Photo by Melody

Tropical Plants: How to get a permisson for cuttings of a botanical garden ?

Communities > Forums > Tropical Plants
bookmark
Forum: Tropical PlantsReplies: 12, Views: 148
Add to Bookmarks
-
AuthorContent
AndyBonsai
other
Germany

August 3, 2012
2:59 AM

Post #9227849

hello,

iīm andy 18 years old and very interested in tropical trees and shrubs. i started to colltect special species (some of them are very rare) to cutlivate them as bonsai in future. i can get seeds of the most specis i want without any problems, but when i grow some species from seeds they need up to 15 years for the first flower. because of this i would like to get cuttings of botanical gardens which have allready old plants. with the cuttings i have only to wait one or two years for the first flower.
do someone know how i can get a permission for cuttings of a botanical garden as private person? i contacted a lot of botanical gardens, but they arenīt allowed to give me any cuttings because iīm a private person. they said that theyīre only allowed to give cuttings to other botanical gardens or to people who do research with them. i had the same problem with all botanical gardens, it has nothing to do with the country.
i hope here is someone who can help me.

best regards
andy
hcmcdole
Powder Springs, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 3, 2012
4:16 AM

Post #9227883

If everyone got a cutting from a public/private garden then there would be no plants left to enjoy for everyone else. Best to take pictures and enjoy. You'd be better off getting cuttings from friends, neighbors, and family. You can also get the name of the plant at the garden and do a search on line for places that sell seeds or live plants of the same thing. Most plants grow fast if given good conditions.

dyzzypyxxy

dyzzypyxxy
Sarasota, FL
(Zone 9b)

August 3, 2012
8:44 AM

Post #9228137

What kinds of plants are you looking for, Andy? Here in the US, we trade cuttings amongst forum members freely. If you can establish contact with other collectors in your country, that would be your best source for cuttings of unusual plants.

I don't know what your regulations would be in Germany, but you should find out. It's possible you could source your plants from others all over Europe and just pay postage, or trade cuttings as we do. There are strict regulations here about importing plant materials between countries to prevent the spread of invasive species, insects and plant diseases. Permits, inspections and sometimes quarantine are required, so only commercial plant importers/exporters bring cuttings and plants into the US. It's generally too much trouble and expense for an individual to do.

We have a local nursery here, Tropiflora, that does ship plants overseas, I think. No idea what the cost would be though. They specialize in rare species and unusual tropical plants, especially bromeliads. www.tropiflora.com



ecrane3
Dublin, CA
(Zone 9a)

August 3, 2012
9:21 AM

Post #9228172

I would be surprised if you find any botanical gardens willing to let you take cuttings--if they do it for you they'd have to do it for everyone else and pretty soon there'd be no plants left. As others have pointed out, trading is your best bet if you want cuttings for free although you'll need to look for others from Germany (or maybe other parts of Europe depending on what the rules are). Trading seeds is generally easy across country borders, but cuttings/plants are not.

Do the botanical gardens near you have plant sales? Here most of them will have sales once or twice a year where they will sell plants which their volunteers have propagated, so that can be a good way to get your hands on some of the things that they grow if you're able to spend a little money. I've found prices at the botanical garden sales are typically very reasonable (often cheaper than local nurseries even though the plants are rarer)
KayJones
Lee's Summit, MO
(Zone 6a)

August 5, 2012
11:29 AM

Post #9230374

The best way to get rare cuttings is just what Ecrane said - if YOU volunteer at a public display garden you would get first pick of the plants the volunteers propagate. Heck, volunteer for the 'trimming' position!
AndyBonsai
other
Germany

August 5, 2012
3:11 PM

Post #9230642

thanks for all answers, but they donīt help me with my question. i know why botanical gardens donīt give cuttings to pivate persons, i wrote some e-mails to botanical gardens and even phoned with a botanist. they would give me cutting, but it isnīt allowed because of restrictions.
you gave me some good suggestions how i could maybe get cuttings in an other way, but i tried allready everything which could be an alternative. the main problem is to find the right people and i didnīt find them in the biggest german plant forum, on ebay (sellers of seeds, plants or both) or here on dg. i checked the member lists to find people who are from europe countries where you can find some species i want, but i hadnīt luck. most of all i want cuttings of Couroupita guianensis and this tree is nowhere to find in europe. i also tried to find people on flickr who took pictures of species i want and who could maybe send me cutting. now iīm waiting for answers, but even i find someone who could send me cuttings, there is a big problem to get documents for them. there are only two botanical gardens in germany which have species i want and they are far away.
ecrane3
Dublin, CA
(Zone 9a)

August 5, 2012
3:41 PM

Post #9230674

Unfortunately the answer is that no matter how hard you try there are probably going to be some species that you just can't get cuttings of quickly and easily (and maybe not at all). You need to be patient and keep looking, and over time (potentially years, not weeks/months) you'll find some of the things you're looking for. I know you don't want to wait for seedlings to grow up & bloom, but realistically that is probably your best option for the things you're having a hard time finding. Seeds are often easier to find than plants/cuttings plus you don't have the import issues with them that you do with plant material so you can order them (or trade for them) all around the world and that really improves your odds of getting your hands on some.
hcmcdole
Powder Springs, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 5, 2012
4:18 PM

Post #9230715

How are you going to grow a cannonball tree (up to 60 feet in height or more) in Germany unless you have an extra large greenhouse? How many years jump can you actually get from cuttings over seeds (1 year? 2 years?)
AndyBonsai
other
Germany

August 5, 2012
4:51 PM

Post #9230758

i want to cultivate all tree i have as bonsais. how many years jump i can get depends on the species and the conditions. some trees need op to 15 for the flowers and with a cuttings of a tree which allready flowered i have only to wait one or two years for the first flowers. i found out that there can be a very big difference how long a species needs to flower for the first time. you can read for example everywhere that the mangosteen tree needs 8 years for the first fruits under good conditions and under bad conditions it can last up to 15 years. very interesting is that i found someone who has a very good climate all year long (lowest temperature is 19 degree in averrage) and that his trees starts to flower within 3 years when they are grown from seed. i donīt know how to explain it in a good way, but the trees have to "grow up" till they flower. they "grow up" much faster under good conditions and under bad condtions it can last much longer. i donīt have much sun in germany and i think that a seedling would need here very long to "grow up".

dyzzypyxxy

dyzzypyxxy
Sarasota, FL
(Zone 9b)

August 5, 2012
5:11 PM

Post #9230785

In places where it doesn't get cold in winter, the tropicals and trees keep on growing all year. So where a tree might grow for only half the year in (for example) northern Florida, the same type of tree would grow twice as fast in Hawaii where it never goes dormant.

Here, even one night of temps below 40deg. F can send tropical plants into dormancy for a month or more. So, keep those divas warm and they'll keep growing!

This message was edited Aug 5, 2012 8:54 PM
vanillaman
Washago, ON
(Zone 5b)

August 5, 2012
6:05 PM

Post #9230874

Guten Abend Andy! KayJones comment is soooo funny, "Volunteer for the trimming position!".

I totally understand your dilemma and it is very frustrating when you can't get the cuttings and seeds you want. I share your Bonsai hobby and experiment with lots of different plants and trees. I also agree with ecrane3 that you will have to be patient and wait a bit longer for some things. It is not the answer you want, but I think that is maybe all you can do at this point for some of the things you are hoping for.

Possibly that British Gardening Forum can help, but they are not a member of the EU, so you might need to find club or association in another member country because of mailing/shipping restrictions. Another suggestion that could work, is if you have cuttings to trade with the Botanical Gardens near you. You might have some things they don't have, but want. Hopefully it is only a few things you are looking for, rather than dozens. If they have occasional plant sales, as ecrane3 also mentioned, that could be another way to get your plants there in Deutschland.

One last thing and "off topic". Those Couroupita trees are beautiful, but I don't think they would work as Bonsais. Even if you grew it and dwarfed it, I don't think it would ever flower because of all the pruning and training it would require. As you know, not all trees make good Bonsai material or "work".

Good luck and I hope you find what you are looking for, either here or somewhere else!
AndyBonsai
other
Germany

August 6, 2012
6:48 AM

Post #9231351

hello vanillaman,

thank you for your answer. i think the couroupita trees would be very great as bonsais. they are very strong plants and grows very well. the flowers appear on the stemm and they will flower without any problems. we will see who is right in the future. you can even cultivate climbing plants as bonsai, but you have to know how.

best regards
andy
vanillaman
Washago, ON
(Zone 5b)

August 6, 2012
8:42 AM

Post #9231534

Yes Andy, basically you can make most things Bonsais, but some things respond to training better than others. Many woody vines are great Bonsai candidates. Wisteria is one that comes to mind and is extremely popular. I have been growing Bonsais for roughly 25 years and enjoy working with both easy things as well as more challenging ones. At one point I was selling my Bonsais in Canada, but it was more a hobby than a profitable business.

That was "off topic" again, LOL! I don't know much about Couroupita trees, but just found out that they have naturalized here on our Caribbean coast mostly. Unfortunately I do not live close to that region; otherwise I would be glad to send you seeds and even cuttings, although they would probably arrive dead because of spending too long in transit. The seeds would be fine and apparently they germinate very quickly.

Cheers!
vm

You cannot post until you register, login and subscribe.


Other Tropical Plants Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Justicia spicigera Peter63 2 Oct 24, 2008 9:31 PM
caladium "Gingerland" Eclipse 43 Aug 21, 2012 7:10 PM
Malanga(Yautia) rootdoctor 22 Sep 18, 2010 8:01 AM
Castor Bean contest? rootdoctor 411 Jul 16, 2008 6:48 PM
Musa AE AE fivelabs 228 Jun 12, 2013 12:39 PM


We recommend Firefox
Overwhelmed? There's a lot to see here. Try starting at our homepage.

[ Home | About | Advertise | Media Kit | Mission | Featured Companies | Submit an Article | Terms of Use | Tour | Rules | Privacy Policy | Contact Us ]

Back to the top

Copyright © 2000-2014 Dave's Garden, an Internet Brands company. All Rights Reserved.
 

Hope for America