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Article: Chenopodium quinoa--ancient food of Incan civilization is packed with protein and a delicious, modern choice: Grow it!

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Forum: Article: Chenopodium quinoa--ancient food of Incan civilization is packed with protein and a delicious, modern choiceReplies: 21, Views: 65
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CLScott
Calgary
Canada

August 21, 2012
7:57 AM

Post #9248788

One year I grew a large container of quinoa.
I just used the seeds from the grocery store box.
There is also an ornamental form which gives coloured flowers ,but small seeds.
Right now in Calgary we can buy a white, Red and Black form of Quinoa.
I think more people should grow it. It does not make sense to ship a quality food item.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 21, 2012
9:14 AM

Post #9248880

Good point! I meant to put a few links to places where one can buy seed, whether ornamental or "food grade".
gardengirl86
Middleboro, MA

August 27, 2012
3:41 AM

Post #9255024

Hi Carrie, I have a package of Quinoa sitting in my cupboard and have not even tried it yet. You have inspired me; I will cook with it tonight. I was going to make Cabot White Cheddar and Black Bean Cakes for supper tonight. I think I will supstitute quinoa for the the Panko breadcrumbs.
Thanks for the informative article. Wish I had known about quinoa when I was teaching and trying to find recipes for a student with celiac disease.
By the way, I am from Massachusetts and do not know if I could survive a move to Texas. Too HOT!!!
herbs501
Hallettsville, TX
(Zone 8b)

August 27, 2012
5:08 AM

Post #9255094

I've tried to grow the ornamental Quinoa in my Zone 8b, Texas garden over the winter. It did OK, but was never very vigorous. It definitely needs colder weather. I'm going to try it again this year, though and see if I can get a better stand of it. For eating, I'll still purchase Quinoa at the grocery!
CLScott
Calgary
Canada

August 27, 2012
5:59 AM

Post #9255153

For eating home grown quinoa, one needs to wash the seeds as it has an outside coating which is bitter.
Birds won't eat the home grown quinoa because of this coating.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 27, 2012
12:17 PM

Post #9255707

Gardengirl, I am not claiming I survived the move YET! Thanks--enjoy your quinoa tonight.

Herbs, Does that mean it gets colder here in the winter? I think there are several different colors of "ornamental" and you can buy black, red, etc to eat, too. Whether they would grow differently, I don't know. Maybe Texas is not "high altitudes, thin and cold air, hot sun, salty or sandy soil, little rainfall, and sub-freezing temperatures" enough. I guess I wasn't really writing about how to grow quinoa, sorry!

CL, correct. Thank you for your comments!
CLScott
Calgary
Canada

August 27, 2012
2:38 PM

Post #9255956

No I know you were writing about the plant.
I brought up the growing and then thought I better add the precaution about washing it.
Caroline
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

August 27, 2012
10:34 PM

Post #9256508

Am ashamed to say I've never heard of Quinoa. Now i've go to track some down and try it.
Vickie

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 28, 2012
9:15 AM

Post #9256892

Don't be ashamed, Vickie, it just means you're not young and hip and you don't read vegetarian blogs. Nothing shameful. Many people--probably most people--go their entire lives without eating quinoa. You can too! (PS My husband says it hurts his gums.) But if you like tabouleh or bulgar wheat, wild rice, grainy things like that, you might like it. Start by cooking it with bullion or broth instead of water. We started with chicken broth. Thanks for reading! (Another PS, I'm not young or hip either.)
Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

August 29, 2012
7:08 PM

Post #9258838

Thanks so much for the article.
I usual stand around the health food Kroger isle and wonder about why this or that food is there.
wheat bran - can your family handle that?
Steel cut oats -
Almond flour - but my gosh the price.

Pricey too is this Keenwha-- quiona --still it is great that you wrote this aritcle and explained it is more protein and all that.

Some one grow it in Kentucky and let me know how it does.
There is something going on funny - strange with my family and carbs for years. Ours were brought on by tetanus and the pertusis (whooping cough shots) We have been told there is something going wrong on the end of the energy cycle. They say we have "acquired mitochondria myopathy on the Complex I and III of the electron transfer chain.,

To tell the truth I have spent my whole life on this; I have a masters degree in microbiology so I know the energy pathways - Glycolysis at the very beginning of the energy cycle I believe is affected and is causing problems on down at the end of the cycle.

I am making a prediction that the vaccines have damaged the hypothalmus (endocrine system) and we are not producing some hormone to break up the glucose. Americans may not be out of control eating freaks after all, but victims.
Which I need to cry to someone - we got a call from my husband's brother yesterday - he lives in California. I thought all his kids got by and had good health. He deserves this for his wife was a diabetic and died of ALS a couple of year ago.
But no - his 22 year old son got up from a meal and passed out - turns out he went into a diabetic coma - and almost died. He did not even know he was a diabetic.

So I guess my blessing is that my kids reacted really fast to the shots and did not take years to develop as did my poor nephew. Yes, I do want to know - for I don't think it is just genetics or fate

Sorry for my rant.
But it was a good article and something I needed to research - so thanks for the help. .
CLScott
Calgary
Canada

August 30, 2012
7:05 AM

Post #9259122

Quinoa has a high level of protein and it is what is
called a complete protein. It contains all of the essential amino acids.
Many of the other grains need to be combined in order to obtain all of the essential amino acids.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 30, 2012
1:42 PM

Post #9259567

Thank you for these comments, which bring up several different important points!

First of all, Liquidambar, that is awful what is happening in your family. I think you have a good approach to say "thank goodness my kids had a fast reaction to those immunizations." I hope your nephew does better and that he is able to control his diabetes. He may end up liking quinoa because I believe the calories are released more slowly into the bloodstream than they are with refined flour or sugar, but again, please don't quote me.

I also think (pound for pound) quinoa may not be as expensive as other sources of protein like, say, hamburger. It is hard to compare because quinoa is a dry weight and hamburger shrinks when you cook it. You can't really compare the price per pound on the shelf in the health food aisle to the price per pound in the meat aisle, but you also shouldn't compare it to the rice price or the wheat price because quinoa is a more complete protein, as Caroline says, above. I hope to explain proteins and amino acids in an article eventually. Maybe compare the price of dry quinoa to the price of dry rice and beans, which is more equivalent nutritionally.

Again, thanks for the thought-provoking comments! I'm not sure I've helped explain anything in this short space but I hope to get more in depth in an article about growing plant protein eventually.
Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

August 30, 2012
2:38 PM

Post #9259607

Many decades ago In biochemistry they said there were 12 essential amino acids. there was no plant under the sun that had one of those -- that one had to be obtained by eating meat, eggs, milk.
I have not looked it up - but I wonder if quinoa is the exception?

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 30, 2012
3:08 PM

Post #9259631

When I studied it, you had to combine stuff -- milk + wheat, beans + corn, nuts + grain -- to get "complete" protein. I don't remember how many there are. I remember vaguely that an egg has them in the right balance (???) maybe? And I thought we made one or assembled some in our bodies but maybe not. You're the microbiologist. But back in those days I had never heard of quinoa.

Then when I was doing the quinoa research recently, I read that quinoa is a "more complete" protein than wheat, corn or rice and is considered a protein equivalent to milk. But I haven't gone back and compared the amino acids in quinoa to those in grains, nuts or seeds (and I probably wouldn't know how to anyway)! I think one of my quinoa charts compares quinoa to other things like grain, nuts and seeds, in terms of protein, fat, and so forth. What's difficult is to find someone who has compared wheat + cheese to wheat alone to quinoa or beans + rice to beans alone or rice alone. I know Frances Moore Lappe did that stuff 20-30 years ago but I think she's moved on now.

(Breathe in.) So... that's just what I'm thinking. I've been eating meat since 1978; I really fell off the wagon and then I married a total carnivore so do as I say not as I do hehehe.

I guess Lappe's point was (originally) that you're not eating red meat so you can afford to eat the animal fat in eggs, cheese and butter. Also you're not spending money on meat so you can afford to spend it on, for instance, almond flour. (Btw, almond flour is something you would add for flavor or texture, not sub 1:1 for wheat flour. ) Good luck! I hope things work out for you. Thanks again for the comments.
Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

August 30, 2012
5:24 PM

Post #9259797

@ Carrielamont:Heeee, heeee, hee, I understand about the "breath in" -- I am like that all the time. I have to be careful - I fear I will come off as a nut. It seems like we are not allowed to have passions.

I can even put the Bible on my side! How about that for breath in.

I will share and let you see what a nut I am;
In Genesis; Cain and Abel was really a metaphor of man's changing diet. Two brothers - two pathways of energy . From hunting fat/meat (one pathway to make energy the ketones ) to that of agriculture; which meant more carbohydrates (the other pathway of energy - glucose).
I even got the punishment worked out in my head. The mark on the forehead and hand was talking about the ability or lack of clear thinking and fine motor skills.
And the part in the Bible that says in the end days they must receive the mark on the forehead or hand or they cannot buy or sell. - that is the V word; or it sure seems that way to me. See I have to breath in.



Combining foods as you were saying; Lape is suggesting to get all the amino acids?
And yes the body does make some .
- Dr. Atkins had some thoughts along that same line in his book, but not because of amino acids.. He says that carbohydrates should never be consumed alone. He did not think potatoe was a good food - but once in a while it was okay - however, he suggested that we should leave the skins on (that is slow realease carbs or low glycemic diet) and put butter on it.
Butter - fats is different from glycolysis. Glycolysis breaks up the glucose 6 carbon chain - into 2 three carbon chains and takes a lot of enzymes to rearrange those carbons before it goes into the Krebs cycle and then on into the eletron transfer system.

Fats come in a different pathway before going into the Kreb's cycle- it only needs one enzyme the rest of the reactions occur on it's own - by simple oxidation. The brain uses lots of ketones for energy .(hee, hee, hee, breath in - indeed!)

But darn bread and wheat and rye and rice and all that stuff is a part of agriculture andwith out them there would be on civilization. Perhaps if we don't eat so much of it, and it is slow release - like whole grain???
Thanks for the almond flour advice, esp when it is 10 dollars for a small bag.

@Scott: Do you still have any seeds and are you trying to grow them to get enough to eat?
CLScott
Calgary
Canada

August 31, 2012
7:56 AM

Post #9260323

I just used the seeds from the grocery store.
No I just grew a container to see how difficult they are to grow.
Not difficult at all to grow. I wonder why more North American farmers don't grow it?
This year I grew Utrecht Blue wheat as a container crop.
Caroline

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 31, 2012
7:59 AM

Post #9260327

Liquidambar-- interesting ideas, but I have to say, you are definitely getting out of my area of knowledge. There has definitely always, I think, been a natural conflict between the hunters and the gatherers. Then again, we are so many thousands of years and societies and lifestyles removed from the original that we have no idea. But very interesting conversation!
Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

August 31, 2012
11:55 AM

Post #9260559

Caroline:
I guess they have to get a market for it first. Right now it is just a few that are standing in the health food isle of Krogers trying to find some alternative to white flour that we all grew up on, and love in crust of blackberry pies (berries are low glycemic and low inflammation) but darn I want the pie with the flaky crust! Wal Mart decided to stop selling non - gluton jiffy biscuit mix -because people are not buying the 4 dollars a box stuff.
And whole wheat flour???? How come it is more expensive to buy that than something like bleached white flour? You know it has to be cheaper to process.

Thanks for the suggestion of where to get the seeds and I will wash the slime off of them if I am lucky enough to get them to grow!

I edited just to put the e on the end of slime. Geezzze!

Carrielamont.;
It makes no never mind about such things, just my musings. Endocrine problems have been around a long time in a very - very small group of people.
The ancient Greeks knew it; The royal physician Erasistratus declared, "One inclining to epilepsy should be made to fast without mercy and be put on short rations"
The ancient Romans; Galen believed an "attenuating diet might afford a cure in mild cases and be helpful in others"
Epilepsy is only one symptom for what ever is going on, with a multisymtomatic endocrine/immune disease..
I would almost think the problem was the modern diet of refined flours and suddenly sugar so available like never before and manufactures of foods-- over use of MSG; that is all driving obsesity, diabeties,ceiliacs, and other auto immune diseases . But I witnessed my kids health regress (and my husband's ) after vaccines mulitiple times -the docs and I just kept at it because I was so indoctrinated that I could not believe it was the vaccines. I was an idiot!

I very briefly reviewed amino acids last night -- there are 22 and only 8 are essential that must be consumed through foods -- the rest the body can make. I still did not find what amino acids are not found in plants. Surely my biochemistry professor was not wrong. He was a sweet old man from Lithuania , that had escaped the Soviet Union, and he knew a lot but of course he was still only human . If I out which ones, I will let you know. .

This message was edited Aug 31, 2012 2:00 PM

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 31, 2012
12:20 PM

Post #9260600

Ack! I can't answer or I would be writing all day long. YES YES YES.Ok 'nuff said. Until later, then.

Google "Frances Moore Lappe" just for fun. That's it, 22 essential ones, 8 of which we need from food.

Carrie
Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

September 1, 2012
7:57 AM

Post #9261353

Lappe has written 18 books. That is a lot of information to process. I think she is saying basically that no plant has all the the essential amino acids but combining them - you can get them all from plants?? Well that does make sense. I am not finished looking at her though - lots more to read- I have just scratched the surface.
I have yet to find the name of the amino acid that is not provided by plants. I will look more when I get the time.

L carnitine (which is needed to transport long chain carbohydrates across the membrane to the energy producing organelle inside the cell, the mitochondria) comes from only animals though,it is not an amino acid- lamb and beef are very high in it. It is also suppose to be made and stored in everyone's liver, too. My family has a short supply of it. I think they are overusing it to help in fat to ketone pathway because the carbohydates to glucose is blocked.
Neurologists love to test for L- carnitine levels --shortage of it can cause seizures.

I think that the reason that all through history there have been a few with these endocrine/immune problems and now there are so many ; has increased --are heavy metals.

I find it interesting that the royal families in Europe - many they claimed had genetic disorders- mostly of the blood/endocrine/immune - even George the III - King of England during the Revolutionary War had porphyrias and this low key, family man, father of 15 went insane. porphyrias - acquired porphyrias is interchangable with lead poisoning. His hair was tested recently and he had high levels of arsenic in his hair. Arsenic being the favorite poison used on the nobiltiy, and arsenic is like lead a metal and caused similar health problems. .
Arsenic is also known to cause diabeties. so probably other metals do too.
Arsenic was just beginning to be used in pesticides esp around blueberries when polio began showing up.Polio in the majority of peole cause sniffles and a cold - and only in a few did it cause paralytic polio.
Other very toxic metals are cadium, and mercury-- well - Mad as a hatter and they still put it in vaccines.

Bubby Epsom of Beverly Hillbillies was injuried with is alumiunium costume he was wearing for the movie "The Wizard of Oz". and they replaced him as he lay in a hosptial bed. He claimed to the day he died that his health problems were linked to Al.
In the 70s, Al was found to be the cause of plaque build up in the brians of alzieheimer's patients. Very much noticed on a segment back in the 70s on the program "60 Minutes", and now it is never mentioned.
They showed an old couple trying to eliminate Al from their diet - no cooking in Al pots, or use of baking powder that has Al in it, or pickles that use Al to give them crispness. They probably never knew that the flu shot had plenty. .

Al is attached to pathogens or piecies of pathogens in many vaccines to make the immune system pay attention to the pathogens. Al inflames the immune system.

It is easy to see that metals can screw up the metabolism by harming the hypothalmus - master of the endocrine system - so we no longer can break down carbohydrates into glucose. Add that to the fact that is what is mainly our diet in modern America --- white flour/sugar, and we just might have a problem. And we find ourselves in the Kroger health food Ise looking for a grain with less carbohydrates.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

September 1, 2012
12:09 PM

Post #9261549

Lol, it sounds like you have enough to research for the next 20 years! I was lucky enough to hear Frances Moore Lappe speak a month or so ago. She was one of my childhood heroines and she happened to be speaking in Fort Worth shortly after we moved out here. She started by looking for a solution to world hunger! She was in Cambridge all those years I was in Boston and I never once bothered to investigate what she was up to in all the years after "Diet for a Small Planet."
Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

September 1, 2012
2:23 PM

Post #9261676

Carrie: ;
I don't have another 20 years-- it is already close to 30 years when this mess began. I was hoping by now to see some people responsible for this mess -- in prison, or at least their careers ruined. Instead they have retired to million dollar homes with beach front property and there is a new generation of crimnals walking the halls of CDC and the NIH. . Time is short! It is short for my family and it is short for my nephew.
Francs Moore Lappe sounds like a good read. - I am glad you got to hear her speak - it is always nice to hear authors of books we like.
Sorry I unloaded so much,--- and forgot to breath : )

I did like your article on quinoa, it had so much information, and answered some questions about it that I had been wondering about .
And glad that Caroline says she thinks we can grow it.

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