9a)

Just remember...it takes two hazelnuts to tango....grin

Magna, UT(Zone 7a)

Thanks. I have to say, researching suggestions is half the fun!

Magna, UT(Zone 7a)

From my "quick glance" reasearch on the hazelnuts, they need acidic soil. I have a place where I can plant one or two, but I need trees that are happy in alkaline.

Prairieville, LA(Zone 9a)

Sorry, i forgot you said that...I did run across this pdf from Utah SU that may be helpful, especially since it is a relatively small area that needs amendments

http://extension.usu.edu/files/publications/publication/AG_Soils_2003-02.pdf

Magna, UT(Zone 7a)

Thank you.

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