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Perennials: long blooming flowers

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juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

July 11, 2012
7:19 AM

Post #9201433

I was talking with a few people about flowers that bloom spring ,summer fall.There does not seem to be many for most of us from central to northern climates. When my Coreopsis has now been knocked out of bloom, drought and heat being extreme the cause of that mostly.I am rather missing one more that has bloomed consistantly over the past few years.Gaillardia Grandiflora and a Chrysanthemum that blooms long and some out of season being mostly my others.
Any ideas or discussion ? What are some of your favorites?
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

July 11, 2012
7:50 AM

Post #9201488

You could try cutting back your Coreposis and it might rebloom once the weather gets cooler. One of my old faves is Chrysanthemum parthenium 'Aureum' although I think the genus name has been changed since I first acquired the seeds years ago. It does reseed, blooms in partial shade and really brightens things up with it's chartreuse foliage. It blooms almost as long as Coreopsis (I have 'Moonbeam').
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 11, 2012
8:02 AM

Post #9201501

I love platycodon grandiflorus. I grow it in three colors but the blue is really strong. It breaks dormancy later but blooms and blooms if you deadhead it, and it doesn't need staking.

Feverfew tetra strain. A perennial that blooms almost constantly if you deadhead it. It tends to spread but you can just pull it out, and it doesn't have a deep root system. It's an incredibly sparkiling and refreshing plant.

Salvia nemerosa Rose Queen. If deadheaded, it too blooms repeatedly. And it is a lovely, graceful plant that fits in with others. It never flops.

Does this help?

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CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

July 11, 2012
10:33 AM

Post #9201683

Yikes! I must be doing something wrong with my balloon flowers since they usually need to be staked. They are exposed to winds out of the west and it seems once they've been blown over, they never quite seem to get upright again. I do love the blue but also love the white with it's pale violet veining. I think my Chrysanthemum is now Tanacetum. I do like the all-white flowers on yours, Donna.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 11, 2012
2:18 PM

Post #9201908

I love the pink with the pink veining, which is perlemutter. I got the seeds from JL Hudson. And the white is lovely too, also with his seeds. I love to grow multiple colors of the same plant

I've never had to stake the blue - or any of them. But my blues are in a somewhat sheltered location. South, with the house behind it.

White really pops in a summer garden - especially at night. I love it.

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happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 11, 2012
2:49 PM

Post #9201931

Chrysanthemum parthenium 'Aureum' is a feverfew. Mobot says: "'Aureum', commonly called golden feverfew or golden feather, is a mounded, clump-forming, dwarf cultivar which typically grows only 8-12" tall and features small daisy-like flowers and chartreuse aromatic foliage." See [HYPERLINK@www.mobot.org] I love feverfew... Is Feverfew tetra strain also short? My feverfew is quite tall and always flops as it gets to be late in the season (though I don't really mind).
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

July 11, 2012
2:54 PM

Post #9201934

Donna - you've got nice clumps of the Platycodon. I don't seem to have any of the pink ones though. Hmmmm...
I think I got my feverfew seeds about 15 years ago from an online gardening friend. The seeds to seem to last a couple of years in storage and every few years I collect some fresh ones.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 11, 2012
2:58 PM

Post #9201945

Tetra strain does not flop for me. IMaybe because it's double. It's over a foot tall - maybe 14 inches. Mine doesn't even flop when it turns up in shade. It has a real knack for placing itself beautifully. It turned up around the feet of Tess of the D'urbervilles and I was blown away.

I remember that Select Seeds sold single feverfew, double, Tetra Strain and Aureum. I found single feverfew kind of ordinary, and I am definately a somewhat over the top type. Love buying seeds from them. You get stuff no one grows anymore.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 11, 2012
3:07 PM

Post #9201949

My feverfews come back every year. I was startled by it. I used to pull out the plants. They bloom like mad till fall. I keep cutting them back. And when they get carried away I just pull out the excess by the roots - they have a small footprint, so they don't dislodge other plants - nicotiana alata can do that.

Try leaving your feverfew plants. I started with two or three plants and now can have 20 if I don't pull them out. I even transplanted some in clumps to my new yard. I was shocked to find that they are perennial in zone 5a - who wouldda thunk it?

Nicotiana, verbena bonariensis, salvia farinacea, feverfew. I find that they come back every tear, and bring friends, every year. Some from seeds, some from plants. Last winter was so mild I great four kinds of farinacea - Victoria white, stratus, gruppenblau and reference in the ground and plants and all of them returned - as plants!

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happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 11, 2012
3:11 PM

Post #9201950

DonnaMack -- your Tetra strain sounds lovely -- I've been hunting the internet and it is no longer available (at least, I haven't been able to find it), so hold on to what you have!
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 11, 2012
4:10 PM

Post #9201999

I don't think I could get rid of it if I tried - and I still have my original seed. There were two sources: Select Seeds and Johnny's Selected Seeds, neither of which offers it this year.

Those wonderful heirloom plants go out of style. I have a bunch of out of commerce plants - Lilium Silver Sunburst (I got it from Old House Gardens, and he is no longer offering it, because he can't find a grower.) It's incredibly prolific. I started with 3, have at least ten, have given away about 15 and have seven of eight of them growing at my house that's under contract), Amethyst Temple, Emerald Temple, saponaria Bouncing Bett in white (which I got from Glenn Varner at Flower Scent Garden the year before he went out of business). What do these have in common? They are incredibly prolific. But they went out of style, simply because people introduced something not necessarily better, but "new".

I started life as an heirloom gardener. They lasted because they were great, but orienpets took out most trumpets.

How could Amethyst Temple be out of commerce? Look at this beauty!

Or Emerald Temple?

Amazing to me!

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happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 11, 2012
4:16 PM

Post #9202005

Those are stunning. The problem is we all go to garden centers and read gardening columns -- but we don't see the old faithful plants there. Garden centers want to show plants that are attention-grabbing and entice the consumer's pocketbook. The more subtle plants that bloom and bloom but may not hog the spot-light -- they get overlooked and fade out of fashion. Which is especially a pity because they are usually tougher than the newer cultivars. Another oldie in that category (that is, plants that are fading into history) is Begonia Grandis.
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

July 11, 2012
4:26 PM

Post #9202008

Loving those lilies. You're lucky to have some definite "hard to find" plants. Mine HTFP is Browallia speciosa. Tried B. americana from JLH but it's not the same so I collect seeds every year and start a whole flat of them.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 11, 2012
4:31 PM

Post #9202014

One of my favorite compositions - a mix of old and new.

Saponaria bouncing bett (the original pink), with a great scent.

Cynoglossum (the blue stuff). Plant it once and it''s with you forever because the seeds are sticky - but it's stunning! Quite old, and also comes in pink..

Nicotiana alata (scented as we all know).

Campanula bernice. And Red Alert. The only new plant is Red Alert, and it actually has a mild scent.

This with a very old miscanthus you can't get anymore - silberfeil.

Old plants have textures and colors to that make them easy to mix. I love cool colors of varying intensity. The red keeps it from being dull. It's my gardening style. I really enjoy it.

Donna

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happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 11, 2012
4:35 PM

Post #9202019

Cindy: I know you aren't hunting for Browallia speciosa any more, but I found it here in case anyone else is looking: http://www.swallowtailgardenseeds.com/annuals/browallia.html.

Donna: That's really lovely. You must have sun, which I envy -- my garden is partly shady (other than a very very dry hilly area in the front).
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 11, 2012
4:36 PM

Post #9202020

Hanging onto the old stuff - or seeking it out in the first place, is fun. I would not have thought that the touted heirlooms of ten years ago would be gone. Glenn Varner's Flower Scent Gardens was wonderful. Illness in the family forced him to close up shop. From him, The year before he went out of business I got 4 Bouncing Bett in white - a ridiculously gorgeous and scented plant. I also got white heliotrope. The pink I got from mistake from Bluestone. I asked for Salvia Rose Queen. It was two years before I realized that it was the wrong plant.

Here it is in white - stunning!

This message was edited Jul 26, 2012 4:25 AM

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happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 11, 2012
4:39 PM

Post #9202023

Is that the heliotrope or the bouncing bett?
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 11, 2012
6:02 PM

Post #9202080

It's the bouncing Bett. It truly looks different in white - it's more refined and less aggressive. I love white plants. People don't think of it as a color but it really makes a staement.You have to control it by taking a shovel around it from time to time, but it is exquisite. I'm struggling to transplant it to my new house.

I love growing the same plant in multiple colors and spreading it around the garden. You don't get repetition - you get an echo. I'm struggling to craete the kind of texture I had in my old yard. Part of the issue was moving a ton of things to pots and having to get them into the ground. I'm going to be digging things up at the end of the season. But it's lovely to garden a completely different way, although it is amazing how many full sun plants do as well, and sometimes better, in shade. I love the sense of discovering things all over again. It's exciting.
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 11, 2012
7:18 PM

Post #9202151

The Bouncing Bett is beautiful -- I didn't realize how full it was.

Our yard is shady, and we have tried to stretch the envelope as to what we plant. I find a lot of "sun" plants do ok in the shade, but never prosper. In the beginning I was satisfied by that, but I do get jealous looking at full sun gardens and seeing what a plant that has limped along for me is "supposed" to look like! Of course, if my soil were better, and if I watered more regularly and fertilized more regularly, well, that might make a difference too! But life does get in the way...
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 11, 2012
10:42 PM

Post #9202331

I transferred the white bouncing bett to shade and it is progressing very slowly. It is also very hard to transplant. It is probably the one plant I transferred to shade that is moving quite slowly. But so many of my plants are actually doing much better in shade. Oakleaf hydrangeas for one. Epimedium for another. Curiously, I do have japanese paintedferns that really did prefer the sun (go figure).

I'm also lucky. I moved to the home of an organic gardener who ground up leaves for years and used them as mulch. Despite tree roots, the soil, which is so balanced that a hydrangea comes into bloom in a mix of pink, blue and violet, as opposed to solid pink in my yard. Who moves into a house with soil like that? No more ironite.

This message was edited Jul 26, 2012 4:27 AM

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

July 12, 2012
1:58 AM

Post #9202356

Hi everyone:
I have reblooms on nepeta Summer Dream.I cut it back after first spring bloom
I also find with pale pink Balloon flower ,it looks white from a distance. I am so glad I planted sone 2 years ago.

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CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

July 12, 2012
6:41 AM

Post #9202500

happy - thanks for posting that link for the seeds! As for planting sun lovers in some shade, I have purchased quite a few part-sun plants hoping they would survive in some shade but I never knew how well they could do with more sun until we took out two oaks last year.
Donna - that Bouncing Bett is really nice. And how lucky to have such great soil to work with. You use Ironite on chipmunks? Tell me more. And I was as surprised as you to find that Japanese painted fern can take quite a bit of sun as well as neglect.
ge - you always have great color combinations!
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 12, 2012
9:59 AM

Post #9202756

Cindy: You asked my question about ironite and chipmunks!
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 12, 2012
11:24 AM

Post #9202834

OOps! I meant milorganite, not Ironite.

Ah, Cindy and Happ, life is about to get easier.

Chipmunks HATE Milorganite. I discovered this years ago when they kept digging in my pots. The third or fourth time you find the roots lovingly exposed in your pots, or in the ground, you know it's time for ACTION!

I found that sprinkling just a bit in my pots stopped them cold. It is a low nitrogen fertilizer, so it's good for the plants. It is also made from EPA approved Milwaukee sewage. Don't stick your nose in a bag and inhale!

Chipmunks, with a sense of smell much stronger than ours, hate it.

When I don't quite know what I'm fighting, I put in min daffs for the rabbits, freshly ground pepper for the squirrels, and milorganite for the chipmunks. Only the pepper has to be repeated every few days. It's the world's cheapest pest control. It works better than sprays.

I order 20 more W.P. Milners from Brent and Becky's bulbs to add a few more to the garden. It is a tiny Division 1 trumpet, so the foliage melts away quickly. No more voles, no more rabbits. This after losing about 50 lilies to voles and at least 100 tulip bulbs to the very overweight rabbits I used to see in the spring.



This message was edited Jul 26, 2012 4:28 AM
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 12, 2012
12:21 PM

Post #9202879

Really? REALLY? We have gazillion chipmunks, and more squirrels. (No rabbits, though.) The chipmunks seem to dig tunnels in the ground -- is that possible?

I don't like the smell of Milorganite, but I could put it on whenever we are going out of town... How long does a dose last? How much do you put on each pot?

So I should get cheap black pepper from Costco? (How "freshly" ground does it have to be? Do you sit out there with a pepper grinder)?

Do slugs dislike it? They could be a benefit!

DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 12, 2012
2:37 PM

Post #9203005

A dose of milorganite lasts for weeks. You need only a pinch or two in a pot. You can broadcast it over large areas if you need to. .\I just put on some gloves and toss.

Are you sure that your tunnelers are not voles? On the other hand, the dumb chipmunks used to dig holes and put sunflower seeds there. I would find them when they sprouted.

Get the cheapest whole pepper you can find. I picked up a pepper grinder at a thrift store for two bucks. I keep it in the garage. After I put in a plant or disturb the earth, I just give it a few turns over the plants. You should repeat this every week or so.

Yes, really! Took me years to figure it out, and I never read this stuff in articles. People would rather sell you sprays that put white gook on your plants. I used to use thiram for rabbits. The stuff is expensive, marks your plants, and makes you feel like a dummy when it wears off.
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

July 12, 2012
4:15 PM

Post #9203132

No rabbits here but I did use your ground black pepper to keep raccoons away and it seemed to work. But that was 6 weeks ago and now they're digging stuff up looking for grubs so I'll have to load up the pepper mill tomorrow morning and give the annuals a dose. Because those are shallow rooted, those are the ones that get dug up.
Chipmunks do borrow into the ground for dens (or whatever you call them) but most of what you see in warm weather is burying seeds or nuts. You won't see a lot of holes to their homes though. Very interesting about them being bothered by the Milorganite. Who knew???
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 12, 2012
5:56 PM

Post #9203241

I've always wondered if we had a big vole population, but I haven't seen enough root damage to be convinced -- and I see tons of chipmunks. We do have the occasional snake, and they dig holes (is "dig" the right word???).
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 12, 2012
6:11 PM

Post #9203264

Ah, so it works for raccoons too. Six weeks is too long, I think. I use it once a month to make up for rain. And then any time I disturbed earth.

I had a neighbor who discovered the hard way that the chippies loved his furnace. It stopped working one winter, and when the repairman came and opened the furnace, a mountain of sunflower seed poured out. Lots of people were using it to feed birds. And I would sometimes find it sprouting in my front. Beds. Removal, and milorganite, put a stop to that.

I have a lot of fun figuring out benign ways to dislodge creatures. I had four large hanging baskets on my porch, and mourning doves would turn up in two of them in the morning, sitting on my plants, and give me the hairy eyeball. I REALLY wanted them to vacate before having offspring - they really stood their ground and gave me the impression they'd tear me a new one, as they say. So when they were absent, I took aluminum foil, bunched it into baseball size, and tossed it into the basket. Shiny - and scratchy. Bye! I wrote to a guy on gmail who was having the same problem with geese. They kept coming back to nest. I told him about it, and it worked.

I love working on pest control. I find it oddly entertaining.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

July 12, 2012
6:32 PM

Post #9203293

I get the vole and chipmunk thing going on every once in while,so I am going to print or copy some these pages.

The only thing successful this season that I have done is my invasive wren for Japanese beetles thing.I don't hardly have any now and they were gaining in number for about a week, so year #2 that my control has succeeded. Only that's a bug story not an animal control.
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 13, 2012
7:15 AM

Post #9203714

Milky spore does wonders for Japanese beetles...

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

July 13, 2012
8:57 AM

Post #9203819

I have no doubt that are some good controls, only getting one that works for you where your at is the purpose. I prefer the natural controls if I can have them, I don't want or have to spend on anything more than I just have to.The birds are already here and they do a good job after the first few days ,that the beetles arrive.I have not lost any more trees or flowers since using natural predators and the birds seem no worse for where.(that is as to studies that the birds can be affected,only I am not spraying anything) Even fungicides seem to affect me some from a distance.So I am staying with the natural anytime I can!!
I have really been enjoying the flower discussion,some interesting things going on here! My blanket flower, a hybrid yellow Daylilly and a dwarf hybrid Daylilly with a giant bloom are all that are blooming for me now.
Mostly common flowers so once again I have been enjoying the info about the unusual of some older common varieties of flowers.Not so common after all are some of them?.!!
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

July 13, 2012
8:58 AM

Post #9203823

Donna - you're right about 6 weeks being too long. I had figured that once the plants had settled in that the critters wouldn't bother them because there wasn't any "freshly" turned earth. I was definitely wrong. Interesting about the foil and birds nesting in hanging baskets. I have some small bird - maybe a wren or finch - that continually builds unused nests in inconvenient places, even inside the bird feeder (what a deal - shelter, food, nest). When they spot my hanging baskets and try to build there, I stick bamboo skewers upright in the pot so there is no open space to place the nest.
juhur - you're lucky to have trained pest control. Wish my bird visitors would discover the culinary delights of Japanese beetles. Still collecting them in soapy water and pushing the 300 mark in my tiny space. Just discovered that they've invaded my climbing hydrangea in addition to the normal menu of porcelain berry vine.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 13, 2012
4:19 PM

Post #9204260

Oh, Happ, I agree. Milky Spore is fantastic. I put it down at my under contract house about 4 years ago, and see almost no beetles. Then I persuaded the owner of this house to put it down two years ago. And my wonderful neighbor with tons of lawn adjacent to my property used it this spring.

I have seen perhaps 15 beetles. And I have raspberries, loganberries and roses. The few I see sit confusedly on lilies (no damage) or nibble my salvia tesquicola. I just trim the leaves.

CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

July 13, 2012
4:28 PM

Post #9204272

I've put milky spore down for two years now, a couple of times a year but if neighbors are not inclined, it don't matter. It's very pathetic - I've learned their habits for different times of the day and where they'll be. They head in straight from the west and first target anything in the 6 ft range. Then they start nosing around for more alluring fare like the roses although they haven't bothered them as much as I would have thought. They've even gone for the coneflower blossoms since they're about 4 ft tall. I've read that they last about a month but I think I'm about there since I first noticed them on 6/19. Sorry - all I do is complain about them.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 14, 2012
5:21 AM

Post #9204703

300! I'd complain too. That's disgusting. I used to gasp when I walked into the yard and saw the nasty things.

But I'll never forget being in Maine perhaps 15 years ago and seeing their JB's. They were coating the four o'clocks so heavily I couldn't see the flowers. It was like something out of a horror movie - swarms and swarms of them in plant after plant.

Interestingly, in my yard four o'clocks killed them. I would plant a stand of the near a climbing rose and find their horrible dead bodies under the mirabilis.
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

July 14, 2012
7:53 AM

Post #9204826

Wow! Maybe I need to plant some four o'clocks next year. Wonder what it is about the plant that does them in? I think I have more this year in my side garden since it now has lots more sun although the JBs do tend to hide out a bit when it gets really hot mid-afternoon.
ecrane3
Dublin, CA
(Zone 9a)

July 14, 2012
8:04 AM

Post #9204833

I've read that there's something in the 4 o'clocks that is poisonous to them--but for some reason they're attracted to them so planting them is one way to help keep them off your roses and other things. It's weird, usually in nature animals/bugs/etc know what's poisonous and avoid it but guess the JB's somehow never learned about the 4 o'clocks being poisonous.

It's sort of a double-edged sword though--JB's are able to sense the presence of other JB's through pheromones or something like that so anything that attracts them (like JB traps, etc) will tend to attract larger numbers into your yard than would have showed up otherwise, so I'd only use the 4 o'clock trick if you're in a situation where you're going to have a billion of them anyway and want to keep them off your more desirable plants.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 14, 2012
9:08 AM

Post #9204894

Ecrane, what you say makes sense to me.

I do know that you should remove any JB damaged foliage. It attracts more of them. Have you ever noticed that you will find 4 JBs on a single plant - and none elsewhere? So I trim the foliage. It's mostly my raspberries, and the leaves only. Also, I understand that if you use the soapy water in a bowl method you should discard them. Apparently the dead little bodies attract others. When I found them under my four o'clocks, I would immediately remove them (after saying na na, na na na!)

This message was edited Jul 14, 2012 11:50 AM
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

July 14, 2012
10:30 AM

Post #9204988

I do know that during the dry spells in the garden, they come back to the same place most of the time. If I water or if it rains, the congregating places usually change. They don't bother my tomatoes or carrots or chard or kale which is a good thing. I think my porcelain berry vine which grows on an 8 ft sturdy trellis is the tallest thing in the sunniest place so it's going to be the target. The JBs love the little forming berries. I'm wondering if it makes any sense next year (assuming that the season is hopefully close to ending) to put a length of row cover (remay?) over the vine next year. It would have to stay on for about a month.
Will have to give some serious thought to four o'clocks next year and where to spot them.
kneff
Dearborn, MI
(Zone 5b)

July 14, 2012
11:03 PM

Post #9205555

I too use Milorganite in pots to discourage the chipmunks, and it does work. I've also found that mulching newly-planted bulbs with cocoa hulls disguises the scent of fresh earth that seems to draw squirrels.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 15, 2012
4:12 AM

Post #9205611

Kneff,

That cocoa hulls thing is interesting. I never would have thought of it. And I think you're right about freshly turned earth. I have been moving my lily bulbs around, and if I forget to pepper them I find them on top of the soil the next day, while noting around them is disturbed. I have also noticed that if I add compost to the base of a plant because the earth has worn down (anything from hydrangeas to peonies) neglecting to pepper them results in holes with dirt thrown around them in a day or two.

And cocoa hulls smell delicious!

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

July 22, 2012
6:34 PM

Post #9214956

hey my neighbor told me also to use regular kitchen flower sprinkled around, helps get rid of chewing kritters.

Juhur, got a few more ideas for you...Veronica spicata; Achillea millifolium, filipendula, ptarmica The Pearl; Armeria maritima 6" or 18" pink or white; Daisies (many var.); Coreopsis grandiflora, rosea and verticillata; Calliroe; many Dianthus; Geranium Rozanne or Johnson's Blue; Centaurea montana: blue, Amethyst in Snow, Sprite (dark blue, new), phyggria (purple or yellow); Rudbeckias; Echinacea; Gaura linheimeri; Geum; Heuchera; Origanum Kent Beauty; Oenothara speciosa or missouriensis; Penstemon Pike's Peak Purple or Red Rocks; Campanula: Carpatica,cochlearifolia, glomerata; Catanche caerulea; Centaurea: dealbata, macrocephala; Delphinium grandiflora, sometimes beladonna; Gaillardia; Knautia macedonica; Lavatera; Malva; Linarea purpurea; Nepeta; Osteospurmum barberiae; Ratibida columnifera; Scabiosa caucasica, columbaria, ochulara; Sidalcea Party girl...these are some ideas for you on all summer bloom, these are a few that I get great summer (sometimes late spring)- frost blooms. The key is deadheading to promote further blooming...I even can get aquilegia to rebloom tho not this year yet...LOL..I need to do my cutting back toooooo!!! LOL.
pix 1: Delphinium grandiflora
pix 2; Sabiosa columbaria
pix 3: Campanula rotundifolia
pix 4: Dianthus X Loveliness
pix 5: Veronica spicata Sight Seeing Blue
these are some more all summer bloomers, some not listed above.

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DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 22, 2012
6:44 PM

Post #9214969

What a wonderful list - and what great pictures!

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

July 22, 2012
6:56 PM

Post #9214986

Donna...I didn't realize that saponaria was available in white, wow pretty...I recently dug the pink variety and potted to move from my daughters house, not much in the way of roots. I potted them anyhow and they finally took and are growing good now. Are they both the same fragrance?

Some annual reseeders I use are Cosmos which are fragrant in mass, Datura metaloides, Alyssum maritima, Snapdragons (sometimes they return for several years and or reseed. Hope you find some goodies to try juhur!!!! Have fun, Kathy.

Ratibida colunifera
Centaurea phygria purple
Penstemon Red Rocks
Lavendula Munsted and snapdragons Rocket series
Veronica s. (unopened) and Centaurea machrocephala

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warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

July 22, 2012
7:28 PM

Post #9215030

LOL...donna thanks, sure wished my garden looked that good at the moment...I'm behind on my cutting things back...
Centranthus ruber, Geranium Rozanne and Humulus (Hops Vine)
Knautia macedonica
Anthemis tinctoria
Johnny Jump Ups
Armeria m. Bee's Hybrids and The dark red is Knautia m.

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DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 23, 2012
2:18 AM

Post #9215206

Such wonderful plants.

I never particularly noticed a scent in the pink, but I wasn't really seeking it. But I immediately noticed the sweet scent of the white.

And yes, I transplanted my white and it took forever to start growing. There are not a lot of roots, probably because of the way it spreads. But I felt lucky because I was never able to get salvia verticillata White Rain, and it's rare.

I like to put pushy plants next to each other and let them fight to a draw. The third pic has anemone x Hybrida Honorine Jobert in leaf, which makes a sensational ground cover before it blooms, the salvia, and bayberries that you can't see in this photo (3rd pic).

So I put it next to Bouncing bett, bayberries, the anemone (which blooms in white)! What fun. I'm trying to do something similar in my new yard.

Pic. 1: On the left is salvia verticillata White Rain. It normally comes only in purple, and it's really hard to find. I got it from Bluestone years ago. It fills any empty space (delightfully, I might add) but is a devil to transplant.

Pic. 2: The second plant is salvia verticillata White Rain in bloom.

Pic 3: Penstemon digitalis Husker Red (the only penstemon cultivar I can grow in the Midwest) is flanked on both sides by salvia verticillata White Rain. In the upper right hand corner is anemone Honorine Jobert, with a bayberry branch in the lower right corner.

Pic 4. All the buddies together. Bayberries (myrica pennsilvanica) top, the anemone below it, the salvia to the right and the saponaria to the left.

I grew annuals for years while figuring out what I wanted to put in that would look good all year. All the plants in picture four are, shall I say, assertive. They battle each other to a draw, and nobody loses (or everyone wins). Once I figured it out, I could sharply edit the annuals, and their maintenance.

This message was edited Jul 23, 2012 7:00 AM

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happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 23, 2012
3:45 AM

Post #9215222

Donna, would you mind ID'ing your photos in your last post?
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 23, 2012
6:10 AM

Post #9215355

Hi Happ,

I went back into the post and ID'd the plants. Lazy Donna shouold have done it in the first place!

Here is the anemone in bloom on October 23rd. This plant is a beauty. One of my favorite for late bloom, and very few people grow it in masses (this started as four plants!)

This message was edited Jul 23, 2012 8:52 AM

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happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 23, 2012
7:32 AM

Post #9215490

Thanks, Donna; I was wondering if that was Husker Red. I love your anemones!
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 23, 2012
7:59 AM

Post #9215526

I tried a bunch of penstemons, but most, especially the blue ones, require sharply drained soil, which is why you see them in Colorado. When I got heavily into gardening most of the books were written for Britain, Colorado, or the Pacific northwest. So I made some mistakes, but got great substitutes. Husker Red rocks. Platycodon is a great substitute for campanula persificolia (I order a bunch from White Flower Farm and grew them from seed. The result in both cases in a plant that lasts one year).

Red Husker, on the other hand, doesn't require sharply drained soil, and it hangs in for years.

One of the things I love about these threads is that we can keep each other from making expensive mistakes. Conscientious plant companies (Forest Farm) will warn you against unsuitable plants. But most don't (don't you all have clay there? Hum?)
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 23, 2012
8:10 AM

Post #9215538

Me, I'm all about clay. So anytime I read advice from people in the Pacific northwest, I assume it is irrelevant to me! Any plants that like good winter drainage? I don't take a second look.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 23, 2012
8:50 AM

Post #9215578

You definitely were smarter than I was. And some catalogues help, and some don't. There's one that goes out of it's way to ask whether you have clay or sand. I wish I could remember the name.

It's interesting now, because my new yard has a much more neutral ph. Hydrangeas that were always pink are coming up with a mix of colors - some pink, some blue and some mauve on a single plant. It's a blast. And the person composted like mad. I did too, but in a shadier yard a big part of it is chopped up leaves. In mine it was tons of compost. And the shade while I garden is definitely nice. I pick out the places where the sun consistently comes through the trees, and plant roses there.
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

July 23, 2012
9:05 AM

Post #9215590

There's a Penstemon 'Mystica' that's very similar to 'Husker's Red' that's just as hardy. Donna, thanks for mentioning C. persificolia - I thought it was just me not being able to keep it going. I was enamored by all things Campanula several years back. Best performer here is C. speciosa but the blooms just flew by this summer with the heat and dryness.
Re: winter drainage - has anyone been able to grow any of the hardy Lobelias? They only hang around here in my clay for a year or two and then disappear.
'Moonbeam' Coreopsis and my 'Aureum' are still going strong here on blooms. The older flowers are starting to look old so I've been selectively pruning them out.
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

July 23, 2012
9:08 AM

Post #9215594

I had mixed colors on H. 'Blue Billow' and 'Endless Summer' this year but I think it might be due to the organic fertilizer I mixed with fresh wood mulch back in the fall from ground tree stumps. Didn't want to totally deplete soil nutrition with decomposing wood.
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 23, 2012
9:42 AM

Post #9215631

Donna -- Your post makes me laugh. I certainly was not smarter than you were! It took many many premature plant deaths before I had a clue what was going on with my un-draining soil! It doesn't matter how much I amend it, either.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 23, 2012
11:55 AM

Post #9215804

I was DETERMINED to grow campanula persifiolia - my heavy influence then was White Flower Farm catalogs. I didn't realize that they, at that time, displayed a perfect English garden. Which I was never going to duplicate on clay, wih intense sunlight, in serious heat.

It didnn't matter that Campanula glomara was supposed to be invasive. My garden took it to the mat. But, oddly campanula pyramidalis (chimney Bellflower) was fabulous (but try deadheading those billion flowers!) and campanula Bernice, which I just love, does very well.
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

July 23, 2012
1:05 PM

Post #9215882

I still drool over WFF catalogs. Sigh. I managed to get white C. pyramidalis started from seed but still waiting for it to bloom. The ones that tend to be invasive here (besides C. rapunculoides) is C. takesimana, especially 'Bellringers'.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 23, 2012
1:32 PM

Post #9215925

Hey, I drool with you!

They nicknamed it chimney bellflower because in Medieval times they used to grow it from the bottom of chimneys. Just give it some time - mine grew five feet tall, and taller is common. And it sticks sround for years! I had it in blue and white.

This message was edited Jul 23, 2012 6:44 PM
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 23, 2012
2:17 PM

Post #9215992

This is my favorite campanula: Campanula poscharskyana 'Blue Waterfall', http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/78849/. It lasts pretty well for me -- a few years.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 23, 2012
5:45 PM

Post #9216296

I love that one. I almost purchased it a few years ago but doubted I could grow it. I take it I was wrong?

This message was edited Jul 24, 2012 10:38 AM
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 24, 2012
4:31 AM

Post #9216602

It grows well for me in shady spots. My sense it it likes it moist, though I haven't taken special pains with it. But I love it. Quite long blooming.

I don't do anything special as far as dirt goes, but I'm sure it would be happier with better draining soil. I don't have it sitting on pure clay, though. It is in a rocky area on amended soil.

This message was edited Jul 24, 2012 6:33 AM
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 24, 2012
6:00 AM

Post #9216680

I think your secret is that it is in a rocky area. Clever of you to figure out how to make that gorgeous plant successful.

This message was edited Jul 24, 2012 9:04 AM
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

July 24, 2012
7:03 AM

Post #9216748

Donna - I've had 'Blue Waterfall' for about 11 years here so I'm sure it would do well for you. I do have it in a raised area, spreading out over a retaining wall in shade so it can get a little dry. I do like the C. poscharskyana for edging plants and have both an no-name (species?) blue and 'E.H. Frost' (white but not a bright white). They will travel a bit so you might have to reign them in once a year but easy to replant the edited pieces elsewhere. They do take sun very well as evidenced this year in my now-sunny area and they bloomed amazingly. They are a little tamer planted in slightly amended clay (but not a low spot) but are much more exuberant in better soil.
I wonder why the chimney bellflower was planted at the base of chimneys. Purely random or purposeful?

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

July 24, 2012
7:19 AM

Post #9216755

Cindy,Blue Waterfall is planted beneath some of my hostas for part shade.
I also love the spreadding habit and the carpet of bright blue in May is most welcome.
No rock walls here or I would have it there too.I just took a baby last spring and transplanted to a container.I'll see how it does in there.
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

July 24, 2012
10:26 AM

Post #9216931

I have to say that I think my 'BW' doesn't spread as much due to it's dry location. Haven't had really enough to steal small pieces for elsewhere. It is in shade next to some self-sown Heucheras from 'Palace Purple'. But I do have the C. poscharskyana in lots of places. I always look forward to all of them blooming. If I pull out the flower stems after they're done blooming, I will get some rebloom but much diminished from spring. They don't seem to mind my pulling of the flower stems which is much easier to do than cutting each one. This impatient gardener loves that.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

July 24, 2012
10:38 AM

Post #9216943

C. poscharskyana, I thought that WAS Blue Waterfalls.
I understand your situation if they are young plants.My C.porsch. is 4 years old and does so well. I did loose one last winter. No reason ,it just died.
This image is from several years ago
second was growing amongst hostas

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happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 24, 2012
11:21 AM

Post #9216988

Ge, you are right, it is Campanula poscharskyana 'Blue Waterfall', http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/78849/. Maybe the species is tougher -- it often is.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

July 24, 2012
2:42 PM

Post #9217163

thanks for the afferm.happy.
I just love mine.
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 24, 2012
3:50 PM

Post #9217240

Ge: just in case i wasn't clear, I think "blue waterfalls" is a named cultivar, not a nickname for the species.
echinaceamaniac
(Clint) Medina, TN
(Zone 7b)

July 24, 2012
3:58 PM

Post #9217266

The longest blooming plants here are Delosperma, Agastache, Coreopsis, and Echinacea.

The absolute longest blooming plant I have ever grown is Delosperma cooperi. It has been in full bloom since April and still looks fresh!

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

July 24, 2012
4:36 PM

Post #9217314

I've been looking for ice plant seeds,I am about to buy some as I don't seem to have a good trade.If by chance anyone has any to sell for postage,I would be grinning from ear to ear to hear!
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

July 24, 2012
5:06 PM

Post #9217346

Sorry, ge - I did mean the unnamed C. poscharskyana and 'EHF'. 'BW' is only in one location. 'BW' is actually 11 years old from a local nursery. 'EHF' came from Digging Dog in '95 and the unnamed blue one came from Bluestone before '95. Yeah, seems like 'BW' should be moved to a better spot after all these years.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

July 25, 2012
1:55 AM

Post #9217695

Cindy.Thanks for the info on BW and its longevity. I was under the impression it was a vigerous grower and I could take a piece off of one of the branches that has airlayered and had roots.
I did that tis spring and its doing just OK ,not great, in case anyone else divides their plant. Mine has never seeded itself, but I dont have luck with self seeding perennials here, just viola,what a mess.

This is where I bought my NW
http://www.bluestoneperennials.com/CABW.html

This message was edited Jul 25, 2012 5:05 AM
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

July 25, 2012
4:47 AM

Post #9217744

Mine arrived through a DG friend 7 years ago and, like Jo Ann, I put it next to hostas and love the look in spring. It has expanded greatly but I just remove them from the path.

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ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

July 25, 2012
4:49 AM

Post #9217745

luv the look
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

July 25, 2012
4:56 AM

Post #9217749

Thanks. It does creep more to the sun than the shade so that tells me something.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

July 25, 2012
5:44 AM

Post #9217798

I agree about the creeping direction. I think the plant I lost was in too much shade.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

July 25, 2012
5:52 AM

Post #9217805

That's how I find out what they'll tolerate.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

July 25, 2012
5:59 AM

Post #9217816

That reminds me to check my transplant and the parent plant.Treedown in January made that spot full sun.One hosta and a few foam flowers need a new home.
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

July 25, 2012
7:24 AM

Post #9217895

To be honest, I haven't noticed C. poscharskyana doing any self-seeding. I've only noticed it spreading by underground mini-runners and have divided it accordingly - just cut out a chunk with roots intact and plant it elsewhere. It is a little reluctant to spread around close-to-the-surface tree roots though.
The 'BW' could very well be a vigorous grower but maybe it's my site that's impeding it. It does seem a slightly stronger plant than the others in terms of stems strength.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

July 25, 2012
7:49 AM

Post #9217930

Mine also spread by underground runners and it is easy to divide. They had the option to go towards tree roots but declined the invitation. I received the C. rotundifolia at the same time and it did not survive.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

July 25, 2012
8:07 AM

Post #9217958

The runners is what I dug and transplanted to a container on the deck.I must have thought it "air layered"
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

July 25, 2012
12:19 PM

Post #9218271

pirl - liked "declined the invitation". I've learned that Campanulas can be kinda finicky but they don't tell you what they want. They usually just disappear. C. speciosa is still putting out a few blooms after the big flush last month. I just keep trimming back the flower stalk to the next set of leaves rather than dead-heading each spent flower.
ge - sometimes those runners are on top of the ground and give the impression of air layering.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

July 25, 2012
12:49 PM

Post #9218327

The one that pleases me greatly is C. Chettle Charm. The accent is on the charm. It's still blooming and that's from May!

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CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

July 25, 2012
5:38 PM

Post #9218712

That is a long-bloomer. I had that one at one point but it's disappeared. :(
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 25, 2012
7:55 PM

Post #9218854

That is lovely.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

July 26, 2012
2:18 AM

Post #9219021

I will have to look into that variety.Its wonderful.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

July 26, 2012
4:56 AM

Post #9219072

Thanks. It was an accidental purchase.

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

July 28, 2012
8:28 PM

Post #9222001

do you all mind if I jump in on the campanula forum (lol). And what's the crack about Colorado soil anyhow...I don't happen to have sand, mostly clay like the rest of you. I do ammend to fit the needs of the plant going into the ground tho...I buy bales of peatmoss each year to ammend planting holes, I find I get better results from adding several handfulls to the backfill. And to those not BLESSED with Colorado soil,(lol) can add builders sand which is coarse to the planting holes that need good drainage (ref. Penstemons). Me, I just figured it was standard practice to add peat every time a plant went in, that's what I get for reading books, lol... Just for those that have never tried it before, I experimented, adding and planting straight into the soil. I always get better results from adding the peat, larger plants quicker.

Now back to the topic at hand, one of my favs., campanulas. I'm glad to see that someone else has grown C. pyramidalis (Chimneybells). I also grew from seed 10-15 years ago, It won't bloom until the second year and is a biennial, (one way around that is to cut the bloom stalk off before going to seed and it will come back the next year. I moved and have lost track of where I put the seed and my seed source (origional) quite selling it. Then last year I found a local nursery that was selling the plant in quarts. It's TIMBERLINE Nursery located in Arvada, Co., I believe. Could check their websight to see if they would ship...Anyway I got several. Not sure if they are even going to bloom as we are in such a drought here that so much is stressed. Still haven't seen any blooms on my C. p. LaBelle, which is a double, so niffty. Got or have had poshcarskyana, protenschlagiana (boy those two are a mouthful, lol), rotundifolia, carpatica, cochlearifolia, glomerata, persicifolia and am truely wanting lactiflora and latifolia (anyone have either)?????? And I also have Adenophora lilifolia, which is related to campanulas, just love it but it does tend to spread a bit...

Can hardly wait for some of my groundcovers to spread a bit, all my C.s are growing in full sun as that's all I have at the moment..., tho altitude does help to keep my summers a bit cooler than everyone elses.

C. rotundifolia is native to the mountains here, thats where I first fell in love with it

pix is Adenophora lilifolia, pix 1&3

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warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

July 28, 2012
8:35 PM

Post #9222003

Hi pirl...is that straight white C. p. with the Chettle Charm and I just love your Auquilegia, soooo pretty...And guess what...most of my clems never bloomed this year...the deer ate all the buds...CRUD!!! Ok, I know...next year.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

July 29, 2012
5:56 AM

Post #9222168

Chettle Charm is almost white with the lightest purple edge. All columbines there are from self-seeding.

The deer aren't dear to many of us. They ate most of the daylilies, a few lilies but have left the hosta alone this year. I did spray twice and hope to see some roses bloom. We did have a lot of roses in late May.
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

July 29, 2012
7:32 AM

Post #9222270

Chimney bellflower is a biennial? Didn't know that. Sounds like I need to treat it like foxglove if it ever blooms. Thanks for that info!
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 29, 2012
8:49 AM

Post #9222329

In my experience, if you want chimney bellflower to act like an annual just cut it back. Supposedly biennials form foliage the first year, bloom the second and die, but I have had the same campanula pyramidalis plant, on the same spot, for at least ten years.

It's like parsley. It's a biennial too, but if you cut the flowers (in my case, rabbits cut the flowers for me) it doesn't die. It keeps growing, and spreading, from the original spot. I find that it makes a really beautiful ground cover, and I use it that way. I do let a few flower, because the parsley caterpillars love them.
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

July 29, 2012
1:37 PM

Post #9222652

Did not know that about parsley either. This thread is turning out to be very informative. I guess I never questioned the biennial designation.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 29, 2012
4:33 PM

Post #9222867

It's a phenomenal ground cover. I put a couple of plants in for culinary purposes, and it has spread to several sections of the yard. It outcompetes weeds, and it is very beautiful.

I let a few bloom for my pals, the parsley caterpillar.

These pictures were taken over a four year period. I dug up a few clumps of it, took it to my new house, and every clump established.

I have also discovered that nepeta snowflake, which is quite short, is another great ground cover that suppresses weeds. Lovely around roses, peonies and well, anything. The fourth image is of it in bloom in spring. The fifth picture was taken today. Notice that there is only one weed. It doesn't flop. I'm going to spread this one around too.

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warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

July 29, 2012
5:35 PM

Post #9222927

Ok Donna...where's the weed? LOL, I don't see it...Just love your Alliums, including the mollies. And is that Salvia victoria in 3 and which host are those caterpillars (Swallowtails?) munching on. Where did you locate the Nepeta, I've not seen that one before...does it reseed? (My N. cataria sure does, it's the species, true catnip, and my kitty loves it and it does reseed).

I love my JJ's as they reseed everywhere for me...

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DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 29, 2012
6:37 PM

Post #9223030

I found it at Bluestone.

http://www.bluestoneperennials.com/NESN.html.

I put it in and it started spreading. Then I moved some to another bed and it happened again. It's very drought tolerant. And the beauty of it is that you can't see the weed.

I love nepeta Dawn to Dusk but you do have to deadhead it.

Yes, that is salvia. I let it grow and it reseeds and spreads as well. And yes, those are Swallowtails. I think that they are adorable.

I just love your JJs, The different shades are just lovely. I've never grown them. What cultivar are they? Where do I find them? And when do they bloom?

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

July 29, 2012
7:32 PM

Post #9223088

Gosh..I started out with a pack of seeds for regular Johnny Jump Ups (viola), might have been from T&M come to think of it...They began reseeding and up come all these different colors, got a few 4 packs of some with orange I'm going to mix in. Gosh they began blooming mid-late spring and will continue til frost,( I'm also at 6800ft, not sure might make a difference) they can get a bit leggy and need a trim once in a while, I let them reseed at will. I collect seed and throw it in other areas of the garden.

I also get the catalog from bluestone, have used them for years...and great pix catalog for ref...

And the salvias, wow, they reseed, haven't had that happen but have overwintered a few times...

pix a mix I gotten over the last few years from them making crosses I guess, neat huh...Enlarge pix 2&3 and see how many I've gotten in one small area...

This message was edited Jul 29, 2012 7:36 PM

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DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 30, 2012
3:28 AM

Post #9223272

Wow! It sounds so easy. And they are really wonderful.
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

July 30, 2012
6:35 AM

Post #9223401

Warrior - nice variety in the JJs. I get some to reseed here though not as generously as yours do. The summers here tend to do them in though. Are your nights cooler due to altitude?
Great idea with using the parsley as ground cover - it's a nice refreshing green.

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

July 30, 2012
12:46 PM

Post #9223810

Cindy...yes our nights get down to 55-60*, where I am (even higher than Denver which is 5200ft, I'm at 6800ft). Here in Denver avg. for this date is 60* and 90*, mine is a bit lower, and I'm about 45 miles south and east of the metro area. We only avg. 15-17" of precip. a year, so anytime you all, (lol) wanna send some rain this direction it will be most welcomed.

I beleive I started out with a tray of 72 jjs and a few years later this is what they looked like this spring. Yup, the heat is getting to them a bit but the d**r have also been munching on them, and they desperately need clipping back as does most of the garden. Has been a warm and dry summer, which is changing due to the annual monsoon season (late July-August) now arriving and blessing us with rain...

Your jjs should perk up and begin blooming again as the season begins to cool off, mine always do...

Donna...do you do deadheading because of reseeding or just reg. garden maint.? ( on the Nepeta?)

pix...boy doesn't that look refreshing, lol... later...Kathy.

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DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 30, 2012
2:13 PM

Post #9223890

Nepeta Snow appears to be self cleaning. I never have to deadhead it or cut it back. No maintenance whatsoever - and it's drought tolerant.

Nepeta Dawn to Dusk will flop if you don't cut it back. It also forms little clumps, which I encouraged it to do. It's a phenomenal filler/edging plant. And if you deadhead it, it blooms for months. Sometimes it reaches 2 1/2 feet in some locations while staying at six inches and others. It's easy to cut back - you just grab a handful of it and cut. I am bringing clumps from my old yard to fill spaces. It will definitely make its way around your yard. I love it with roses, but it's handsome enough to stand on its own.

Nepeta Souvenir Andre Chaudron, which I adore, actually declines if you don't cut it back. It's ridiculously beautiful, even standing alone. Pic 1.

A fabulous foil for my red rose Quadra, in the background. Pic 2.

But also a cool colored rose, like Zephirine Drouhin. Pic. 3.

And sensational with lilies and grasses. Pic 4.

I like the ones that are less known. Lots of people have Welkers Low and Six Hills Giant (I understand that SHG flops). I'm perverse. If it's everywhere, my eye turns against it. I was growing calamagrostic acutifolia Karl Foerster in 1998. I loved it. Once it became a "Perennial Plant of the Year" it was everywhere, often in corporate sites. It's just about the only grass I didn't take with me ot try to grow again.



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CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

July 30, 2012
2:22 PM

Post #9223903

Beautiful pic, Kathy. Sorry but don't have any spare rain to send your way. My rain barrels are dry and I'll have to hide under the bed when the water bill comes.
Donna - lots of garden space for your Nepeta collection - lovely. Can empathize over 'Karl Foerster'-ism - I feel that way about 'Stella D'oro' but have kept one around anyway as a color combo with a couple of others.
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 30, 2012
3:47 PM

Post #9223979

Donna, do you think Nepeta Snowflake would grow in clay-ey soil? I can amend it a bit, but it basically would get no attention.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 30, 2012
9:28 PM

Post #9224408

Oh, Happ, yes. When I got it, it was the overlooked sister of my other nepetas. I grew it in a really crummy clay section of the yard at my old house, and gave it no love at all. I realized it was remarkable when it came back year after year, and spread, with no fertilizer and no water. The picture I posted represents total neglect. That's when I knew it was a keeper and should be taken to the new house where, with a minimum of decent care, it is doing beautifully.
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

July 31, 2012
10:28 AM

Post #9224863

Gosh - anything that can grow in clay soil, suppress weeds and isn't a thug is a keeper! Does it take full sun or can it go with partial sun?
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 31, 2012
12:29 PM

Post #9224980

It went from full sun to partial sun. The bed gets shade part of the day.
frahnzone5
Bensenville, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 31, 2012
1:37 PM

Post #9225088

I love nepeta 'Snowflake'. The white flowers are lovely and it makes a great groundcover. I grow it in both a full sun and half shade position. It does well in both places. I ususally get three bloom periods from it. May-June, August-October.
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 31, 2012
4:18 PM

Post #9225265

Wow -- sounds like a plant I need to get!
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 31, 2012
5:06 PM

Post #9225319

It is absolutely obligatory.

And once you get it it is easily divided and spread around. There are a number of wonderful plants like these. They take your maintenance down and give your yard flow.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

July 31, 2012
5:57 PM

Post #9225399

I am trying something like that with some ice plants,I planted seeds day before yesterday and they are sprouting today. Now to see if they can take all that intense sunshine.!

A new song perhaps, Sun baked people .. Sun baked people! I will hope it is not Sun baked seedlings!!

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

August 1, 2012
2:38 AM

Post #9225657

Nepetas love clay.
I have a short one ,just put in this summer.
LilTitch ,Dos compact spread 16 inches ,maybe 12 inches hi or less.
NUTS I thought I had a more recent image of it. When the sun comes up I'll get better pix.these were taken in June just after planting.

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happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

August 1, 2012
3:42 AM

Post #9225669

Donna: So what plants meet your description of easily maintained, easily divided "wonderful plants" that take your maintenance down and give your yard flow?"

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

August 1, 2012
4:16 AM

Post #9225685

Finally light enough for Lil Titch
#1Same spot as above
#2-4along path in another garden

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ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

August 1, 2012
4:17 AM

Post #9225687

happy I'll jump in and say Hostas for no maintenance.They come in so many diff leaf shapes and colors and sizes.
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

August 1, 2012
4:41 AM

Post #9225698

Ge -- I'm covered on hostas -- thanks. Got an awful lot of them. But the deer do love them, so there are only limited spots where I can put them.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

August 1, 2012
4:51 AM

Post #9225703

I understand
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

August 1, 2012
5:08 AM

Post #9225718

Well, another plant I love to have around is fragaria vesca reugen, or woodland strawberries. White Flower Farm was selling them at 3 for $17.95 years ago as attractive edging plants. As I'll bet a lot of you have found, they have great ideas. They are just ridiculously expensive!

I went to J.L. Hudson, and purchased the seeds. These are the lovliest little plants you can imagine. In spring, they form luscious little leaves. Then white flowers. Then tiny delicious berries. The beauty of it is that it is a clumper, not a runner. They just get bigger. And then they are easily divided (I did a trade with a DG'er a couple of years back. I actually took one plant, dug it up, split it into 3 part, potted them up for a couple of weeks and then delivered them locally).
Pic 1.

Then they started popping up all over the yard and, delighted, I started moving them where I wanted them to be. I ended up with dozens from the original three plants. Enough to edge a quite large bed. The reason is, you guessed it, the berries aren't delicious to just us. The rabbits and birds, shall we say, processed the seeds for me.

They last beautifully through the winter. They also return quickly in spring. Here they are in very early spring next to penstemon Digitalis Husker Red. Pic. 2

This is the opposite side of the front bed, a bit of a mirror image of Pic 2. I didn't put the frasies there - they just appeared on both sides of the salvia! Pic. 3

So, not being dumb, I picked up a few clumps and established them in my new garden this spring. Pic. 4

They are completely drought tolerant and winter hardy. Once you grow them you will always have them. They are easily divided and spread around. They don't require fertilizer, but if you want more berries, fertilizer will get you a better crop.

And they grow in full sun to mostly shade.

And did I mention - no deadheading? Again, it's a clumper and not a runner, so you don't have to worry about it being willful.

Gotta be honest. I don't like hostas. In fact I detest them. Everybody has them, which always turns me off. They get slugs. There were about 50 in my new yard and I eliminated all but ten. And all of the hostas around me are horribly burned, so they aren't drought tolerant. And if you want to get rid of them, digging them up breaks your back. You can't easily move them around. They're expensive. And did I mention the hosta virus that people are getting from their trades?

For shade, why not epimediums, hydrangeas, heuchera, shade tolerant roses and grasses, fragaria vesca reugen, hardy geraniums?

Why not?

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happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

August 1, 2012
6:17 AM

Post #9225765

Donna: I get so many of the wild running strawberries -- I'd be worried I wouldn't distinguish the 2 in my zest to pull out the weeds.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

August 1, 2012
7:13 AM

Post #9225808

Oh, I have them too, in my yard 2 types - some with inedible red berries and some with inedible yellow berries. They're all over the place, with the violets. You mean you can get rid of them?

And creeping charlie was allowed to get so established in parts of the yard that the red berries, yellow berries and violets form a groundcover. I just remove it from the base of trees, where I decided to put chionodoxa and where I have actually established some arabis caucasica which, by the way, is a great plant for crappy soil. Blooms in the spring, and then forms a green groundcover the rest of the year. See pic below.

For some reason, the previous owner had lemon balm all over the place. The good thing about lemon balm is that it is a terrific market of where I can dig and plant, which is helpful. Its presence means that there are no significant tree roots.

They actually look completely different, but I really do understand your concern.

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happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

August 1, 2012
8:02 AM

Post #9225865

Donna, that photo is gorgeous!

Did they grow well from seeds?


This message was edited Aug 1, 2012 10:03 AM
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

August 1, 2012
11:46 AM

Post #9226094

The white grows beautifully from seeds - that's how I got it. I'm in the process of germinating some now.

happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

August 1, 2012
12:25 PM

Post #9226134

Wonderful! If I grow them from seeds, I might have enough that I will still have some left after I kill half and pull out most of the rest by mistake!
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

August 1, 2012
1:58 PM

Post #9226230

LOL!

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

August 1, 2012
7:53 PM

Post #9226615

Donna...oh my that rose in 2 is lovely, which one is it? And I love Zeph. want to get one for the north side of the house, (lol, like I don't already have enough to plant yet this season, my whole driveway is FULL of plants, new project to get started on when the g. kids go back to school in TWO weeks (YEAH!!!, lol)...

And for those that don't know Nepeta is a Herb with a square stem. Any plants that have square stems can handle clay quite easily and like a more bland or lean soil.

Some of my groundcovers:
Phlox divaricata woodland phlox
Veronica pedunculais(I believe), Georgian Blue
Gypsophila repens (pink creeping babies breath)
Dianthus deltoides Zing
Saponaria ocymoides soapwort

Got a few more I need to get pix of.


This message was edited Aug 1, 2012 8:01 PM

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DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

August 2, 2012
3:38 AM

Post #9226774

Warrior, I just love your pics. When I first started gardening their were lots of books by Colorado writers, and although I quickly learned that my soil is wrong for them, I still love them.

If you mean the red rose on the trellis, that is Quadra from the Canadian Explorer program (two of them actually), the most amazing rose I have ever grown. Fully hardy, blooming from April until frost, with big double red flowers, but alas no scent. I needed a rose rampant enough to cover a trellis, that could take minus 20 temperatures with no protection, and would coat itself in bloom, since the trellis was for privacy. This fit the bill.

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warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

August 2, 2012
7:01 PM

Post #9227654

Absolutely outstanding roses, just stunning. Now I need to ask...how old are they? I hope you sit their often, and you can always add fragrance with something else...OOOh , how 'bout 'Resedia', migionette; 'Katherine The Great' loved them for their fragrance and they reseed year to year...or even Asperula orientalis which is blue (of course, lol) , or another outstanding fragrant one is Zaluzianskya capensis, which is eve. fragrant and white with a red reverse that closes during the day. And these are all YUMMY...You can find them at Select Seeds.com...or Thompson & Morgan Seeds.com..

Any of these should entice you to sit there more often or longer...

Ref. the Colorado authors, I'm going to guess Lauren Springer and Rob Proctor. I have many of their books myself...In June I went on a garden tour at Rob's house, yes his personal gardens are a not to miss tour...
Sooooo many goodies...I've done a bit of plant trading with him myself...If the plants are wrong for your area, substitute things that are good for you...I'm thinking I read toooooo many garden books, lol...Kathy

Ps. my favs are the English Cottage type of books...

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DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

August 3, 2012
5:09 AM

Post #9227913

Kathy,

It was planted in the spring of 2005. The pictures above are from 2009, which shocks even me as I write. They are some of my favorite pictures, which is why I chose them. I have been primarily cutting it back since. It is very vigorous. I added fragrance by growing heat tolerant sweet peas through the flowers. And there are several scented roses nearby.

Yes! Lauren Springer and Rob Proctor! I just went to my bookshelf and saw 'Naturalizing Bulbs", "Herbs in the Garden" and "Annuals and Bulbs". I not only read too many garden books, I buy too many. And, s you can imagine, while I had some successes with them, I also had a lot of "mishaps". But they were great writers.

It was pretty hilarious. Back then, almost all the really well written books were the one by Proctor Springer or by writers inspired by English gardens. Books written for the Midwest finally started popping up, but I thought that some of them lacked a dreamer's perspective. One that was called "Plants and Flowers for the Hot Midwest" basically said - don't grow this, don't grow that. Including many things in my yard, like lilies. Very limiting and discouraging. Happily I didn't listen. I actually found Alan Armitage of Georgia and the rocking Michael Dirr much more helpful. Georgia clay?

And there were a couple of fabulous books that included large gardens around the Chicago area. Those helped me realize that I could easily grow roses, peonies, and lilies.

What I ended up doing (hey, great minds) was adapting the English cottage garden to my climate. And it worked very well. I like a lot of texture and a kind of whimsical quality. It makes gardening fun.

Donna

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warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

August 3, 2012
11:47 PM

Post #9228980

Is pix 1 La Belle?, Phooey, mine isn't going to bloom this year I don't think, such a hot spring and early summer, I'm just glad it's still alive, with the lack of precipt. up until now. pix 2, wow!!!! just sooo inspiring, wow!!!! Which lily is that, look like a asiatic but which one (true red...just love it...). pix 3: love the alliums, what's the plant in front not in bloom yet?

Yes, I also have books by Dirr and Armitage, they are true experts in their feild, MR. Flower and MR. Tree GODS, lol...Yup they wrote the total info. books for their feild, and the price of their books prove it too, lol... Hey ...I have a tip for you...I just found many great books for gardening, new and used on Amazon.com. This spring I bought scads as gifts for trades here at Dave's ...but...I can't let them go,,,OH MY...lol!!!! Most of the books I got so far are from .99 to $4.99 plus $3.00 for shiping. Many I got were in absolute perfect condition, some were origionally up to $45.00 (A. Armitage)...Like I don't already have enough, My backroom is filled with gardening books, ( I call them ref. books, and maybe one day I'll get back to reading and studying them, eye candy for the soul...lol. Love the inspiration that I can transfer into my garden... LOL...where do you think I got the inspiration for my border being 45ft X 100ft...(English Cottage Americanized).

Just to let you know, many flowers can grow all over the U.S., if you give them what they require for growing, some just hate soggy clay and others love it...I use peatmoss in almost every planting hole and found it works miracles...I try it if I like, it as long as it's within my zone (was 5b and now reevaluated to be 6a). And the more unusual the better, tho not quite up to Lauren Springer's standards ( I don't grow just natives (either to this state or this country)).
Most of my plants were started from seed obtained from Thompson & Morgan Seed from England getting many unusuals that are no longer even available. Kathy

Pix1: Centaurea machrocephala and veronica spicata Sight Seeing blue, still the tallest veronica and it's not available in commerce, 15 or more years since I first grew these from seed, tho not these particular plants
Pix 2: Veronica austriaca, just love it but...it's only a spring bloomer but reseeding is great.
Pix 3: Centaurea phygria and it blooms all summer
Pix 4: Centaurea I believe it's also a phygria, this seed I obtained from the Denver Botanic Garden...I was deadheading a few flowers for them...Thankyou..
Pix 5: Dianthus deltoides Zing

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DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

August 4, 2012
4:44 AM

Post #9229032

Picture number one is Campanula Bernice. I just love this plant, and it persists year after year. I can's retain campanula persificolia, and Glomerata (which is supposed to be invasive) disappeared in three different colors. But this double beauty is happy in the soil in both yards. It and platycodons are what I used to get the cottage garden effect.

The knock 'em dead red lily is Red Alert, and early blooming (June) scented Longiflorum Asiatic. Incredibly reliable. Here it is in my new yard. I put it next to the trumpet Silver Sunburst (which is out of commerce!) Unfading. I took a lot of things out of my old yard and threw them into my new one just to get them in. I am finally adding grasses because I just love the texture they give to plantings.

And the plant in front of the alliums is Campanula Bernice in bud.

I amend my soil with tons of compost, and in fact plant with 70% compost. The yard at my old house had a thin layer of top soil over clay and hardpan. Typical former farmland. At first I could barely dig in it at all, and plants would hit the clay and drown. But there was an organic farm in the community with tons of free compost. I added a layer every spring and fall, and planted with it, and after a few years I could easily dig holes one foot deep. And clay is nutrient dense. Once amended, it was almost ideal.

My new yard was owned by an entirely organic guy who mulched the whole yard with leaves every year. I have to avoid tree roots, but the soil is magic, and the ph almost neutral. A hydrangea growing in the yard has pink, blue, and mauve flowers.

Most of my seeds come from JL Hudson, The Fragrant Path, and Select Seeds, although I have also started to favor Swallowtail. I check out Daves for good seed companies. I am germinating three shades of platycodons and salvia rose queen. I grew them from seed at my house and want them back!

And you are quite right about books. I got some of them years ago when Timber Press conducted its 30% off and free shipping offers (that's when I get the Dirrs and Armitages) but I, like you find that the best deals are on Amazon in used books. I have purchased brilliant books for $.1 plus $3.99 shipping. Some of them were originally $40. There is an exquisite book by Patrick Taylor - "Gardening with Roses, a Practical and Inspirational Guide". Filled with gorgeous photography and chock full of info, I bought two copes of the hardcover addition, one as a gift, for a fellow DGer, for less than $10. That's part of the reason I have so many books, most of them in hard cover.

I find many great books, first, in the library. Then I wait to acquire the ones I want when the prices come down. But I do have to STOP!!

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