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Upper Midwest Gardening: Late Summer 2012 Blooms

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sherriseden
Des Plaines, IL
(Zone 5b)

August 5, 2012
11:52 AM

Post #9230395

Just thought I'd start a new thread for the end of this crazy summer! I'm guessing the only things that look great in our gardens at this point are:

1. Plants we coddle
2. Plants that survive anything and still look great
3. Plants that we just planted within the last two weeks
4. Garden art : )

That said, here are some pics I took today. All plants pictured fall into one of the above categories!

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sherriseden
Des Plaines, IL
(Zone 5b)

August 5, 2012
11:53 AM

Post #9230399

And one more - the classic late summer plants, Black-eyed Susan and Hydrangea paniculata (this one is Pinky Winky.

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juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

August 6, 2012
12:26 PM

Post #9231840

This season not much now. these BES and a couple of zinnia ,are all now

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nutsaboutnature
Algonquin, IL
(Zone 5a)

August 9, 2012
11:43 AM

Post #9235745

Oh my gosh, Sherri, your flowers look gorgeous!!

I haven't even bothered taking many pics because we've been so dry my plants are really suffering. I've done a little lurking in some of the gardening forums, but that's about all, spending most of my time in the bird and other wildlife forums (we have lots of wildlife). We're on water restrictions right now even worse than our normal Summer ones. We can water every other day from 6AM -9AM and if you go over a certain amount of water usage, the cost of your entire bill will triple!

That said, IT'S RAINING, YAY!!!! Boy I hope it continues for a while. I do have a (very full) rainbarrel, but I mostly use it to fill a watering can. Glad I didn't bother with veggies this year.

Juhur7, how are your veggies doing?

Well I guess we all have some Black-eyed Susans. These are being enjoyed by a Goldfinch.

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juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

August 9, 2012
12:09 PM

Post #9235784

The vegies are semi alright ,rained all night last night and is rainy today.I sure hope all this rain helps!!.I have seen Goldfinches swaying on Coreopsis blooms amazing how they do that.
From the garden a couple of cucumbers,several tomatoes,.not much besides that.Some small Cantelopes about the size of a nickel have set on,and a few watermelons up to a couple of pounds are growing. Watering caused chlorosis,one more of why I- do- not -like- to- water!
Here's a Coneflower that is still blooming,one of my volunteers,almost six inches the bloom.Not much of a pic from mw only that is reall nothing new(lol) Your BES look they are having a good time,weather lovers aren't they!!?

Well, I hope your your drought lets up soon ,it appears ours is ending, with any hope anyway!

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juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

August 9, 2012
12:15 PM

Post #9235799

Adding I forgot that is one nice pic of that Goldfinch!! I Coudn't get a pic like that if my life depended on it!! Great shot!!
nutsaboutnature
Algonquin, IL
(Zone 5a)

August 9, 2012
12:23 PM

Post #9235812

That's a pretty Coneflower, Juhur7! Yes the BE Susans seem to do well in nearly all weather (guess that's an advantage of natives). My Coneflowers have done fairly well and some others here and there, but in general, a disappointing year of blooms. A few of my perennials didn't grow at all or barely grew.

I had planned to add some annuals, but I had hand surgery in May and it took a while before I could have planted anything. By that time we were in "full drought".

Our rain has basically stopped, but we may still get more over the next day or so (my fingers are crossed). Our temps are supposed to be in the high 70's for the next several days. Boy is that going to feel good!

Edited to add: Thank you for such a nice compliment! You're too kind!

This message was edited Aug 9, 2012 2:25 PM
sherriseden
Des Plaines, IL
(Zone 5b)

August 10, 2012
9:13 AM

Post #9236722

Nutsaboutnature, thanks for the compliment, but, if you'll notice, all the pics are closeups - that's because the yard as a whole has the August "overgrown in some places, fried in others look"! That goldfinch shot is BEAUTIFUL! Juhur, kudos to you for getting even some veggies out of this horrible drought year!
nutsaboutnature
Algonquin, IL
(Zone 5a)

August 10, 2012
1:11 PM

Post #9236947

Sherri, Thanks for your lovely compliment! You're so right about the, "overgrown in some places, fried in others look" comment! You might notice that I only posted one picture. That's because it's one of the few plants that really look good. Others only have a few blooms (when they should have lots) or no blooms at all. Some of my foliage plants are okay, but most are kind of so, so and my Astilbes gave up in June.

Well, we did have a fabulously long and heavy rain yesterday so I assume you did too. It's too late for some plants, but I'm sure others got some benefit. Once the rain eased up a little the birds mobbed the feeders. It was quite the feeding frenzy in my yard.
sherriseden
Des Plaines, IL
(Zone 5b)

August 10, 2012
6:13 PM

Post #9237218

Yes, we had a good rain here, too! Well, soon we'll have cooler weather and COLOR - in the form of leaves. I always enjoy that!
nutsaboutnature
Algonquin, IL
(Zone 5a)

August 10, 2012
9:02 PM

Post #9237353

Well, we had a little taste of cooler today and it was sooo nice! I'm definitely looking forward to Autumn!!
dax080
Cedar Rapids, IA
(Zone 5a)

August 11, 2012
8:32 AM

Post #9237699

Hi - I've been in drought mode, and not taking pictures of my poor babies - hosta, perennials, annuals - as they've been so stressed, especially the hosta. But it's amazing what rain, that giver of life, gives immediately to our plants. I took a few yesterday of tropicals, annuals, and the woodland. These fit into one or more of the categories above. They looked SOOO happy yesterday -- Dax

1) Caladium, Elephant Ear, Impatiens, Hosta
2) Japanese Forest Grass, Hosta, Caladium, Brunnera
3) Impatiens, Caladium, assorted perennials -- I left alot of plants (and trees) in pots over the summer rather than planting them -- this is generally a plant nursery right now. Hopefully, I can plant them in the fall.
4) Various hosta, Creeping Jenny
5) Woodland hosta -- since I never supplemented water up here, I am pleased how well they all did

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nutsaboutnature
Algonquin, IL
(Zone 5a)

August 11, 2012
8:51 AM

Post #9237723

Love the photos, dax080..what a beautiful garden you have!! It looks so lush. I especially like the contrasts between all the foliage colors. Thanks for sharing those lovely pics!
sherriseden
Des Plaines, IL
(Zone 5b)

August 11, 2012
12:35 PM

Post #9237938

Wow, your plants are gorgeous, Dax! Did you have a lot of unusual heat? Just wondering because none of your hosta leaves are burnt! I love the garden pics that look like gold fanciful aliums in picture 2, too!
dax080
Cedar Rapids, IA
(Zone 5a)

August 12, 2012
8:45 AM

Post #9238825

Thanks! Did I mention my OCD? We've beat the records for heat this summer, and so I couldn't really get out for weeks! But the last week has been in low 80's, so I've been out there all day every day. I've trimmed the leaves of the hosta by hand -- otherwise they would look pitiful. However, the coleus and caladium seem to thrive on the heat, and took off in July (as long as I watered them). Here's a few more I took a couple days ago --

1) Coleus on the patio in pots
2) Caladium and hosta around the oak
3) Hosta along path in woodland

Dax

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nutsaboutnature
Algonquin, IL
(Zone 5a)

August 12, 2012
10:00 AM

Post #9238890

Lovely! The Caladiums really pop! Do you dig them out and replant each year?
sherriseden
Des Plaines, IL
(Zone 5b)

August 12, 2012
3:27 PM

Post #9239197

Beautiful!
BlueBlossoms
Bolingbrook, IL

August 13, 2012
6:46 PM

Post #9240615

Sherri,
Fun thread~ thanks for starting it! :) I love (and don't recognize) the first two flowers you have pictured... Can you id them for me? We are in the Chicago 'burbs too~ what crazy weather! Three cheers for the last day o' rain! :)
Photo 1: Our parking strip ~ mixed bed (canna, Red knocokout rose, Autumn Joy Sedum, Karl Foerster Grass, Russian sage, etc...)
Photo 2: Phlox paniculata 'Shockwave'
Photo 3: Two plants that seem to enjoy all the dry weather we've been having! (Russian stonecrop & perennial verbena)
Photo 4 (clockwise): Pink turtlehead, Floristan White Liatris, Miss Manners Obedient plant, Lambs ear (when all else fails, the lambs ear thrives~ go figure!), Viola 'Etain', Scabiosa columbaria 'Butterfly Blue' & Clematis recta (bush form~ it's small/new but blooming right now!)...

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sherriseden
Des Plaines, IL
(Zone 5b)

August 14, 2012
10:28 AM

Post #9241309

Hi, BlueBlossoms! Your flowers are beautiful. I love verbena, too - they survive anything! The first two of my pics are Pardancanda norrisii 'Dazzler Series'. They are hybrids of belamcanda (3rd pic) and pardanthopsis dichotoma (vesper lily). Very strange that the pardanthopsis is a different genera because it's practically impossible to hybridize between two genera and the vesper lily is so much like the tiger lily - belamcanda. I really believe one of them was mis-taxonomized (if that's a word!)

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

August 14, 2012
1:28 PM

Post #9241471

The flowers are wonderful!! I always love this thread.

Zinnia from my corner; Still it brightens up my little corner!
A different computer and no web cam at all.lol

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BlueBlossoms
Bolingbrook, IL

August 14, 2012
2:31 PM

Post #9241535

Hi, Sherri! :) Thanks for the id! I have actually looked at that exact plant (at my favorite local nursery "The Growing Place" in Naperville), but thought the blooms were dark (more on the maroon side)~ Yours are absolutely gorgeous! I will definitely have to revisit the possibility of adding them to our little patch of earth!

Just out of curiousity, do they fall into your category 1, 2, or 3 (I'm ruling out garden art~ lol!)... If you have found them to need coddling, then I will probably just admire them from afar! I have four year old twins to keep up with and am sticking to low maintenance beauties for the time being! ;}

juhur7~ love your zinnias! Do you start them from seed? (if so, indoors or out) We started some indoors this year and had some success, but only with the red Benary's giant variety... My "Green Envy" didn't make it... so I'm thinking I will try direct sowing them next year! :)

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

August 14, 2012
3:14 PM

Post #9241581

BlueBlossoms; I keep some of them that I don't dead head ,dried, and then, in an old ice cream container or bag(if the bags secure so small friendly visitors can't get to them)dry flower and all unless I try(lol) to clean them for trade.

Then the following spring I break up the heads about an inch or so thick,mulch, seeds, and all in one quick sow. In this zone I can sow them anytime from May through July.In fact these you just saw didn't come up until July after being sown in May. (usually that would make weeds a problem, not this year!!)
If you try that sow method you might remember the gloves,some of them get a little spikey!!

sherriseden
Des Plaines, IL
(Zone 5b)

August 14, 2012
5:53 PM

Post #9241722

BlueBlossoms - they are category 3 - just planted about 3 weeks ago! No, I don't coddle anything either. Uh, except my hydrangeas! As far as the color, they are really variable. Both pic 1 and 2 are the same species and you can see how different they are. Juhur, love your zinnias! I'm going to do some annuals from seed next year. I have shade so I have lots of foliage plants and need color!

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

August 14, 2012
7:14 PM

Post #9241798

sherriseden;I have been looking for color foliage for the sun .That has turned out to be a tough search!! I have seen a few though, there is a phlox with red leaves and a queen -annes lace also with red leaves .I cannot find either !!
I use to think I was good at looking things up until now!!lol
nutsaboutnature
Algonquin, IL
(Zone 5a)

August 15, 2012
9:12 AM

Post #9242301

BlueBlossoms, your garden is just gorgeous! It's amazing you've been able to keep it looking so good with this hot, dry weather we've been having. I hope you've had some of the recent rains we've had up here (we're North of you). Expecting more tomorrow. I'll keep my fingers crossed.

Juhur7 - Love your Zinnias! I've had them in the past with excellent results, but have forgotten about them for a while...that is until I see some growing and wish I'd planted some. In the past I've "direct sowed" in Spring since they grow so quickly. I just saw a beautiful bed of one of the "giant" varieties a few days ago and, once again, kicked myself for not planting any this year.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

August 15, 2012
12:33 PM

Post #9242492

There was a red and white new hybrid zinnia at the hardware store this spring that I wish now I would have purchased and tried to grow,The new ones are gorgeous !!!!
Adding to that I still like the cal. giants and some of the older ones, so do the BF's HB's, They are a nice flower especially, as to people like myself that have never been to good with annuals.
BlueBlossoms
Bolingbrook, IL

August 15, 2012
2:09 PM

Post #9242581

juhur7 wrote:sherriseden;I have been looking for color foliage for the sun .That has turned out to be a tough search!! I have seen a few though, there is a phlox with red leaves and a queen -annes lace also with red leaves .I cannot find either !!
I use to think I was good at looking things up until now!!lol


juhur7~ Are you looking for Phlox paniculata 'Starfire'? It has bronze foliage and bright red blooms... Not sure about the queen anne's lace but I grew Orlaya grandiflora (an annual) from seed this year and they are lovely (esp. around the roses and phlox!).

Thanks for the zinnia tips too! I will def. give that a try! I realized today that one 'Green Envy' did make it (bloomed for the first time today!)~ Yay! :)

nutsaboutnature~ Thank you for your kind words! We started our garden last year, so we still have many young, new plants and seedlings (started over the winter with my twins), so I've had to water a bit more than needed in a well-established garden (and have had two eager "helpers")~ which has probably contributed to the blooms, despite the brutal temps and dry days!

*Crossing fingers with you for rain tomorrow!! :)*

This message was edited Aug 15, 2012 4:38 PM
BlueBlossoms
Bolingbrook, IL

August 15, 2012
2:33 PM

Post #9242619

P.S. A couple new photos from today~ :)
PHOTO 1: Chelone (not sure if I have obliqua or lyonni~ I inherited this from a friend who was unsure of the species~ if anyone can suggest how to differentiate between the two I would appreciate it!)

PHOTO 2: Verbascum 'Southern Charm' ~ a very recent addition to our garden~ this is the first bloom! :)

PHOTO 3: Knautia 'Thunder and Lightening' ~ my favorite addition to the garden this year! I love the variegated foliage and it has bloomed non-stop!

PHOTO 4: Eutrochium purpureum (Joe Pye Weed), Cynoglossum amabile (a fun annual the kids and I direct sow each year~) & Salvia azurea 'Nekan'

PHOTO 5: Silphium laciniatum (a/k/a Compass plant)~ must give credit to this Illinois native~ adds some nice height to the garden and, of course, the bees love it! :)

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juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

August 15, 2012
5:30 PM

Post #9242847

A few more odds and ends ,as you can see not as nice as usual seasons still to enjoy though! From this evening. I am still not good with the cam.

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juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

August 15, 2012
5:36 PM

Post #9242857

BlueBlossoms;I think that Starfire phlox is one of the ones I was looking at. THANK YOU!! A couple more this eve. a sunflower and cutleaf coneflower

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nutsaboutnature
Algonquin, IL
(Zone 5a)

August 16, 2012
11:13 AM

Post #9243571

BlueBlossoms & juhur7 - your flowers are soooo pretty!! BlueBlossoms, it's hard to believe your garden is so young...very impressive!

Well, we got rain this morning, but not nearly as much as I had hoped for...but I'll still take it.

Juhur7, are you wanting flowers with colored or variegated foliage or just colored foliage? Because most Heucheras and Heucherellas can take from full sun all the way to mostly shady and come in an incredible array of colors with new ones every year. They do have tiny flowers (that hummingbirds like), but generally that's not the main attraction. Of course they need more water in full sun. Most of mine are in part shade, but I've considered trying a couple in sun.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

August 16, 2012
11:41 AM

Post #9243586

I've thought about Heucheras in front of the susans,thing is with my vigorous plants whatever and put near them is going to have to have some resistance to being run over. That's my fault when it happens ,I know lol
Mostly a taller plant ,for the back of the bed is the difficulty.
For the moment a tall varigated phlox or a dwarf red blackberry looks to be the choice.
nutsaboutnature
Algonquin, IL
(Zone 5a)

August 16, 2012
12:54 PM

Post #9243690

Juhur7, I came across this interesting website. I haven't checked them out on GardenWatchdog yet, but even if it's just to get ideas it was kind of a fun place to look. It's possible you've already looked at this site.

Not all of the plants were tall or for full sun. I wrote down many that were. I have to go run some errands now, but I can post some of the names later if you want. They may all be plants you've already looked at and have no interest in. Anyways, here's the link to the website.

http://www.variegatedfoliage.com/perennials.html

BTW, DG has suddenly changed the photo "upload" format. In fact, it has happened since the last time I was on here.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

August 16, 2012
6:14 PM

Post #9244093

I always appreciate the search suggestions, not a matter to having seen the site before or not. I am not sure there is anything as a no interest plant with me.lol
That new upload is a thing ,saw that this morning. My garden also is overgrown or burnt,all those look much better close up on film than live eye.
When it started raining here this morning it decided not to stop,it has rained all day and is raining still.That rain is cold!!
Still my poorly looking plants may enjoy the cool and rain ,as they sure didn't take the heat or dry well!! Mums, Camo, and Blanket flower.
Kinda thought ya all might help me figure out where that cat flower came from.,sorry I couldn't resist. lol

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nutsaboutnature
Algonquin, IL
(Zone 5a)

August 16, 2012
7:59 PM

Post #9244177

Hah...now the uploader is back to normal so maybe it was just a glitch. Pretty Mums and Blanket Flower, but I particularly like the 'Cat' Flower!

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

August 17, 2012
1:07 PM

Post #9244776

Well here's another look of the Cutleaf Coneflower ,what not to grow,this things gotten huge.
And a chicory I believe growing in a corner.

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sherriseden
Des Plaines, IL
(Zone 5b)

August 17, 2012
7:34 PM

Post #9245181

Juhur, so sorry I didn't answer your question about colored foliage for sun sooner - got distracted with other things! I think the suggestions the others gave were great. Also, our native ninebark (physocarpus opulifolius), which was practically unheard of until a few years ago, now comes in many bronzy or burgandy leafed varieties. I have a "Summer Wine" and it's great!

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

August 17, 2012
7:47 PM

Post #9245197

sherriseden' What's to apologize for? You have always been very nice with the compliments and suggestions!!I looked that up and I really like those! like love, yes indeed!!The summer wine is pretty but I think I am going to look around a while for Diablo. I really like those ""Thank You""
sherriseden
Des Plaines, IL
(Zone 5b)

August 19, 2012
12:09 PM

Post #9246694

You are welcome!

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

August 31, 2012
12:40 PM

Post #9260624

These decided to bloom today; Uploads from me are like Oh, well , you know.

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nutsaboutnature
Algonquin, IL
(Zone 5a)

August 31, 2012
1:34 PM

Post #9260689

Juhur, very pretty!

I actually have some things reblooming now - Reblooming: Delphiniums and Nepeta.

I also have some sporadic blooming of plants that should be done by now, like one variety of Monarda.

Continued blooming, (though most not as heavy as earlier in the season): Salvia, Gaillardia, Heuchera, Lobelia, Lamium, Campanula, Veronica and Spiraea. Probably forgot some.

Then, of course, there are the plants that didn't grow well, never bloomed or died in this hot, hot, hot Summer.

I'll try to get some of the pics of blooms uploaded today or tomorrow along with which varieties they are.

nutsaboutnature
Algonquin, IL
(Zone 5a)

September 1, 2012
3:00 PM

Post #9261703

Well, here are a few of my plants that are still blooming:

1) Gaillardia 'Goblin' (not putting out as many blooms right now as it normally does at this time).

2) Lamium 'Purple Dragon'

3) Lobelia 'Cardinalis'

4) Delphinium 'Sky Blue/White Bee' with a glimpse of Nepeta 'Walker's Low' on the left.

5) Veronica 'Giles Van Hees' (with a 'Cabbage White' Butterfly)

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juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

September 1, 2012
3:29 PM

Post #9261721

PUHR-TIES !!!! really yours too, very pretty also, cheers up a rainy overcast fall day,and every so often a hummingbird to the lobelia,and as you are showing there a bright little Butterfly.
Next years hopes Agastache ,yarrow, AND a very soggy grandiflora ,Gaillardia
These from today.
The middle pic is hibiscus tree rose of sharon? Unidentified seeds you know...lol

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nutsaboutnature
Algonquin, IL
(Zone 5a)

September 1, 2012
4:09 PM

Post #9261751

Thanks, juhur!

You have some very nice plants started...even your "mystery" seeds!! I have to plant some more Agastache. It was a late season hummer favorite and for some reason it didn't come back this year. We're kind of soggy today, too, but you won't hear me complaining!

Here's a couple of...very bad...pics of hummers sipping nectar at my Lobelia 'Cardinalis", but so far they're the best I've been able to get.

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juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

September 1, 2012
4:25 PM

Post #9261778

Looks like the Bee tails that visit here! I love to watch them when I get a chance. My scarlet Lobelia seems to have died this year and the hummers just loved them! I will replace them ,meanwhile the hummers are at the fennel zinnia,, Like is said the little things love the red colors. And I have seen them looking over the hibiscus.
Some fun with the plants, and some for next years visitors.
I forgot to say I really like that Delphinium! I have never been able to get those or poppies to grow here for me, although I know they will. I'm learning.lol
nutsaboutnature
Algonquin, IL
(Zone 5a)

September 1, 2012
7:29 PM

Post #9261943

What are Bee tails?

You know, that Delphinium was something I just decided to try a few years ago when Menard's had an incredible sale on perennials. They had quart-sizes of about a zillion varieties for $2.00 each, so naturally I went a little crazy! They were all healthy and beautiful. Not all their stores near me had a good selection, but one of them must have just gotten a whole truckload. There were so many I decided against because they required full sun and most of my yard is shady.

I have the Delphinium in part shade. It seems to do fine except I sometimes have to stake the taller stalks.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

September 1, 2012
7:41 PM

Post #9261949

Bee-Tailed Hummingbird They have a black and white tail, when they spread their tail feathers they are black and white alternately.Looks like they have a striped tail,The only time I have ever gotten a good look at them was at a family members nectar feeder.
Also their body appears a little more green than Ruby- Throated hummingbirds,and they are usually slightly larger, only not much around here.
There is also a difference in coloration between male and female.The male is smaller , kinda brown spotted camoflage with a longer beak.
nutsaboutnature
Algonquin, IL
(Zone 5a)

September 1, 2012
7:49 PM

Post #9261955

Interesting! All I've ever seen in this part of the country are the Ruby-throats, although I've read that on rare occasions a migrant may drift into an area out of its normal territory. I grew up in California and we had a variety of Hummers, some that drifted up and down the state depending on the food availability.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

September 1, 2012
8:01 PM

Post #9261961

Look at the lower right tail of your second photo , do you see the the white edged tail? , I was wrong before to much caffeine,they have white edged black tail feathers.That looks to be a female Bee-Tailed Hummigbird, See how she reflects green in the photo?
That was what caused me to mention that earlier.
By the way, if hey would of set those flowers in front of me for 2.dollars , I would of tried to have bought them all.lol

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

September 1, 2012
8:30 PM

Post #9261979

Might also be what the files refer to as broad tailed Hummingbird, I am rather common or colloquial in my reference to such things.lol Whatever ,anyway I love the little critters!!!

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

September 1, 2012
10:20 PM

Post #9262019

I can't find a photo of the one I am seeing!!
nutsaboutnature
Algonquin, IL
(Zone 5a)

September 2, 2012
6:42 AM

Post #9262187

Juhur, she's definitely a Ruby-throat. The Ruby-throats do have white on the tips of their tails and body coloring can appear different depending on the lighting. This same female was sitting still for several minutes while eating at the feeder next to the Lobelia so I had a very good look. Also the Broad-tailed (which my brother has in Colorado) has similar coloring in the tail.

Go to Google Images and compare both Ruby-throat females and Broad-tailed females and I think you'll be surprised. They can look very similar, but in this area we have Ruby-throats. The only Broadtails I've seen were while visiting my brother in the mountains...they have feeders placed all around the porch of their upstairs bedroom. He also gets Rufous Hummers.

If it's another hummer you're referring to I don't know what it would be. There's a very, very tiny hummer in Costa Rica called a Bee Hummingbird. In your area you should be seeing Ruby-throats. No other hummer nests east of the Great Plains.

If you are seeing Broad-tails in Indiana, it's really unusual and you're very lucky.



This message was edited Sep 2, 2012 2:26 PM
nutsaboutnature
Algonquin, IL
(Zone 5a)

September 2, 2012
8:14 AM

Post #9262301

Juhur, If you have a sunny yard, you would have had trouble controlling yourself with that $2.00 sale! The variety was amazing. Because so many of the plants required full sun, I had to limit myself somewhat. As it is I put some of those in part sun...and most are thriving. Everything I bought, took off right away and and by the first full Spring most were beautiful.

Here's a list of the plants I purchased...also, I bought multiples of many of them (I'm sure I'm forgetting some):

Delphinium 'Sky Blue/White Bee'
Several different varieties Aquilegia
Nepeta 'Walker's Low'
Campanula Carpatica 'Blue Clips'
Geranium 'Biokovo'
Polemonium reptans 'Stairway to Heaven'
Veronica 'Giles Van Hees'
One variety Astilbe
Two varieties Heuchera
Echinacea 'Ruby something (forgot exact name)
Dianthus 'Cranberry Ice"
Liatrus Kobold 'Gayfeather'

If I think of any I missed, I'll add them in another post.
I also love that many of them are Natives.






juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

September 2, 2012
1:54 PM

Post #9262556

The Echie was most likely "Ruby star" I have seen a few offered with "Pow wow".
Y es I go way over with the plants "occasionally "?
I was right the first time about the hummingbirds . The bee-tailed have a long white stripe in black tail feathers going up the length of the feather. I must have read a hundred times over the years that the Ruby Throated was the only HUMMINGBIRD east of the MISSISSIPPI . I am going to have to get better with a camera that is all there is to it.If you ever see a female Bee- Tailed you will know, they are full grown at 6in tall ,that's big for a Hummingbird.I'm wondering why I cannot find a photo of them? There use to be some on the web photo gallery, not anymore it seems.
Bee-tailed
Rufous
Ruby- throated Are the three your most likely to see here ,The gray "corn hummer" I am always seeing is probably a rufous
I have been trying to grow white "Gayfeather" forever and I will try again later I always do,lol
I will bet your garden is a delight to see!! those flowers growing well together must be a gallery of eye-candy.Well maybe someday for mine.(like next year) maybe , hopefully?lol

nutsaboutnature
Algonquin, IL
(Zone 5a)

September 2, 2012
3:18 PM

Post #9262633

Hummingbirds.net is my favorite hummer website and the one I generally use to follow the Ruby-throated migration. (Journey North is also an excellent website. The DG Hummingbird forum has "stickies" that list both links if you ever need them for the future).

Take a look at this link from Hummingbirds.net and see if any of these look familiar to you. The pictures show the tails spread out so maybe they'll be of some help. This page shows all the hummers that breed in North America. You can also click on their link that shows hummer sightings in different states even though many of them are rare visiters.

http://www.hummingbirds.net/species.html

Yes, the Echinacea is a 'Ruby Star'. I checked the tag outside after posting my list.

Thanks for the compliment, but my garden is only a "sometimes" delight. We have clay and it's a pain. My best bed is the long, thin raised bed my husband built along our neighbor's fence. He dug out most of the clay soil then we replaced it with topsoil, compost, leaves and peat moss. It's wonderful even several years after he built it! I'm thinking about digging out some of my beds and replacing some of the clay.

I have a small island bed that we put a ton of ammendments in plus lots of Cotton Burr Compost. It's in an area that gets kind of soggy and it still had a tendency to stay wet at first. This year (its 3rd year) when I started digging it was full of worms! I was sooo excited. Now it's pretty nice to plant in. Several of those $2.00 plants are in this bed.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

September 2, 2012
3:42 PM

Post #9262657

I follow the journey north website also, Just like to see how the Butterflies are Birdies are doing.. My earth here is ancient salt river sea bed mixed with swamp silt and volcanic ash that is pre- hard pan and it locks all the minerals so they are unusuable to plants. My vegetable garden I keep adding to and raising up.After years of doing ,digging, adding and "playing"? at it, I can grow a few tomatoes.
The wild or adapting volunteers as far as the flowers are about all that do well.Micro-climate effect is in play and at the edge of three or four growing zones it gets kind of "fun" trying to comprehend what is going on sometimes.
The Illinois Basin here you are I believe comes together here with the Trenton field, clay through gravel is fairly common. Most of us with houses, condos ,apts,. and the like end up on clay or nearly unusable soils that have been past over, and, if ,or also, that have been built over agriculture fields that have been played out or covered with construction fill.
Grows good thistles and some really pretty chicory though!!lol
nutsaboutnature
Algonquin, IL
(Zone 5a)

September 2, 2012
7:23 PM

Post #9262860

We're in a natural area of deciduous trees about 1/4 mile from a river. Apparently the developers left most of the trees because many of them were here long before this subdivision was built and are over 30 years old and huge. We have an Ash tree 70-80 ft tall and a Cottonwood almost as tall.

Of course, that didn't stop the contractors from backfilling with construction junk (rocks, concrete, wood).
When my husband built the raised bed he had to remove huge rocks and some chunks of concrete so I can only imagine what's under the lawn.

Another problem is invasives that have really gotten a foothold in some of the natural areas. I don't plant any, but it's just too hard to try to get rid of all the ones growing on their own.

Did any of those hummers look like the ones you were talking about. Those are the only ones that breed in North America.

Thistle and Chicory...Well, the birds love those! Don't feel bad, we have so many weeds in the very back of the yard that I couldn't possibly name them all.

I thought this was kind of cool. I took this pic of my Rudbeckia at night experimenting with the "Hand-held Night" mode for the first time.

Thumbnail by nutsaboutnature
Click the image for an enlarged view.

sherriseden
Des Plaines, IL
(Zone 5b)

September 2, 2012
7:23 PM

Post #9262861

Wow, Juhur - you seem to know quite a bit about soil. Cool! I just know mine is pretty clay-ey but I've improved it a bit by chopping maple leaves every fall the last two years and mulching with them. I have to restrain myself to NOT rake back in the spring - let them compost into the soil. You and nutsaboutnature are SOOOO lucky with hummers - I have seen exactly one in the 20 years I've been here in Des Plaines and that was this summer. He was sipping monardas!
nutsaboutnature
Algonquin, IL
(Zone 5a)

September 2, 2012
7:28 PM

Post #9262866

Sherri, that's so cool about that hummer! Now that one found out you have great-tasting blooms, it's possible you'll see more next year. I'll keep my fingers crossed for you!

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

September 2, 2012
7:53 PM

Post #9262891

nutsaboutnature; The broad -tail looks a little like what I have always called corn hummers, but the Bee-tail or black&white tailed Hummingbird and that is it's name I cannot find.My family had that feeder setting there for three years and one of them had not ever seen a hummingbird at the feeder in all that time. I was sitting in the driveway one afternoon waiting for grandma and counted seven.it is easy to miss them if you aren't watching.
That is one neat photo!! that night mode really shows the blooms,kind of reminds of what the bees see that is shown in nature films.
sherriseden From my days of geology in school,I remember some of that!lol When it comes right down to getting things to grow I have a long way to go. You learn where you are after a while though. Earthwaves ,sub soil structure, ground shifting and absorbtion of water, where minerals of this kind or that kind are likely to be found, Remember some of that from school days? I bet you do too.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

September 2, 2012
8:25 PM

Post #9262915

nutsaboutnature Every couple of years I will see two or three Black&white tail hummingbirds they are bigger than the ruby and easy to recognize, As far as it I may have you believing I might be seeing things but if you watch ,sooner or later I believe you will see them, I once saw a black emerald rufous, and those have been extinct for decades?That was four or five years ago when it flew right up to the screen door and hovered almost eye to eye with me. Black and sparkle reflecting like an opal in the sun, with a beak half as long as a pencil.
They are rare and still exist, But then again I was aboard a merchant ship in 1962 when a giant wave had me hanging on the side of a table, And as you know giant waves didn't exist until 1990 either when the 100ft tall wave took out a GB oil platform in the north sea .lol
nutsaboutnature
Algonquin, IL
(Zone 5a)

September 3, 2012
8:13 AM

Post #9263233

Juhur, I wish I could help you figure out what type of hummers you saw. The list and photos on Humminbirds.net shows all the ones that breed in North America. If you saw some other type, I'm sorry, but I don't know what it is.

I thought maybe the Black-chinned had a tail similar to what you described and they have been seen in Indiana...but from what you said, I guess that's not the one. The largest hummer in North America is the Blue-throat. It's about 5 inches long, but it doesn't look anything like what you described and there haven't been any reported sightings anywhere near Indiana.

I haven't been able to find any reference to Bee-tail or Black-and-White hummers...even as a slang term.

What I would recommend, though, is if you see them again, report it to one of the Hummingbird conservation groups or one of the hummer websites. They should be able to hook you up with a local organization. If it's a bird that is unusual to your area, they would definitely want to know about it.

Thanks for the compliment on the Rudbeckia photo. It was an experiment and it was fun. I'll have to play with that feature some more and try it on different subjects.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

September 3, 2012
9:58 AM

Post #9263340

The web isn't the all knowing information file and the bee-tail is shown in the pbs nature film. It with the info will eventually return to the web though, I'm sure.
I always appreciate the info and direct to more info sites ,some I have been to ,some not.

We, myself and others will be looking forward to more of your experiments with your camera , should be interesting!!

I have read an old naturalist's book from the early 1900's and he documents 12 of 16 hummingbirds then that lived east of the Mississippi. It is those government library reprints I use to have access to the site where there where millions of publications. I haven' been able to get the site since 2;000 though, changes Arrgh!!!
Watch awhile you will see a few more, I have no doubt at all.
nutsaboutnature
Algonquin, IL
(Zone 5a)

September 3, 2012
3:13 PM

Post #9263641

Oh well, hope you can eventually find the info you're looking for.

I'm still learning to use this camera so everyday is an experiment :-)

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

September 3, 2012
3:31 PM

Post #9263659

A totally odd question , how do you get the smile face to appear on this site my usual 1,2, 3, doesn't seem to work?
nutsaboutnature
Algonquin, IL
(Zone 5a)

September 3, 2012
3:49 PM

Post #9263683

Oh, that's easy!
Hold down the "Shift" key. While holding it down, press 6 (^) then - (dash/underscore) then 6 (^). it will look like this to you, but without the spaces ^ _ ^ . (I made the spaces so it wouldn't turn into a smiley face)

Just so you know, the Smiley face won't show up when you hit "preview". It will only show after you hit "Send". Go back to your post after you hit send and look at it and you should see a Smiley Face.:-)

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

September 3, 2012
4:09 PM

Post #9263721

:-)
nutsaboutnature
Algonquin, IL
(Zone 5a)

September 3, 2012
8:11 PM

Post #9264066

Congrats!!! :-) It's fun, isn't it? :-)

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

September 17, 2012
3:48 PM

Post #9278126

here's these today

Thumbnail by juhur7   Thumbnail by juhur7   Thumbnail by juhur7   Thumbnail by juhur7   Thumbnail by juhur7
Click an image for an enlarged view.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

October 11, 2012
1:25 PM

Post #9302532

Some from today
clematis
mums
hollyhock
morning glory
ice plant
The asters are not shown

Thumbnail by juhur7   Thumbnail by juhur7   Thumbnail by juhur7   Thumbnail by juhur7   Thumbnail by juhur7
Click an image for an enlarged view.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

October 11, 2012
1:35 PM

Post #9302536

Couple more
Coneflower
willow aster

Thumbnail by juhur7   Thumbnail by juhur7         
Click an image for an enlarged view.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

January 28, 2013
9:26 AM

Post #9400141

nutsaboutnature ; :-) after this! I struck music too♪♫♪♪♪♫♪ How about that :-) LOL

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