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Article: Bt. a good bacteria and friend in the garden: BT Applications

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Forum: Article: Bt. a good bacteria and friend in the gardenReplies: 7, Views: 71
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Michael_Ronayne
Nutley, NJ
(Zone 6b)

July 9, 2012
7:15 AM

Post #9198833

Paul,

Thanks to a recent report by Melody I have been controlling Mosquitoes very effectively using “Mosquito Bits” which contains BTI.

Money Saving Projects and Tips; How to Create a Small Water Garden
http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/3756/

You’re Mosquito Control Solution
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1270083/

In addition to “BT” classic and “BTI” how many different strains of BT are now commercially available?

I have been using Bayer’s Imidacloprid, which is a synthetic Nicotine Sulfate, to control White Flies, to which some species of Hibiscus are highly susceptible. The Imidacloprid is absorbed into the stems and leaves, through the roots, and protects the Hibiscus through the growing season. I am currently testing Worm Castings (I kid you not) to control White Flies because it reportedly constrains a chemical which White Flies don’t like, but would be interested in other solutions. I will not know of the Worm Castings are working until the end of July but the Hibiscus love the natural fertilizer.

Is there are a list of insect species which are controlled by BT? Anything about White Fly control would be much appreciated.

Mike

paulgrow

paulgrow
Allen Park, MI
(Zone 6a)

July 9, 2012
7:31 AM

Post #9198859

Yes, most "dunks" active ingredient is Bt.
acfrancis
Trenton, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 9, 2012
10:44 AM

Post #9199133

do you know if the type that is added to water is harmful to dragonfly larvae? I have used it for years (mosquito bits) in my rain collecting buckets for mosquito control, but have never found details on its feffect on dragonflies.
Michael_Ronayne
Nutley, NJ
(Zone 6b)

July 9, 2012
3:59 PM

Post #9199480

I have located several research papers which indicated that Bt is ineffective against whiteflies. Here is one which is not completely behind a pay-wall and the PDF is available at this time.

Bioassays of entomopathogenic microbes and nematodes
By Amos Navon, K. R. S. Ascher
http://books.google.com/books?lr=&id=0-o0M73vWUkC&pg=PR10
http://bookshop.cabi.org/Uploads/Books/PDF/9780851994222/9780851994222.pdf

From Page X:
Though BI has been the most successful commercial microbial insecticide, insect-pathogenic viruses, fungi, microsporidia and nematodes have been used or are being considered for use against many crop pests, especially against pests not controlled easily by bacteria. These insects include locusts, sucking insects such as whiteflies and aphids, termites, ants, and even lepidopterous pests insensitive to Bt. Viruses must be eaten to be effective, whereas the fungi typically invade the insect target through the cuticle. Both of these pathogen types can cause acute diseases. Microsporidia, which are commonly transmitted horizontally by feeding or transovarially on or within eggs, cause chronic diseases. The nematodes are minute parasitic worms which, unlike most pathogens, can actually seek out their host, invade the body through various orifices (the mouth , anus, or spiracles), and cause death within a day or two. The methods to assess the efficacy of these agents differ markedly owing to these different modes of action. To treat this diversity, four separate chapters, one dealing with each of these agent types, are included here that cover a wide range of methods which can be used to evaluate efficacy.

Mike
Village_idiot
Alberta, AB
(Zone 3a)

July 9, 2012
6:20 PM

Post #9199657

I'm having a serious problem with something chewing the roots and bottoms of my onions. It's probably some kind of grub because it was lawn until about four years ago. Two years ago I had to throw the entire crop out. (200 onions)
Would Bt, sprayed on the ground a couple of times and then watered in before planting help solve this problem?
Michael_Ronayne
Nutley, NJ
(Zone 6b)

July 10, 2012
6:07 AM

Post #9200096

[quote="acfrancis"]do you know if the type that is added to water is harmful to dragonfly larvae? I have used it for years (mosquito bits) in my rain collecting buckets for mosquito control, but have never found details on its feffect on dragonflies.[/quote]
Good news!

Larvicidal Efficacy of Bacillus thuringiensis Serotype H-14 Against Stagnant-Water Mosquitoes and Its Effects on Nontarget Organisms
http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/esa/envent/1982/00000011/00000004/art00003

Mayfly and dragonfly naiads, diving beetle larvae and adults, and ostracods were not affected at the rates of 0.56 to 2.24 kg/ha of the formulations employed.

Bacillus thuringiensis serovar. israelensis (ABG-6108) against chironomids and some nontarget aquatic invertebrates
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0022201181901324
http://mrec.ifas.ufl.edu/Ali/AALI_040.pdf (Free access)

Other insects, such as Chaoborus sp. and stratiomyid larvae and damselfly and dragonfly nymphs, occurring in small numbers, did not show any population decline after the treatments..

The last paper was from the University of Florida, which is of immediate interest to you given your location, but the other papers all indicated that there was no adverse impact on dragonfly larvae from the use of Bt. I only started using Bt six weeks ago for mosquito control and was very skeptical as to its effectiveness. Not only is Bt highly effective for mosquito control but there are surprisingly few side effects.

I really wish Bt would kill whiteflies!

Mike

paulgrow

paulgrow
Allen Park, MI
(Zone 6a)

July 10, 2012
6:11 AM

Post #9200104

Village Idiot

Sound like you have onion maggots here is a link that might help you

http://ccesuffolk.org/assets/Horticulture-Leaflets/Onion-Maggot.pdf
acfrancis
Trenton, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 30, 2012
8:15 AM

Post #9223491

Thanks Mike, I have found it very effective for mosquitos for years. I still have problems with the tiny guys that breed in the thousands of oak leaves on my property, but they stay mainly in the wooded areas thankfully.

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Other Article: Bt. a good bacteria and friend in the garden Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
This is not a friend in the garden AmyInNH 7 Jul 11, 2013 10:09 AM
How to Brew Your Own BT Pesticide Michael_Ronayne 2 Jul 10, 2012 5:10 AM
Storage florida254 3 Jul 22, 2012 6:29 PM


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