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Vegetable Gardening: Sowing Onion seeds now

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JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

August 26, 2012
12:36 PM

Post #9254448

I am going to do a crazy experiment. I have had great luck growing Walla Walla Onions from plants, and now I want more after mine are gone. I bought some seeds, and contrary to all instructions, have sowed some in empty spaces in my pyramid garden. I added some steer manure since I know they are heavy feeders. If they sprout and start to grow, I figure I can pull some up and plant them in deep trays in my greenhouse for the winter. Does anyone have a guess whether I might get anything? I will record progress and time will tell!

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

August 26, 2012
6:34 PM

Post #9254776

Only to say mine sometimes grow though the snow,I don't know where to go any farther with that though.

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

August 27, 2012
5:37 AM

Post #9255121

Keep em watered- we can grow them year round- the green onions- not bulbs- and I usually plant the roots off the green onions that are used for Thanksgiving- root with 1/2" of onion left- after they have lain out a day or so to heal. After 2 yrs they get a bit too old and woody, but the tops are great year round. I think yours will be big enough to set out this spring and look like what you are used to setting out- keep us posted!
JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

August 27, 2012
7:50 AM

Post #9255318

Thanks, kittriana- I love experimenting and trying to fool mother nature! I win some and lose some, but my garden is what keeps me going- I'll be 78 next month- on that infamous day 9/11--both hubby & I have that b'day.

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

August 27, 2012
10:23 AM

Post #9255554

Oh my! Chuckl, double celebrations! My paternal grandparents kept a garden an a few fruit trees till their late 80's. I hope to make it another 20 yrs at least, but they were married something like 70 years. Be careful!
Garden_Sass
Central, TX
(Zone 8b)

September 12, 2012
5:33 AM

Post #9272849

kittriana wrote:Keep em watered- we can grow them year round- the green onions- not bulbs- and I usually plant the roots off the green onions that are used for Thanksgiving- root with 1/2" of onion left- after they have lain out a day or so to heal. After 2 yrs they get a bit too old and woody, but the tops are great year round. I think yours will be big enough to set out this spring and look like what you are used to setting out- keep us posted!


Very Interesting Kittriana...so you take the cut ends from green bunching onions, let them dry a little then plant them back into garden soil? They grow on to produce greens that you then harvest? Do these produce more shoots from the single onion that was replanted or remain single?

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

September 12, 2012
7:36 AM

Post #9272979

First, happy birthdays Jo- belated a day now, how did your seeds grow?

Ummm, green onions simply put more tops out, bulb onions will sprout from the roots like a potato.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

September 12, 2012
7:53 AM

Post #9272992

Google "The Bayou Gardener". Then look for "Growing onions in containers". He did a whole onion growing tutorial from seed-starting in a trough for 12 weeks to transplanting the plants out into his HUGE field.

I'll be starting onion seeds this weekend, and transplanting the plants in 12 weeks or beginning mid-December, and again January 8th.

If the transplants work, I'll be harvesting my own bulb onions beginning June-July.
JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

September 12, 2012
10:34 PM

Post #9273707

kitt, my onions have sprouted nicely-they are about 3" tall now. Gymgirl, I will look at the Bayou Gardener and see if I can use any of it.
Garden_Sass
Central, TX
(Zone 8b)

September 13, 2012
5:12 AM

Post #9273810

I'm trying "bunching onions" for the first time. Any suggestions for a variety that really grows well in central TX?

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

September 13, 2012
8:20 AM

Post #9273960

Zone 8b central Texas covers a LOT of different soils, any hints at where your biggest city nex to you is?
Garden_Sass
Central, TX
(Zone 8b)

September 14, 2012
4:51 AM

Post #9274753

I live close to Bastrop, about 35 miles southeast of Austin. I have loamy soil.

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

September 14, 2012
4:45 PM

Post #9275402

I went to Territorial seeds and found several types of scallions listed, but I got information on day neutral varieties at Dixondale Farms. Don't know which ones I would choose- but that soil is good for onions, Dixondales tutorials are really good for resources and directions,
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

September 14, 2012
9:37 PM

Post #9275658

kittriana wrote:I went to Territorial seeds and found several types of scallions listed, but I got information on day neutral varieties at Dixondale Farms. Don't know which ones I would choose- but that soil is good for onions, Dixondales tutorials are really good for resources and directions,

You CAN grow scallions from bulbing onion seed or plants (Allium cepa), by growing varieties that don't form bulbs in your area or by picking plants early before bulbs form. OR you can plant seeds of one of the many varieties of Allium fistulosum and grow REAL scallions, green onions which if you care for them will make permanent beds like many other perennials.

Some seed companies separate the varieties and identify those that are A. fistulosum. However, not all such identifications of A. fistulosums are correct. For instance, to the best of my knowledge (and following extensive research growing plants out from seed) there are no red-pigmented varieties of A. fistulosum despite the claims of several catalogs (including "Crimson Forest" and "Red Beard"). If someone can prove me wrong, I wish you would - I would love to find a true perennial red-stemmed scallion.

-Rich

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

September 15, 2012
9:48 AM

Post #9275901

Ahh, this is because many are just grown to resemble a scallions habits- and how they grow for that area, why I said I wasn't sure which I would choose- but I wouldn't want a sweet one, I would want one with flavor and zing, but no bitterness,
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

September 15, 2012
9:57 PM

Post #9276362

kittriana wrote:Ahh, this is because many are just grown to resemble a scallions habits- and how they grow for that area, why I said I wasn't sure which I would choose- but I wouldn't want a sweet one, I would want one with flavor and zing, but no bitterness,

Not knowing that area or being familiar with your soils, it's difficult to nail down an exact recommendation.

That said, the perennial scallions I grow here outdoors in the heat and humidity of north-central Florida come from areas in Japan that are roughly equivalent to the middle Atlantic states to New England in climate. In other words, they're tolerant of a wide range of soils and temperatures. Heshiko and Ishikura are both currently growing well and producing green onions I am using frequently in my cooking - and they have been growing in the same outdoor patch now since 2009. There is always one fairly brief period in midsummer when they flower, and I am more careful to avoid mixing the solid, more woody flower stalks in with the leaves when I harvest bunches for stir fries or soups.

I also have several small flats of seedlings that I started LAST OCTOBER (2011) and never got around to planting out (because the ones I already have are still doing so well). They include Guardsman and Shimonita (both from Territorial Seed), and Tokyo Long White and more Ishikura (from Kitazawa Seed) - and they are still thriving (though still very small, naturally) after almost a full year sitting in shallow nursery flats outdoors in full sun with only occasional watering and some liquid fertilizer. I am planning to put them into permanent locations as soon as I have some more space cleared. Assuming they like onions, I cannot understand why any food gardener in a temperate climate would NOT try to keep some of these around.

-Rich

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

September 16, 2012
7:47 AM

Post #9276564

Scallions are one of those things that need a permanent spot- as you've discovered Rich? They are very tenacious at survival- once you have them, takes a lot to eradicate them, but yes, I love them and have them as well as garlic in their own beds whenever I can. Flavor is what I look for...

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