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Hybridizers: It can be fun to breed your own zinnias - Part 5

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Zen_Man
Ottawa, KS
(Zone 5b)

August 15, 2012
11:33 AM

Post #9242419

Greetings to all,

Welcome to this continuing message thread. The previous part of this ongoing series, It can be fun to breed your own zinnias - Part 4, has over a hundred messages and has become rather long and slow to load, so we are continuing it here for a fresh start. If you want, you can access the Part 4 thread through this link http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1136291/ and it, in turn, has a link to the part before it. As always, your participation and comments here are most welcome.

The first of my Fall crop of zinnias is starting to bloom. Several have already qualified as "culls" and will be discarded, but the attached picture shows a "toothy" specimen that caught my eye. That picture was taken yesterday.

That zinnia has a reasonable amount of toothiness, and I used that single pollen floret to self-pollinate most of the available stigmas on this bloom. I did that by using a special pair of fine point tweezers to extract the anther bundle from the floret and touch the exposed anthers to the stigmas. That is a technique I developed indoors last Winter to make choice pollen go farther. It is enabled by a special pair of tweezers that have curved fine points.

I hope to see more toothy zinnias in my Fall crop of zinnias. I intend to self them and inter-cross them in order to build up more seeds for a big plant-out of toothy zinnias next year. My hope is, that if I grow a large number of toothy zinnias, I might find some rare specimens with an extreme amount of toothiness. At the present time, I don't know far zinnias can go in the development of this subdivided petal form.

I don't have any trumpet-petaled or tubular zinnias in the pollen-bearing stage right now (they have all gone to seed and I have harvested the seed to save them from the Finches), but there are some tubular seedlings coming on in my Fall crop. If I have the opportunity, I will make some crosses between the toothys and tubulars, both ways. I would like to see the toothy trait in some tubulars, and vice versa. More later.

ZM

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irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

August 19, 2012
2:07 PM

Post #9246800

Many different colors?
Zen_Man
Ottawa, KS
(Zone 5b)

August 19, 2012
8:26 PM

Post #9247101

Hi IrisMA,

It is my objective to develop a strain of the toothy zinnias in a complete range of zinnia colors, as well as two-color and three-color versions. The bi-color toothy in the attached picture had Whirligig ancestry. Today I noticed several budding toothy specimens in pastel colors. As they develop, I will post pictures of some of the more interesting or significant specimens. I will be self-pollinating them and/or cross-pollinating them. And I will out-cross some of them to other colored zinnia specimens, in order to get a wider color range of toothies in the subsequent recombinants.

I hope to build up enough toothy zinnia seed supply to make a fairly big planting of them next year. This year I have been dividing my time between expanding and improving my garden and tending my zinnia breeding, but next year my garden infrastructure should be essentially complete, which will let me devote more time to my zinnias. I intend to cross some toothies with trumpet petaled tubular flower forms to combine the toothy effect and the tubular petal effect in the same flower form. I hope to do some of those toothy/tubular crosses later this Fall.

ZM

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irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

August 20, 2012
8:20 AM

Post #9247532

I prefer the color on the first one, but that is just me. Good luck with the project.
Zen_Man
Ottawa, KS
(Zone 5b)

August 21, 2012
2:23 PM

Post #9249210

IrisMA,

Thanks for wishing me luck. It looks like I am going to have a variety of the "toothy" zinnias this Fall.

ZM

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Zen_Man
Ottawa, KS
(Zone 5b)

January 26, 2013
7:20 AM

Post #9398011

Hi all,

I am looking forward to an interesting zinnia garden this year. One "new" project will be to grow more Whirligigs and select out some of the mottled and streaked specimens. I will inter-cross them for more variation. The attached pictures were taken in my Whirligig patch last year. I like their "look" better than the striped and spotted effect that the Candy Cane and Peppermint varieties have.

ZM

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irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

January 26, 2013
8:04 AM

Post #9398045

Glad you have a new concentration. Good luck with it.
Zen_Man
Ottawa, KS
(Zone 5b)

January 26, 2013
8:53 AM

Post #9398082

Thanks for the wishes for good luck. That was a surprisingly quick response. Incidentally, I did get some more toothy specimens, inter-crossed them, and saved seed from them to continue the toothy project this year. A few of those specimens are shown.

ZM

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Zen_Man
Ottawa, KS
(Zone 5b)

January 26, 2013
9:38 AM

Post #9398115

I have several zinnia projects going in a sort of multitasking mode. The aster flowered zinnias are one of them. They have decidedly longer thinner petals than "regular" zinnias, which gives them an informal look that I like. Some of them remind me of Crego asters.

ZM

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irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

January 26, 2013
11:00 AM

Post #9398192

I liked #2 in your first post the best. Has the dry summer weather bothered your zinnia at all? Here the lack of water cost us some of our iris plants & slowed down the growth of others.
Zen_Man
Ottawa, KS
(Zone 5b)

January 26, 2013
2:49 PM

Post #9398412

Lucy, I notice that your favorite is the only one with some yellow in it. I have a long ways to go to get a complete color range into everything I am working on. I suppose "complete" for zinnias also includes green. I'll make a note to myself to plant some green zinnias this year. I intend to devote an entire separate bed to various white zinnias. White crossed with green might be good.

The drought last Summer caused me to use a lot of water watering my zinnias with an oscillatory lawn sprinkler. All that overhead watering prevented Powdery Mildew, but may have promoted some Alternaria. And, toward the end of the season, our well was starting to run dry if I left the sprinkler on for too many hours. Hopefully the water table has made some recovery.

Droughts are usually multi-year, so I anticipate an even worse problem this year. This year I may abandon the lawn sprinkler (it is awfully convenient to use, though) in favor of fabric soaker hose. It is more targeted, but is convenient only if you can leave it in place. It is a pain to have to move soaker hose around.

I am thinking of buying a 500-foot role of the fabric hose together with separate fittings so that I can custom make a soaker system. My plan is to have 4-foot wide beds with 4 rows in each bed and a soaker hose running in place down the middle of each bed to hopefully provide the needs for that bed. Then I will just move a feeder hose to connect to the stationary soaker hose in each bed and run it on a timer for that bed. That will help me "ration" our water resource in the coming drought.

I considered a drip system, and I may give that a second look. Maybe I will try out both methods this year. We just rent here, so drilling a second well into a deeper aquifer is not an option for me. Water is my biggest worry for this year. Heat itself is not a problem -- it just makes the zinnias grow faster. And use more water.

Incidentally, I hope to be making some significant progress with my tubular petaled project. A few of last year's tubulars are pictured. I am hoping for a lot more variation in them this year.

ZM

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irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

January 26, 2013
4:32 PM

Post #9398496

We have a soaker system laid out, but didn't use it last yr. It uses less water than anything overhead would do. The town will let us hand water in the summer which leads to being mosquito bait. The soaker uses less water & we can be in the house. Check on it once in awhile & not as many bites.

I like pictures # 2 & 3 as there apears a good mass of color per blossom. Not sure what aur iris seeds are doing over the winter. They are outside in their boxes waiting for spring.

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

April 29, 2013
3:55 PM

Post #9501677

Zen_Man,

Do you have yen to trade for "Zinnia peruviana" seeds? Elijablue has some.

Check out the Seed Trading forum:


Elijablue - http://davesgarden.com/members/Elijablue/
>> Seed Trading: Zinnia peruviana seeds
>> http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1309584/

>> "I have extra seeds from a seed exchange (not DG). I'm open to items not on my want list."

http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/866/
Zen_Man
Ottawa, KS
(Zone 5b)

April 30, 2013
11:44 AM

Post #9502848

Thanks Corey, but I already have some. So far I haven't succeeded with an interspecies cross with them, but they do have very small flowers (red and yellow) and are kind of weedy. In fact, they have self-sowed, and I usually have a few of them as "volunteers".

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

April 30, 2013
3:38 PM

Post #9503145

Understood. Good luck wirth those interspecies crosses. I learned from South Park that they are facilitated by lots and lots of beer.

Lowers their inhibition, or something.

;-)


This message was edited May 1, 2013 12:20 PM
Zen_Man
Ottawa, KS
(Zone 5b)

May 1, 2013
6:02 AM

Post #9503849

Do I give the zinnias the beer, or is that for me?

ZM (grin)

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

May 1, 2013
12:21 PM

Post #9504297

Whatever needs un-inhibiting!

Zen_Man
Ottawa, KS
(Zone 5b)

July 17, 2013
7:01 PM

Post #9602917

Hello everyone,

Well, time flies. Here it is Summer and I am having to water my zinnia patch to keep it from burning up. I have crossed my tubular zinnias with a lot of different zinnias to get modified tubulars. I particularly like this combination of tubular with toothy petaled zinnias. It approximates a new zinnia flower form that I am trying to develop.

ZM

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irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

July 17, 2013
8:08 PM

Post #9603006

Great color also. I didn't get many iris pods this year.
Zen_Man
Ottawa, KS
(Zone 5b)

July 18, 2013
6:22 AM

Post #9603384

I hope to get a flower form like this in a complete range of zinnia colors.

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

July 18, 2013
9:47 AM

Post #9603625

Your blooms are always surprising. They're like a Far Side cartoon wjhere the punchline is "Can they DO that??!??"
Zen_Man
Ottawa, KS
(Zone 5b)

July 18, 2013
4:20 PM

Post #9604068

Those frogs crack me up every time I see them.

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

July 18, 2013
6:02 PM

Post #9604182

And you think YOU'RE a zinnia hybridizer!!

Gotten any frog-zinnia hybrids yet??

Could this be a case of tree-frog-envy?

:-)

Zen_Man
Ottawa, KS
(Zone 5b)

July 29, 2013
8:27 AM

Post #9615223

Hi all,

It has been sprinkling on and off for the last few days, so I haven't had to water my zinnias during that time.

I noticed that this big zinnia bloom in the first picture has some recurve to its petals. It kind of reminds me of a pagoda.

I like the spidery effect of the zinnia bloom in the second picture. My spider flowered zinnia project has been "on the back burner" while I concentrated on the tubular flowered zinnias, but next year I hope to expand my zinnia growing to include some beds devoted to zinnias with long narrow down-rolled petals.

ZM

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irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

July 29, 2013
12:56 PM

Post #9615493

Not very many iris pods this year from me, but the bees have been busy. We can send those seeds to several iris groups.
Zen_Man
Ottawa, KS
(Zone 5b)

July 29, 2013
6:40 PM

Post #9615855

Hi all,

There is quite a bit of variation in my tubular recombinant zinnias. The first picture on the left has a rather smooth, filled-in bloom, but there is quite a bit of variation in the individual tubular petals.

The second picture shows a tubular with a bloom that is not tightly filled with petals. There is quite a bit of "air" between the petals, but unfortunately there is not much flare-out at the petal ends.

It's still raining here. Looks like we may get a decent amount of moisture out of this.

So, Lucy, I know how it is to be too busy to do as much pollination as you would like. It's a good thing we have those bees to fill in for us. Unfortunately, the bees don't keep could records. (grin)

ZM

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Zen_Man
Ottawa, KS
(Zone 5b)

August 12, 2013
6:48 AM

Post #9628234

Hi all,

It has continued to be mostly wet. It's raining as I type this, so I haven't had to water my zinnias in quite some while. I continue to get interesting specimens blooming out, because I have been doing succession plantings. Pictures of a few are attached. The three-armed stigmas are unusual.

I see several small insects going in and out of the tubular petals, and I wonder if any of them are carrying pollen. I have had several mysterious situations in which stigmas concealed in tubular petals got pollinated on a large scale.

I stopped planting any more zinnias at the end of July, because although there is plenty of time to get new blooms here from zinnias planted all through the month of August (zinnias bloom in 5 or 6 weeks from seed), there probably wouldn't be time to set and save a good seed yield from them before a killing frost. But I will continue to have new zinnias blooming out for at least another month. So there may be a few more surprises ahead this year.

ZM

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irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

August 12, 2013
8:27 AM

Post #9628323

I really like the colors on the red violet flowers.
Zen_Man
Ottawa, KS
(Zone 5b)

August 12, 2013
9:53 AM

Post #9628409

Lucy,

Thanks for your response. I wish you were a zinnia breeder or at least a zinnia grower. Apparently I am the only one on Dave's Garden breeding zinnias. At least over on Garden Web there are a few zinnia breeders, although we are relatively small in numbers. But some of the Garden Webbers have gotten some impressive new forms of zinnias, well beyond what I have been able to achieve. I will continue to enjoy my zinnia hobby, and check back in here from time to time.

ZM

irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

August 12, 2013
2:41 PM

Post #9628728

I have grown zinnias in the past (way past). With the irises & this year, weeds I have not had time for something else. I can't do the indoor trick like you do as irises need the cold before germination. There is an iris hybridizer group on facebook, mainly the tall ones, not the medians. Are there zinnia groups like that?
Zen_Man
Ottawa, KS
(Zone 5b)

August 12, 2013
10:39 PM

Post #9629169

Lucy,

I am not on FaceBook, so I have no idea if there is a zinnia hybridizer group there. I would be surprised if there were. The book, "Plant Breeding dor the Home Gardener" by Joseph Tychonievich

http://www.amazon.com/Plant-Breeding-Home-Gardener-Vegetables/dp/1604693649/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1376370398&sr=1-1&keywords=plant breeding

mentions amateur zinnia breeders, and has an inset on page 81 about "a retired molecular biologist who has turned her scientist's mind to exploring the diversity and beauty of zinnias in her Indiana garden." The "It can be fun to breed your own zinnias" message threads in the Annuals forum of GardenWeb also got a mention in that book. That book has a short 4-page section on zinnia breeding. I am enjoying my zinnia hobby, even if I don't have a lot of co-hobbyists.

ZM
(not associated with any product or vendor mentioned or linked)

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irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

August 13, 2013
5:14 AM

Post #9629296

I have not seen white ones. Years ago Burpee was putting out a prize for developing a white marigold. DH does like white flowers (he says), but he likes lily of the valley.
Zen_Man
Ottawa, KS
(Zone 5b)

August 13, 2013
8:36 AM

Post #9629478

W. Atlee Burpee, or maybe it was his son David, had the idea that if they could get a true white marigold, that getting a complete color range in marigolds would then be "relatively easy".

Eventually someone did get the $10,000 prize for a white marigold, although in my opinion it was not a true white. And the extended color range never came. As a kid on the farm, I tried repeatedly to cross marigolds and zinnias because I thought that the extended zinnia color range would be really great in marigolds. I also tried to cross watermelons and cantaloups. Needless to say, those crosses were never successful.

Zinnias have a wide range of whites and "near whites". Perhaps the whitest zinnia cultivar is White Wedding from Burpee. It was developed by Ball, which is now the parent company of Burpee after Burpee faced bankruptcy along about the year 2000, and was bought by Ball.

http://www.burpee.com/flowers/zinnias/zinnia-white-wedding-prod000445.html?catId=cat100022&trail=

White Wedding also has a white center. The color of the center of zinnias is governed by some different genes than the petal color, so occasionally I see white or near white zinnias with various dark colors of centers. It's not a bad look.

Zinnias come in every color except blue. Irises come in a complete color range, including several shades of blue. If irises weren't so "slow", I would be breeding them for that reason. But zinnias are more like the "fruit flies" of the flower kingdom, with four generations per year being attainable if you grow two generations inside and two generations outside. I do that. The zinnia seeds germinate in two to six days, and flower in five to six weeks. And then by planting green seeds or excised embryos, you can have a second generation going in a little over two months from the time you started the first generation.

I think if you really "pushed it", you could get six generations of zinnias in a year. And you can grow zinnias from cuttings, and I don't recall anyone propagating iris in that way. Someone should probably experiment with that. Also, tissue culture of iris might open up some possibilities.

I expect that zinnias will eventually get blues via genetic engineering, and then they will have a color range comparable to iris and orchids and such. But I don't expect that to occur for several years. I expect that genetic engineering will eventually make it possible to cross zinnias with marigolds. Or even cross zinnias with irises. It will be "a brave new world".

ZM


This message was edited Aug 13, 2013 9:38 AM

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irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

August 13, 2013
2:13 PM

Post #9629808

The true spectrum red is not in bearded irises, although the LA irises are supposed to have it.
I don't know about cutting. Of course they don't come true from seeds. I am having enough trouble trying to get the falls of my amoena SDBs trying to expand the 'red' color to the edge ot the petals of the falls. I work with the standard dwarfs & other medians not the tall irises.
Even Burpee admitted that the prize winning white had a yellow center.
Zen_Man
Ottawa, KS
(Zone 5b)

August 19, 2013
11:44 AM

Post #9635250

Hi, Lucy,

Have you considered the technique of embryo extraction as a potential method of speeding up your iris seed germination? Zinnias don't require a cold treatment for germination, but embryo extraction does make them germinate essentially instantly from an immature seed. I am attaching a couple of pics documenting the technique for zinnias.

I think it would be essentially the same for iris seeds. You could try the technique on immature seeds, and save all that waiting time waiting for a seed pod to mature. And possible bypass the cold treatment time as well. You might be able to get iris seedlings the same year as you make the cross pollination.

ZM

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irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

August 19, 2013
6:12 PM

Post #9635616

I could learn, but at 78 it's too much work for me.
weedyseedy
Warners, NY

August 30, 2013
1:37 PM

Post #9646041

It's too confusing after seventy five!! I check the obits every morning to see if I'm there and what someone might have written----------------------------------------------------Weedy

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

August 30, 2013
6:15 PM

Post #9646266

A friend used to make fun of his Mom's obsession with never missing the nightly news. When she came out of the TV room, he would ask her "So, are we at war yet?"

That hasn't worked for him for QUITE a few years now.

Zen_Man
Ottawa, KS
(Zone 5b)

August 31, 2013
4:50 PM

Post #9647068

Hi, all,

I am "no Spring chicken" myself, but I credit my enthusiasm about my zinnia hobby for keeping me physically and mentally active, engaged with life, not bored, and optimistic that good things will happen. Regardless of what it is, a hobby that you are passionate about can be very beneficial, regardless of your age.

ZM
keithp2012
West Babylon, NY
(Zone 7a)

November 16, 2013
8:45 AM

Post #9710231

Every year I find crazy new zinnias. I bought wildflower mix and it comes with red, pink, and fushia colored zinnias. Each year some seeds sprout on their own from the previous year. I've seen variegated zinnias, one zinnia was orange and pink like sorbet, another was pure white, some were tiny and others had few giant blooms.

My advice is plant different varieties close let them naturally pollinate and sow seeds in the ground and grow on their own, you'll get new varieties without any work.
Zen_Man
Ottawa, KS
(Zone 5b)

November 16, 2013
8:10 PM

Post #9710664

Hi Keith,

You are right that you can find new zinnia varieties using the technique you describe, which involves very little work. And you can actually make a lot of progress by simply saving seeds from your favorite zinnias every year. But, if you are so inclined, you can go deeper into the hobby, if your curiosity about zinnias leads you there.

Over in the Annuals forum, in the "Annuals: zinnia problem" message thread, I told Brenda about the green seed technique for saving zinnia seeds as a means of minimizing the risk of water damage and bird damage to the seeds in the zinnia flower heads. I mentioned that another implication of the green seed technique is that it opens up the possibility of starting a second generation of zinnias while the first generation is still growing. I told Brenda that I would go into that in more detail in a subsequent message. I think I will do that here in this Hybridizer's forum, and refer Brenda over here, because it has applicability here and the Hybridizer's forum is one of Dave's Garden's forums that is open to outsiders without requiring them to become members of Dave's Garden. It would be good if we could widen our circle of people interested in growing zinnias.

I originally experimented with planting green zinnia seeds as a means of getting a quick second generation of zinnias. It was another zinnia breeder (Jackie R over in GardenWeb) who informed me that I could dry my green seeds for storage and later use, because she had been doing that for quite some time. I started doing that myself, because saving green zinnia seeds has several advantages.

When you are trying to get a quick second generation of zinnias, you are in a hurry to get the green seeds to germinate. Drying them takes time and if you plant them immediately after pulling them from a zinnia flower head, they don't germinate immediately because the green seed coat is alive and impermeable to water. When a green seed is planted, the seed coat has to die and become permeable to water before the green seed germinates. That can take two or three weeks, which significantly delays getting that second generation of zinnias. But if you breach the seed coat in some way, water can get immediate access to the embryo and cause prompt germination in two to four days. Several ways of doing that are shown in the accompanying picture.

Notice the "nearly naked" embryo in that picture. At first that was sort of an accident, but I discovered that while you are opening the seed coat, it isn't hard to go on and extract the embryo altogether. That was how the technique of growing zinnias from embryos instead of seeds evolved. That technique was illustrated in a message above.

I have a bunch of zinnias growing right now beside my computer that were started from green seeds and embryos that were harvested from selected specimens before our killing frost. That third generation of zinnias this year is budding out, with the potential of starting a fourth generation of zinnias before Christmas.

Because you extract green seeds from a growing zinnia flower head, the green seed technique lets you get a second generation of zinnias growing and developing while the parent mother zinnia plant is still growing and developing. That's a little bit reminiscent of a mother hen with her baby chicks.

ZM

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Mipii
(Robin) Blissfield, MI
(Zone 6a)

November 16, 2013
8:16 PM

Post #9710666

Zen, you have a picture of a Zinnia that I'm particularly fond of. I'm talking about the recurved or pagoda style...I think it's magenta with long petals (left of the spider). Have you saved seeds from this? If you have will you trade for something on my have list?
Zen_Man
Ottawa, KS
(Zone 5b)

November 18, 2013
7:41 PM

Post #9712092

Hi Robin,

" Have you saved seeds from this? If you have will you trade for something on my have list? "

I saved a limited amount of seed from the specimen you indicated, but I will be using all of them next year in an attempt to improve the strain.

My breeder specimens of zinnias are fairly heterogeneous, meaning that they have a variety of different grandparents and great grandparents. The picture on the left is another bloom on the "pagoda" zinnia you indicated. It was packed with numerous cactus-style petals, much more so than ordinary.

To show how much difference there can be between one generation of zinnias and the next, the picture on the right was the mother of that "pagoda" zinnia. I referred to the mother as my "Pink Shaggy Dog", and considered it to be an important breeder zinnia because it had such long hanging-down petals. If those petals had been pointing more or less straight out, as the petals do on a lot of zinnias, that zinnia could have been more than 8 inches across. So I consider the genes coming from the Pink Shaggy Dog to be potentially useful for one of my goals, namely a new strain of zinnias with huge blooms. That's not my only goal, but it is one of them.

I anticipate that for at least the next year or two I will not be sharing, trading, or selling seeds from any of my breeder zinnias. I will be growing all of them myself in my quest for strains of novel new zinnia varieties. My basic breeding methods are rather simple: make a lot of crosses, grow a lot of zinnias, watch for mutations, and use only the best of those to produce seeds for the next generation.

ZM


This message was edited Nov 18, 2013 9:59 PM

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WormsLovSharon
Las Vegas, NV

November 18, 2013
8:10 PM

Post #9712114

ZM, that sounds like a blast I will have to read how to breed zinnias. I am 71. ZM, how long have you taken to get this far?
Mipii
(Robin) Blissfield, MI
(Zone 6a)

November 19, 2013
7:37 AM

Post #9712338

I understand the point...'make my own mutations'...believe me, I'm going to try and replicate that one.

IMHO you had saved only a few seeds from a winner (only to keep trying for a winner). Have you seen one like that on the market? I rather like 'sister' pagoda too.
Zen_Man
Ottawa, KS
(Zone 5b)

November 19, 2013
1:20 PM

Post #9712534

Hi Sharon,

"...how long have you taken to get this far?"

I started back in 2005, by planting a few Whirligigs, Burpee Burpeeana Giants, Burpee Giant Hybrids (now apparently a discontinued strain) and some Scabiosa Flowered zinnias. I made quite a few crosses, and in 2006 I got an excitingly different "sunflower flowered" zinnia (picture attached) from a cross between a Scabiosa Flowered zinnia and probably one of the Whirligig specimens.

I had never seen any zinnia like it, and that one zinnia was enough to get me hooked, although I had some other interesting results from crosses between Scabiosa Flowered zinnias and the large cactus flowered zinnias.

So really it took me only a year to get some unique zinnias that you couldn't get from a seed packet. My zinnia patch gets more interesting to me as each year goes by. It's an absorbing hobby, and easy to get into.

ZM

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Zen_Man
Ottawa, KS
(Zone 5b)

November 19, 2013
8:28 PM

Post #9712785

Hi Robin,

"Have you seen one like that on the market? I rather like 'sister' pagoda too."

I haven't seen one like it advertised or on the picture of a cactus strain seed packet or catalog entry, but I think that if you grow a lot of cactus flowered zinnias, you will probably find one or more like it, or very similar to it. You might find one even better. Over at GardenWeb, a zinnia breeder, Jackie R, showed a picture of one very much like it and possibly better. They aren't extremely common, but they aren't super rare either. Because bees do so much accidental hybridization, field-grown zinnias can show a lot of variation that doesn't get into the catalog pictures or seed packet pictures.

And you can induce more variation by crossing cactus type zinnias with other types, like Whirligigs. Whirligigs can be a "secret sauce" when you cross them with cactus-type zinnias. The F1 hybrids may not be so remarkable, but further recombinations in F2, F3, and beyond generations can bring out characteristics that were not obvious in either the original cactus zinnias or the original Whirligig zinnias. And the scabiosa flowered zinnias are full of variations and breeding potential. That "pagoda" cactus may actually have some scabiosa "blood" in it, like in the attached picture of a scabiosa hybrid.

ZM

Thumbnail by Zen_Man
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Mipii
(Robin) Blissfield, MI
(Zone 6a)

November 19, 2013
9:26 PM

Post #9712802

Am I understanding that you will not pay that much attention to the beauties you create because you're focused on other breeding goals. I'd like to buy all three of those Zinnias...I think you should register them. To my mind, they are unique and very pleasing, why not register them?
Zen_Man
Ottawa, KS
(Zone 5b)

November 20, 2013
7:40 AM

Post #9712971

Hi Robin,

"Am I understanding that you will not pay that much attention to the beauties you create because you're focused on other breeding goals."

I am not totally ignoring any of my zinnias that I consider to be of "breeder quality". It is true that I neglected to pollinate the Pagoda specimen a lot this year, because I was much more focused on making cross pollinations between my new star-petaled mutant and some of my tubular petaled specimens in an attempt to get new and improved variations of that new petal form.

The flower form of the Pagoda zinnia is not as rare as the star petaled form, so the star petaled form got much more of my time this year. However, I share your admiration for the Pagoda flower form, and I will continue to develop that unusual cactus flowerform as well. I plan to grow a lot of my cross-pollinated cactus flowered zinnias next year, looking for further improvement in size and flower form. But I will also be growing a lot of the progeny from the star petaled mutant, looking for further improvements to the tubular petal structure and the flower forms that have it. And I have several other ongoing zinnia projects.

"I'd like to buy all three of those Zinnias..."

I took up this zinnia hobby purely for my personal enjoyment, with no intention of ever selling anything. And although my successes have been much more than I originally anticipated, I still don't anticipate selling or distributing my zinnia seeds. After some of my new zinnia strains become stable, I will want them to become available, and I might entertain selling them to a seed company who would have the facilities to grow them in commercial quantities and make them available to the general public. But that is years in the future, and for the time being I plan to continue this zinnia hobby purely for the fun of it. I do consider your offer to buy all three of them as the ultimate compliment, and I thank you for that compliment.

"...I think you should register them. To my mind, they are unique and very pleasing, why not register them?"

I agree with you that they are unique and pleasing, but I don't know of any Registry for Zinnias. Zinnias aren't like daylilies or irises or dahlias or roses, in that zinnias are primarily grown from seeds, and not from rhizomes or bulbs or tubers or grafted rootstock or such. It is true that zinnias can be grown asexually from cuttings or tissue cultures, but that is not done commercially. At least, not currently. So, at this time, registering zinnias is probably not an option.

I am attaching pictures of my star petaled mutant. It got a lot of my attention this year. It has obvious flaws, such as the brown tips on the points on the stars, but it is a different new petal structure for zinnias. I want to explore the possibilities of recombining its genetics with some of my other zinnias, including those with tubular type petals. I continue to look for new flower forms in zinnias.

ZM

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brendak654

brendak654
Anna, IL
(Zone 6b)

November 20, 2013
2:48 PM

Post #9713181

Hi ZM,

Time to think outside-the-box. With your breeding talent with the zinnia, can you tell me what mix caused this rudbeckia to throw white in its blossoms. This was a strain that I have grown for years (volunteers) and there was only once this happened. I have never seen one like this elsewhere and it has not happened since. At the time I could have saved the seed, I'm sorry to say I did not. Just curious???





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brendak654

brendak654
Anna, IL
(Zone 6b)

November 20, 2013
3:09 PM

Post #9713192

ZINNIA'S GALORE...WISH THEY WERE BLOOMING RIGHT NOW AS I CAN SPEND HOURS AMIDST THE ZINNIA. ZM - YOU TALKED ABOUT WHITE ONES, THERE ARE A FEW HERE, BUT NOTHING COMPERABLE TO YOUR CREATIONS.




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brendak654

brendak654
Anna, IL
(Zone 6b)

November 20, 2013
3:13 PM

Post #9713194

ZM - THIS IS THE ONE I WANTED TO SEND AS I ESPECIALL LIKE THE ORANGE ZINNIA WITH THE PINK CENTER - THE SECOND BLOOM OVER FROM THE LOWER LEFT.

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keithp2012
West Babylon, NY
(Zone 7a)

November 20, 2013
3:44 PM

Post #9713232

These are some zinnias I had grown


http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/12670247

http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/2329009
Zen_Man
Ottawa, KS
(Zone 5b)

November 20, 2013
5:24 PM

Post #9713291

Hi Brenda,

I am no expert on Rudbeckia, but that Rudbeckia looks like Rudbeckia hirta, common name, Black Eyed Suzan. A think that a breeder of Black Eyed Suzans would have been excited to get some seeds from that mutant.

It's hard to say what might have caused that mutation. Some strange chemicals can cause mutations, and Cosmic Rays have even been credited with causing mutations. Occasionally a mishap occurs during sexual cell division.

Whatever the cause, mutations are relatively rare on our time scale. That is why it is so exciting when a mutation happens in our garden. I have never seen a Black Eyed Suzan like your mutant. Rudbeckia hirta "Prairie Sun"

http://www.tmseeds.com/category/s?keyword=rudbeckia

has whitish petal ends and a greenish white center, which is completely different from your mutant. I think your mutant probably was unique.

I hope that you will take up amateur zinnia breeding, and be on the lookout for any mutant zinnias. As Forrest Gump quoted his mother in the movie, "Life is like a box of chocolates, you never know what you're gonna get." Zinnias are kind of like that, too.

ZM
Mipii
(Robin) Blissfield, MI
(Zone 6a)

November 20, 2013
6:47 PM

Post #9713335

ZM, thanks so much for sharing your valuable info. I collected a bunch of Zinnia seeds (a mix) from a gardener friend's garden and will start on my 'Make 'em Look Like ZM's Project' late winter. I'll be thinking of your three little beauties the WHOLE time.
Zen_Man
Ottawa, KS
(Zone 5b)

November 20, 2013
7:12 PM

Post #9713347

Hi again, Brenda,

That orange bloom with a pink center is quite significant. That contrast in color is a bit unusual, and worthy of consideration when evaluating a zinnia. The center of a zinnia is kind of a forgotten flower part, and it is an important part that we breeders of our zinnias should take notice of when we are picking which zinnias to use as breeders.

The first picture shows that the center can have a striking contrast in the composition of a zinnia bloom, especially when there are unusual bicolor petals. The second picture shows that a large sized center can be significant. The third picture shows that a hidden center can cause a whole new look in a zinnia bloom. The fourth picture shows that a white center looks "right" in a white zinnia (and is attractive to a nine-spotted cucumber beetle). The fifth picture shows that when the color of the center matches the base color of bicolored petals, the effect unifies the whole central region of the bloom.

I could go on with this theme of the various roles of the center in a zinnia bloom, but I think that zinnia DNA has many hidden surprises that we haven't seen yet, regarding what zinnia centers can do. It is good that you called attention to zinnia centers.

ZM

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irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

November 20, 2013
8:13 PM

Post #9713378

ZM I prefer photo # 5

Brenda I like the red on the lowest part. Both they are all nice.
Zen_Man
Ottawa, KS
(Zone 5b)

November 20, 2013
8:20 PM

Post #9713384

Hi Robin,

Your message came in while I was composing that last response to Brenda.

"I collected a bunch of Zinnia seeds (a mix) from a gardener friend's garden and will start on my 'Make 'em Look Like ZM's Project' late winter."

You must have a much warmer climate than we have here in east central Kansas. I am growing a limited number of zinnias indoors this Winter, but I definitely couldn't start anything outside until next Spring.

I don't know how varied your gardener friend's zinnias were, but I would suggest a minor purchase of a few additional seeds to add some variety to your genetic mix. Several seed companies offer Whirligig zinnias, but Stokes has reasonable prices, especially if you get more quantity than a single packet.

http://www.stokeseeds.com/product.aspx?ProductID=39127&CategoryID=540

Whirligigs have much more diversity than any seed packet picture or catalog picture might suggest. Whirligigs differ from most zinnias, in that they were derived from an interspecific cross between Z. elegans (violacea) and Z. haageana. Those hybrids had the potential of being fertile, because both species had the same chromosome number (24). The progeny from those hybrids (F2 and beyond) are capable of recombining genetics from both species in many different ways. And Whirligigs are the progeny of those hybrids. I have found that crossing Whirligigs with my favorite large zinnias and scabiosa flowered zinnias has yielded a whole spectrum of new variation. In short, Whirligigs are the "secret sauce" in my zinnia breeding program.

If I were to recommend just two additional strains, they would be the scabiosa flowered zinnias and Burpee's Burpeeana Giants. And there are many other interesting strains of zinnias that give you a mind-boggling astronomical number of possible crosses that you could make. And don't forget, you can make crosses between your own hybrids. That's fair, and fun.

"I'll be thinking of your three little beauties the WHOLE time."

Don't limit yourself to just those three. With zinnias, the possibilities are almost endless. Breeding zinnias is a little like pulling the handle on a slot machine. The more times you pull the handle, the better your chances are of hitting a jackpot. And there is no reason you couldn't hit a bigger jackpot than I might hit. Lady Luck rules this game.

ZM
(not associated with any product or vendor mentioned or linked)
Zen_Man
Ottawa, KS
(Zone 5b)

November 20, 2013
8:36 PM

Post #9713390

Hi Lucy,

Glad to have you back.

" I prefer photo # 5"

I was just touting Whirligigs to Robin. Interestingly, photo #5 is of a Whirligig grown from a seed straight out of a Whirligig seed packet from Stokes. No interference from me on that one. I grew a whole bed of Whirligigs and each new bloom was a surprise. I will be growing another bed of Stokes' Whirligigs next year. I'm always looking for "new blood" for my "gene pool".

ZM
WormsLovSharon
Las Vegas, NV

November 20, 2013
11:21 PM

Post #9713419

I love #5. I am going to order some seeds. I just throw them on the ground this time of yer and in lat April, early May thy start coming up all over.

Having lived in Las Vegas since 1960, I have heard of Lady Luck. I do not gamble. Never did. Just was not my thing.

It has taken me many years to finally become a decent gardener. You can tell ZM has not been to Las Vegas for a long time because slot machines no longer have handles. LOL.

We are still in the high 60s but will go down in temperatures quickly when our windy season moves in. Roses are still blooming but leaves look bad. I usually throw seed from the first blooms of the zinnias and they come up in our heat in about 4 days during the summer. But I have beautiful soil because of composting for the past 12 years when we moved into the property.

Zen, thanks for sharing your knowledge. I really appreciate it and you. Sharon

brendak654

brendak654
Anna, IL
(Zone 6b)

November 21, 2013
7:43 AM

Post #9713608

ZM

I checked the Stokes website for Whirligig Zinnia and I cannot imagine a 1/4 pound of zinnia seed. Yes, quite the bargain.

Thanks for the feedback on my Rudbeckia.

Of the pictures you posted most recently, the last three iced the cake for me. Your # 3 (center) must be what you refer to as your scabocia zinnia?

The # 2 picture with the purple center is about the same shade of purple as the orange with purple center that I had grown.

I must order some of the Whirigig's. Good point you made about them.

Brenda

Zen_Man
Ottawa, KS
(Zone 5b)

November 21, 2013
9:02 AM

Post #9713648

Hi Sharon,

And I also appreciate your comments and you. Yes, it has been a few decades since I was in Vegas. When I was much younger I had several occasions to make business trips to Las Vegas to help install some software at Nellis Air Force Base. Slot machines were everywhere. As I walked down the ramp from the airplane, carrying my carry-on bag and heading to the luggage pickup area, there was a slot machine right at the end of the ramp.

I had a couple of quarters in my pocket, so I fed them to the machine. The second quarter hit a jackpot, and suddenly I had a pocket full of quarters, and I was kind of "hooked". I mentally budgeted $20 as the amount I would lose in Vegas on a trip, and I stuck to that.

It actually took me several hours in a casino to lose that. I followed the same plan on subsequent trips to Nellis. Lose $20, and quit, and treat it as cheap entertainment money. (Actually, $20 was worth a lot more back in those days).

On my last trip, I hit a "run" of jackpots and found myself $135 ahead, so I vowed to quit while I was ahead, and I did.

Until many years later, while attending a wedding in Las Vegas, I remembered that $135 and decided to "go for it". Needless to say, I eventually lost the whole $135 and quit.

So the saying that "the house always wins" eventually came true for me, after many years. Except I quit at a point where I was even, and had the consolation of being "ahead of the game" for over two decades. They say that for many people, gambling is an addiction, and I believe that. In the casino there were people who had been pulling those slot machine levers for hours, and you could tell that many of them were no strangers to it, because their right arms were noticeably bigger than their left arms, like you see on some people who bowl a lot. I guess the new slot machines have solved that problem.

Your Whirligig zinnias will appreciate your composty soil. I still have a long way to go in that area. Although I did till in a couple of old compost piles into my zinnia garden yesterday and the day before. There were some live earthworms in that compost. I don't know if earthworms love me -- they probably don't, because I have undoubtedly cut a few of them in two with my tiller. But I definitely like earthworms. I am attaching a few pictures of some of my Whirligig specimens from past years. Whirligigs have a variety of petal forms.

ZM

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Zen_Man
Ottawa, KS
(Zone 5b)

November 21, 2013
10:29 AM

Post #9713707

Hi Brenda,

"I cannot imagine a 1/4 pound of zinnia seed. Yes, quite the bargain."

I actually purchased a quarter pound package of Whirligigs from Stokes a few years ago. I will be planting the last of those this Spring. One advantage to having a huge excess of seeds is that you can pour some of them out on a sheet of white paper and go through them, picking out your "favorite" individual seeds.

I have noticed that there is some correlation between petal seed shape and the shape of the petal. Long thin seeds tend to produce zinnias with long thin petals. Broad seeds produce broad petals. If you are going for bigger flowers, pick out the biggest seeds. You probably don't need the 1/4-pound package right now, or maybe for years, but there are advantages to getting the big package anyway. Namely, you can get "pick of the litter" by selecting out the individual seeds that appeal to you. There is a lot of difference between the individual seeds, and a big package of seeds lets you take advantage of those differences.

"Your # 3 (center) must be what you refer to as your scabocia zinnia? "

It was produced by crossing a scabiosa flowered zinnia with a "regular" larger zinnia. And perhaps crossing two of those scabiosa hybrids together. There was a lot of scabiosa crossing involved. The big attraction of scabiosa flowered zinnias to me is that the scabious flower form doesn't have those "fuzzy yellow starfish" pollen florets. Instead, their florets have the petal color and can build up an attractive petal-colored center. If Whirligig ancestry is involved, the scabious florets can have a contrasting color to the petal color, but still not be "fuzzy yellow". One current source of scabious zinnias is the Scabious Flowered Mixed strain from Thompson & Morgan:

http://www.tmseeds.com/product/Zinnia-Scabious-Flowered-Mixed/Shop_Annual_Flower_Seed

Parks Seeds offers the newer Candy Mixed strain:

http://parkseed.com/candy-mix-zinnia-seeds/p/51989-PK-P1/

The Scabiosa flowered and Candy Mix strains are probably available from other seed companies as well. Swallowtail Gardens is one source:

http://www.swallowtailgardenseeds.com/assets/zinnia_scabiosa_flowered_mix_3.jpg

I should add one qualifier about the scabious zinnia strains currently in the marketplace. Namely, they don't produce a high percentage of the scabious flower forms, and there will be a lot of non-scabious specimens that you will probably want to cull and discard. As a zinnia breeder, I am happy if I get one good zinnia in 20, but a lot of gardeners would be appalled to find so many off-type specimens. Just be mentally prepared that your commercial scabious zinnias will contain a lot of culls. But, to me, the few "good ones" make up for it. Not all people would be as forgiving as me.

I am attaching a few pictures of my zinnias that were derived from scabious crosses. There were many more than are shown in this 5-picture gallery.

ZM
(not associated with any product or vendor mentioned or linked)

This message was edited Nov 21, 2013 12:36 PM

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irisMA

irisMA
South Hamilton, MA

November 21, 2013
6:06 PM

Post #9713958

ok #3 ☺
WormsLovSharon
Las Vegas, NV

November 21, 2013
8:54 PM

Post #9714047

OK, I got it. I will order the seed, lay them out on a white sheet of paper, take a photo and you can tell me what I have. LOL. Or, I could separate the seeds, and identify what I planted where, so I would know what seed is what.

'ZM, you do realize I am 71 and do not have forever for this exercise. LOL.

ZM, I cannot believe you tilled your worms.

We had a steady rain here all day. So thankful for the moisture. Suppose to rain again tomorrow and then we will be sunny but 15 degrees lower in temperatures.

So looking forward to warm weather in April. Just around the corner. Have a great evening and a wonderful day tomorrow. You all stay safe. Mother Winter
Zen_Man
Ottawa, KS
(Zone 5b)

November 22, 2013
7:56 AM

Post #9714260

Hi Sharon,

"...you do realize I am 71 and do not have forever for this exercise. LOL"

I am also a senior citizen. But, as they say, age is not important, it's how young you feel. And my zinnia hobby keeps me feeling young. There is always something to look forward to. And even if you don't grow zinnias indoors during the Winter months like I do, there is always planning to do and seeds to mess with and reading about zinnias to do. I'll touch on those things in a subsequent message.

" I will order the seed, lay them out on a white sheet of paper, take a photo and you can tell me what I have. "

That sounds like a plan. Let's do it.

" I cannot believe you tilled your worms. "

It's not as bad as you think. I piled the aged compost several inches deep on some garden soil that needed both improving and elevating to smooth out and make more level a slope. So I needed to mix the compost into the soil underneath. There were earthworms in the compost, and a few earthworms in the existing garden soil. I could have used a spading fork (I have two of them) to dig the compost in, but I am a senior citizen and we had inclement weather pending the next day, so I needed to use the tiller to get the job done fast. My tiller gets soil blending done with less effort and much faster than using the spading fork.

My tiller is a mid-tined Merry Tiller that has a triple reduction enclosed chain drive transmission for extremely high tine torque and very slow tine speed. So there is no need for a dirt shield and I have full view of the tilling zone and a delicate clutch control over the tines. If I dig up a toad, lizard, or tiny snake, I can instantly let off on the clutch to stop the tines, so I can rescue the animal unharmed. Or, if I dig up some old artifact like a belt buckle, a tiny toy, a nail or spike, or a piece of glass or pottery, I can stop the tines instantly and retrieve that. I always remove any foreign object that might be harmful to a person.

Rear tined tillers have a high tine speed of 200 RPM and higher, while my mid-tined Merry Tiller has a low tine speed that can be as low as 30 RPM. While a rear-tined tiller can act like a high speed blender set on "puree", my tiller does a gentle blending like a hand mixer. The rear tined tillers make mince meat out of earth worms, but my tiller might just cut an earth worm in two to become two earth worms.

"We had a steady rain here all day."

We had a light freezing rain last night. It got down to 18 last night, it was 22 this morning, and our high today is predicted to be 32. Our deck is covered with glaze ice right now. I'm glad I got that tilling done when I did. Today is an inside gardening day for me. I have zinnias growing on the shelves right by my computer, and they do need my attention.

ZM

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

November 22, 2013
6:14 PM

Post #9714592

Can Zinnias be propagated by stem cuttings?

WormsLovSharon
Las Vegas, NV

November 22, 2013
10:04 PM

Post #9714694

So ZM. how do you grow zinnias inside.

We have had rain for more than 24 hours. Very unusual for Las Vegas. The valley is surrounded by mountains and the mountains are all getting snow. Our high today was 50. Rain is moving out tomorrow and we will be back in the 60s.

I have plumeria, tropical hibiscus and Philippine Violet and Delonix plants in the garage garden area and coleus and geranium cuttings in small three shelved greenhouses. I am a zone pusher. Good thing I have a three car garage.

You are so right about age. I can outwork most 50 year old individuals. My father's training. "You quit when you are done, not when you are tired". I can still hear his voice. I was the oldest of 4 children. But I did learn a great work ethic. And I relax by moving, not sitting.

Looking forward to hearing how you grow zinnias in the house.

Stay safe and have fun. Sharon "Mother" Winter
Zen_Man
Ottawa, KS
(Zone 5b)

November 22, 2013
10:08 PM

Post #9714695

RickCorey_WA wrote:Can Zinnias be propagated by stem cuttings?


Yes, with several provisos. You need to use something like Physan 20 to prevent bacterial rot of the soft tissue. You need to use a good rooting hormone. You need to provide a humidity dome and adequate lighting. You need to have a good rooting medium that provides adequate aeration. You may need to provide bottom heat. It takes about 10 or 12 days for the cutting to strike enough roots to allow you to remove the humidity dome.

In previous years I took numerous cuttings in the Fall as a "lifeboat" for breeder zinnias that were threatened by a killing frost. This year I took green seeds instead, to start a new generation indoors rather than prolong the current generation indoors. That new indoor generation is coming into bloom now.

In the past, as an experiment, I have taken cuttings from zinnia plants that were themselves started from cuttings. Those second generation cuttings produced plants that could have had third generation cuttings taken from them, although I did not choose to do that. Actually, I wonder if a zinnia plant is potentially immortal if you continue to take cuttings from cuttings repeatedly.

A problem is that the average zinnia plant doesn't have enough nodes to provide the material for very many cuttings. In my Fall "lifeboat" operations, I sacrificed the entire plant for cutting material, but even then didn't get very many cuttings from a plant. I don't think that cuttings are a practical method for the commercial multiplication of a zinnia strain, because the multiplication factor isn't very high. I think that you would need to use Tissue Culture for a high multiplication factor.

ZM
Zen_Man
Ottawa, KS
(Zone 5b)

November 22, 2013
10:16 PM

Post #9714696

WormsLovSharon wrote:So ZM. how do you grow zinnias inside.


Hi Sharon,

I will respond in some detail tomorrow. Outdoor zinnia growing is easy, but indoor zinnia growing is not easy, and it's time for me to "hit the hay".

Goodnight,

ZM

WormsLovSharon
Las Vegas, NV

November 22, 2013
10:36 PM

Post #9714698

Actually, way past your bedtime.
Mipii
(Robin) Blissfield, MI
(Zone 6a)

November 23, 2013
8:33 AM

Post #9714974

Just an aside note ZM; thanks for the photography skills -- you do your specimens justice.
WormsLovSharon
Las Vegas, NV

November 23, 2013
10:38 PM

Post #9715370

So are you still sleeping ZM. I have to go to airport at 11:30 to pick up daughter and 3 granddaughters that are coming for Thanksgiving.

We have had a nice steady rain for 48+ hours. It moved out around 7pm. Heading East. Not normal for this neck of the woods but we will take it.

Sharon
WormsLovSharon
Las Vegas, NV

November 24, 2013
10:13 PM

Post #9715996

ZM, where did you go. I hope all is well with you.

It stopped raining and the Las Vegas sun is back.

Sharon
Zen_Man
Ottawa, KS
(Zone 5b)

November 24, 2013
10:48 PM

Post #9716014

Hi Sharon,

All is well. Company dropped in for the weekend. It has been bitter cold here for the last two days. I will go into detail about growing zinnias indoors and post a few pictures. I actually have a few indoor zinnias starting to bloom out now, and I need to repot a lot of them. And do some cross pollination as well.

More later.

ZM
WormsLovSharon
Las Vegas, NV

November 24, 2013
11:27 PM

Post #9716020

OK. I was just concerned because you just dropped off into the obis...
Zen_Man
Ottawa, KS
(Zone 5b)

November 25, 2013
11:45 AM

Post #9716384

Hello again, Sharon,

OK, I have a software update download going, so I have some time to talk about growing zinnias indoors. It isn't particularly hard to start some zinnias indoors a few weeks early to set them out in your garden after it safe to do so in the Spring. Although that usually does require fluorescent lights, pots, growing medium, and possibly some soluble nutrients, it isn't nearly as hard as actually growing the zinnias indoors from seed to flower to seed to complete the cycle.

As far as I know, no book discusses growing zinnias as a house plant. And there is good reason for that. Houseplants usually have minimal light requirements, are relatively slow growing, and have modest requirements for water, nutrition, and care in general. Zinnias are not like that at all, in that they require a lot of light, grow rapidly, and use a lot of water and nutrients.

If you take the time, effort, and expenditure of money, you can grow zinnias indoors successfully. It can even be gratifying to meet and overcome the challenges of growing zinnias indoors, just as people who grow orchids indoors enjoy doing that, despite the challenges. Zinnias are probably at least as difficult to grow indoors as orchids. My zinnias are my orchids.

I am not an organic gardener, although I use some of their methods, particularly soil improvement by composting. It's hard to get too much organic matter in garden soil. But I have no compunction against using "chemicals" along as they are handled safely. I don't understand some of the organic gardening dogmas. Organic gardeners seem to approve of using Epsom Salts to provide some much needed magnesium (a component of chlorophyll). Epsom Salts, which is Magnesium sulfate, is somehow organic, although Potassium sulfate fertilizer is somehow a dreaded chemical. That seems inconsistent to me, particularly since both substances could come from the same chemical plant. But that is irrelevant to the discussion here, except to explain that how an organic gardener could grow zinnias indoors is beyond my expertise. It might be possible, but I have no information on that.

If you are breeding zinnias, growing them indoors has some good advantages. It lets you make progress much faster, because you get more generations per year. And it turns out that cross pollinating zinnias indoors is particularly easy and effective. You no longer need to worry about the bees stealing your pollen or applying unwanted pollen. Since your indoor zinnias are portable, you can move the pollen donor zinnias next to the female zinnias for your own convenience.

Adequate light for the zinnias is a requirement. You might succeed in starting a few seedlings early on a sunny window sill, but that won't work for actually growing zinnias indoors. That doesn't provide enough light. Even if the window sill were very sunny or there is a sun room or greenhouse available, there simply aren't enough hours of sunlight in the Winter to meet the "full sun" requirements of zinnias.

So you have to supply some light. I use T8 4-foot fluorescent lights in inexpensive shoplight fixtures. I got most of mine from Home Depot, and paid about $8 per 2-bulb fixture. I think that prices have since gone up significantly, because inflation continues. I think that inexpensive shoplights are still cost effective. I put the shoplights as close together as I can, and get four shoplights over each 2 foot by 4 foot shelf. That gives 8 fluorescent tubes per shelf. I have overdriven some of my shoplights for more light output. I try to adjust the hanging chains to keep the bulbs about 3 inches above the zinnia plants. Occasionally I forget and a rapidly growing zinnias gets a little "scorched" by contacting a bulb. The shoplights are on a timer, set to turn the lights on and off for a day length of 16 to 17 hours. The shoplights and T8 bulbs are one of the necessary expenses, but I use the economy priced cool white T8 bulbs. They cost less in boxes of 10 bulbs. I don't think the special plant spectrum bulbs are worth the extra cost. I try to keep my bulb cost to about $3 per 4-foot T8 bulb.

You also need pots, growing medium, and trays for the pots. I use Premier Pro-Mix BX as my "sterile" growing medium. I don't use soil indoors, because that can cause problems. The Pro-Mix contains a very limited amount of nutrients, just adequate for two or three weeks of seedling growth. Because the sterile growing medium doesn't contain the soil bacteria necessary to break urea down into available nitrate and ammonium ions, I use urea-free nutrient formulas, like Better-Gro's soluble nutrients for orchids.

Because you aren't growing in soil indoors, you probably have to add soluble calcium in your nutrients. It might be helpful to get an analysis sheet for your water supply. Most municipal water departments will supply you an analysis sheet on request. Your water might contain usable amounts of calcium, magnesium, and other elements, and then again, it might not. When you are using soil-less growing, you are in effect growing your plants hydroponically, even if you are using a growing mix as a support medium in lieu of the gravel, sand, rock wool, or just plain water that are used in hydroponic gardening. Plants need a lot of calcium, so hydroponic growers almost always add soluble calcium to their water. I purchased some calcium nitrate and I add some of that to the water that I supply to my zinnias.

I will touch on problems with pests, such as aphids, fungus gnats, thrips, and the dreaded spider mites in subsequent messages. You may not have them, but you could, and you have to be prepared, and possibly take preventative steps. One year I lost my entire indoor zinnia garden to thrips, and my very first indoor zinnia garden involved an ongoing war with aphids that I had inadvertently brought indoors from the garden on zinnias that were transplanted from the garden to pots. I used a small vacuum cleaner intended for computer keyboards to suck many of the aphids off of my zinnia plants. Pests that are normally kept in check by natural enemies outdoors can have catastrophic population explosions indoors.

This year, even before a killing frost, starting the 12th of October, I began bringing green seeds indoors and planted them to start a new generation of zinnias, rather than prolong the current generation via indoor cuttings. I took a few pictures yesterday. The first picture shows a zinnia plant in the process of being re-potted. The second picture shows some of my indoor zinnias that are budding. I have a lot of re-potting pending, and it's time to start some cross-pollinating as well.

ZM

Thumbnail by Zen_Man   Thumbnail by Zen_Man         
Click an image for an enlarged view.

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

December 24, 2013
5:58 PM

Post #9733879

Thanks, ZM!

Possible ... but not very practical.

Zen_Man
Ottawa, KS
(Zone 5b)

April 16, 2014
9:03 PM

Post #9814658

Hi,

I have grown a few crosses between mutants and gotten some different results indoors. I saved seeds from a selected few and will plant them outdoors when the weather allows in a few weeks. Instead of ordinary petals, they have small tubular petal-flowers. One of my hybridizing goals is new zinnia flower forms that you couldn't get from any commercial seed packet. These indoor specimens, and others not pictured here, meet that goal.

ZM

Thumbnail by Zen_Man   Thumbnail by Zen_Man   Thumbnail by Zen_Man   Thumbnail by Zen_Man   Thumbnail by Zen_Man
Click an image for an enlarged view.

Txtea
Fabens, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 17, 2014
6:40 PM

Post #9815227

Zen-Man, these look wonderful, well done on your part.

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

April 21, 2014
6:17 PM

Post #9818327

You know that many of us are still hoping that you'll release some of your unique seeds for others to try ... some day ...

My most-hoped-for is one that looks like an explosion in a paint factory! I know that you focus on "form", but the multiple distinct colors fascinated me most.

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Other Hybridizers Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Welcome! Terry 6 Mar 27, 2008 1:03 PM
Wow we got it bwilliams 68 Jun 4, 2010 9:21 PM
Mutation Experiments 2008 bwilliams 28 Jan 21, 2010 2:41 PM
Tomato Crosses Planned? pennyrile 1 Mar 16, 2008 3:05 AM
A Casual Thought Kaelkitty 3 Mar 17, 2008 7:50 PM


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