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Perennials: What are some of your seed failures?

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Pippi21
Silver Spring, MD
(Zone 6b)

July 12, 2012
3:00 AM

Post #9202362

I decided to clean out my flower seed box of all the seed envelopes I kept of tried seeds and thought how foolish to continue to keep them so in the trash they have gone. I think of how many failures. Mine are: Morello cherry lupin, Marine heliotrope, "Thai silk fire" California poppies, Mourning Bride scabiosa, Salvia superba "Rose Queen", Aselepias tuberosa "Butterfly weed", Campanula persicifolia "Peach-leaf bellflower", campanula glomerate" clustered bellflower" and I'm sure there were others. Some germinated but when planted out croaked in a few days..maybe I set them out too soon, maybe the soil wasn't good in that location, some I didn't give enough time to grow before I got disappointed because they weren't growing like the picture showed..Wintersowing has taught me many things..have patience for one thing..not all perennials flower the same year they are planted. Some I just didn't like after I planted them. Some I'd like to try again.

Have you ever thought about all the seeds that you planted that didn't make it? Have you tried to grow that flower again? Some have survived but the jury is still out on them..

I still have seeds that I bought but never got around to planting so I will have some Fall planting to do.
ecrane3
Dublin, CA
(Zone 9a)

July 12, 2012
7:17 AM

Post #9202558

Seeds I'll usually let myself try multiple times--there are so many things that can go wrong that I always figure I could have better luck the next time. With things that I purchase as plants though I have a "three strikes" rule...once I've killed something 3 times I'm not allowed to buy it again. You can accidentally kill something once or twice, but if it dies a third time that means either it's too finicky or my climate is just not suitable for it.

Rather than throwing out your seeds though, I'd be tempted to scatter them in the garden and see what happens--some of them could surprise you and come up and do well.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

July 12, 2012
7:23 AM

Post #9202568

This will take me a while to remember,I have so many fails the last couple of years I could not possibly name them all.
Failed with Delphinum,cardinal flower,bunches of them ,only these I have a few of except the delphinium.Some agastache,penstemon. the list goes on and on as never ending as the attempts.
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 12, 2012
12:27 PM

Post #9202890

I tried Larkspur a million times to no avail. So I exceeded the ecrane3 rule by 999,997 attempts.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

July 12, 2012
2:01 PM

Post #9202963

Hey ya happy; I tried some larkspur years ago and you know what.? Some the annual kind came up this year as a complete surprise after how many years? They must like the weather this year.
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 12, 2012
2:30 PM

Post #9202992

Supposedly they want to be planted in the fall, or on newly fallen snow. Neither worked for me.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

July 12, 2012
2:38 PM

Post #9203006

I can't even remember when I had planted them little lone how? Big help I am there huh? Maybe I will name them Rubik's
for beginning gardeners,As they sure made a cube ,square out of me!!!
Pippi21
Silver Spring, MD
(Zone 6b)

July 12, 2012
3:46 PM

Post #9203077

I was told by some gardeners on the garden websites that larkspurs don't like to be transplanted so they suggested I start them in the late Fall in peat pots..It worked! This year they were so beautiful until the 100 plus degrees days/weeks done them in despite watering and no rain except the 2 in. we had on 6/29, the night the storm flatten them and one group of my coneflowers..Then began the high temps and they don't like extreme hot temps..I've been taking and saving the larkspur seeds for next year, even throwing the seed pods down on the ground to see if they will sprout. An experiment of mine. If you catch them right after they germinate and move them, I think you have a better chance of them surviving transplanting. I had the Giant Imperial larkspurs in mixed colors. I am searching for dwarf varieties and have found several resources.

luciee
Hanceville, AL
(Zone 7a)

July 12, 2012
3:51 PM

Post #9203099

This year I have not been able to get petunias up. I have one plant from seed. I do not know what is wrong this year. Others: delphinium, pentstemon, poppies, astillbe, begonias, etc. Next time I will stick with known germinators, like marigolds. Luciee {;^)
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 12, 2012
5:54 PM

Post #9203239

Pippi -- I direct sowed them into the garden -- I was told that would give the best chance of success. I guess I can next try your approach, though my sense is that larkspur and me are not to be.
ecrane3
Dublin, CA
(Zone 9a)

July 12, 2012
5:58 PM

Post #9203246

happy--as long as you tried your larkspur from seed a million times you didn't break my rule :) That rule is only for purchased plants. Seeds there are too many things that can go wrong, I have to give myself more chances at them!
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

July 13, 2012
4:59 AM

Post #9203608

Lavatera was a dud for me. Last year I got 1 plant, this year zip. And that one plant didn't self seed either, even though I was careful in my weeding and left lots just in case. White liatris, larkspur, nigella (sown in place, maybe the heat got it?), some dianthus but not others... Aquilegia-fall, WS and spring sown, several types, but not the old fashioned purple, that was great, cobea scandens, and for some strange reason, this year morning glories and sweet peas sulked as well.

But I have been successful with some tricky things- lupines. Penstemons, platycodon, thalictrum, various other dianthus, among others. As you say, methods and conditions vary endlessly, so I guess I have to keep on trying.

Any hints for what works for white liatris, anyone?

Pam
1alh1
Sidney, OH
(Zone 6a)

July 13, 2012
5:14 PM

Post #9204329

Lupines and larkspur seeds need a cold treatment before they'll germinate. I also soak lupine seeds overnight before planting in the fall. I simply sprinkle them on the soil where I want them to grow. Try refrigerating larkspur seeds with a little water for 2 or 3 weeks or longer in a zip-loc bag. I sprinkle refrigerated larkspur seeds on the ground in early spring. The larkspur bloom that same year in early- to mid-summer. The lupines sprout in the spring, bloom the following spring, and if dead-headed, rebloom later in the summer (smaller spike). Transplanting either one has been a losing venture for me, whereas starting from seed (even old, refrigerated seeds) has worked.
Pippi21
Silver Spring, MD
(Zone 6b)

July 13, 2012
8:30 PM

Post #9204513

This question is for 1alh1..I want to try lupines again. Do you put anything in the water that you soak them in? I assume you prepare the soil in the area you want to grow them, and sprinkle them on the soil..do you coverly lightly with fine soil or vermitculite or just press the seed into the soil a little to make contact? I watched a video on YouTube recently where a gardener put water in a cheap plastic ice tray, when the ice was almost frozen, she drop a few seeds and let them kind of freeze in the water and then when almost frozen, she poured a little more water over the frozen seed and it stayed like that until the specific time was up, then she would put the ice cube with seeds on top of the potting mix and proceed from there. I wished I'd written the name of that video down. I thought it was interesting. I thought wintersowing outdoors in the cold winter took care of all of that process.
1alh1
Sidney, OH
(Zone 6a)

July 14, 2012
5:38 PM

Post #9205354

I haven't soaked them in anything except plain water. But I think I'm going to add a little hydrogen peroxide to the water this year. I put a damp, folded paper towel in a zip-lock bag and add the seeds. The next day (or two) I can see where the seeds have begun to sprout. When I plant them, I water the soil, rough it up a bit, and drop the sprouted seeds. I don't cover them at all. If it doesn't rain within the week, I water those areas again. Otherwise, rain and snow moves them deeper in the ground. If they sprout where they shouldn't the following spring, I pluck the strays out. The ice cube method sounds interesting! Our Ohio winters must take the place of the ice cube trick. I have had no problems in growing gorgeous lupines and collecting the seeds to plant the following year.
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

July 14, 2012
8:50 PM

Post #9205492

1alh1: I might try your soaking method -- though I would have thought sprinkling the seed on snow would have achieved the same effect... Do you think the problem is that it isn't cold enough for long enough at a time here?
1alh1
Sidney, OH
(Zone 6a)

July 14, 2012
10:43 PM

Post #9205552

I don't know. We had a very mild winter and an early spring this year, and my lupines were the best they've ever been! It's been hot and dry for the past 6 weeks, but the lupines are still going strong. Many are sending up their secondary spikes. I water them occasionally, cut off the raggy leaves and old stems, and give them a little acid fertilizer. Some don't make it through the hot weather, but most do. The best ones are in full sun. Those that are shaded by shrubs or taller plants don't produce as many spikes. I think that refrigerating the seeds and soaking them before planting is the key.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

July 15, 2012
4:59 AM

Post #9205631

What worked for me was soaking 24 hours in 10:1 water:peroxide, then putting them in a damp paper towel in the frig for a few days until they sprouted. They bloomed this year.

Thumbnail by Pfg   Thumbnail by Pfg
Click an image for an enlarged view.

1alh1
Sidney, OH
(Zone 6a)

July 16, 2012
7:31 AM

Post #9207004

Pfg, your lupines are beautiful!
frausnow
Winterville, GA
(Zone 7b)

July 16, 2012
12:31 PM

Post #9207470

Canna seeds...planted a couple of different kinds I received from trades. So either they weren't viable or maybe I planted them too deep. I did the scarification and soaking thing, too. Cannas are usually so easy to come up so I'm perplexed.

Also, I never had luck with the Himalayan Blue Poppy seeds. Never germs for me.
timeinabottle
Louisville, KY

July 16, 2012
6:28 PM

Post #9207962

I winter sowed larkspurs 4 or 5 years ago and then transplanted the seedlings into 2 inch pots then on to the garden, I now have larkspurs everywhere in the spring. They do self seed. I recently read on longwood gardens site that they fly in their blue poppies from Alaska. If they can't start them from seed ...well what do you think?

I have been able to grow clematis from seeds only once...I'm still trying.

kiseta
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)

July 16, 2012
6:52 PM

Post #9207994

I have larkspur seeds from a DG lady from Indiana, wintersown them lots of the seeds came up but when the heat came ,they disapeard, only few bloomed. I still have some seeds, thinking about sowing it soon so the new plants will drop some seeds for next year. Or I should just wintersow the rest of the seeds and start again in Spring. Etelka
timeinabottle
Louisville, KY

July 17, 2012
8:07 AM

Post #9208643

Etelka they do not last the summer here. I just pull them up and replace with other annuals.
1alh1
Sidney, OH
(Zone 6a)

July 17, 2012
11:56 AM

Post #9208976

Larkspur don't last in Ohio's hot summers either. I let some go to seed and yank the rest. My larkspur have been done for about 2 weeks, but they dropped seeds, and I have lots of little 1-inch tall seedlings coming up in the scorched earth.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

July 17, 2012
12:56 PM

Post #9209028

I had those(the larkspur) that came up some yellow solid and some blue with white centers That one was pretty for such a small flower. As July came, they left, as did some annual poppies they sprouted up next to.I may try some in the future only for now if any return I will let them grow,only I am not going to grow them on purpose.
The dwarf hollyhock I have does that ,some years it is there ,some not.It bloomed this year and the last time I saw it was three or four years ago. It is suppose to be a ever returning perennial,only it didn't work out that way.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

July 18, 2012
1:50 AM

Post #9209733

My hollyhocks are covered with rust, they look disgusting. We had so much rain at one point- hard to remember now, it's been so hot- they got it then and never recovered. I won't plant them again.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

July 21, 2012
12:11 PM

Post #9213451

1alh1; Thank you for the towel and fridge method, I just planted some hibiscus that sprouted that way.

Planted some Penstemon seeds outside about the same time,the penst's are up and growing,the hibiscus have not appeared from the ground yet.Back in a couple of days as to that.
1alh1
Sidney, OH
(Zone 6a)

July 21, 2012
1:54 PM

Post #9213540

Perennial hibiscus has been slow to emerge from the ground for me, too. Even well established plants are among the last to show signs of life in the spring. When I cut them back in the fall, I always leave about 4" of stubble so I won't accidentally plant over them in the spring. Just keep the seeds moist and within 2 weeks or so, yours should send up young shoots. Good luck!
cindyeo
Duxbury, MA
(Zone 7a)

July 30, 2012
5:23 AM

Post #9223329

I have really good luck with larkspur, now it comes back from volunteers, but to get the area started I did direct sow in the early spring. Not winter, it was definitely around April 1. I was careful to keep the area watered. And because I wanted a long, thick row, I planted 2 or 3 packets of seeds. I also have luck with moving them, but I agree with someone above, you must move them when they are very small. They do look wilted for a day or so, but keep them watered and they will perk back up. This photo is from June of this year. All these are volunteers, I didn't plant any seeds this year. And obviously they didn't come up in a neat row, so I did quite a bit of moving around.

Thumbnail by cindyeo
Click the image for an enlarged view.

DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 30, 2012
11:59 AM

Post #9223758

Pippi,

I just went back to the top of this thread and saw your problems with Salvia Rose Queen. Please try it again! I found that when I purchased it and it fizzled out, but when I grew it from seed - well, I've never lost one. This photo is from is from 2006 - I still have it. According to my records, I germinated it in 2003. I have several of them. I got the seed from Park.

I did start it indoors. It's a surface seeder, which made it easier. It's tough to transplant, so I actually seeded it the other day from my very old seed and we'll see what happens. I refrigerate my seed, so I have 75% germination rates from seed I gathered in 1998!

Whoops, wrong pic! See below!


This message was edited Jul 30, 2012 1:02 PM

Thumbnail by DonnaMack
Click the image for an enlarged view.

DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 30, 2012
12:03 PM

Post #9223765

I got the seed from Park, which no longer carries it. But Swallowtail does, and they are great!

Thumbnail by DonnaMack
Click the image for an enlarged view.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

July 30, 2012
1:35 PM

Post #9223853

I will throw an endorsement for swallowtail in here,I have some seeds starting from there. Rarely do they fail and when it has happened it was me ,not the seeds. Yarrow, Penstemon, Agastache,Guara ,all currently sprouting.Actually the Guara is next on the planting list.Hoping I will have the time to get to em'.

Hopeful of next summer's blooms I always am.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 30, 2012
1:53 PM

Post #9223869

And lavatera - wow! I must have tried 20 times. In the ground in cells. Probably a hundred seeds. But let me tell you what was maddening. I was in the hibiscus/mallow phase of gardening: lavatera, hardy hibiscus, mallow, and I wanted to grow malva alcea fastigiata. Tried over and over again. People complain about self seeding with this plant. I'd take my few pathetic flowers and scatter the seed. Nothing. I gave up.

So this year - what six years later - I go back to the house we have under contract to tidy and weed and there they are, lots of them, blooming their brains out, laughing at me!

I think some plants are sadistic. Oh, and most strains of verbena. I have bonariensis everywhere, but I have tried to grow from seed a bunch of different hardy verbenas and I am batting 0.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

July 30, 2012
3:18 PM

Post #9223950

DonnaMack; Here's similar? I'm planting Yarrow Nobelissa, got the sprouts and was going to save myself some work planting them in ready pots from three months ago.Okay I planted them in the ready pots that the seeds from three months ago didn't sprout or germinate in,(I know risk of fungus so on so on so forth), well today I have yarrow growing with and along with the seeds that didn't germinate three months ago.Now I will have to determine whether the sprouts today are Agastache orPenstemon.
It is sometimes like the plants are laughing at you (me) expecting you(me) to reply a sigh like Duh< or something while laughing a little. Nature does have a sense of humor!
weedyseedy
Warners, NY

August 2, 2012
9:57 AM

Post #9227092

Over forty years of trying, I am now getting forgetful and don't even want to remember what didn't show. The delphiniums that were entirely obliterated by slugs, the lupines that never appeared, the foxgloves that didn't show, the Acer seeds I got caught hanging on to a branch ten feet up filching in a public garden (actually after two years they showed but the plumbers dug them up when the new septic tank was dug-----they needed double stratifying!) Most recently five seeds from Saratoga Pinwheel X Ed Murray that refused to germinate----repeated the cross, stratified daylily seeds and they are now seedlings that , I hope, bloom next year--probably uglies----------------Weedy
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

August 2, 2012
10:16 AM

Post #9227116

Oh, yes and primula japonica. I can buy plants that last a couple of years and I so much wanted to grow them. They need variable temps so I kept sowing them outdoors. Then I tried indoors. Three packets of seed later and - NOPE!

On the other hand, I was given a digitalis grandiflora that I gave to a friend, who killed it. It was only in my yard for two years. Then I look up and - boom! In my yard there are half a dozen beautiful plants, some in sun, some in shade.

There also was a digitalis mertonensis, which I tried in vain to grow for years! I think primroses and strawberry foxgloves know how much I want to grow them, so they say NO! NO! NO! take that!
etnredclay
Spring City, TN

October 3, 2012
10:28 PM

Post #9295366

The thought of all the work, sweat, hopes, and hovering over seeds only to watch them fizzle -- or worse, do nothing at all -- has made me think it would be wise to only try half of each seed packet and save the rest as insurance against monumental failure.

Or is that too pessimistic?
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

October 4, 2012
4:49 AM

Post #9295441

Hardy geranium - 0 for 10 seeds. I felt really stupid stratifying them with a nail file, and even dummer when it didn't work.

lanakila

lanakila
Holly Springs, NC
(Zone 7b)

October 4, 2012
7:11 AM

Post #9295557

RedClay, when I am not sure about how well something will seed, I split the packet up a bunch of ways to try to hedge my bet! I try nicking, soaking, cold-stratifying, hot-bedding, and even peroxide. I've never been shut out, but I'm also really, really, really, really bad about losing the chart that I write about what I did to each set so I can't even tell you which things worked and when.
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

October 5, 2012
8:56 PM

Post #9297133

[quote="cindyeo"]I have really good luck with larkspur, now it comes back from volunteers, but to get the area started I did direct sow in the early spring. Not winter, it was definitely around April 1.
quote]

Thanks for the info. I will try them in fall and spring and see which works for me, as I would love to have some.

birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

October 6, 2012
4:20 PM

Post #9297732

It took me about four years to get Larkspur growing. This past spring, I had a huge amount of them blooming - coming up from seed. So, don't give up on the Larkspur. If you keep planting them, they will grow. For me, it is much better to plant them in the fall--like right now--even much better-last of August or September. Mine are already two inches tall. So, keep this in mind next fall. In the meantime, put some seed out now, and Winter Sow some-transplanting them very early in the Spring. I Winter sow them--and get a tremendous stand of babies. But, it was difficult to get them in the ground in the spring before the heat set in. Plant them in a glob-not separating ea. one. I have good luck transplanting them. They have a root like a carrot so you have to get them early or dig down-- really deep. Once you get them growing, they will re-seed from then on. It's just getting them going initially.

I have really, really good luck growing seeds via Winter Sow. There are a few exceptions: heliotrope has to be grown inside under lights. Verbena was difficult and has to be indoors in something like a cool whip container with the lid (darkness)-but watch-when they sprout, be ready to take the lid off. I have tried to grow Oriental Poppies via Winter Sow for years, and this is the first year I have a "few" to plant in the ground. I have also tried to grow them in the ground. This year, my husband took pity on me, made a raised bed and planted a gob of O. Poppies. They grew like gang busters. So, I have plenty to share. However, the writing on the tags disappeared, so we are waiting until next year to move them after they have bloomed. (Hopefully!) I have also read the Blue Poppy is a difficult plant to grow from seed and difficult plant to well, just grow. So, I don't bother to even try it. There's so many beautiful plants out there-I don't need the challenge!

Digitalis grows like absolute weeds for me--if I winter sow it. Penstemon has to be stratified. I haven't tried Salvia much, but would like to-maybe this next year. Aquilegia (columbine) has to be in moistened medium and be stratified. My problem is not getting seeds to germinate--my problem is having so many germinate, I don't know what to do with them. I hate to throw away perfectly good plants.

I don't have very good luck with the baggy method-I often forget them, and they rot. Also, once they germinate, it's extremely tedious to prick out the seeds and get them in the soil. Starting seeds in situ doesn't give me enough control. I don't do many annuals unless they are costly to buy at a garden center (Heliotrope, Angelonia), or they aren't available at garden centers (tall snapdragons).


This has been what is successful to me: First is: research, research, research. I first decide which seeds I want to plant. Then, I do research on how ea. seed is best suited for successful germination. Then, I order the seeds in time for the necessary stratification etc. Winter Sowing the seeds for me, has been extremely successful.
You have to keep a couple of things in mind:
1. Always start with new seed starting medium--other wise, the soil is too heavy and will suffocate the seeds(rot).
2. Moisten the soil so that it is like a sponge that has been rung out. You can hear it "squish" but you don't see any mositure when you squeeze the soil in your hands.
3. Always research the best method for the seed. Don't just follow the directions on the seed packet or what the catalog says--it's too vague. Make written notes and refer back to your notes often as you plant the seeds. Using gallon milk jugs has worked best for me.
4. Keep a close eye on the ones you plant; so you don't have them collapse. Once they germinate and get to growing well, watch out for hot sunny days-allowing extra air circulation, or they will collapse.

I have bookmarked several germinating references. I will share these with you: Bookmark them and refer to them often as you plan your seed purchases and sowing your seeds. Put the names in a search engine (Google). I start looking at seed catalogs in December and get my order in by the first week in January, so I will have enough time to get the necessary seeds stratified.
1. Backyard Gardener Seed Germination Database (This is the best one-scroll all the way down the page)
2. Tom Clothier's Garden Walk and Talk (Brief but accurate)
3. 2 B Seeds

I encourage you to try Penstemon one more time. If you follow these directions, you will get germination:
Germination is in 18 to 21 days. Needs light. Temps: 55-60*. Well drained soil. Just barely cover the seeds. Sometimes, when it says "just barely cover", I use a lite sprinkling of Perlite. Plus, you can really seed the little green specks of seed germination when you use Perlite. (always exciting!)
Stratify Stratify Stratify Stratify
Seeds need moisture and cold before they will germinate. I put the seeds in the refrigerator. This artificially stimulates them by placing the moistened seed in a refrigerator for a certain period of time (depending on which species)--usually 3 to 5 weeks at around 41 degrees. (some take 8 weeks-so allow extra time when you are ordering your seed. For example, starting them in January for germination in March.

Columbine has to be stratified also. It has irregular germination--so just be patient.

The only seeds I don't attempt are those that may take 3 or more months to germinate-my seasons aren't long enough for that.

This is way more information than you wanted-but maybe it will be useful to someone.
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

October 6, 2012
4:46 PM

Post #9297743

birder17 ~ Thank you so much for taking the time to give us the detailed info you have gained over the years of your experience.

I have an underbed storage bin filled with smaller boxes of seeds that I hope to sow all during fall through this coming spring. Most of them are too old to put into seed exchanges or "robins", so I will have to "bite the bullet" and sow them. I know that many old seeds are perfectly fine and if they only give me 50% germination, that will be more than if I just keep them in their packages...LOL!! I do have lots of room in which to sow them directly, but like many of you, I obsess about wanting to have the control but sometimes, I realize, it is time to "let go". I will be happy to have all of these sown, or tossed if they really look too old or the seed packet looks damaged in any way.

Some seeds have to be sown fresh. I know that is the case with Delphinium, is it also true with Larkspur? I would think so, if they are in the same family and being so closely related. Does anyone have experience in germinating old Larkspur seeds?

And of course, I have tender perennials and annuals that will need to be started under lights indoors. Once spring hits, I have little time to sow many seeds as I seem to be busy with so many other garden chores. I may just have to do a lot more direct sowing. Last year I sowed some old sweet pea seeds and they did fine. However, I did not count how many I sowed and how many that came up. So I do not really know what percent of germination that took place. However, it was nice to have sweet peas instead of just looking at the pictures on the seed envelopes...LOL!! And they smelled heavenly!!

Does anyone besides me have a glut of old seeds? I did clean out quite a few last year, but I still have the almost full storage box, so...sow...sow... ^_^

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

October 6, 2012
6:03 PM

Post #9297806

I have two tissue size boxes full of old seeds I will throw out on ground during late winter if they grow they grow if not too bad . me too piggy, piggy, piggy, when it comes to keeping too many seeds.
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

October 6, 2012
7:50 PM

Post #9297938

Be careful what you wish for. Two years ago, I Winter Sowed a bunch of old seeds-just to see if they would make it--do or die--and I had way too many plants. You can put ten seeds in a damp paper towel in a baggie and see how many would germinate. That would you give you an idea how viable your seed is. For me, I tend to forget to check the paper towels. When I use milk jugs, I use a soldering iron to melt the holes for drainage. It goes really fast.

I have four shoe boxes of seeds. One for perennials, one for annuals, one for vegetables, and one for vines. I Do have them organized. All the different Antirrhinums (snapdragons) in separate small envelopes, then, in a zip lock baggie, all the different Digitalis (foxglove) in small envelopes and into another baggie etc. Having the extra seeds doesn't bother me. I also "try" to keep an inventory on the computer. I keep my seeds in the garage. A lot of people put their seeds in the freezer. I keep thinking I will do that-but I don't. Plus, my freezer is full.

There's a thread on the Propagation forum on "old seeds and new seeds" you might find interesting.
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1028162/

What "tender perennials and annuals" are you planning to sow under lights? For me, under lights is prime real estate.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

October 6, 2012
8:08 PM

Post #9297959

Like sowing seeds I'm still trying to decide,Maybe some of my purple basil?If the room is there later, some of the vegies ,only spring is a long time off .
1alh1
Sidney, OH
(Zone 6a)

October 6, 2012
10:55 PM

Post #9298151

I often start seeds using the wet paper towel method and then just "plant" the whole paper towel. I toss a little soil on top. If you use really cheap paper towels, they decompose easily, and you don't have to pick out the seeds.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

October 7, 2012
7:18 AM

Post #9298342

Birder, I very much agree with your recommendation of Dave Clothier's Garden Walk and Talk. I am not familiar with the others but I certainly will be checking them. Another great source is JL Hudson. He discusses, for most of his seeds, germination times, difficulty of germination

He also has an unbelievable section on germination of various plant types:
http://www.jlhudsonseeds.net/Germination.htm

And links to an authoritative source, plus supplements, on the same page.

And thank you, 1alh1! I start heliotrope on damp paper towels in a baggie on top of my fridge (since it requires 70 degrees and must be started early), and the problem has always been picking out the seeds. How simple! How clever! I just need a roll of really cheap paper towels.

I have a thousands of old seeds. I have managed to germinate seed from 1998, because once the regular refrigerator got too full I was given the gift of a minifridge (the kind without a freezer) by my exasperated husband. I dug up 68 lilies last year and put them in seed starting mix (low fertility) inside zip lock bags. I only lost one. Seed I dig up and dry out goes into the same kind of bags. I harvest mirabilis jalapa, hyacinth beans, ricinus, nasturtiums, garden balsam, morning glories and other seeds. Some seeds only come in color mixes, and I tag and separate them.

My previous home had a dark section of the basement where I hung a series of shop lights and would germinate hundreds of plants. I particularly liked the salvia family, and would germinate three colors of hominum aka viridis, four kinds of salvia farinacea, and two kinds of salvia coccinea. I've also germinated lots of perennials. My new house has too much light in the full basement! I do some germination on my sunny enclosed patio, but the success rates are lower. I do have a bumper crop of platycodons coming up, but I miss being able to hang shop lights.

I had an inventory that listed the seed, the company from which I bought it, the date I bought it and the success rate, but my old backup drive crashed and with it the list. My winter project may be to start a new chart of all the seeds I have now.
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

October 7, 2012
10:25 AM

Post #9298541

[quote="birder17"]Be careful what you wish for. Two years ago, I Winter Sowed a bunch of old seeds-just to see if they would make it--do or die--and I had way too many plants.


What "tender perennials and annuals" are you planning to sow under lights? For me, under lights is prime real estate.

[/quote]

Petunias, impatiens, vinca (Catharanthus roseus), and four o'clocks mainly. I'm sure there are others. This year I got a Ptilotus 'Joey' and I have saved the seeds. Has anyone had experience with those?

And, of course my usual assortment of tomatoes, and peppers. Yes, I do not have a lot of room for "under lights" either, so I winter sow many of them each year. I hope to do a lot more direct sowing as it will save a lot of steps, I think...



This message was edited Oct 7, 2012 10:26 AM
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

October 7, 2012
12:35 PM

Post #9298660

I also like Tom Clothier and Backyard Gardener. Do you know this one?

http://theseedsite.co.uk/

There is a ton of information on it. The database describes and shows photos of seed pods, seeds and seedlings, and gives an idea of germination times and conditions. Other areas go into much more detail. This time of year when I'm saving seeds from plants I haven't grown before it's invaluable.
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

October 7, 2012
12:44 PM

Post #9298667

Thanks, Pam. I have been collecting seeds of buddliea and they are very tiny and hard to see. I think that this will help.
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

October 7, 2012
3:48 PM

Post #9298866

I have grown Heliotrope from seed for years. I put it by my front door every year (fragrant). It's a little slow to start blooming, but once it gets started, it blooms all summer long. Mine are loaded with blooms right now, and it's October. I have tried Winter Sowing it and that did not work, and since have been doing it under lights. Last spring, I tried the Burpee self watering cell system under lights, and I had excellent and quick germination. I am going to do this method again this spring.

I use Swallowtail Seeds a lot. They seem to have a nice variety. I also used Eden Brothers this last Spring. They send a lot of seed per package. It seems I only had to pay two dollars regardless the amount of order. Now, I notice they say something about free shipping within the continental US.

Yes, I have been to the Seed Site--somehow I failed to bookmark it. It's a good site too.

Regarding Larkspur, along with planting some seed outside now and winter sowing some, you might try putting some in the refrigerator for a month and then plant the seed--either winter sow or in situ. One problem I recall with Larkspur seed was it was unavailable in late August. Locals would stock it for spring.

"Generally", the bigger the seed, the less care you have to take with getting it to germinate. That's one reason why a lot of gardeners plant their vegetables straight out into the garden. Vegetable seeds are relatively big. Hyacinth Bean & Scarlet Runner Bean has to be excellent drainage, or the seeds will rot when starting them in cells/pots. I use about 1/3 sand.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

October 8, 2012
5:55 AM

Post #9299291

Ah, that was the problem with my hyacinth beans this year. I'd always grown the successfully, but I have a new yard and direct seeded them, as I had before, and they did not take. The soil is different, and less well drained.

Thanks!
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

October 8, 2012
5:57 PM

Post #9300037

Eveline: Since your under lights is premium real estate, have you considered just buying a couple of six packs of petunias, vinca and impatiens and put other plants more rare or more expensive under your grow lights. It's what I do. I don't mess too much with annuals. By the time they are big enough to plant "out", it's too hot, and they have to be babied to get them to take off.

We start our heirloom tomato plants from seeds, and they go under the grow lights. Used the Burpee self watering cell system for them, and they grew like gang busters. Peppers, we usually find enough of what we want at a garden center. It's just a thought.

Donna, what a shame, no, disaster to loose your seed data. That sounds like a good winter project. You might want to print out a hard copy. That's what I do. I have saved a lot of my tags from way back when. This winter, I am going to go through them and enter them on a spread sheet with various info. It's nice to be able to look at a glance and see what you have and the scientific name as well as the common name.

Eveline, I have used old Larkspur seed (last years), and it has germinated fine. Donna sounds like the expert on germinating old seeds.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

October 9, 2012
5:56 AM

Post #9300371

I will be able to assemble my seed data from some of the packets. I also record when I bought it,from who, and the germination rate. I can assemble a lot of this from my garden logs, one start in 200 and the other in 2008. Then I can compare them with my current seeds. I used to carefully record what I ran out of.

I do have an annual file on plant purchases, and I keep the tags. It helps.

I used to have an elaborate collection of APS systems from Garden Supply Company, but had to ditch lots of them when I moved.

This is why I now have a hard drive back-up AND Carbonite. I lost some pictures from before 2006, as well. However, back in 1998 through about 2003 I used to photograph them with a disposable camera, and I still have all of those images.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

October 9, 2012
6:38 AM

Post #9300415

I have a lot of info on a couple of CD's i cannot play because my computers aren't compatible, I will keep the discs until I update to something that plays any of them.
I just love the way everything works all together as one. Don't you?
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

October 9, 2012
6:44 AM

Post #9300418

Back in the 80's and 90's I also used the APS system for seed starting. It was the first of the self-watering systems I found. It made all the difference, as I was a weekend gardener back then, too. Now I use the ones from Novosel, much less bulky and the standard 1020 size, which makes it easier to mix and match containers. They fit nicely on the shelves under lights in the city window. In the country I like the ones from Gardener's supply that are a little bigger and very sturdy, also good for outside use.

I keep a journal, too, and seed starting logs. My old files were on 4x6 cards, and are long gone. I gardened in a different zone then, so it's not such a big loss now. I record my current files on the computer and/or iPad, but always put them in cloud storage for backup and easy access from both.

Still, every year is different, and the tried and true doesnt always work...

I will try larkspur again this year using info from this thread, very early, maybe in the section I just re-arranged. The hard part always is finding an area where I won't be digging so much in the spring!

DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

October 9, 2012
10:46 AM

Post #9300642

My expereince is equally positive. In many ways they made me a gardener. They opened the door for the growing of, over the years, thousands of plants. The APS system gets better every time I order some more. They keep improving parts of it, like the capillary matter, which is just outstanding now. I first used it in the late 90's. I ordered a couple of APS 12's this year and I have to applaud them. They really have it going on.

The other thing I got, still have, and still love, are a set of self watering hanging planters they don't offer any more and their self watering pots on wheels, which I use to grow roses, tomatoes and peppers.
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

October 9, 2012
3:54 PM

Post #9300911

Last year was the first year I used the propagation system. I was amazed how well the seeds germinated. It seems to take all the guessing out of the process. I have always used the Winter Sow method and grew many plants rather than purchase outright. Ten dollars for one plant that I may kill seems steep!

So, what do you do with your tags? I am trying to figure out what I want to do with them.

One seed I have trouble getting to germinate is Sweet Pea vine. I don't know if I get too aggressive with scarifying the seed or what. Maybe, I soak the seed in water too long.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

October 9, 2012
4:25 PM

Post #9300931

I think you mean the perennial but I usually have good luck soaking them overnight and then sticking them into heavily composted soil on the last day of March. That's been my modus operandi for several years, but this year, with the overly warm weather, it didn't work!

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

October 9, 2012
4:39 PM

Post #9300946

I just saw this pop up and it reminds me that I want to get some of those old seed packets out, fill some four packs, and let them do what Mother Nature will allow.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

October 9, 2012
5:10 PM

Post #9300970

Sweet peas: Last year I had more sweet peas than I knew what to do with. This spring I was sure I remembered, how I did it, didn't even question. So I nicked and soaked, and got zip. Couldn't believe it! Now I've actually looked back at 2011 to see what I did, and this is what I found:

3/16 Put sweet pea seeds in paper towels, baggie. Did not nick, seeds from 2009, look old, some cracked.

3/19: Wow! Sweet Peas sprouting already! This AM put 4 in Dixie cups, potting soil, cover w. wet seed starting mix, covered with plastic wrap. Later found 3 more, put in 1 Dixie cup. Worried about space- running out again.

Now I remember, I dampened thenpaper towels with 1:10 peroxide:water, left the baggies in the corner of the shelf, out of the light, no heat but not cold, and checked them every morning until they started to sprout.

I guess that's what I'll be doing in 1013.
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

October 10, 2012
8:21 AM

Post #9301470

I have never used Hydrogen Peroxide. I am basically unfamiliar with its use and need to research. I have always nicked the Sweet Peas and soaked them in water. I think I am too aggressive with the nicking, but man, they're hard to nick.

I have had good luck the first year I tried the Sweet Peas, but don't remember doing anything unusual. I will try the peroxide. I tend to forget to re-check the baggies. I get busy and oops! it's been two or three weeks. I guess that's why WS works so well for me--I tend to plant and forget!

Donna, I meant the annuals. I have read the perennial sweet peas are too aggressive. What has been your experience?

It gets so hot here so fast, the sweet peas don't last very long. I do love their fragrance and their blooms are ...so sweet!
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

October 10, 2012
8:44 AM

Post #9301489

I started growing sweet peas when I put an unscented rose on a trellis. I do use Mammoth Mix, which is a heat tolerant strain with large flowers. The antique ones smell lovely but they are tiny, and I only got mediocre results from the big English ones.

I also got nice results from scarlet runner beans, which surprised me. These runner beans are from a pic taken on August 24 of 2010.

I find the trick with both is starting them under the right conditions. I would soak them for two days, and then direct sow the in lots of compost. My target day was always March 31. It completely failed this year, but I think that was because spring was too mild (if there is such a thing!)

Thumbnail by DonnaMack   Thumbnail by DonnaMack         
Click an image for an enlarged view.

evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

October 10, 2012
11:52 AM

Post #9301613

I did not soak or nick my sweet pea seeds. They were old seeds, so I just put them in the ground. I was not even sure if they would come up. Since I did not count how many I sowed, I do not know the percentage of germination. However they were amass with color and fragrance and very much welcomed. They lasted until the end of July. It was past their time before then, but I did keep picking them, so I had lots of flowers for indoors as well.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

October 10, 2012
1:47 PM

Post #9301691

WOW. You grew sweet peas successfully in California?

You have the touch.
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

October 10, 2012
3:48 PM

Post #9301785

Eveline: I am jealous! The few times I have had sweet peas, I have forgotten to pick the flowers. Thanks for the reminder.

Donna: I will try the Mammoth Mix.

Since different gardeners said they used old seed and did not nick them, I am thinking I must be nicking them too deeply. I will try soaking them for two days instead of nicking them.

I seem to have had better luck planting them in the ground vs pots then to the ground. Donna, is your goal date of March 31 to plant them or get them growing by then? You use lots of compost and no soil?
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

October 10, 2012
3:56 PM

Post #9301786

I out them into the ground on that date. After soaking them overnight, I literally push them as far as I can into the ground and cover them with compost. I do that because our ground is often still frozen at that date and I can't dig!

So there is some soil, but sweet peas prefer "rich" soil, which I interpret as compost.
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

October 10, 2012
4:30 PM

Post #9301806

I think I will shoot for St Patrick's Day as I am in zone 6.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

October 10, 2012
4:53 PM

Post #9301834

That sounds perfect.
dmac085
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7a)

November 11, 2012
9:54 AM

Post #9330318

I'm going to give my larkspur a chance again. I had some bloom one season--one of the shorter types--and no more after that. I know fresh seed is important for larkspur but I've got a year old pack I'm still going to try. I tend towards annuals due to limited space and my bulb and iris addiction but I do need a couple or three good perennials to anchor the space a bit.

Nothing reseeds well for me but I do have one rogue 4 o'clock that has formed into a tuber and returns each season and flowers from late summer to frost.

I'm going to try some small scale wintersowing and direct seeding. I do have a question about that direct seeding thing. When exactly would you do that? I'm in zone 7 and the past winters have been relatively mild with the exception of a Jan/Feb cold period. Not sure what this winter is going to shape up into. So for direct seeding, would it be in mid/late Dec or later, maybe in mid January?
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

November 20, 2012
5:01 PM

Post #9338452

Hi dmac, for "direct sow" are you referring to Larkspur?

If it is Larkspur, I believe I would put it out around late February. In order to get Larkspur to grow in my garden, in the "early" Spring, I roughed up the soil, planted the seed, patted it down, and put "rings" around the seeds so I would know where the seed had been planted. For rings, I cut a milk jug around horizontally below the handle and again three inches or so down. Then, I used garden "Staples" to hold the ring in place. That way, I knew where the baby seedlings were and to Not pull them thinking they were weeds. This worked "okay", but I didn't get a hefty stand of plants. It simply allows those plants to re-seed and a couple of years later, you start getting a good crop of seeds. The best germination for me was to Winter Sow them in milk jugs and plant them out early.
Here's my Larkspur last year:

Thumbnail by birder17   Thumbnail by birder17   Thumbnail by birder17      
Click an image for an enlarged view.

birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

November 20, 2012
5:16 PM

Post #9338462

Here's "some" of my winter sowing last year:

Picture 1 & 2 in the milk jugs.
The rest are taking them out of the jugs and potting the seedlings up.

Thumbnail by birder17   Thumbnail by birder17   Thumbnail by birder17   Thumbnail by birder17   Thumbnail by birder17
Click an image for an enlarged view.

cindyeo
Duxbury, MA
(Zone 7a)

November 22, 2012
5:03 AM

Post #9339700

birder - your larkspur are gorgeous. Although I see a few pink ones mixed in, it's predominately the beautiful blue. Is that just nature taking it's course? or did you buy an all blue variety? I get the Imperial giants (and they aren't that giant). Like you, it took a couple years to get them started, but now they self-seed, and I do have good luck moving them around, if I do it early.

my second question for you is the intermediate step in winter sowing. Why do you move them from the milk jugs to the six packs? I usually go right into the ground from the milk jugs. Just wondering if there's a trick I'm missing out on.
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

November 23, 2012
8:39 PM

Post #9340941

Cindy,
Thanks for the compliment. I really enjoyed the combo of Larkspur and Poppies. I wish I could tell you why they turned out so big--I can only guess: right climate at the right time and maybe amended soil. We had an early, wonderful spring this past year.

I don't separate the Larkspur into separate cell pots. I put the Larkspur in "wads" right into the garden soil as soon as the temps permit. Actually, I think one should probably put them in as soon as your ground is not frozen. Larkspur can take a lot of cold--like pansies and my snaps are doing quite well.

I do separate the perennials, pot them up over the summer and plant them in the fall. They do Very Well if they are planted in the fall. I planted over a 100 perennials this fall that I grew from Winter Sowing this past winter and gave as many plants away that I could talk anyone into taking some of the plants. I probably had more than 300 plants that germinated, but could not keep up with potting them all up. It starts as early as January (those that have to be stratified) and ends in September, October and even some were planted in November. The most taxing challenge is two fold: 1. Keeping them watered and 2. When it rains, the soil splashes on the leaves and can literally kill the plants, drown the plants, or wash all of the soil from the cell pots. You have to keep them from getting under an eave or whatever may cause extra rain water falling onto the little plants. When they get bigger, you don't have to worry about that--just have to keep them watered.

I try to keep the number of seeds planted under control, but seeds the size of dust is hard to control how much falls into the soil. Every year, I tell myself "not very many seeds--be very selective". My nice husband has even asked my not to plant so many seeds! (He helps me plant the plants!).
And then of course, there's some of "I want some of these and some of these and some of these...etc." Larkspur, Lobelia, Digitalis, and Penstemon germinate prolifically.
cindyeo
Duxbury, MA
(Zone 7a)

November 27, 2012
1:35 PM

Post #9343939

I know, I think that is a universal gardener's problem, controlling ourselves when ordering seeds or bulbs, so we don't have too many things to plant each summer. Just wondering what your reasoning is for not planting the perennials right into the ground? I suppose you lose too many of them over the course of the summer? I do lose track of things if I plant babies in the middle of my perennial garden, not sure why, lack of water, cutworms, shaded out too much as the big plants grow? So maybe I should take that intermediate step.
dmac085
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7a)

November 27, 2012
7:44 PM

Post #9344280

Thank you for the planting information for the larkspur:) I'm actually afraid to try wintersowing--afraid it will work like a charm and I'll end up running a nursery from my apartment:lol:

I picked up some of the 2 liter soda bottle trays that the soda delivery guys have them stacked up in their big displays so maybe since each holds 8 two liter bottles I'll do two trays.

Domehomedee

Domehomedee
Arroyo Grande, CA
(Zone 9a)

December 3, 2012
5:23 PM

Post #9349079

I've already started planting mass amounts of perennial seeds in trays and putting them on the heat mat or in the greenhouse. I even have four seed trays that have been on the mat and then in the greenhouse and now they are back inside on the mat again. I'm not getting a lot of germinaton yet, but a few have come up:
Echium (tower of jewels), white Stokes aster, Asclepias tuberosa. I read somewhere that alternating heat and cold can shock them into germinating. Sounds good and nothing lost if it doesn't work. I remove the seedlings into 4" pots as they germinate.
I had to laugh when earlier in this post someone mentions Himalayan blue poppies, I don't know how many times I tried them before giving up! I am rather excited about getting "tower of jewels" to germinate, this is the third try on these and I have like a dozen seedlings. I don't blame myself when the seeds don't germinate, I blame the seed source, or sometimes the seeds themselves can be difficult. The best seeds come from other gardeners on Dave's garden.
dmac - wintersowing did get me to start a nursery with all my extra plants LOL!
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

December 4, 2012
10:55 AM

Post #9349621

cindy: you asked about waiting to plant the perennials in the fall rather than in the summer. Yes, I lose too many of them. It gets too hot, too little water--lack of control on my part--I can keep those babies in pots and take better care of them until fall--then, they are on their own and do quite well. I don't do Anything to them after I plant and water them in. They take off like gangbusters. They have lots of roots by the time I plant them in the fall. It works really well for me.
cindyeo
Duxbury, MA
(Zone 7a)

December 10, 2012
5:12 PM

Post #9355070

yes, I'm going to try that from now on, wait until fall to plant perennial seedlings

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

December 10, 2012
5:16 PM

Post #9355073

Yes that and all the little Cutleaf Coneflowers sprouting here would agree, millions of em!! self sow incident in the making!!!
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

December 10, 2012
5:35 PM

Post #9355090

Cindy, you have to "baby" your perennial seedlings throughout the summer. The two biggest problems I find are:
1. Keeping them watered--being careful not to drown them when they are tiny. I often hold the plant up with my fingers from the stem, water them, let the water soak into the soil, then let go of the plant. If the plant gets stuck in the mud-it covers up the stomata on the leaves and the plant suffers tremendously even dieing.
2. Keeping them protected from downpours of rain for the same reasons as mentioned above.
3. Transplanting to larger pots. I do this twice: Once from the milk jug into tiny 2 X 2 inch cells and once more into a larger pot that it will stay in until it would be planted in the fall. I use about anything for a flower pot--plastic pots I have kept from past purchases, and when I run out of those, I use 32 oz. styrofoam soda cups. I cut the top down and punch a few quick holes in the bottoms for drainage. For poppies and plants that have long roots, I leave the 32 oz cup as is and just punch holes in the bottom.

Then, in the fall, you just plant them out and they take off.

Every one has their way of getting flowers from seeds. This is what has worked for me.
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

December 26, 2012
12:27 PM

Post #9367640

Re-reading this thread.

dmarc: You wrote you didn't have luck with plants re-seeding. Could it be that you are using lots of mulch and the seeds aren't hitting the soil? I used to do that and had very little re-seeding.
dmac085
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7a)

December 30, 2012
6:42 AM

Post #9370405

No, I don't mulch at all--a good half of my bed is TB iris and since those are my faves I don't put down mulch. I'm going to give it another go and put out some seeds this winter.

I actually had some linaria Northern Lights reseed from one container into another and the new seedlings bloomed a few weeks later, just prior to the first hard frost.
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 30, 2012
2:07 PM

Post #9370750

What is TB iris?
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

December 30, 2012
2:50 PM

Post #9370770

Tall Bearded Iris, also referred to as TBI's.

I do mulch, and usually don't often get volunteers from perennials because of this. I do, however, get plenty of annuals such as Nicotianas, Verbena Bonariensis, Cleomes and the like. Having said that, I realize that it's not completely true. The perennials whose seeds travel pop up in the most interesting places; Digitalis Grandiflora, aconitums,Llobelia Siphilitica, some phlox, even a Verbascum Wedding Candles 2 years after the parent plant vanished.. I often leave them, or share them with others.
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

December 30, 2012
3:27 PM

Post #9370799

Thanks, pfg!

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BLUE FLOWERS Lori_Illinois 62 May 4, 2010 4:09 PM
Triple Roadside/Ditch lily OhioBreezy 21 Jul 9, 2011 6:56 PM
what are you sorry you planted.. thehumblebumble 279 Aug 12, 2012 4:28 AM


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