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Recipes: What's for Dinner (Part #35)

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Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

August 4, 2012
6:13 AM

Post #9229103

What are you having for dinner tonight?

Please join us in this wonderful series Terry started for us way back when

Photo of my favorite dessert.
(From Eating Well Magazine, Decadent Chocolate Cake recipe)

Tam

Thumbnail by Tammy
Click the image for an enlarged view.

digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 4, 2012
7:45 AM

Post #9229206

All it needs is a dollop of homemade vanilla custard , made with pure vanilla flavoring from Mexico . Yea , I still have a quart in the pantry . I have to hide it from my DDinLaw because she adds it to the coffee when brewing .I'll have to buy her some more this winter .
R R , hate you had to go back early and I missed you . Maybe next time . Lotsa hugs .
That was a good toast to the kids from everyone . I am happy I got to meet them at Laurel's round up . The daughter is a very classy lady , no doubt inspired and guided by her mother . She wears it well . Her D H reminds me a lot of her daddy, quiet and always seems to be thinking .Beautiful couple, and that marriage will last forever , no doubts !
Love ya all .
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

August 4, 2012
2:21 PM

Post #9229561

Laurel - Another virtual toast to the bride and groom! The bride looks beautiful in the dress and they look happy. BTW- Congradulations also to the MOB and chef. More pictures when you get decompressed.

Tam - Thanks for the new thread.

Dinner tonight is steak and some yet to be determined side dishes.

We have a bucket load of small tomatoes out of the garden. Enough that DH is making salsa tomorrow and I'll be throwing the rest in a crockpot to cook up some sauce.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 4, 2012
2:39 PM

Post #9229585

Laurel, I have been remiss in my congratulations! (I've been awol, so that's my excuse!) She is lovely; you did good with that girl. ^_^

SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

August 4, 2012
4:07 PM

Post #9229668

Dinner was steak, a salad of tomato, basil, pepper, and basil, and a side of red quinoa cooked with peppers and leeks.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

August 4, 2012
4:12 PM

Post #9229671

I'm just lovin' the summer vegetable braises w/fresh herb sauce. Tonight's batch had eggplant, zucchini, kale, peppers, onions and tomatoes (most of which were sungold cherries but a couple a yellow paste tomato).

Darius - I had carmelized squash yesterday and it was fabulous! I didn't have bacon but even with just the butter & olive oil, just delicious! It'll be on my rotation now.

Tam
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

August 4, 2012
4:20 PM

Post #9229677

Is that the recipe from Eating Well?

We're loving all the fresh produce also. I'm continuing to be grateful for whatever we get. The drought is taking it's toll on the plants.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

August 4, 2012
5:09 PM

Post #9229739

Yep. A recent issue showcased the best-of recipes for the last 10yrs. The vegetable braise was the readers favorite for vegetarian dishes. The herbs really make the dish. I've made three batches now, each time with a very different mix of veggies and each time we both just loved it!

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


August 5, 2012
5:31 AM

Post #9230036

Thanks, Tam! As a side note, our school supply giveaway was a whirlwind of success: we asked our congregation members to donate enough supplies to help 300 children; we had enough supplies to make up 375 packages for those who walked in the door starting at 10 yesterday morning. My amazing volunteers somehow managed to parlay those supplies into enough packages to hand out to 413 Ks through 12th graders; that was the final count when we ushered the last family out at five minutes after noon. The only snag we hit all morning was the lack of a Laotian translator - we made it work somehow, but we'll be prepared next year. We had a dinky stack of spirals and a few boxes of crayons left. Tonight we gift the school teachers from our church with apple baskets stuffed with supplies they requested for their classrooms, and then this annual project is officially done for another year.

And then my life returns to normal...whatever that means :-) Just in time to start the real canning and freezing. And hopefully some real cooking!

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

August 5, 2012
5:46 AM

Post #9230050

That's simply wonderful Terry! My old employer ran a "backpacks" program for the kids in need. They would buy the backpacks and you would sign up for a number to fill. You'd pick up the backpack, buy supplies (they gave us a list of suggestions but it was up to us to decide) and then we'd return them full. That's another downside of working remotely (though there are plenty of upsides!)

I'm meeting up with a friend at the Farmers Market. I'm on the hunt for tomato seconds to make some roasted sauce. Mine are just so slow in coming in this year!

Tam
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 5, 2012
4:50 PM

Post #9230757

Tam, thanks for the new thread.

Terry, what a fantastic community service your church is providing.Bet it will be great to see "normal" again.

A continued thanks to all for the support and comments. I am buried in email and unanswered phone calls. I don't text or do Facebook so am getting super frustrated with family and friends who have seen wedding Facebook posts from DD and are texting for info..."What's this about a wedding?", "She got married?", "When?", "Is she pregnant?". We kept to the kids' wish to have an event with immediate family and their friends and omitted all but a few of our own close friends. We kept things pretty low key regarding extended family and friends yet it was still a good sized event. I now have a lot of explaining to do. I'm starting with, "It wasn't at the Ritz. There was mountain music. People sweated. We ate dessert served in Mason jars." That should do it.

A zucchini that went unnoticed this past week is about to get stuffed with leftover cornbread, roasted peppers, onions, mushrooms and one of the many small packets of home smoked ham we keep on hand. They come in handy for all kinds of dinners from quiches to mac n' cheese to cooking greens or beans. I was waiting for the filling to cool off so that I can add a few eggs.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 5, 2012
7:01 PM

Post #9230937

I thought everyone ate dessert out of Mason jars .
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 5, 2012
7:23 PM

Post #9230958

No, Sally, just everyone north of Cumming, GA and south of Petersberg, VA. Personally I thought the bride's friends who wore hightops with their contra dance skirts had a special Daisy Mae thing going.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 5, 2012
9:07 PM

Post #9231034

Funny . Get rested up , you deserve it !

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


August 6, 2012
5:23 AM

Post #9231206

Laurel, with the little I know about you, I am 100% confident the event was completely classy, but also filled with unexpected touches that made it personal and memorable for the bride and groom. I've cautioned my share of new brides-to-be that their day is just that - THEIR day. Spending tons of money they don't have to impress their guests is not what the day is about, because to the guests, it will be just-another-wedding. Far better to find some ways to make it a day that the couple will remember when they look back on it.

Normal...I did say that, didn't I? Not sure what normal is some days but it's a good goal.

Okay, for tonight, pork chops. Not sure exactly how they'll get cooked or what's going with them, but I know they are what's for dinner ;-)

This message was edited Aug 6, 2012 11:31 AM
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

August 6, 2012
5:25 AM

Post #9231211

Laurel - Glad to see you are recoverying from the wedding. High tops are in style with some contra dancers. It's the look and quality of the stomp that counts.

Tam - Thanks for starting the new thread.

Terry - Nice that your church puts together all those back to school supplies. It's a lot of work.

We went shopping yesterday for a new oil mister. The one we bought quite a few years back from Martha Stewart's Co died and the they no longer sell the same kind. We've owned a misto before and threw it a way. So hopefully the new one will work. Also stopped to shop at The Plaza. It seems that there was a no tax day this last weekend so everything was very crowded.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

August 6, 2012
5:41 AM

Post #9231244

Susan- let us know what you find. I'm not really happy with the mister I got and am tempted to replace it, though I've only had it about a year.

Tam

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

August 6, 2012
8:32 AM

Post #9231508

burlap table cloths and dessert served in Mason Jars is quite "in"

I say weddings and funerals bring out the worst in families.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

August 6, 2012
8:35 AM

Post #9231519

Best and worse in people in general. Has to do with expectations and stress. That's why the movie bridesmaids is so funny.

Tammy - This is what we got. The bottom is glass. I'm hoping it works well. http://www.surlatable.com/product/PRO-635052/Prepara-Oil-Mister
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

August 6, 2012
12:35 PM

Post #9231851

Dinner is Chicken Mole with a salad.

Crockpot is full tomatoes from the garden. Looking forward to the first batch of tomato sauce.

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

August 6, 2012
12:56 PM

Post #9231892

so how is the sauce done in the crockpot. Are the tomatoes peeled, deseeded or? is interesting
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 6, 2012
3:09 PM

Post #9232059

Well we didn't have burlap tablecloths. I made eleven quilt tops with wide borders. The borders will get trimmed down and the tops will be connected to make an anniversary quilt. I'm sharing a photo of Sautee valley where they event took place and a few photos of the outside tables with their quilt toppers. Bride and groom are in the rear of that second photo.

Thumbnail by MaypopLaurel   Thumbnail by MaypopLaurel   Thumbnail by MaypopLaurel   Thumbnail by MaypopLaurel   Thumbnail by MaypopLaurel
Click an image for an enlarged view.

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

August 6, 2012
3:49 PM

Post #9232100

now how thoughtfull was that!!!? so unique and personal.
I always entertained on our property tables were sheets of plywood covered with damask of which I had many and borrowed chairs from the local funeral parlor. small town, they were free to pick up and bring back. Wild flowers or ptted plants depending on season.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


August 6, 2012
5:10 PM

Post #9232227

Love the toppers - they look great!
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 6, 2012
5:55 PM

Post #9232283

Well, you saw them in person, Terry, so perhaps you will comment about what we rolled out on my bed at Maypop. I was so ecstatic to be able to share that secret with you. DD is still flabbergasted that I was able to hide this from her. I need some other creative project/s before I embark on the wedding quilt though. I am worrying about dieing and leaving nothing more than a toothbrush clean house and some leftovers in the fridge. Both won''t last but a few weeks. Maybe it's the occasion that's got me thinking about these things.

I want to say we had a wonderful event and there was no drama. Any stress was because I was working an event that, by request, happened to be DD's and DSIL's (still sounds weird) occasion. It was something to weigh in advance and I carefully discussed the pros and cons with SO before taking on the project. It was understood that our role as parents of the bride would be somewhat compromised while our opportunity to be the Mom and Dad she knew would be realized. I have had to rely on close friends and participants for feedback as to the success of the various events since I did miss being a passive guest. Feedback has all been great and I am saying this because calls are coming in daily and we are thrilled to be hearing from the kids friends as well. There was a Mark Hewitt pitcher sent as a thank you from guest friends at the door in Atlanta when we returned. http://www.hewittpottery.com/ Wow!

The luncheon was at Canoe http://www.canoeatl.com/. See photo. We had a pre-selected menu and wines (Reisling for the fish and salad and Pinot for the lamb) for the occasion. They printed the menu of two starters, three entrees, two desserts and two wines. We took a break between the entree and dessert to walk through the restaurant garden and down by the river.

Thumbnail by MaypopLaurel   Thumbnail by MaypopLaurel   Thumbnail by MaypopLaurel
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Edens_Gardener
Clay Center, KS
(Zone 5b)

August 6, 2012
6:06 PM

Post #9232298

What a wonderful "occasion", thank you for sharing.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 6, 2012
6:11 PM

Post #9232310

Thank you for allowing me to share. I think you must be the mom who would be supportive. :)
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 6, 2012
7:18 PM

Post #9232406

I've heard twice about the "secret " in the bedroom . Now let the rest of us know , Terry . You have laurel's permission .
We're waiting ...?
I didn't see it that strong when we met your D D , but in those pictures , she is another vision of you , Laurel .

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


August 6, 2012
7:29 PM

Post #9232427

Well, I was trying to maintain confidentiality...but now that the squares have been seen by the bride, I can say they were absolutely gorgeous in person. And they will make a wonderful, precious quilt for them. I think Laurel can tell you the story behind nearly ever piece of material in each square - some were from childhood clothes she made for her child, and some have other sentimental meanings. What a fantastic memory to snuggle up under with her new husband as they make their new life together :-)

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

August 7, 2012
5:58 AM

Post #9232749

That's just a fabulous idea & will be a family treasure for generations!

Tam

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

August 7, 2012
7:15 AM

Post #9232848

Quilting, now is my #1 hobby and I so appreciate the hard work in the table toppers, the nostalgia behind these creations and the finished product yet to be made. Certainly an on going heirloom. Wonderful stories and happenings. Certainly part of the foundation for this couples life together.






SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

August 7, 2012
7:25 AM

Post #9232858

I agree with all the comments about how fabulous the wedding, dinners, and table toppers are. I'm glad it turned out so well. The wedding anniversary quilt will be cherished.

Lazy person's way of making sauce. Throw cut up tomatoes and what ever veggies you want into the crockpot. Cook until done. Use a immersion blender do get the amount of chunky or smooth that you want. If you want to get rid of the seeds and skins then either seed/skin before cooking or run through a sieve after cooking to get rid of them. Freeze in individual containers. I add the spices when I go to use the sauce later. That way I can use it for whatever I want.

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

August 7, 2012
7:27 AM

Post #9232863

ohhh i'll have to try this as the abundance of the jersey tomatos will be here soon at the farmersmarket,
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 7, 2012
7:33 AM

Post #9232866

I couldn't agree more . Wonderful choice for heirloom gift .
My precious first MIL made my son a quilt out of her and grandpa's old coats and wool , corduroy pants so he would always have them near . It's one of the most prized items in the family. They are both gone now , but love for, and grandparents love back can be as strong as parents .
Thanks , Terry , they are certainly nice in the pictures , what little I can see .
I have a warm , fuzzy feeling .

MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 7, 2012
4:28 PM

Post #9233464

So, Sally, now you know my bedroom secrets. We had to keep the toppers in SO's closet because DD is always digging around in mine. While DD was giving garden tours during the RU, I had a pre-planned date with Terry to show off the toppers. BTW, I've had a warm, fuzzy feeling for several weeks now.

Helene, I am really a needler and not a piecemaker. Though I have quilted for a zillion years I have never taken a quilting class but have spent years studying Japanese embroidery here http://www.japaneseembroidery.com/ and other embroidery and fabric art traditions. I would love to find the time in my life to take some quilting classes. DD and I both have textile art backgrounds/degrees and best express our art in hand work. I received DM that you posted a link on the
Quilting forum. I am so flattered.

We make lazy person's tomato sauce by putting tomatoes in the crockpot on high and leaving them overnight.

We are having home ground, garden spiced, lamb meatballs. Linguine with mustard greens and cheese sauce. Slightly hot garden cherry Italian peppers will be part of the pasta and sauce mix. Garden Romano beans.

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

August 7, 2012
4:53 PM

Post #9233487

I have been a needler, do some fabolous needlepoint from www.ehrman.com did many other things in fiber art and now at 76 I do quilting. My friends on the quilting forum are an interesting group and havenothing but praise for your quilts, the idea thereof etc. They do do meals as well some don't subscribe to DG so therefore my post.We all love nostalgia.I have done some japanese silk ribbon embtoidery and french silk needlepoint...much more. However always in awe of new ideas that spring up.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

August 7, 2012
6:26 PM

Post #9233571

When you make the tomato sauce in the crock pot - it doesn't evaporate down? Isn't it a little thin?

I tried a new dessert and will definitely be making it again. I bet its old hat to many of you - don't know why I hadn't tried it before. Plum Clafoutis. Sooo good & relatively low in calories/ fairly healthy.

Tam
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 7, 2012
7:00 PM

Post #9233620

Tam, leave the top off the pot once the tomatoes simmer and leave it set high. Then reduce by at least 30%. It may take 24 hours but that's the beauty of the crockpot.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 7, 2012
9:37 PM

Post #9233766

My big brag in needlework is a reproduction of a Grandma Moses painting in cross stitch . Took over two years and tens of thousands of stitches . The back looks as good as the front , no loose threads , all woven in . I envy anyone that does the Japanese /French needlework . So perfect ! I do have a piece that was never finished in Japanese embroidery . I need to find it and have it framed .
You all have so much talent.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

August 8, 2012
4:10 AM

Post #9233877

I leave the lid slightly ajar to reduce the water content and to make sure the temp is high enough. There also is some evaporation when we cook it in the winter for whatever. BTW - I only run the crockpot during the day while we are home. I had a friend whose crockpot started a fire in his kitchen. They were lucky his wife came home early that day or it would have been more than just the kitchen.

Dinner last night was leftover Chicken Mole. The rest gets frozen today.

The tomato sauce turned out nice. I threw in some Black Cherry tomatoes and the color of the sauce is the best we've had so far. The BC tomatoes added extra flavor also.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

August 8, 2012
5:19 AM

Post #9233914

I'll have to give the crockpot sauce a try when I don't want to have the oven on! Thanks for the info.

Tam

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


August 8, 2012
6:15 AM

Post #9233997

Re: the crockpot tomatoes...I'm thinking I will give it a go this year. I've got my roasted tomatoes in the freezer, but what a great (lazy!) way to do tomato sauce. Do you freeze it or can it after it's cooked down?
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

August 8, 2012
6:22 AM

Post #9234003

Finally back - lots of great cheese & beer for 7 days in WI.
It will take a day or two to get back to normal.
Thanks for the new thread.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

August 8, 2012
6:28 AM

Post #9234012

I freeze mine. I would think canning should not be an issue.

Glad you had a nice time in WI. I'm assuming it was cooler than TX.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 8, 2012
9:21 AM

Post #9234217

I freeze and can the sauce, trying to can as much as possible for ease of storage. It's safest to store canned goods at Maypop in case a power outage happens in our absence. The crocks get set up in the evening and sauce is ready to can the following afternoon. Good thing we have smoke alarms. :) I have a six quart crockpot for basic sauce and several four quart ones at both houses if specialty sauce is desired. Remember, you are going to seriously reduce the tomatoes unless you plan to thicken with tomato paste later. This is a much better way to cook it than in a pot...almost as good as roasting because the more even crock temp makes for not having to tend the sauce over a stove. I've also added meat, onions and peppers that have been browned separately for chilli or ragu and then pressure can those batches.

Welcome home Bubba!

Got fresh buffalo mozz. for a Caprese salad with garden tomatoes and basil. Also confetti slaw with poppy seed dressing. Crostini topped with egg salad and chopped arugula should round it out. Watermelon too. I've got a Pinot chilling. We need a quick fix tonight since there's a reclaimed cabinet sitting in the back hall for three years waiting to get refinished and a new top. I am just now getting to it.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 8, 2012
12:08 PM

Post #9234441

Hey , Bubba , did you bring any curds back ? I could eat my weight in them .
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

August 9, 2012
4:25 AM

Post #9235275

Dinner was fresh pasta sauce with ground chicken (seasoned like sausage) on a lemon pepper angel hair pasta and topped with fresh basil.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

August 9, 2012
5:03 AM

Post #9235307

We went out on our boat with friends to see the purple martins massing over the phragmites for their fall migration, and we had pâté de campagne, a salmon spread, baguettes, crackers, lots of different cheeses including Mimolette in honor of François Hollande and Manchego, one of our favorites, plus a soft mushroom dotted Brie-type, and pears and grapes. And wine. The martins come to roost at twilight and it's quite an impressive show. Last night there were probably a hundred thousand of them! I have better photos from a couple of years ago, but this was the martins yesterday, with a lone osprey trying to hang out with them.

Thumbnail by greenhouse_gal
Click the image for an enlarged view.

digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 9, 2012
5:22 AM

Post #9235320

Oh , and looks like a little cove and good fishing along the brush .
You watch purple martins like we watch the bats emerge at night to hunt . Nature is beautiful .The osprey makes that picture unique.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

August 9, 2012
5:24 AM

Post #9235322

Sounds like a very nice evening Leslie!

I have a crockpot of tomato sauce going today. Looking forward to seeing how it turns out!

Tam

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

August 9, 2012
8:13 AM

Post #9235512

We have to go out in the boat to get a good view of the martins, although the bridge isn't too bad either. I'll bet it's fun watching the bats. We saw one flitting along as we were motoring home last night. I did think the osprey gave the photo a nice touch!

We have enough blue-claw crabs for a crab dinner - maybe tonight.
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

August 9, 2012
9:30 AM

Post #9235569

Did not bring any cheese curds home, but had some fresh while there and some deep fried at the State Fair on the 2nd.

DW & I shared one of the HUGE cream puffs and roasted corn - they dip the corn in a tank of melted butter so it goes clear to the cob - awesome!

Shipped cheese to our son's house - should arrive today or tomorrow - looking forward to that.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

August 9, 2012
10:30 AM

Post #9235631

Welcome home!
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 9, 2012
11:23 AM

Post #9235709

If you go again , let me know , I'll load you up with curds money to flat rate me .

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

August 9, 2012
4:58 PM

Post #9236075

The crock pot tomato sauce has really cooked down! I have to admit I was skeptical.

Tam

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

August 9, 2012
5:23 PM

Post #9236108

Hmmm, I'll have to try that. Laurel, you leave the lid off completely once it simmers? And I take it you put it on low? Usually I chunk the tomatoes, cook them until they're a bit soft, and then use a Victorio-type strainer that has been in my husband's family for generations to get rid of the seeds and skins. I cook the resulting purée down so it's semi-thick, but that takes a while and you have to make sure it doesn't burn. A friend of mine scoops off the liquid that comes to the top and freezes that separately for sauces and stews, leaving the very thick purée to freeze by itself for red gravy. I was thinking of doing that this year. How would the crockpot method compare with what I do? I guess I'd use the strainer and then the crockpot?

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

August 9, 2012
5:48 PM

Post #9236131

I tried it as Laurel & Susan suggested - put the cut up tomatoes w/onion into the crock pot, put it on high. When it started simmering, put the lid ajar. Cooked from 8am to 7pm and was the nice thick consistancy I was hoping for. I'll purree with my immersion blender. (I used to always remove the seeds but I've decided its not worth the time. I don't like the skins so do remove those. I bought one of those strainers years ago but got frustrated w/it - don't remember the problem - and haven't tried it since. I really should try it again.)

Tam
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

August 9, 2012
6:34 PM

Post #9236186

I usually don't leave the lid ajar until I'm sure the tomatoes are cooked. I like to make sure that temps are high enough long enough to kill any pathgens. I leave the seeds in. Since we mostly use the sauce back in the crockpot after freezing the second cook seems to breakdown a lot of it out anyway. Or I just don't notice it. I will take out the tougher skins as they do not seem to cook down. The immersion blender also seems to catch some of them.

Nice photo of the birds. Evening sounds wonderful. DH and I would have liked watching all of them fly around.

Did you go to the WI state fair since there seem to be cheese curds involved?
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

August 9, 2012
6:38 PM

Post #9236196

Oh. Dinner was leftover spagetti. There is double gingerbread in the oven.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 9, 2012
8:02 PM

Post #9236291

I leave it lidless and prefer to start the process in the evening. The reason for the overnight method is because the tomatoes are sometimes not reduced or cooled enough to store at bedtime if started in the morning. I cook them on high the entire time though when I have been pushed to doing a day time batch, and they are almost but not quite done, I'll leave them on low overnight. The high temp, with the lid off, leaves them at a bare simmer. All that can happen is the sauce gets thicker. You can figure out what to do with that. The great feature of this method is the sauce does not burn. If you are wanting "gravy" without skins or seeds then process the tomatoes before placing in the crockpot. You are already going to reduce down the tomatoes in a limited space so don't waste precious space on seeds and skins if you plan on getting rid of them anyway. I have done it both ways...seeds and skins for soups and more rustic sauces and processed for a finer product.

I prepare tomatoes for cold pack, hot pack and crockpot to can and freeze. Each method has its advantages and I have learned the nuances in the flavors. When I go into my pantry or freezer to get tomatoes for a dish I can definitely determine which method of preservation will be the best choice for the dish planned. Cold packing is best for the most rustic soups, etc. and crockpot or roasting for the best sauces. Hot packing with reduction is somewhere in the middle but standing for hours over a pot of simmering tomatoes and stirring to prevent burning is a waste of my time when better results can be achieved with a crockpot. This led to several years of braking for crockpots at yard sales so that I could have enough plugged in to make big batches for canning. One could prevail upon friends who don't can or freeze for loaner crockpots during tomato season but most of my friends think cooking is sidling up to the bar at Whole Foods and then laying it out on a plate. Putting the plates in the dishwasher counts extra.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

August 9, 2012
8:29 PM

Post #9236300

Smiley on the food bar and dishwasher points.

I may not be making the sauce as thick or my crockpot runs hotter. The batch this week was started a batch mid morning and was cooled and in the freezer way before bedtime. I've had no burning on any of the sauce. And I'm also not running as many crockpots at the same time. So less to put up at once.

Mom used to have a roaster. I would guess that a person could also use that to cook the tomato sauce in.

I'm not sure what cold and hot packs are? Would you explain.

MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 10, 2012
2:40 AM

Post #9236393

Cold packing refers to placing raw tomatoes that are whole, cut, or milled in a jar and processing. Hot packing is any method of canning where the tomato or sauce is jarred after cooking while still hot. There is a surprisingly small difference in processing times. Cold packing results in more intact tomato flesh and a lot more liquid. Best for use in rustic sauces or soup where the pieces are desired as well as the liquid. Hot packing is best for sauce. I like to add a pint of cold pack pieces near the end for a chunkier sauce.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

August 10, 2012
4:14 AM

Post #9236421

Is an example of cold pack tomatoes dunked in boiling water to remove the skins and then canned?

Gingerbread turned out well. It has enough backstrap molasses in it to make it look like a chocolate cake.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

August 10, 2012
4:41 AM

Post #9236434

I found the tomato sauce was simmering slowly even with the lid ajar so I think theres no concern about pathogens. I tasted it and thought it wasn't quite as good as oven-roasted. But it kept the house a lot cooler & the taste just may have been my taste buds being a little off at the end of the day. (The sauce was cool by the time I went to bed so I was able to pack & freeze it same day. I probably have a much smaller crock pot than Laurel though. I only got 1 quart from a 3/4 full -to start- pot full)

I'm off to visit my folks & friends (and ... my high school reunion) so won't be cooking or posting much for a few days.

Tam
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 10, 2012
9:17 AM

Post #9236727

Susan, pre-blanching would be an example of cold pack.

No, it's not as good as oven roasted but it is better than stovetop because temperatures are more even and there won't be burning. I usually do have a lot of tomatoes to can. Think I recall twelve cases of quarts last year (144 jars), plus several cases of pints. I usually can six to twelve finished quarts at a time, once or twice a week.

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

August 10, 2012
9:22 AM

Post #9236730

In My NY home I had a squeezo and prepared to tomatoes with this machine (took out seed and skin) then just canned them in quarts. So many years forward to no. I will try this Slow cooker method. thanks for being so patient and post exactly what has to be done
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 10, 2012
9:30 AM

Post #9236736

Very welcome. We are off to Maypop shortly where I'll probably be taking care of some of those tomatoes this weekend.

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

August 10, 2012
10:30 AM

Post #9236787

Laurel, so do you think I could make peach jam/marmalade this way.Ii mean with appropriate ingredients and in a crock pot.?
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 10, 2012
12:18 PM

Post #9236878

Helene, I'm not sure that will work. The acids and pectin in fruits require temperatures right around 220F to react with the sugar. That interaction is what causes the gel. The temp for a simmer, such as in a crockpot temp is around 212F. Even if your pot got hotter it could be dangerous to get that roiling boil you get when making jams. I don't add pectin to my preserves so don't know if that will help set the product. That sure would make things easier though, wouldn't it? You could reduce fruits in a crockpot to get a naturally thick compote and use that as a topping. I think that's what the newer low sugar and natural preserve spreads are...more of a compote.

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

August 10, 2012
2:05 PM

Post #9236993

I see. thank you. I never add pectin, some lemon jiuce and boil the s=== out of them. They do turn darker than store bought. For My late DH made ital. prune jam, very thick. so it didn't matter how dark it got.Also I don't like all that sugar so I cook my jams longer... Well whatever works for one.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

August 10, 2012
6:09 PM

Post #9237213

I tried using Pomona pectin this year on my grape preserves and it didn't seem to do a thing for them in terms of thickening. But either way they're good on bread or mixed with Fage yogurt.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 11, 2012
4:25 AM

Post #9237468

That's curious, Leslie. I only use Pomona's Pectin, and I swear it could jell plain water!

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

August 11, 2012
4:47 AM

Post #9237478

Well, I probably didn't use it correctly. I didn't want to use too much sugar so I didn't have a lot to mix it with and it clumped.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

August 11, 2012
2:01 PM

Post #9238040

Tam - Have a fun time.

This is a strawberry jam recipe from 365crockpot website using a crockpot. They use pectin and sugar in it so it might not be what you want. http://crockpot365.blogspot.com/2008/05/crockpot-strawberry-jam-recipe.html

Apricot jam using dried apricots but no sugar or pectin. http://southernfood.about.com/od/jamsjellies/r/bln51.htm

We make our apple sauce in a crockpot with no sugar. It turnes out to be some of the best apple sauce I've had.

MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 12, 2012
9:05 AM

Post #9238850

Dinner guests at Maypop tonight. A summer menu planned. Goat cheese rounds topped with grilled peppers & onions, garlic & rosemary olive oil. Cavier stuffed eggs. French roasted chicken & lemons served with peach chutney. Roasted fingerling potato salad with chipotle mayo. Grilled corn & cherry tomatoes dressed in herbs, sherry vinegar & oil. Watermelon/lime granitas for dessert. Most was done in advance and everything will be served cold. I can spend the afternoon in the garden.
plantnutz
Austell, GA
(Zone 7a)

August 12, 2012
9:22 AM

Post #9238860

Susan, do you have a recipe for your crockpot applesauce?

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 12, 2012
9:44 AM

Post #9238880

Sounds like a cool, laid-back dinner with friends, Laurel.

I haven't done much cooking lately, thanks to a short hospital stay (not too serious). I'm in the middle of canning all of the frozen venison left from last year, and plan to lacto-ferment some Swiss chard ribs this afternoon. I've made some chive blossom vinegar, and now some purple basil vinegar for small gifts. Still thinking about making some mustards.

Did you know you could can bacon? I did a 1½ lb. batch yesterday. If there's an extended power failure, there's no way I could cook stuff in the freezers over an open fire in time to save them all. I plan to cook down some more lard and tallow this fall and can them.

Susan, I found several recipes to make verjus, even one for the old-fashioned kind. My grapes are greening and I may try to make some. Sure can't find it in the stores here.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

August 12, 2012
10:33 AM

Post #9238909

Gosh, Darius, I hope you're okay and that the hospital stay fixed you up.

My grapes are done already!

DH got some more big crabs in his trap so I think that's what we'll have for dinner tonight.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 12, 2012
10:57 AM

Post #9238933

Leslie, every time you say "blue crabs" I get a fierce longing for steamed crabs! Haven't had any in years now, and sometimes I think I should just get in my truck and drive up to that area just to gorge on a mess of crabs!

The hospital stay almost 2 weeks ago was kinda a wake-up call but didn't "fix" anything. I was referred to a specialist at UVa last week, and now I need several more tests (upcoming in Sept). The original diagnosis was based on assumptions of the symptoms presented at the time, but things don't look so bad now. They (local hospital) put me on BP meds and a heart-healthy low sodium diet (bleck) but the specialist took me off both.

Hospital food is the pits, heart-healthy diet or not. Food was unpalatable and over-cooked, and fruit dishes were overly sugared. How could anybody regain health on that?
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 12, 2012
11:16 AM

Post #9238946

Grapes , when green , before the seeds get hard , make a wonderful pie . Blueberries work great also .

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 12, 2012
11:30 AM

Post #9238962

Grape Pie? I've never heard of one...
kiseta
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)

August 12, 2012
12:10 PM

Post #9238997

First time I ever had crabs it was in Wilmington De. in the Crab shak. They brought 12 crabs a wooden hammmer and lots of newspaper, I was wondering why do people eat them "bugs" After I tried it it was good, but I like fish better, mostly Salmon or catfish. I just cooked a Salmon stew from caned salmon, not bad. lots of onion, potatoes and I used tomato juice, my husband said that was Cajun style, with hot sauce. Etelka

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

August 12, 2012
1:12 PM

Post #9239049

Darius, I'm glad things don't look so bad now! Health is always an iffy thing as we get older. And I'm glad you're off the BP meds; they can cause problems of their own. I also don't think that the latest medical research is suggesting that sodium has much to do with heart-health as long as you're not using ridiculous amounts.

Yes, you really should go get yourself a mess of crabs! Three or four No. 1s apiece are enough for us. I'm trying to decide what to serve with them - probably corn on the cob if the farm stand still has it.

Kiseta, a friend just made a salmon spread from canned salmon, horseradish, mayonnaise and a little chopped onion. It was good on crackers and would also have been good in a salad or sandwich.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

August 12, 2012
2:30 PM

Post #9239136

Laura - Dinner sounds very nice.

plantnut - DH makes it and he's on OT. I'll ask him later. I know he started with the following recipe but has modified it but I'm not sure about the quantities. I like cinnamon and I think he may have upped the amount. We decided that the apple sauce comes out sweet enough so no brown sugar. Although it does add a level of flavor to it. http://crockpot365.blogspot.com/2008/09/crockpot-applesauce-recipe.html

Darius – I’ve not been able to find a local source of verjus here either. What we get we order on-line. I did get an offer to come down and get the immature grapes from a vineyard but we’ve not done anything with it. It's a drive and I'm not sure they were serious about having someone they don't know running amuck in their vineyard. My understanding from reading up on the verjus is that there are a couple of types of verjus including fermented and non-fermented. What kind are you making?

Digger – I’ve never heard of a grape pie either. Are you also talking immature blueberries? How do you make the immature grape pie? I would guess it would be similar to cooking with gooseberries.

Salt is still tied to high BP. I've been reading about some resent studies and the recommendation was to get salt levels down. There also seems to be a tie between body weight and high BP. We use more spices and acids in the cooking so neither of us misses the salt.

Dinner will be left-overs from lunch. Lunch was a raw vegetable pasta salad (scallions, carrots, zucchini, yellow squash, bak choi, peppers, etc.) with a mustard, lime, olive oil, Penzey's vindaloo spice, and parsley dressing topped with spiced cubed pork.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 12, 2012
5:30 PM

Post #9239314

It's like any other fruit pie and yes , it's the immature berries . It's tangy sweet like gooseberries with a tang that is like rhubarb pie , but of course a different flavor .I always picked the blueberries until I got tired of picking every day , then stripped the bushes of the green ones to freeze separately for pie .I always added a handful of green ones to the pies anyway to give more flavor . A pie made from all ripe blueberries has a boring taste to me , too bland .A few semi ripe ones in the green pie doesn't hurt anything .

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

August 13, 2012
7:28 AM

Post #9239869

Weekend cooking is DD and SIL efforts.
I am cooking today.
Chicken papikash with new potatoes, and spaetzle. Green Salad from the farm and cuke salad with sour cream dressing from their garden.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

August 13, 2012
5:09 PM

Post #9240483

Omelets with our own eggs & garden produce. Life just doesn't get any better. :-)

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

August 13, 2012
6:00 PM

Post #9240543

We had spare ribs cooked in the crockpot, corn on the cob, a tomato salad, and baked beans, with cantaloupe. A nice summertime meal. Earlier DGD and I picked tomatoes to process; there were a lot of damaged and rotten ones that I threw to the chickens, but we still had a respectable amount, even if it wasn't as much as last year. We had other things to do so we only got as far as cutting the tomatoes up and cooking them so that the skins would loosen. Tomorrow we'll put them through the tomato machine and then I'll have to decide whether I want to try the crockpot idea with them.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

August 13, 2012
6:28 PM

Post #9240593

I just lost a crock pot full of tomato sauce. I cooked them skin on for long enough to loosen the skins (which are really tough this year due to the heat) and then took them out and ran them through the food mill. I lifted the lid and stirred occasionally, but my slow cooker must have a hot spot because some of it stuck and burned and ruined the whole batch. I might just freeze the rest whole, and bring them out on a cold winter day and roast them. Bahhh.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

August 14, 2012
6:24 AM

Post #9240998

If it has a hot spot then I would throw the crockpot and get a new one.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

August 14, 2012
6:35 AM

Post #9241009

I am very tempted. If I used it a lot, I'd be more tempted but I don't know if I want to invest in another seldom used appliance. Maybe I can find one at a garage sale!!

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 14, 2012
6:44 AM

Post #9241022

If you look for a used crockpot, look for an older one. FDA regs now require crockpots to have a higher heat even on Low so idiots don't undercook meats.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 14, 2012
8:22 AM

Post #9241137

I agree with all this info and am sorry about your experience. I stir, every few hours, to get things going and then let the pot do its thing. My Corningware 6 qt. crockpot is a few years old but the other four 4 qt. ones are old. In using borrowed pots I have found the smaller ones with a removable crock are more likely to have hot spots.

We have been eating salads topped with a revolving combination of meats, cheeses, eggs and homemade croutons several times a week. Last night's dinner was a salad topped with a shared ribeye, hard boiled egg, marinated corn and tomatoes and feta. It's a rainy day. I'm going to make pie crust for a spinach and mushroom quiche and a tomato pie for tonight to go with leftover salad.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

August 14, 2012
8:31 AM

Post #9241146

I just love tomato pie. How do you make yours Laurel? Mine are always a soupy mess but delicious. I sure wish I could get the trick right to make them simply delicious. :-)

Tam
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 14, 2012
8:46 AM

Post #9241172

Tam, squeeze the tomatoes gently to eliminate some of the seeds and juice. It will be somewhat drier but the soupy mess is the charm so go ahead and serve it in a bowl or make individual ramekins for guests. You never hear people complain about pot pie being a soupy mess. I use Greek yogurt instead of straight mayo. I used to use half mayo and half sour cream. I now use a little mayo and mostly yogurt and cheese. Lots of fresh basil and cracked pepper. It's one of my favorite next day soggy breakfasts. Right up there with cold Chinese food. :)

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

August 14, 2012
9:02 AM

Post #9241193

OK - that's what I've done (gently squeezed & then set on a stack of paper towels the tomatoes) but still soupy. The greek yogurt sounds like a good idea too.

Hadn't thought of ramekins - great idea! The serving of the pie is where the "soupy mess" really annoys me most.

Tam

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

August 14, 2012
9:15 AM

Post #9241215

there used to be a thread here on DG for tomato pie. lots of suggestions.

Can you guys perhaps share a recipe. have some Brandywine coming in from garden very mealy tom. Thanks in advance.

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

August 14, 2012
10:02 AM

Post #9241281

I made light eggplant Parm and have some in the freezer. As it is a rainy, coolkinda day, SIL agreed that is a nice dinner, Fresh Pasta and nice green salad with it.I did not frie the egg plant, did just egg and sasoned bread crumbs and bake 4 min on each side in the overn. To make it lighter yet, we grill the eggplant and then parm it. But you guys know all this better than I...

Thinking of making the TOm pie for lunch this weekend.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

August 14, 2012
12:26 PM

Post #9241400

Salting the tomatoes and letting them drain in a colander will also take out some of the extra juice. I put a layer of cheese on the bottom otherwise the crust gets soggy.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 14, 2012
1:41 PM

Post #9241484

Well, I'm bummed. I bought a used KitchenAid gas cooktop several years ago and it's been in my storage unit. I just had a propane-worker friend check it out and 3 of the 4 burners work fine, but need the surface burner caps that spread the flame evenly. They are no longer in production, but I managed to find TWO online, for over $77 each. Not going there!

I wanted to set it up on the porch for canning. Pfffftttt...

Lacto-fermented Swiss chard ribs...

Thumbnail by darius
Click the image for an enlarged view.

MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 14, 2012
2:13 PM

Post #9241511

Bummer, Darius and I'm very surprised because I can find all kinds of parts for my all but antique JennAirs cheap on line. Hope the ribs make up for things a little. They're beautiful.

Helene, did you go back over that thread? I thought I posted a recipe there. My original recipe came from the Atlanta Journal Constitution paper way back when. It's available here http://projects.eveningedge.com/recipes/tomato-pie2/ It's since evolved to suit our tastes and diet. Once you make it a couple of times you will see that you layer, slather and sprinkle as you please. I've used all kinds of cheese and cheese combos, gilded lilies with Parm on top and in the crust, but good 'ol cheddar works best IMO.

This message was edited Aug 14, 2012 8:56 PM

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

August 14, 2012
2:39 PM

Post #9241542

thanks I printed the recipe.those pockets are interesting

there is quite a tompie disscussion here http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/454938/
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 14, 2012
4:36 PM

Post #9241653

That juice can be thickened with a teaspoon of flour . That way , you get all the flavor . Brush the crust with egg yolk and bake ten minutes before adding other ingredients . Perfect pie !

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

August 14, 2012
5:09 PM

Post #9241682

I'm gonna have to make tomato pie for a dinner party Sat. Its been too long!

Tam

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

August 14, 2012
5:12 PM

Post #9241691

I was going to make a 6" one to go with our leftovers tonight, but decided to make a 9" tomorrow so we can eat it all up.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 14, 2012
6:51 PM

Post #9241773

Had breakfast for dinner . Eggs, biscuits, grits ,steak cut bacon . Will have stir fry veggies tomorrow with oriental seasoning , add shrimp . Too hot to cook much and too many leftovers for two people .
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 14, 2012
7:06 PM

Post #9241788

Helene, did you see my tompie photos on that thread from August 10th, 2011?.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

August 14, 2012
8:07 PM

Post #9241846

You might try a paste or romano tomato. They tend to be dryer.

I don't stir while cooking the tomatoes. It may have to do with the fact I leave the lid on until after using the immersion blender. I take the lid off only to thicken the sauce. We have two sizes of crockpot. Large and medium party size. I'm too lazy to haul them off the shelf to look at them and they were original bought for house parties. They do well in the winter for holding mulled cider and chili.

Washington Post just posted their winners of their Top Tomato 2012 recipe contest. There might be some ideas for tomato recipes there. I am not seeing any actual recipes posted with the photos. http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/food/top-tomato-2012-winning-recipes/2012/08/14/8df4c0fc-e637-11e1-8741-940e3f6dbf48_gallery.html

Darius - There was a kicked up pickled stacked tomato that looked like something you would like. BTW - The chard looks good. http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/food/top-tomato-2012-winning-recipes/2012/08/14/8df4c0fc-e637-11e1-8741-940e3f6dbf48_gallery.html#photo=5

We use Bradywines in just about everything. I made a pasta salad with raw chopped veggies including tomatoes this last weekend. We've also made tuna salad stuffed tomatoes with mustard and olive oil based dressing. The last favorite is BLTs made with pesto instead of mayo.

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

August 15, 2012
7:10 AM

Post #9242147

my fav tomato recipe: make cauliflower(cooked al dente) salad with mayo, lemon juice, salt pepper and nutmeg*. serve in raw (same size) hulled tomatos with this salad. "Sehr fein."

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 15, 2012
7:26 AM

Post #9242167

Helene, I bet the lacto-fermented cauliflower I made would be good stuffed in tomatoes like that also. (Cauliflower had garlic cloves, black peppercorns and red pepper flakes in the fermenting brine.)

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

August 15, 2012
7:35 AM

Post #9242180

Sounds really good.Nice lunch. I think I love it because I do love fresh tomatos.

Laurel, yes I read the whole thread and yes Tomato pie is in this weekend. Never made it before because my DH did not eat mayo or mayo like product. here at DDs it'll fly.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 15, 2012
11:01 AM

Post #9242387

Can anyone tell me the practical differences in French Grey Shallots and other shallots? I know the hype is that chefs prefer them, but is it worth the bulb cost to grow them? (They also don't keep well.)
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 15, 2012
11:11 AM

Post #9242394

Fair warning, Helene, have everyone grab a spoon and sidle up to the pie plate.

Tonight's menu will include Thai chicken curry in coconut milk. There's beautiful Thai basil in the garden to share with the hummers and butterflies. We'll also have basmati rice and already made Asian-style cucumber salad (rice wine vinegar, toasted sesame oil, black sesame seeds, garlic, Thai basil, bird's eye chilies and lots of fresh grated ginger).

We are awaiting word on whether there will be guests at Maypop this weekend. I think so.

This message was edited Aug 15, 2012 1:48 PM
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 15, 2012
11:17 AM

Post #9242401

Sorry, Darius, we crossed. I don't think the difference is worth the price. If your growing them, I like the torpedo ones best for growing and storing. I've been growing some pretty schmancy ($$$) garlic but buy only a few heads and then plant larger amounts of silverskins. Maybe try the same with the shallots and increase your holdings if you can get them through to the next planting season. I'm not investing in anything that's a one shot crop. Guess you could call that a crop shoot.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 15, 2012
11:41 AM

Post #9242431

Thanks Laurel. My taste buds are not sophisticated enough to note small differences now that I'm older. I guess we lose some of our taste buds?

I grow lots of garlic, but over the years I'm not sure what I still replant resembles the originals.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 15, 2012
11:56 AM

Post #9242447

That's okay. My spelling is going along with the taste buds. Actually both my sense of smell and taste are acute but not so much the spelling. :) SO is always amazed that I can tell if there is too much salt in a dish from the smell. I smell everything, even if used daily, before it goes into my cooking. That's how I judge the amount to use. This includes not just herbs and spices, but peppers, onions, mushrooms, and all dairy.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 15, 2012
12:11 PM

Post #9242463

Cool! I have anosmia so my sense of smell is terrible (and it affects taste). My old cat who was killed 2 years ago was my "tester". If I was uncertain about anything (esp. meats), I gave her a smidgen. If she turned up her nose, it went in the garbage. Now I try to keep leftovers no more than 2 days because I sure cannot tell if they are on the verge of spoiling.

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

August 15, 2012
12:39 PM

Post #9242496

"He is coming to dinner" we met around the corner as I was coming home from hunting and gathering/ As we live up the mountain. Our preferred shopping comes to about 2 hrs between hitting the fav stores and farmstand and home..
second pic we have a heard of this size deer coming through between 4=7 each day.

Ladies you have to plant "purple Cherokee" heirloom next year. sooo good

Thumbnail by helenethequeen   Thumbnail by helenethequeen
Click an image for an enlarged view.

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

August 15, 2012
12:51 PM

Post #9242507

he is following me home for dinner. We met just outside next door neighbor.

A heard trepses through here everyday bet. 4-7 PM come on to the deck at nights

ladies you have to grow "purple cherokee" heirlooms next year, soo good. I do love "Amish Paste" also

dinner, red snapper on the grill (SIL makes) stuffed Zuke with some of zuke,mushroom, tom,onion parm cheese and a bit of breadcrumbs, basil, parsley etc. sliced roasted potato from farm.my part of the picture. green salad. DD and SIL love thei fresh Veg.
I did make grilled peaches the other day not worth the effort. Grilled pineapple to die for

Thumbnail by helenethequeen   Thumbnail by helenethequeen
Click an image for an enlarged view.

digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 15, 2012
1:35 PM

Post #9242553

We had a small black bear come within 15 ' of the porch last week . Dh was sitting on the porch and first glance thought it was neighbors English Mastiff . Nope , BEAR . He stood up and told it to "Git!" That's the second one this year in our yard .

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

August 15, 2012
2:46 PM

Post #9242639

he was big and coming our way for dinner...We akso have foxes/
This is horse country. So driving through a small town yesterday. There is driving Miss Daisy on main st, hat, clothes. one horse drawn carriage, took my breath away. too dumbfounded to grab the camera. Just precious. She was her own driver/ Very excentric here.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 15, 2012
3:45 PM

Post #9242712

I love baked pineapple with cheese . I need to find that recipe to make sure I don't forget something .

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

August 16, 2012
3:59 AM

Post #9243188

We had steamed clams and corn last night; DH went clamming earlier in the week. The night before we went out to an Italian restaurant with DGD and I tried an interesting-sounding dish of chicken breasts with artichokes and mushrooms in a lemon-y sauce. It was really nice. I'm not crazy about chicken breasts but this was tender and infused with lemon flavor.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


August 16, 2012
5:54 AM

Post #9243256

Last night was Swimmer Girl's 17th birthday, so I whipped up a pan of lasagna because I knew she'd like it even though we weren't officially celebrating her birthday with a family meal. We all ate in shifts - Middle Son and I ate our dinner as soon as it came out of the oven; the birthday girl showed up 30 minutes later and wolfed down a piece or two before heading back out the door. Mr. Official had to warm up his portion around 8:30 last night.

At least I know what I'm having for lunch today :-)
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 16, 2012
6:16 AM

Post #9243269

I bought a big bag of oriental stir fry with seasoning in the bag . Cooked half of it and added cooked rice,and one seasoning bag . When it was cooked , added shrimp,, with the juices, pan fried/steamed in olive oil ,
drizzled some soy sauce and very lightly sprinkled some ground cinnamon , tossed it again and surprised me , it was so good . DH said I had to do that again .

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

August 16, 2012
10:35 AM

Post #9243529

As an update to the crockpot tomato sauce discussion, several days ago my granddaugther and I picked all the ripe tomatoes, threw the rotten ones to the chickens and geese, cooked them to loosen the skins, and then the next day we put them through our strainer. We got enough rather thin liquid to fill my 8 or 9 quart crockpot plus half of a large stainless steel stockpot. I had the crockpot on, at High first and then at Low once the tomatoes started to simmer, for a couple of days; as the level slowly dropped I added more thin purée from the stockpot until that was empty. This morning I could smell that it was starting to carmelize a little bit, and when I checked, lo and behold it was ready for packaging. So after it cooled DH and I scooped it into quart freezer bags (each holds a pound of purée). We ended up with eight of them, which I think is fairly typical, so it wasn't such a bad year after all! And I really like the crockpot method; I didn't have to worry about scorching, and the occasional stir was more than enough. I think the purée was a bit thicker than usual, too, because it was so easy to keep cooking it down. I'd call it a success! Thanks for the idea!

Larkie

Larkie
Camilla, GA
(Zone 8a)

August 16, 2012
10:56 AM

Post #9243556

When making roasted tomato sauce, I always skin the tomatoes, but then I puree the peelings and add back to the simmering sauce.. Adds tons of flavor..No waste of the tomato at all.. I also love the crockpot method..Much better in our sw. GA heat..

Larkie

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 16, 2012
11:35 AM

Post #9243581

I'm in the throes of canning meats from my freezer, hence my meals are catch as catch-can... So far I have canned lots of venison, some pork shoulder, a few jars of lard along with a couple of jars of tallow and schmaltz, plus some bacon... and plan on doing sausage patties this afternoon. Tomorrow will be making butter, cooking it down to ghee, and canning that. I recognize that canned sausage patties have a softer texture, but it beats losing the sausage in an extended power outage.

Susan, I haven't gotten around to making verjus yet. Will post how and what when (if) I do. Medical trips to UVa are driving me (and my food processing schedule) nuts.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

August 16, 2012
11:42 AM

Post #9243587

How do you make roasted tomato sauce? Do you just roast the tomatoes in a huge pan? And do you purée the skins in a food processor?

Darius, I hope you're seeing a light at the end of the medical odyssey tunnel!
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 16, 2012
11:50 AM

Post #9243599

And Larkie , not to mention the extra fiber , GO GIRL !

Larkie

Larkie
Camilla, GA
(Zone 8a)

August 16, 2012
12:05 PM

Post #9243622

Yes, I just used the blender or processor until the skins are a thick sauce and peelings are well blended.. I hate shreds of peelings in the sauce.. Everything is thrown in one huge pan.. Seasonings & veggies.. slow roasted for many hours..I make chunky and some smooth..And yes, lots of fiber. I hate waste to begin with, much less any of a good GA tomato..lol

Larkie..
Edens_Gardener
Clay Center, KS
(Zone 5b)

August 16, 2012
1:31 PM

Post #9243747

I roasted tomatoes yesterday http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/984/
I seem to have trouble finding the original post. I do like to run ours through a food mill, I always think there is a bitterness about the skins and seeds, but that's just my thoughts. I tend to keep it it fairly shallow pans, lined with foil, not as time consuming and it makes clean up easier.
We planted some fall garden today, beets, radishes, lettuce, cabbage and broccoli so far, would like to find a few Brussels sprouts and more kale to finish up the remaining space.
Tonight is eggplant Parmesan, some kind of rustic bread and a salad.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

August 16, 2012
3:58 PM

Post #9243949

Tam also makes the roasted tomato sauce.

I made another batch of sauce this morning and tried to track the time. Put the chopped up tomatoes in around 7:30am. Set the crockpot on high. Used the immersion blender around 11am. At that time I used the blender, the tomatoes still look like tomatoes but were softer. I set the lid a jar at that point. Sometime around 2 or 3pm the batch was done. I throw everything in except the core on large tomatoes.

GG The sauce sounds very good.


SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

August 16, 2012
4:10 PM

Post #9243962

BTW - Someone was asking about what to do with zuchinni. There was a hummus recipe in the paper today that uses zuchinni instead of chickpeas. http://www.kansascity.com/2012/08/14/3760742/local-cookbook-author-bends-the.html

Larkie

Larkie
Camilla, GA
(Zone 8a)

August 16, 2012
4:41 PM

Post #9243985

Zucchini fritters are also delicious, if you are not afraid of fried..We also make the same fritters with corn, okra and any veggie that grates well.. I think corn is the best..

Larkie

sample recipe, this can vary many ways.. I add grated Parmesan to my batter.

1 egg
2 Tbsp. flour
1/4 tsp. salt
Vegetable or canola oil for frying
Preparation:

Grate zucchini into a large bowl.
Add the egg and beat it with a fork. Combine zucchini and egg. Sprinkle mixture with flour and salt and stir to combine thoroughly. Cover and chill for 30 minutes.
Heat a generous layer of oil (about 1/4 inch deep) in a large frying pan or pot over medium-high heat to 350 - 375. A bit of batter dropped into the pan should sizzle immediately.
Put generous spoonfuls of batter into the pan and flatten a bit with the back of the spoon. You should be able to fit about four fritters in the pan at a time. Cook until fritters are browned on one side, flip, and cook until they are brown on both sides. Transfer fritters to a paper towel-lined plate to drain and repeat with remaining batter. Serve immediately.
Makes about 8 Zucchini Fritters.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

August 16, 2012
4:42 PM

Post #9243987

I agree about the skins & seeds adding a bitterness (maybe its really the seeds?) but I get busy and just roast 'em all whole often. Cut up w/onion & peppers. I just love the roasted sauce & the crockpot method was good (but maybe not quite as tasty).

Salmon w/lots and lots of fresh green beans for dinner tonight. :-)

Tam
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 16, 2012
5:40 PM

Post #9244059

We are having a cross between veggie quesadillas and pizza. I've got a package of flax seed and blue corn tortillas to use. There's layers of mushrooms, onions and cheddar along with plenty of garden garlic, herbs and tomatoes. There were a few tortillas left so I cut them into thin strips and placed them on top along with a healthy sprinkle of fresh Parm.

Terry, a happy birthday to SG from us. Someone in our house would probably be eating that lasagna for breakfast. :)

Darius, you are busier than a Buckhead plastic surgeon. Such an extensive list of projects going on. I'm looking forward to reports on your results. I personally have not canned anything that's been previously frozen. Though the idea of extending the shelf life is appealing, the loss of nutrition is something that can't actually be personally measured but something I consider.

Leslie, I don't make roasted tomato sauce but do make boat loads of roasted tomatoes. The cherries get dressed with herbs and garlic oil and served with a variety of foods, such as cheese boards, or tossed with pasta. The big ones get used as sauce or slathered across crostini with goat cheese or Gouda or herbs.

Edens, you got me thinking about the fall garden. I am ready for a fall garden but the weather is not yet here. Maybe in a few more weeks.

Larkie, I think you and I would get along well in the kitchen.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

August 16, 2012
5:44 PM

Post #9244066

Today we had fried peppers and provolone cheese in an Italian roll for lunch, courtesy of DH, and we went to the French restaurant down the shore for dinner. Shrimp bisque, DH had escargots and I had pâté de campagne, and then for our main dish we both had duck with a fig sauce, a few stalks of almost crunchy asparagus, a tomato coulis and a dab of sweet potato or pumpkin. And a great chocolate hazelnut tart that we shared for dessert. Leftovers for tomorrow, after all that food! Yum! (Or, as the French say, "Miam!")

Larkie

Larkie
Camilla, GA
(Zone 8a)

August 16, 2012
5:58 PM

Post #9244079

Thanks Laurel.. That would be a treat for me, lol..

greenouse gal,
Fried peppers sound delicious.. Were these stir fried or batter fried?
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 16, 2012
6:47 PM

Post #9244118

Yeah , G G those peppers sound like something I'd want . Is that all in the roll ? No meat ?

Larkie

Larkie
Camilla, GA
(Zone 8a)

August 16, 2012
8:40 PM

Post #9244203

I had a great big ole pot of okra and tomatoes, all fresh picked today.. Used some rib broth I had in the freezer for the base.. Darn good if I do say so..Forgot to add that I had a bowl of freshly boiled peanuts.. They were just picked this week. Love the farm at night during peanut season.. The smell is wonderful..

Larkie

This message was edited Aug 16, 2012 10:42 PM

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

August 17, 2012
4:14 AM

Post #9244317

Larkie and Digger, DH sautés sliced garlic in olive oil in a large cast iron frying pan, and then adds the peppers - about four or five for each of us - and cooks them until they're soft and the skin and garlic have somewhat caramelized. Then we cut open the rolls, drizzle them with some of the now-flavored cooking oil on both sides, put a couple of slices of provolone cheese on each roll, and then add the peppers hot from the pan. The heat from the peppers helps melt the cheese. You can salt if you like. No meat at all, but it's a great sandwich! He grew up eating those and it's a summertime treat for us, but I also freeze peppers and we do sometimes make it in the winter, too. These are long sweet peppers, by the way, not bell peppers. He sometimes adds a few long hots to the mix, but he's careful not to put any in my roll!

Your okra and tomatoes sounds wonderful too. Neat to hear about these regional dishes and the regional, seasonal smells!

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 17, 2012
5:25 AM

Post #9244370

Larkie, I love fresh boiled peanuts. Haven't had any for years, though. The canned ones are not even close.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

August 17, 2012
5:38 AM

Post #9244381

Forgot to post that the new sprayer sprays well. The only complaint is that the spray is heavier than the last one but we can live with that.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 17, 2012
6:44 AM

Post #9244416

G G , another regional dish that goes back to the depression . A side for meals , or a sweet for the kids .(omit onions for the kids sweets)
No recipe , just lightly saute an onion , skinless tomatoes and juice, cut up , fresh or canned , sugar to taste ,( should be sweet ).Add pieces of stale bread .D H liked it .


Now G G , tell me how to get the mark over my "e" . in saut'e' Duh !

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 17, 2012
7:38 AM

Post #9244483

Sally, do you use Firefox? If so, go up to the menu bar under "edit" and drop down the "special characters" menu. Lots of interesting things there you can insert! GG and I both use a Mac, and it's easy on a Mac, just "Option e then e" but I doubt it would work on a PC.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 17, 2012
8:08 AM

Post #9244512

Nope , isn't listed on my Edit .

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 17, 2012
8:21 AM

Post #9244532

Sorry, don't know what else to tell you. Maybe someone else with a PC has a suggestion.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

August 17, 2012
9:14 AM

Post #9244589

Digger, check this page out for accents; Mac is first and then PC:

http://faculty.weber.edu/tmathews/grammar/Compmark.html
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 17, 2012
10:32 AM

Post #9244650

We are having chicken thighs braised with artichokes, garlic, onions and tomatoes atop couscous and wild rice. Also a salad with homemade rosemary croutons.

We adore boiled peanuts but since I can't stop once I start I rarely get them. (: Our new SIL never had them until he came to Maypop. Now he can't drive over the GA line without stopping for boiled peanuts. There are stands at every country intersection with pots boiling. Even gas stations have pots at the door. Everyone has their recommends. Some like them with more or less salt and no heat to lots of heat. I like them not too salty and with lots of heat.

Darius, they are easy enough to make if you can get raw peanuts.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 17, 2012
11:00 AM

Post #9244666

Never thought about making them, nor even where to get raw peanuts. They do grow some peanuts in Virginia over in the flatlands but I never see them raw in the stores.
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

August 17, 2012
11:09 AM

Post #9244673

Darius ~ I am growing some peanuts, for the first time ever! I'll let you know how they do and if I actually get a crop. If I have enough to share, I will send you some.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 17, 2012
11:20 AM

Post #9244684

Evelyn, I'm not sure they'd grow in my heavy clay soil, but Thanks.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 17, 2012
11:23 AM

Post #9244687

You can usually find them at health foods stores or Asian markets. Thought this is an interesting read http://whatscookingamerica.net/History/BoiledPeanutsHistory.htm
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

August 17, 2012
11:29 AM

Post #9244689

I have heavy clay soil as well. I have them in a "Square Foot Garden". I had some in a raised bed, but something beneath the soil devoured all but one plant. That is a new raised bed and now I have corn, zucchini and cantaloupe growing in there. The beans in there also were demolished.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

August 17, 2012
11:41 AM

Post #9244704

They proably can be grown in a container or one of the potato bag planters.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

August 17, 2012
4:39 PM

Post #9245006

By the way, a weird thing is that the packets of tomato sauce that I processed have been in the chest freezer for about 24 hours now and they're STILL not frozen. DH is proposing that we patent the process for dog-friendly antifreeze.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 17, 2012
5:38 PM

Post #9245063

Too full , too close to the lid ?

Larkie

Larkie
Camilla, GA
(Zone 8a)

August 17, 2012
5:51 PM

Post #9245076

If you get peanuts to boil, make sure they are green, very green, not just raw...

Larkie

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

August 17, 2012
6:54 PM

Post #9245133

If being too close to the lid can do it, that was most likely the problem. Everything else in there is frozen solid, and DH checked the temperature and it was 15 below 0! We haven't had the chest freezer for very long; our other two freezers are uprights. I switched the packets to one of the uprights and hopefully they'll freeze now.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 18, 2012
5:27 AM

Post #9245415

Happens to me all the time . I need to use more out of it . I love my upright , the chest makes it so hard to find anything . I solved part of the problem , Milk cartons with like kind in each one . Blueberries , peaches , etc

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

August 18, 2012
6:05 AM

Post #9245457

I bought clear plastic bins and use those in the upright freezer - peaches, basil, zucchini, peas. Works really well. I haven't done that with the chest freezer; mostly that's our chicken, so I know what's in there.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

August 18, 2012
6:55 AM

Post #9245500

I'm on year #3 with my freezer now and try keep like items in their own shelves. Its working pretty well so far. The door holds a lot too so that helps organize. I label everything.

I'm having friends over for a tapas style dinner. I'm making bruschetta, some fruit infused goat cheese, roasted cherry tomatoes on a puff pastry, a veggie ragout tart and deviled eggs. The other guests will be bringing something made with their garden ingredients so it will be a celebration of summer.

(The tomato vines finally kicked in and I have a good supply to work with!)
Tam

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

August 18, 2012
7:08 AM

Post #9245515

I have labeled bins on all the shelves in my upright, fruit, prepared foods, beef, chicken, sausage, slide out baskets have vegetables, top shelf has bread, rolls, etc. I never could keep a chest freezer organized well.

Larkie

Larkie
Camilla, GA
(Zone 8a)

August 18, 2012
12:50 PM

Post #9245787

I wish I could be so organized..When my freezer gets opened, all I can say...is watch the toes, lol..At least it is full of our own farm fresh, home grown stuff..lol

Larkie

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

August 18, 2012
5:56 PM

Post #9246003

Good for you, Larkie. I'm not that organized either, but I'm better than I was.

A crab and spaghetti dinner tonight at the sailing club. (Sorry, Darius!) They did a great job!

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

August 18, 2012
7:23 PM

Post #9246089

Dinner turned out really good! The savory tarts were especially good.
Tam
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

August 18, 2012
8:36 PM

Post #9246155

Mixed green salad and talapia with mushrooms in a lemon-butter sauce.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

August 19, 2012
3:54 AM

Post #9246250

No labled bins yet but shelves that have general catagories on them.

Dinner was ham steak with a tomato basil farro salad and fresh sunshine watermelon and peaches.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


August 19, 2012
5:37 AM

Post #9246304

Dinner was a steak for DH (he gave a "double red" at our church's blood drive yesterday, so the organizer told him I should buy him a steak dinner - and I did :-) I can't give, but I went up and took pictures for the event, so neither of us were home much during the day. I ate a very late lunch consisting of a ginormous jalapeno cheeseburger (it wreaks havoc with my upper GI but occasionally I just have to give in to the craving and pay for it later), so I picked at a small plate of pasta while he ate.

Today/tonight is probably a pot of soup. It hasn't cooled off yet, but the brunt of summer's heat seems to have peaked already...and I'm in a soup mood. Plus it'll be easy because we're both running hither and yon today. I'd long for longer weekends, but sometimes they're busier than weekdays.

A friend of ours has tentatively promised me as many pears as I can handle in the next week or two. I'm mentally ready to delve into pear honey making.

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

August 19, 2012
10:35 AM

Post #9246604

Cool here today
Pork roast, spkiked/studded with garlic
German potato spaetzle, also called schupfnudel. Meaning pushaway noodle, in taste similar to ital. nocci.Potatoes are ready, riced, cooling for further work
Tomato medely (that is one "brandywine" tomato) ready for julianne zukes.Zukes sit a while, salted and a few drop of vinegar, than squeezed dry and added to this tomato thing. They are quite crunchy. Nice way to use large zucchini.
Will also make cuke salad as we have many burpless from the garden.SIL doesn't mind it next day. Loves his veg.
Also gravy fo the pasta, hence the vegetable around the roast. A FEAST to say the least.(it rhymes).

Thumbnail by helenethequeen   Thumbnail by helenethequeen   Thumbnail by helenethequeen
Click an image for an enlarged view.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 19, 2012
10:41 AM

Post #9246611

Looks yummy, Helene!

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

August 19, 2012
10:43 AM

Post #9246616

Very old world meal. Will show final results. I want to share as it is really work.

DD and SIL are out at a kids B=D party so I have free reign.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

August 19, 2012
10:50 AM

Post #9246631

That looks very inviting...gnocchi are very similar. I don't even roll mine down one of those corrugated paddles, I cut the pieces about an inch long and punch them with a knuckle. Serves the same purpose. Holds the sauce.

I always stud my pork roasts like that, yum!!!

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

August 19, 2012
11:51 AM

Post #9246684

Oh that is so interesting. well these are the spaetzle ala Ella (my mom).Can be served as a nice lunch. String bean soup and spaetzle ala Alfredo,.

A 3 lb pork roast rather thick, how long do I roast lets say at 350? Anyone?

Thumbnail by helenethequeen
Click the image for an enlarged view.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

August 19, 2012
12:37 PM

Post #9246713

Internal temp for a pork roast should be 165. I always use a thermometer, and your roast looks like two pieces tied together. No bones. Bones make a difference. Usually 20 minutes per lb for pork, but this is pretty thick. I'd surely use a thermometer. Or, untie the string and pull it apart and see if you see any pink.

SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

August 20, 2012
6:26 AM

Post #9247365

Dinner was burgers and a cucumber, tomato, kale, and basil salad.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 20, 2012
6:36 AM

Post #9247386

Helene, how did the pork roast turn out? You have me hungry for one but I just canned the last pork roast (in chunks) from my freezer.

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

August 20, 2012
11:17 AM

Post #9247787

OMG thanks for asking. SIL got the meat from the country butcher. He gets the meats from the farmers, so no fillers?water added. But I should get a medal for the nocchi's (haven't made these in light years) they were so good. Just Fab, Just Fab. Cooked it as per meezersfive suggestion.

Here they cook it in the "Staub" at higher heat.

Thumbnail by helenethequeen   Thumbnail by helenethequeen
Click an image for an enlarged view.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 20, 2012
11:19 AM

Post #9247794

Cool, glad it all turned out yummy!
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 20, 2012
3:46 PM

Post #9248085

Helene, that does look delish. What a feast for sure. Curious about the schupfnudln. I've never seen it referred to as spaetzle. My grandmother made knodel (noodles) often to serve along with her rustic dishes which involved throwing everything into a pot and slow cooking all day (or days). Didn't matter what the meat or fish or veg was...it all went into the big pot.

The way I learned to make spaetzle requires making a batter and passing it through a large-holed sieve or a spaetzle hoper. I've got a hoper. My grandmother used the large holes of a flat grater. She placed the flat grater over a pot of boiling salted water, the can on top, and poured the batter into the can that had top and bottom removed. She ran the can back and forth across the backside holes of the grater. We had a German nanny when the kids were little. She was Schweibish and made them spaetzle all the time. That's how I ended up special ordering a spaetzle hoper twenty years ago.

I am pooped. Weekend company stayed until this morning. Up at five, made breakfast and sent off the cottage stay guest. Closed down the house and drove back (in rush hour) to Atlanta to do a food pick up at Trader Joe's. We have Whole Foods at seven in the morning tomorrow and Costco on Wednesday. We are doing three committed pickups and a couple of fill ins a month and averaging a ton of food. It's a lot of food to pick up and unload!

I have lingering roasted cherry tomatoes, grilled peppers and onions, mushrooms, farm corn and garden squash. We are having veggie topped flat breads with raw milk gouda and topped with grated pecorino. There is always a variety of pickled produce to go alongside simple meals.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

August 20, 2012
4:19 PM

Post #9248117

we had speghetti squash w/roasted tomato sauce for dinner. Oh so good. :-)

Tam

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

August 20, 2012
4:27 PM

Post #9248125

Ginormous fresh tomato, (yes, one, it weighed a pound and a half), steamed chard, grilled lemon chicken, potato salad, green beans...

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 20, 2012
4:31 PM

Post #9248131

Wow, sounds like everyone had a healthier dinner than I had... but my excuse is a fever and no appetite.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 20, 2012
4:37 PM

Post #9248138

Oops, meant to say I just had a small grilled burger w/ sautéed onions and a few slices of yellow squash sautéed in coconut oil. Fair tasting, but today my stomach is no judge.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 20, 2012
4:44 PM

Post #9248149

Darius, I am sorry to hear you have spent much of the summer feeling poorly. It would be incredibly difficult, not to mention depressing, for me to get through these seasons and be out of commission. Hope you are able to find something healthy and restorative to eat and the appetite to do it with. Sounds like you need a Jewish mother. :>)

Our biggest problem at the moment is the avalanche of garden produce and the lack of time to do anything with it. Much of our garden this year will be going to the food pantry we deliver to.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 20, 2012
4:47 PM

Post #9248157

Yeah, a Jewish Mother and chicken soup sounds good right about now!
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 20, 2012
4:54 PM

Post #9248173

:) Get well soon!

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

August 20, 2012
5:14 PM

Post #9248208

Aww, we had Avgolemono last night, I had just the right amount of leftover rotisserie chicken, jasmine rice, so sometimes freezer diving results in something delicous!!

Larkie

Larkie
Camilla, GA
(Zone 8a)

August 20, 2012
5:41 PM

Post #9248240

I had a delicious black bean veggie burger piled high with fresh sliced tomatoes, cukes, onion and Jalapeno peppers..All open faced on a whole grain bun..

Larkie
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

August 20, 2012
6:29 PM

Post #9248298

Left over El Salvadorian Beef Kabobs. We helped a neighbor with a moving issue yesterday. She needed help loading some boxes. While we were there her four year old locked the her keys, purse, and cell phone in their truck. The spare key was with it. So dinner was some place local after AAA broke into the car and we helped with the last load.

Darius - Sorry to hear you are running a fever. Must be what the sweats were about last night. I hope you feel better soon.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 20, 2012
6:59 PM

Post #9248356

Made a huge bowl of salad with broccoli, spinach , red lettuce Romain lettuce, shredded carrots , chopped ,roasted pecans and chopped up, sugared dates . Garlic cheese croutons and poppy seed dressing .I can make a meal for two days on it . Will add cut up pineapple tidbits tomorrow and green onion day after with a little Green Goddess dressing , switch to seasoned croutons .If it lasts that long.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

August 21, 2012
5:59 AM

Post #9248670

that salad would not last long in this house. yum!
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 21, 2012
6:10 AM

Post #9248684

Tam , I have some cooked chicken breast in the freezer , think I'll chunk some of that in for today . Chili for D H tonight .

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

August 21, 2012
8:26 AM

Post #9248829

ladies all the meals sound and I am sure taste good. They would fly in this house.

We had chicken cutlets in a mushroom sauce, using garden goods for salad, and parsley rice. That was nice. (It rhymes.

Darius sorry that you have issues, Not pretty.

Laurel: I lived in swaebian for 3 years. Yes the spaetzle tools you discribe are correct and used internationally.I just scrape the dough, with a knife from the bowl into boiling water. Pot has to be quite full so they hit the water right away. Hate cleaning the spaetzle Hopper/machine.
To explain spaetzle delicately: the word is derived from, ein Spatz, (one bird) spaetzle meaning little bird.
Looking at the shape of the nocchi will explain what they (germans) mean. And they do have a lot of fun with this word after a glass or two of beer or wine. In german slang it's part of human anatomy, you see?

I recindled an elementary school friendship with Maria after 45 years not knowing her married name and she not knowing my address. Fast forward, last year and 2 years before that she and her fam. (8 peeps) came from Germany to Fl and stayed in Apts near my house on the beach.Each time they stayed almost a month. Last year, after DH passed they cooked for me, so I do know about these discussions. Man can she make spaetzle, delicate, melt in your mouth, using a spaetzle board and scraper which they sell in Germany.In Austria they are called nockerl or nockel, and this is my cooking background. Austria/Hungary.in bavaria they make knoedel.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 21, 2012
10:19 AM

Post #9248956

Both my grandparents were born and raised in the Stanislaus section of Vienna. They were later "re-located" to Austro-Hungary, an area now a part of Poland. They were able to immigrate to the U.S. in the early 1900's. I'm sorry to hear about your DH's passing, Helene, but glad that you have old friendships to rekindle. Are you living in FL now?

Darius, are you better today?

We had our early pick up this morning and I am now trying to deal with the piles of garden produce strewn throughout the kitchen. A crockpot tomato sauce is burbling and a pot of mixed beans and okra is done. I'll add that to a leftover tomato, onion and pepper dish that's begging to become a gumbo. Just needs the right seasonings. There's always roux in the fridge. That's not for dinner tonight though. I'm waiting for a lightening bolt.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

August 21, 2012
11:00 AM

Post #9249002

We're doing a green bean taste test here. My DH does not like the rattlesnake pole bean. I got it based on reviews of good taste & drought tolerance (its an heirloom). I also have some Kentucky Blue to compare.
Do any of you folks know these two? Opinions?

Tam

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 21, 2012
11:42 AM

Post #9249052

Don't know either bean personally. Sorry.

I am growing a pole bean new to me this year, an heirloom named (Cherokee) 'Trail of Tears', which is a small elongated black bean, usually dried and shelled. My sis hired a yard man to do some weedeating today and he accidentally cut most of the bean vines off at the base of the trellis. Enough are already starting to dry on the vines that I should get enough for a pot of beans, though.

I'm feeling a tad better, at least enough to be hungry anyway.

Here's a fun, short video on a creative egg separator. Don't worry about understanding the language... it isn't necessary.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=Uz2Vnp5ZW4c

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

August 21, 2012
11:55 AM

Post #9249063

I've had Kentucky Wonder but not Blue. I like Blue Lake bush beans the best, for flavor and tenderness. They produce all season long...except this year with the devastating heat the first planting dried up before my eyes...and what beans we got were tough. The second planting, after I pulled up the kohlrabi, is producing beans after only five weeks...and they are very nice.

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

August 21, 2012
12:34 PM

Post #9249096

We always gre Kentucky Wonder. I don't care for Pole Beans to hearty tasting.

Love Love stuffed Kohlrabi. I grew them just to have a few meals.

Thanks Laurel,

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

August 21, 2012
4:47 PM

Post #9249400

OK - what do you stuff kohlrabi with?

The bean tasting was a dead-on tie. I think the problem with the rattlesnake previously was that they were too ripe/tough. I've got so many green beans in the freezer that I am letting the rest of the bush beans dry out for dried beans. Probably will do the same for the pole beans after a few more meals worth.

Leftovers for dinner. Plus fresh green beans. :-)

Tam
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 21, 2012
4:49 PM

Post #9249403

We grow a variety of beans and rotate multiple selections each year. There are two main Kentucky Wonder pole varieties. I've grown both. There are also bush varieties that I don't bother with. I hate bending and never grow bush beans that aren't intended to dry and be picked in Fall. In other words, no fresh green beans that need to be picked multiple times a week! I now only grow the brown seeded version of KW. It's a richer, more earthy tasting bean and not like a "store" bean. We love it for soups and as a side bean. It's not this bland green thing on the plate for sure. Very flavorful. White seeded Kentucky Wonder is more like Blue Lake. Blue Lake is a California creation. Kentucky Blue is a cross of the two. I have not grown it because, to date, I grow no hybrid beans, not even primary hybrids, so I can't say about Kentucky Blue. However, I also grow Blue Lake pole beans. I think Kentucky Wonder white seeded is better than Blue Lake and the brown seeded version of KW is better than both. If you eat a more veg diet you will find the brown seeded KW has the most flavor bang. I should have prefaced any comment with not being able to recommend a variety based on your zone, just on my personal flavor preference.

LMK if the above post need a facilitator to puzzle out.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 21, 2012
4:51 PM

Post #9249405

We cross posted and I didn't comment on the Rattlesnakes. We love them. They need to be picked early. I have a new Romano that you might like next year. DM me if interested.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

August 22, 2012
4:07 AM

Post #9249706

I am having problems with my Fortex pole beans, which have been my favorites for years. This year only the first couple of pickings were really nice: crisp and bright. After that they started to become misshapen, with large seeds even in young beans. Later on a lot of them were soft and hollow. A friend mentioned that the beans she got from her local farm stand were like that, too. Someone here suggested that it was due to a virus, and said that the only way to avoid it next year was to plant resistant varieties. But I don't know which those might be. These were from seeds I saved myself, so maybe I should just try buying some fresh ones.

Last night we had leftover ribs and baked beans with a tomato and cucumber salad from the garden. We are really enjoying our tomatoes!
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 22, 2012
5:49 AM

Post #9249766

I wish I liked cukes . The only way I don't burp them , even the burp less , is to process them into a dressing . Weird .

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

August 22, 2012
6:06 AM

Post #9249781

Have you tried leaving some of the peel on? That is supposed to help. Works for me.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 22, 2012
6:27 AM

Post #9249809

Mike (yard man working for me yesterday) said he peeled, sliced and baked some cukes last week and for the first time ever, they didn't make him burp.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 22, 2012
7:01 AM

Post #9249847

Bright lightbulb just came on , Meezers ! When I process them , I do the whole thing for the extra fiber , so bet that's it . I'll try it . I don't grow them at all because of the discomfort , and will even try that Thank you
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 22, 2012
3:25 PM

Post #9250408

There is more cucurbitican compound near the skin and at both ends of the cucumber. Therefore, theoretically leaving the skin on would cause greater indigestion. The amount of cucurbitican in any cucumber is related to growing conditions and variety. The drier the weather, or the less water the cuke receives, the higher the cucurbitican. I find the long Asian cucumbers, like Soyu, to be more mild than hybrids like Burpless.

Came home from our Costco pick up and been canning tomatoes and jam all day. Ribeyes met marinade early this morning. The grillmaster, known to the RU crowd as "Weennie Man", (vulgar I know) is in charge. He grilled corn yesterday. I'll warm it in chipotle butter and squeeze with lime. Our international market has dried, powdered chipotle. Very useful. I've got buffalo mozz marinating in special olive oil and garden basil to combine with slices of yellow and pink beefsteak-type tomatoes for a Caprese salad.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

August 22, 2012
3:28 PM

Post #9250415

Wow, I can't compete with that menu! We're having deer Italian sausage over linguine with broccoli raab, and the ubiquitous tomato salad.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 22, 2012
3:45 PM

Post #9250436

Whoa, venison sausage with linguine makes an amazing dinner. Gotta sneak in tomatoes while we can. I've been trying to get a little quilting time in before dinner each night with two hand quilted bed pillow shams that are close to done. Always looking for an easy way around dinner these days.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


August 22, 2012
4:06 PM

Post #9250453

Well, I finally (!) got my fridge and pantry cleaned out and inventoried, made a dash to the store and...wait for it...I made dinner! That pasta e fagioli I meant to make on Sunday? Yeah, it got made tonight, along with some cheesy biscuits. I would have made garlic bread, but I've got too much milk and cheese in the fridge, so biscuits it was. It's been so long since I've cooked anything resembling an actual meal, I'm afraid I might strain something, so I started out with soup. :-)

Tomorrow night is tamales smothered with chili verde. And for dessert, a peanut butter and banana bread pudding. (Not banana bread, but bread pudding with a dash of pb and sliced bananas, topped with a peanutbutter crumb and baked, then drizzled with a dark caramel sauce. New recipe, and I'm excited, can you tell?)

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 22, 2012
4:32 PM

Post #9250483

My sis wants a tuna-noodle casserole so I'm actually thinking of making one from scratch in a couple of days. NO canned mushroom soup!

I had planned a spinach-quinoa casserole for tonight, but I was out of frozen spinach and the yard man blocked the bridge until 7 PM... too late for me to go to town and/or start a dish. Instead I had a few frozen haricot verts lightly sautéed in butter and a tad of garlic and lemon juice. Grilled free-range burger. My yard guy brought me a few Mr. Stripey tomatoes (popular here) so some went in a salad. Unfortunately the best of them are punctuated all over from the brown marmorated stink bug and unusable.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 22, 2012
4:45 PM

Post #9250492

Gosh , Darius , tuna noodle casserole is all I knew to cook when I first married . Haven't made one of those in 58 or so years .They were good .
Have venison/beef meat loaf with a vally down it filled with catsup , cheese , green olives , mushrooms .Pretty when sliced and good too .Twice cooked potatoes in white sauce , sprinkled with a little dill .

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

August 22, 2012
5:54 PM

Post #9250541

Then, I have theoretically solved the burping with magic.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

August 22, 2012
6:04 PM

Post #9250557

We had zucchini pie for dinner w/muskmelon for dessert. Its my first zucchini pie. Was good.
Debsroots
Northwest, MO
(Zone 5a)

August 22, 2012
6:52 PM

Post #9250614

How do you make the zucchini pie? I have several extra zucchini and canned zucchini relish over the weekend, but would like to know other uses.

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

August 22, 2012
7:07 PM

Post #9250640

so what is zuke relish, pls.?
Debsroots
Northwest, MO
(Zone 5a)

August 23, 2012
5:33 AM

Post #9250951

Recipe for Zucchini Relish.

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1276145/
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

August 23, 2012
2:21 PM

Post #9251462

Dinner is cherry almond pork loin with green salad and sunshine watermelon.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 23, 2012
2:22 PM

Post #9251463

Spent the day cleaning in the greenhouse, cleaning upstairs and working on a slate and glass table top for an old vanity-turned-hall cabinet. SO built slanted retro legs to raise it and turned the center blind sink panel into a nice drawer. I gave it many layers of a hand rubbed finish with various diluted paint concoctions. I put new cup pulls on the drawers and doors. Was hoping to grout the tile tomorrow but didn't finish the mastic and tile work. I'm going to goof of with my quilting for a bit and then make a goat cheese, gouda, mushroom and caramelized onion pizza. SO made a salad earlier.

Don't know where the days go. My "to do" list was way longer than what I got done.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 23, 2012
2:27 PM

Post #9251469

My "To-Do" list is even longer than my imagination!
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 23, 2012
2:53 PM

Post #9251487

Just forget it . DH is bringing Wendy's hamburgers for dinner .
Edens_Gardener
Clay Center, KS
(Zone 5b)

August 23, 2012
3:02 PM

Post #9251502

Tonight is pulled pork on buns, potato salad and a couple ears of sweet corn. Topping it off with a fresh bing cherries - Did a pork roast in the crock pot yesterday, so this is the "planned-over" , Have some home made buns in the freezer, so an easy meal. Today was back in the mid 90's, but we actually have a 50-60% chance of rain the next couple of days, so here's hoping!

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


August 23, 2012
4:27 PM

Post #9251579

I'm tempted to eat all the salted dark caramel sauce and call it "dinner", but I guess I'll save some for the rest of the crew. Plus I'd like to drizzle some over my bread pudding :-)

The chili verde is simmering away and I'll steam the tamales here in a few minutes. The bread pudding is in a water bath. I managed to scald the side of my hand deglazing the deep skillet after I fried up the pork. My brain said "hot" but my hand said "huh?" And then it was too late.



darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 23, 2012
4:33 PM

Post #9251585

My supper is just a repeat of last night as "must-goes" need to be eaten. I had a BLT for lunch, using only the 2nd fresh tomato I've had this year. Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs have been on the rampage here, and they have yet to find a solution.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 23, 2012
5:49 PM

Post #9251653

It's almost Fall, right? We'll have to get in gear for earlier eating but as of now we've still not eaten. The pizza is ready and the oven is heating.

Edens, want to share your crockpot pork recipe?

Terry, salted caramel is awesome. Have you ever made caramel with chipotle or other chiles? Pink peppercorns are good to finish and so is basil. Grated ginger done with a microplane. Rosemary or fresh thyme leaves are both good. I was disappointed in fresh and dried mint. They compete. Don't mix herbs. Too much going on. Caramel lends itself to lots of switch ups. I rarely make it because of my un-sweet tooth but know its good flavor. I like to do flans with various twists. Speaking of twists, if you zest and save from grapefruit, oranges, lemons or limes they work well. I keep a variety of zested citrus in the freezer.
Edens_Gardener
Clay Center, KS
(Zone 5b)

August 23, 2012
6:10 PM

Post #9251663

Crockpot pork is just a shoulder roast, onion, some ancho or chipotle pepper, garlic, kosher salt, pepper and a few herbs..most of the liquid goes for gravy with sliced pork roast, the remainder is shredded for pulled pork, barbeque sauce of your choice, (sweet/hot is our preference). Years ago (decades ago) my SIL started me on beef in the crock pot,shredded, then return part of the liquid along with barbeque sauce, I've just adapted variations to pork. This can all be made as spicy as desired or horseradish..anything rather than just plain.
Terry, hope the burn isn't too bad. I recognize the temptation to grab a pan without thinking. Do you think it's an inherited trait? What is the bread pudding/salted caramel recipe?
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 23, 2012
6:32 PM

Post #9251690

Oh, Terry, I saw that burn comment and forgot to add I hope you are okay. Sorry. SO is bad about reaching into the oven with Corningware. (: A few months ago I rotated a whole cabbage, boiling away for stuffed cabbage, towards me. The water spewed out across my belly. Now I'm wondering if the scar will be permanent.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

August 23, 2012
6:39 PM

Post #9251694

omlete w/garden veggies for dinner.

I have a big pot of roasted tomato sauce in the oven.

Debs - zucchini pie:

4c chopped/shredded zucchini/ summer squash
1/2c chopped onion
1c shredded cheese
1/2c oil (I use less and add an extra egg)
3 eggs
1c bisquick

You can also add shredded red pepper (~1/2c)

Mix all this together and put in a 9" deep dish pie plate. Bake for ~40min at 350

Tam
Debsroots
Northwest, MO
(Zone 5a)

August 23, 2012
7:35 PM

Post #9251761

Thanks Tammy, I will certainly try this recipe as I have a lot of zucchini and like to find new ways to use it.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


August 23, 2012
9:24 PM

Post #9251848

Okay, I should clarify - it was a steam scald. I was pouring stock over the pork in the skillet to start the chili verde. Didn't grab a hot pan off the stove or anything from the oven. Not today anyway!

Mom, the bread pudding was a Southern Living recipe. It was well-received here, but it won't be appreciated by bread pudding purists. Too many other flavors and textures with the peanut butter and bananas :-)

Laurel I haven't added peppers to my caramel. I'm a huge fan of sweets including salted caramel, and so I make it once in a blue moon, unless I have a crowd of eaters on hand. Otherwise I'd be running to the moon and back to work it off :-)

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

August 24, 2012
6:03 AM

Post #9252013

Debs - I had a huge crop a couple years ago and found every recipe under the sun for zucchini/summer squash. There's also a good pizza crust made with it. With the other garden veggies available, it makes for a nice summer meal too. (But it takes a lot longer to cook than the pie)

Tam

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

August 24, 2012
9:26 AM

Post #9252190

I stuck one of our frozen cockerels in the crockpot; I'm waiting for a quarter of organic pig and am trying to get some stuff out of the freezer to make room. This was a pretty big bird so if we eat it up that will help. The basement upright freezer has mostly veggies plus some deer and some supermarket meats that I bought on sale; the chest freezer is mostly chickens, plus DH is storing crabs in there now. So we'll have chicken for dinner; maybe I'll serve it room temperature with potato salad.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 24, 2012
2:42 PM

Post #9252449

Terry, a steam scald can be just as bad. Hope you are not uncomfortable today.

GH, how many chickens do you have and how many do you hatch out each year? How many roos end up in freezer camp? Do you caponize any of your roos? Lot's of questions, I know. I've only ever eaten roos in stews.

Picked up a pound of shrimp to complete the gumbo and acquired a fresh baguette to garlic and toast. Wish there was a leftover wedding cornbread instead of the baguette but those are in the freezer at the other house. We are managing them like the wedding cake top layer that's supposed to be eaten on the first anniversary. I have chicken Brunswick stew in the freezer to go with the cornbread for their anniversary dinner.

We are joining friends at the Atlanta Fish Market for dinner tomorrow. I've not been there in several years. Robert Holley is a great chef and his menu is terrific. I often order several appetizers instead of an entree. Must squeeze in fresh P.E.I oysters here. http://www.buckheadrestaurants.com/atlanta-fish-market/

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 24, 2012
4:07 PM

Post #9252560

Laurel, the Atlanta Fish Market in Buckhead must be new since I lived there. Sounds interesting. What's so special about PEI oysters? I thought it was their potatoes that were famous.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 24, 2012
4:24 PM

Post #9252572

Darius, the Atlanta Fish Market has existed in downtown Buckhead for over twenty years. Joel Antunes was the original chef. The Buckhead Life Group (Pano Karatossas) owns this one. They hire premiere chefs and then build fabulous restaurant concepts around them. Kevin Rathbun was the executive chef and focus of their very upscale S.W. style restuarant, Nava. These chefs are frequent guest participants or judges on the food channels.

Malpeque oysters, the variety cultivated on Prince Edward Island, are my favorite for raw eating. They are so sweet. They come in fives at the AFM. I can eat several dozen. Restraint is required at those prices.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

August 24, 2012
5:30 PM

Post #9252630

I found some chicken that was in the freezer since Jan (cooked) so I threw together a bunch of garden veggies, the chopped chicken & some leftover wine for a stew of sorts. I have a plum clafoutis in the oven for dessert. (Was a long day at work so everything is late tonight!)

Have fun at the Atlanta Fish market w/ apps & friends! Sounds like a nice weekend.

I have one roo that is just crowing his way into a stew pot! I want to wait til the next batch of chicks gets old enough to see how many are roos before taking him to the menonites for "preparation". (We had three batches of chicks this summer!)

Tam

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

August 24, 2012
5:37 PM

Post #9252634

Laurel, we have about forty chickens, including nine new pullets, and sixteen cockerels. Straight run orders usually run much closer to 50/50 male/female, so we were disappointed to have so many males and we may order just pullets next spring. We don't hatch them; we buy them from Murray McMurray as day-old chicks. We don't caponize; it's a bit tricky and you can lose some.

All of the cockerels from each new batch end up in the freezer, and we really don't need sixteen new ones! It's a bit of work to process them and we also don't have much room left.

When we butcher them, we hold them in a refrigerator for two or three days before freezing them. That allows the muscles to relax and makes them tenderer. I also sprinkle them with seasalt in their freezer bag, and then when I use them I immerse them in water, changing it several times, while they thaw, and that continues the brining process. This rooster was a big one - almost six pounds - and I added rosemary, bay leaf and lemon to the pot and to the interior of the bird. It was very flavorful and tender, just the way you'd expect a really good farm-raised chicken to taste. We all enjoyed it. I served it at room temperature with a pasta and white bean salad.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


August 25, 2012
8:57 PM

Post #9253865

Scald burn is all healed - it was minor, just irritating when you're cooking and dunking your hands in a sink of hot water to wash up.

I did a beer-can chicken tonight, with a side of roasted sweet potatoes and a congealed salad, which was too sweet. Shrug. Nothing ventured, nothing gained. I also poached a second chicken and then simmered the bones and skin from both birds. (I lost all my frozen broth when the freezer went out earlier this summer; just now getting feeling like boiling stuff to replace it :-)

Tomorrow's lunch is hot Hawaiian bread sandwiches for lunch, and a vegetable-cheese chowder in the crockpot for evening.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

August 26, 2012
3:53 AM

Post #9253956

Well I managed to cut my finger on the tip on the blade of my new food processor. :-(

Last night, I harvested a bunch of basil and made pesto, roasted a bunch of bell peppers and made another batch of roasted tomato sauce. I wanted to clean out the garden before heading out of town on another business trip. Its all in the freezer to enjoy later.

I'll be cooking virtually through you guys for the next week. :-)

Tam

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

August 26, 2012
4:44 AM

Post #9253982

We went out to dinner at a crab shack last night and I had fried oysters. Not sure what we're doing tonight, but we do have a bag of crabs in the freezer that DH catches in a trap off our dock and that we should use. That's why I didn't order crabs last night...

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

August 26, 2012
5:00 AM

Post #9253990

Tammy, those blades are sharp!!! And they stay that way, even my old one that was passed on to my DD still was able to inflict harm. The Cuisinart that I got in the mid eighties is still going strong while my newer big one has already had two of the plastic parts replaced. The work bowl and the feed tube. The work bowl was seemed the same density but I suspect they thinned it down some, and the feed tube cracked where it snaps into position over the bowl. I'm going to turn in to one of those grumpy old ladies, snapping "They made better stuff in my day" ...

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 26, 2012
5:12 AM

Post #9254012

I have a 2nd cousin whom I have never met coming in 2 weeks with her DH. I'm thinking about getting some local trout. I'd take them trout fishing so we could catch our own, but that requires a year's fishing license plus a trout stamp... around $35 for each person.

It's hard to plan 3 days of meals for people I've never met. The DH is from Alabama so soup beans and cornbread will be on the menu for sure.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

August 26, 2012
5:23 AM

Post #9254036

That should be interesting, Darius. I suppose you know ahead of time that there are no medical or dietary restrictions, at least?

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 26, 2012
6:51 AM

Post #9254135

Yep, I actually did check. Restrictions are nothing spicy, and no onions... for the husband's food. She's Wiccan and will give thanks and eat almost anything, even groundhog.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

August 26, 2012
7:52 AM

Post #9254183

Darius - Have fun with your relatives.

I hope that Terry's burn and Tam's cut are doing better.

We spent yesterday at the Busker Festival in Lawrence Kansas watching Pogo Dudes (guys on pogos doing stunts), Ariel (silk ariel group), fire eaters, jugglers, magicians, and a number of bands. A lot of fun. http://lawrencebuskerfest.com/

Dinner was at Zen Zero in Lawrence. http://www.zen-zero.com/index.shtml

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 26, 2012
7:57 AM

Post #9254185

The Noodle shop looks interesting, hope you had great food!
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 26, 2012
9:19 AM

Post #9254294

We had to cancel our dinner engagement last night. Spent most of the day in the hospital radiology department 'cause a bone fragment in SO's hip let loose and the hip socket filled with fluid. Terrible pain! Fortunately, and coincidentally, a radiologist friend called while all this was going on and met us at the hospital. He ordered an MRI,CAT and X-rays. The upshot is SO needs to have the fluid drained, an out patient procedure, and must wait until Monday or Tuesday depending on what my friend can arrange for outpatient procedure suite. Meanwhile SO is much more comfortable today. Though he is not getting around well he was able to sleep last night. I set him up in one of those reclining lawn lounges. We have two, and I can help him down the stairs a little later.

Well, we got home late afternoon. I had taken out babybacks to grill tonight (his favorite) but the situation was dire and, in an effort to cheer him up, I threw the ribs in a crockpot with homemade sauce and cranked it up. We had ribs by eight o'clock. I served them with re-heated Mexican rice that was a few days old and slaw. Certainly not as good as grilled but I like to think those ribs helped him feel better. :) Tonight I am making a kitchen sink salad with a roasted tomatillo dressing. SO made batches of garden tomatillo salsa last fall. A little olive oil and sherry or balsamic vinegar turns this salsa into a very nice salad dressing. I've been baking whole wheat tortillas into crisps instead of buying chips. Love the crunch and the flavor.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 26, 2012
10:16 AM

Post #9254355

Laurel, Acckkkk! So sorry for the DH, and hope he gets some improvement soon.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


August 26, 2012
10:52 AM

Post #9254385

Tell him we hope he feels better soon! Ribs in the crock aren't as good as grilled, but they will do the trick in a pinch. I just use a dry rub on mine, then take them out and put a bit of sauce on top and stick them in the oven or grill to glaze them for those who want wet ribs (personally I like 'em dry but that's just me.)

Hand is all better - all that remains is a "ruddy" looking knuckle to remind me of my faux pas.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 26, 2012
1:06 PM

Post #9254474

Blowing xxxxoooo to all those injuries so they'll get all better .

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

August 26, 2012
2:15 PM

Post #9254540

Laurel, what a mess with SO! Good that your radiologist friend was on hand! I hope he gets it taken care of ASAP and is back to normal!

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

August 26, 2012
3:01 PM

Post #9254573

sorry for your SO situtation. Mensch denkt, Gott lenkt. Humans think, but god directs.

Trying eggplant lasagna. We went to a very nice restaurant and had eggplant torta for app. very delicious. I was trying to mimic this. Crossing fingers, toes, arms and legs that this turns out ok. Also salmon on the grill.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

August 26, 2012
3:39 PM

Post #9254594

Ouche on the hip. Glad to hear he is feeling a little better today and that your friend was able to help out.

Dinner is Italian chicken sausage with fresh made tomato sauce and pasta plus a batch of kale chips. We are (or rather DH is) planting seeds for the fall garden. A little later than we would like but it's been hot and dry.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 26, 2012
3:44 PM

Post #9254602

Thank you all for the good thoughts. He's trying to stave off a replacement until Medicare kicks in. That's fourteen months away. Don't know if he's going to make it.

Tam, hope your finger isn't setting you back in the kitchen but look at it this way...you're about to get the week off. Have a good trip.

Susan, I looked at the Zen Zero menu. It looks great!

Terry, glad to hear your hand is improved. I paper cut my quilting pushing finger the other day but am determined to stitch an hour each day to limber up for the wedding quilt. Ooch, ouch!

Six mini loaves of banana bread got made today. Looking in the fridge, there's lots of creative cooking needed. There were potatoes that looked like apple grannies. The insides were fine so I sliced them up, tossed them with olive oil, fresh garlic and rosemary, salt and pepper, and they are roasting away. What will they be? Potato jerky?
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 26, 2012
3:47 PM

Post #9254607

Oh, and by the way, did I mention the Miami house has a new buyer contract as of last week and Isaac is barreling down? I have no clue what is going on down there. My realtor has gone missing.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

August 26, 2012
5:06 PM

Post #9254671

The food is always good there.

Anyone have suggestions on where to look to find out what spices are put in different types of sausage? I have some problems with some of the aged sausages so I thought I could just take the spice mix that is typically used and put into fresh ground meat.

Realitor is proably headed out of the path of Isaac. Hopefully the house closed before they left.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

August 26, 2012
5:25 PM

Post #9254689

Susan, we make our own Italian-style sausage with deer meat and pork; we add oregano, basil, fennel seed, salt, pepper, and lots of fresh garlic. For a breakfast sausage I think the predominant herb is sage, along with salt and pepper.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


August 26, 2012
7:27 PM

Post #9254822

For everyone's sake, here's hoping no one takes a direct hit from Isaac! But I confess, I am hoping we get some rain as a result.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

August 26, 2012
8:20 PM

Post #9254877

Laurel - sorry to hear about the all the drama at your place! It sounds like it will be a long 14mo for your SO.

I'm in Ca and indeed am happy not to have to cook & wash dishes with this little cut on my finger! I'm sure it'll be healed up by the time I get home in a week.

Have fun cooking!
Tam
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 27, 2012
5:55 AM

Post #9255150

T V weather says you'll get your wish , Terry .
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

August 27, 2012
6:57 AM

Post #9255245

GG - Thanks! I missed the garlic but got the rest for the chicken in the spagetti yesterday. What portions of herbs to meat are you using?

We've already had rain due to the Isaac. We're very happy about that. Still 15 inches or so behind. Looking for more rain later this week.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

August 27, 2012
7:19 AM

Post #9255278

Susan, here's my Italian deer sausage recipe:


Italian Deer Sausage

To 13 pounds of ground deer and 7 pounds of ground fatty pork, add:
14 tbsps ( 3 oz.) fennel
7 tbsps salt
4 1/2 tbsps freshly ground black pepper
4 1/2 tbsps garlic powder and six or more large cloves of garlic
4 1/2 tbsps oregano
3 tbsps basil

Grind deer meat and leave pork coarsely ground. Add six or more garlic cloves while grinding.

Mix thoroughly, fry up a small patty to check seasonings, and if delicious, stuff into casings.

This made 23 pounds of sausage, so maybe my initial weights were slightly off.

It's very lean and dense, but really good. You can add crushed red pepper if you like it hot. I probably wouldn't add more than a tablespoonful and then taste. You can always add more.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

August 27, 2012
8:40 AM

Post #9255391

Thank you. I have that printed off.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 27, 2012
9:26 AM

Post #9255453

Me too !
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 27, 2012
9:47 AM

Post #9255486

SO is doing better and has decided to delay another steroid injection for now. He must be careful to use the treatment sparingly because of side effects. We are somewhat homebound which provides an opportunity to catch up on cooking, seed saving and house chores.

I ground up the tail ends of the two whole top sirloins used for wedding party deli-style roast beef and froze it following the wedding. The ends are a little grizzly. Wasn't sure if they would tenderize with moist cooking or I'd have pieces like rubber bands in the mix. In that case the dogs would have had a treat. The ground meat has been simmering with stock for just a short bit and no evidence of grizzle. Skip the glucosamine! Now I can proceed with turning the mixture into red bean chili con carne. There's a pot roast in the crockpot with veggies too. I'm banking kitchen time.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 27, 2012
9:50 AM

Post #9255489

I've got a pot of soup beans simmering.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 27, 2012
3:20 PM

Post #9255996

No one here hungry . Snacked on boudin and crackers . Eating green grapes as I type .

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

August 27, 2012
3:37 PM

Post #9256027

Crabs, corn and green beans, with cantaloupe for first. Just stowed 55 lbs. of organic pork in the freezer and we need the room! Crabs take up a lot.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

August 27, 2012
3:52 PM

Post #9256057

Dinner is left overs from last night.

The electricians have been here all day and left not too long ago. The bathrooms are now vented, have a moisture sensor to turn on the fan, have extra lighting, and (best of all) an electrical receptical in each bath. DH is happy because we can now turn off the basement stair lights from either the bottom or top of the stairs. They also put in recepticles in the garage.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


August 27, 2012
7:30 PM

Post #9256398

Time for a new thread...here we go: http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1277503/

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