What is your least favorite garden chore?

(Zone 7a)
There are a total of 122 votes:


Weeding
(63 votes, 51%)
Red dot


Deadheading flowers
(6 votes, 4%)
Red dot


Pruning trees and shrubs
(7 votes, 5%)
Red dot


Turning the compost pile
(8 votes, 6%)
Red dot


Raking leaves
(11 votes, 9%)
Red dot


Removing dead plants
(12 votes, 9%)
Red dot


Other (Tell us!)
(15 votes, 12%)
Red dot


Previous Polls

mid central, FL(Zone 9a)

i voted other because there really is no aspect of gardening that i dislike. i love hand weeding but if i had to pick, spraying round-up is my least favorite thing (but a necessity every once in a while).
i have no leaves to rake, no compost to turn. deadheading is easy for me...removing a plant, whether alive or dead, just means another new plant to take its place!
^_^

Cedarhome, WA(Zone 8b)

I agree with Tracks, I like them all. I voted pruning because I am always so unsure of what I am doing, and it is often difficult for me to reach everything. I enjoy picking weeds, deadheading can be tiresome but gives instant gratification, my husband turns the compost with his tractor, and I'm always switching out plants (dead or alive). Perhaps I should have voted other, because picking up my weeded weeds is actually something I am really poor at.

Somerset, KY(Zone 6b)

Due to a spinal injury many aspects of gardening I don't like, but I do them because I love the look of a nice garden and I am converting everything into containers because it will make it easier on me. I just can't get down on the ground and up again without someone to help me.

Concord, CA(Zone 9b)

Marti 001, I empathize with your problems. Been there, done that. BTW, your profile says that you're in zone 6b, but I think Ventura is more like 9b.

(Tammie) Odessa, TX(Zone 7b)

The drought has changed the enviornment enough that I am seeing entirely different weeds. There are some things growing in my front yard I have never seen since I bought my house in 1989. Some strange flat weed that is VERY prickly with little round balls that HURT! I get rid of those as fast as I find them... we also have foxtails now... I hate those.. they get in the dogs hair and are nightmares. They grow in the front yard and I just found some in the back yard... NO WAY am I letting them take hold in the back..... and what in the world are these teeny tiny morning glory looking vines growing everywhere????? They are coming up in the flowerbeds.. they yard.... everywhere imagineable.... and I did not plant them.... itty bitty flowers.... they grow even where the weeds are struggling....

The drought even has the weeds compteing to try to grow.. that is the only good thing about it!

central, NJ(Zone 6b)

Lhasa, bindweed??? http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/WEEDS/field_bindweed.html

(Zone 7a)

I checked OTHER. My least favorite thing is trying to decide what plant to put where. I love weeding, it's my Zen for the day.

Somerset, KY(Zone 6b)

I'm trying to remember how to change my location. I am now in Somerset, KY. My DIL in Ventura did not like the idea that her son would obey me and not her so she threw me out. So I came home to KY. AND my yard is a mess. It will take me the next year to get it back in order.

(Zone 7a)

GO to My Info at the top of the page. then to Manage Your Preferences. When you get there, on the side will be a list of things under Preferences. Your Location is there.

Anderson, IN(Zone 6a)

I voted dead plants.,particularly because of they way this year has been. Hot ,Dry ,and not so good till about now for me anyway.

Deep East Texas, TX(Zone 8a)

I voted dead plants too. But it is just because I hate to give up on them ~ lol

Algonquin, IL(Zone 5a)

I voted "Other" because my least favorite job is coming up sometime in Autumn. I have to completely dig out a "mostly clay" bed to remove all the Daffodils that have gotten very crowded. I'll also have to remove all the perennials from the same bed since most of them grow above the daffodils.

It's clay soil plus lots of ammendments, but it's still quite hard, so I think I'm going to replace most of it with topsoil and mix compost and other ammendments into that. It's a job I should have tackled last year and put off. Timing is also a problem because some of the perennials keep blooming until late Autumn.

I'm also going to move the daffodils to their own bed somewhere else because the dying foliage covers many of the perennial blooms. It lasts so long that some of the blooming is finished by the time I can remove the "eternal" daffodil foliage.

Don't get me wrong...I Love, Love, Love daffodils! I've just reached a point where I really don't love an entire bed of dying foliage crowding out my perennial blooms. Anyways, I'm definitely not looking forward to it!

Kure Beach, NC(Zone 9a)

Turning the compost pile. None other were even close. Of course the fact that I haven't turned it in 2 years could have something to do with it...
Barb

mid central, FL(Zone 9a)

rof

Cedarhome, WA(Zone 8b)

Nuts, I experimented with cutting the daff foliage down when it flops (cut one bed, left the other to die off, same conditions). Did not see much, if any, difference the following year. I cut it down to about 4-6 inches which was quickly covered up by the companion plants. I know this flies in the face of most garden books, but you might give that a whirl.

(Tammie) Odessa, TX(Zone 7b)

flow.. thats it! bindweed! The flowers on the stuff here are more pink and a pain in the tail! This stuff is horrible.. it grows a network of roots and spreads underground..... it is something new here. I have lived here all my life... well, since the early 70's and this just showed up about 2 years ago in my front yard. I started pulling it constantly and it has been a monster of a fight. It grows faster than I can pull it.

Anderson, IN(Zone 6a)

It would truthfully take me too long , so it just sounds better to say the blooms and vegies and fruit is all I really like ,so I garden?

Algonquin, IL(Zone 5a)

Bonehead - It's funny that you should mention that because I get tired of waiting every year and usually remove the foliage way before it's ready. It hasn't seemed to hurt my daffodils, either. I also have a bunch of the large-size Crocus planted around a tree in my front yard. When the grass grows enough in Spring that we need to start mowing, the Crocus foliage gets mowed with it. It's never hurt them either. In fact they multiply every year.

I understand the theory behind keeping the foliage to nourish the bulbs, but I'm not so sure it's as important as the gardening "experts" would have you believe. I usually trim the foliage just a little at first, rather than pulling it out entirely, but I like your idea of trimming it down fairly low.

Ozone, AR(Zone 6a)

My solution was to plant Daylillys among my spring bulbs. They send up green leaves about the same time the spring folage is dieing.
Vickie

Winter Springs, FL(Zone 9b)

I have so many oak trees...so raking leaves is the number one on my list. First the turkey oaks, then the laurel and last are those tiny live oak leaves. It is a good three months of leaf raking, and cleaning gutters out. Trimming trees is a close second...it can involve using a chainsaw at times. ☺

mid central, FL(Zone 9a)

i'd kill for leaves......i'm sick of buying mulch!

central, NJ(Zone 6b)

cando, I did the same thing, the early blooming daylilies hiding the dying bulbs foliage perfectly

Jasper Co., MO(Zone 6b)

Raking up the leaves then into compost pile in trash bin...

Charlotte, NC(Zone 7b)

I voted "other" because to me gardening is not a chore. It's the triple digit temperatures that have kept me out of the garden the past two years!

(Zone 7a)

I'm with you, Honeybee. Gardening is a pleasure.

Winter Springs, FL(Zone 9b)

I'd be glad to share my bags and bags of leaves with anyone that wants them for mulch, I sure can't use it all, you wouldn't see my plants if I piled it all in the garden, and only so much room in my compost bin. Cleaning gutters isn't gardening, it is a chore...hands down...and has to be done all year around here. Problem here is our soil is sand, which comes up with the leaves and has to be sifted before putting in the bags....or you have heavy bags full of sand. I wish we were aloud to burn leaves, would sure be easier.

I honestly don't mind pulling weeds, dead-heading, or light trimming, kind of an ongoing thing every day as I walk around my garden. My fiskars pruner is always in my hand. ☺

Jackson, MO(Zone 6b)

I don't mind pulling weeds--but by the third time I am pulling the same garden area-I get a little tired of it. When I pull weeds, I put my trowel, round up, nut grass spray, garden scissors, and pruners in a bucket. Then, if I come across something that needs attention, I have everything handy. I only use Round Up if I can't get the weed pulled from its roots. For me, nut grass has to be sprayed.
I put turning the compost. I simply don't have the strength to do it.

mid central, FL(Zone 9a)

there are ways to make a compost bin so that turning is not necessary. who knew?
i don't know how to scan this large enough to read but it is basically a wooden pallet surrounded by wire fencing with a large PVC pipe in the middle. you cut holes all around the pipe up and down and this allows the compost to breath.

Thumbnail by trackinsand
Algonquin, IL(Zone 5a)

Trackinsand, that's a pretty cool idea. You should post it in the Soil and Compost forum. You could probably do something very similar with just about any type of compost pile or bin.

I was able to read it okay, but it was even better when I zoomed the page larger. With Internet Explorer, on the tool bar, I just clicked on "Page" and used the zoom feature.

I've also read that if you put a few branches between some of the layers in your pile or bin it helps to create air pockets in the compost so I've been trying that for a while. It makes it harder to turn the pile, though, so I haven't been turning it as often. I'll see how it works.

edited to fix my typo

This message was edited Aug 23, 2012 7:20 PM

mid central, FL(Zone 9a)

thank you. i will do that. i think you can drag it to photos and then print it too (on a mac for sure).

oh, thought i better give credit to Sunset Garden Book of Pests & Diseases for the article and picture.

This message was edited Aug 23, 2012 8:13 PM

Colima, Mexico(Zone 11)

i voted "other"...squishing ants, aphids, and parasitic wasps (they kill the caterpillars in my butterfly garden).

(Arlene) Southold, NY(Zone 7a)

I voted "other": Trying to eradicate the evil Houttuynia cordata 'Chameleon'. Last summer through fall I spent 8 to 12 hour days digging it out of two fields where daylilies previously grew. Each daylily was potted up and will never be planted again for fear of spreading any errant pieces left in with the soil around the daylilies. We covered both fields with black plastic in November and December. Now it appears all Houttuynia is gone but it has wandered into two other gardens and the lawn, probably prior to the great black plastic experiment.

This photo, taken 11/7/11, shows just a small section of the problem area (before being covered with the black plastic to solarize the soil and kill the roots) as well as a portion of the lawn I had to dig out to get the portion that invaded the lawn in just this area but there is much more to it. Regardless of how deeply I dug it has returned in this area.

In the past I've tried dipping each leaf in straight (undiluted) Round Up and though it killed the above ground growth, it didn't have any effect on the roots. Undiluted Weed B Gon (why can't they spell these products correctly?) had some effect on the leaves but I'm not sure about the roots. My latest experiment is with undiluted Brush B Gon and, once again, the leaves look (mostly) dead but only time will tell if the roots are dead.

Thumbnail by pirl
Cedarhome, WA(Zone 8b)

Pirl, what a horror story. I have a hosta bed with houttuynia (had to copy your spelling, I refer to it at hootenanny) as a ground cover. I found I don't like the smell of it and have been randomly pulling it out. I have not made any effort at all-out war on it, doesn't sound worth the effort if it is that tenacious. It hasn't spread to the surrounding lawn, nor adversely affected the plants in the bed, so I think I will just tolerate its stinkiness and enjoy its color.

(Arlene) Southold, NY(Zone 7a)

The only guarantee you have with the Houtt. is that it will spread and will invade the lawn and will have you crazed. I even tried the torch on it but it only gets rid of what's above ground, not the horrid roots. The stink/stench of it should be a warning that it is not a desirable plant even though it certainly is beautiful.

Algonquin, IL(Zone 5a)

Ugh!! I better head on over to PlantFiles and see what that horrid plant looks like!!

This message was edited Aug 24, 2012 12:32 PM

(Arlene) Southold, NY(Zone 7a)

They are the very pretty variegated colorful leaves that are predominant at the lower left in this photo.

Thumbnail by pirl
Algonquin, IL(Zone 5a)

In the pic it looks similar (except for the red color) to the Variegated Bishop's Weed (don't remember the formal name) that was here when we moved in. There was an entire bed of it in the shade. I didn't know what it was, but it seemed attractive enough except that the leaves would get burnt-looking about mid-season.

When I started planting other things in that bed it was kind of a bully so I started removing it a little at a time. We were lucky as it never showed up in the grass or anywhere else. I finally took it to a nursery and was told what it was and how invasive it was so I started researching it.

Little-by-little I removed it, but if I don't stay on top of it it still pops up here and there in that bed, but fortunately no where else. One of my next door neighbors has some growing that she dug up from her Mother's garden. I told her it was invasive, but she was unfazed and continues to let it grow.

(Arlene) Southold, NY(Zone 7a)

So does my daughter and it doesn't bother her at all. We've had it in three gardens and through constant RU applications I did get rid of it. BTW, it's Aegopodium.

Thumbnail by pirl Thumbnail by pirl
Algonquin, IL(Zone 5a)

Thanks for the name, pirl! I remembered it started with an "A", but was too lazy to look it up.

Okay, everyone, sorry if we got off track here, but it's so easy to do when you start talking plants with other plant lovers...or birds, or wildlife or bugs, or....

Back to the Voting...

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