seedling rescue

New Port Richey, FL

While taking a break yesterday I noticed quite a few seedlings coming up in the mulch under 2 large plumarias where I work. I lifted 7 of the largest (3" high) and brought them home and potted in 4" pots. Checked when I got home today and they look fine. No wilt. The parent plants are white with yellow centers. within 25 feet there are 2 pastel rainbows and all colors in the neighborhood. It's an upscale beach community and plumerias are in every landscape. The lawn maintenance guy's come on friday's and I know they'll be spraying round-up soon. There's probably 2 dozen or more still there and I hate to see them get sprayed. I'm very new to plumaria and not sure if it's worthwhile to save what I can, and if so am I doing it right and if I'm successful is anybody interested in adopting some of them. I certainly don't have space for that many.

Lee's Summit, MO(Zone 6a)

It sounds as if you did it correctly. Now, the challenge will be to keep them growing. If overwatered, they rot - if underwatered, the dehydrate. I don't do well with seedlings, so can't give you definite directions to grow them, but surely someone will come along and help you.

Why not dig them and make a row of them in your yard. When they get large enough, trade them for other plants you want. We love to trade on these forums!

New Port Richey, FL

Kay, Thanks for the advice. They're still looking good and it looks like some are sprouting under the rainbow one. I'll probably keep them in pots till spring. Getting ready to move to a place that has absolutely nothing in the front or back yard so I'll need all the plants I can get and if I can get them for free all the better.

Lee's Summit, MO(Zone 6a)

Well, keep us posted on how they do for you.

Baton Rouge, LA

If I had limited space to grow them, I would choose the seedlings from the rainbow tree. Seedlings do not usually grow true to the parent, but seedlings from white and yellow flowers would most likely give you white and yellow flowers. The pastel tree seedlings will probably give you a greater variety of colors.

Since you can grow them in the ground and you have a long growing season, you could get blooms in less than two years. Many will bloom in the second to third year. However, keep in mind that some may take five or more years to
bloom.

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