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Recipes: What's for dinner? (Part 36)

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Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


August 27, 2012
7:30 PM

Post #9256397

It's time for a new thread! We came from here: http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1273909/

Thumbnail by Terry
Click the image for an enlarged view.

digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 27, 2012
8:18 PM

Post #9256440

I'm first ! Thanks .
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

August 28, 2012
6:36 AM

Post #9256692

2nd! Also thanks for the new thread.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 28, 2012
12:20 PM

Post #9257154

Yes, thanks for the new thread, Terry.

We made it to Maypop! SO continues to feel better though he is pretty gimpy. It was pouring in Atlanta but cleared up halfway into the drive. I ran out to the garden to pick before the rain let loose. We could see the clouds were chasing us. Came in about fifteen minutes ago and now it is pouring. I'm going to convert some of the pot roast veggies from yesterday's crockpot effort into a Mexican veggie stew over rice and top with coddled eggs and cheese.
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

August 28, 2012
12:32 PM

Post #9257173

And the thread continues...

Thanks, Terry.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


August 28, 2012
3:51 PM

Post #9257475

It's the least I could do considering I haven't lifted a culinary finger since Sunday!

It was an honest mistake - I thought our bunco game was last night, and Mr. Official was off officiating, so I advised the two at-home kids they were on their own. Found out that bunco is tonight; Mr. Official is once again sporting the stripes, so once again, no dinner for those left behind by their ne'er-do-well parents.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 28, 2012
4:03 PM

Post #9257485

For shame ! lol
Edens_Gardener
Clay Center, KS
(Zone 5b)

August 28, 2012
4:04 PM

Post #9257487

Echoing Terry's prior menu, green chili and tamales. Found a bag of cheese/green chili tamales so it's time to use them up. Some sliced tomatoes, avocado for sides. Ancho chilies have not set on this year, but the Anaheim's have been great, so will enjoy them tonight.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

August 29, 2012
8:17 PM

Post #9258897

Dinner was pick up sandwiches. A number of meetings today so harder to throw something together.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 29, 2012
8:41 PM

Post #9258926

Hamburger steak , pork and beans , potatoes in white sauce , acorn squash , salad .

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


August 30, 2012
5:29 AM

Post #9259061

I don't know what's for dinner tonight, but I do know I'm going to be up to my elbows in pears today. A guy we go to church with brought them to me last night - i'm guesstimating I've got a generous bushel, maybe a little more.

Any unusual and/or particularly good recipes or ideas to put them up? I'm planning on making several jars of pear honey, probably some pear butter and preserves (I found one that calls for macerating them overnight first.)

lourspolaire

lourspolaire
Delray Beach, FL
(Zone 10a)

August 30, 2012
6:35 AM

Post #9259098

Hi, everyone.

I feel like having one of my favorite dishes tonight: rice and kidney beans. I'll also grill a pork tenderloin and voilà! A great dinner without fuss. I just finished rubbing the tenderloin with italian spices, a bit of salt and freshly ground pepper. I wrapped it in plastic film and it's sitting pretty in my refrigerator. I'll bring it to room temperature 1 hour before I am ready to grill it. When done, the tenderloin should be pink inside; everything else is either underdone, or overdone. But...Hey, it's your tenderloin and you'll cook it the way you like.

To make the rice and kidney beans:

Difficulty level: easy
Expense: low
Prep time: 15 minutes
Cooking time: 25 minutes
Servings: 4 hungry appetites, plus a bit of a leftover.
Comfort food level: very high.

Start by boiling about 2 cups water. You'll need it halfway through the recipe.

In a large microwaveable container, mix:
1 cup chopped onions, any kind of onion
1 cup celery (if you have leaves, include them in)
2 tablespoons vegetable oil (I use canola oil)
Freshly ground black pepper.

Cover the dish and heat in the microwave at maximum power for 5 minutes.
Mix everything, cover the dish and return it to the microwave.
Cook at maximum power for another 3 minutes.

Add:
2 cloves crushed garlic,
1 can kidney beans (with its liquid)
1 cup real rice (the kind that cooks 20 minutes); Minute Rice doesn't work for this recipe
1 1/2 cups boiling water,
1 tsp salt,
a dash of tabasco.

Mix everything together.
Cover the dish.
Microwave on maximum power for 5 minutes.
Stir everything.
Cover the dish.
Microwave at 40% power for an additional 15 minutes.
Let stand 5 minutes.
Enjoy.

It tastes even better the next day, reheated. I like it so much, I have had just that rice for a meal. I like to add butter to my rice & brown beans. I know: it's bad for me but I like to live on the edge.

Take care, all.
Sylvain.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 30, 2012
7:17 AM

Post #9259134

I just printed that beans and rice recipe . BTW , I just had my cold , from the fridg . acorn squash for breakfast .
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 30, 2012
8:00 AM

Post #9259176

Sylvain, your dinner sounds excellant. I too am a big fan of rice and beans.

Terry, the following is from Nora Carey's, "Perfect Preserves". http://www.amazon.com/Perfect-Preserves-Provisions-Kitchen-Garden/dp/1556704011 The second recipe might be more up your alley though the first is scrumptious and unusual. She gives no processing time in the second recipe. Macerating will make the flavor stronger if you reduce or don't use the juice. It will also allow you to procrastinate. :>)

Poached Pears In Black Current Syrup
2 1/2 C sugar
6 C water
6-7 lbs firm pears
6 allspice berries
3" cinnamon stick
4 whole cloves
Zest of 1 lemon
6 Tbs. black current vinegar ( http://www.wikihow.com/Make-Blackcurrant-Vinegar ) or substitute another flavored vinegar.
6 bay leaves

Dissolve sugar and water over low heat, stirring occasionally.
Peel and slice pears in half, removing seeds and fiber. Place pears in liquid as you work to prevent discoloration.
Add spices, but not bay leaves, in cheesecloth bag. (Actually I leave them loose).
Bring the pears to simmer until soft; around 30-40 minutes or when centers are just soft when pierced with a skewer.
Divide the pears into three hot, wide mouth jars and Add 2 bay leaves and 2 TBS. vinegar to each jar.
Reduce syrup to 5 C and divide among jars adding more vinegar to top off jars.
Process 45 minutes.

Chunky Vanilla Pear Jam
5lbs. pears
Grated zest of 1 lemon
2 Tbs fresh lemon juice
2 qts. unsweetened apple juice or white grape juice*
1 vanilla bean split lenghtwise

Peel and quarter pears then chop in small cubes. Toss in bowl containing lemon zest and juice as you go.
Combine apple juice and vanilla bean and reduce by half. Remove bean and add pears and their liquid.
Bring to boil and cook 30-40 minutes or until jellying point is reached.
Spoon jam into sterilized jars and seal as for jams in similar size jars.
*No sugar is required for this recipe as the reduced fruit juice sweetens the jam.

I started crockpot grits early this morning. There's one last pork shoulder "steak" hanging around. It will go into a garden ragu (we've got tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, yellow squash and zucchini out the ears. The plan is to de-bone and shred the shoulder steak into the ragu and serve it over cheese grits.

We had a Spanish potato omelet (tortilla de patatas) last night. I added peppers from the garden and onions which is acceptable but not traditional. I canned three pints of peppers yesterday...one red and orange habeneros (from last year's international market saved seed), one mixed lemon and jalapeno peppers and one of sliced hot banana and sweet Italian slices for sandwiches. I'm going to be canning tomatoes and making cucumber something-or-other today. There are various cucumber concoctions already filling the fridge. The weather is dark and uncertain.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 30, 2012
8:09 AM

Post #9259188

For you chili pepper lovers, my friend Stan in New Mexico sent me this... He just bought 2 bags of Hatch chili's, 30 pounds each bag. He's canning many of them.

Chili Rellenos Casserole

1 Large Can of Anaheim or use Hatch chilies
Jack Cheese
Spray casserole pan with cooking oil
Layer pan with chilies then layer with jack cheese and one more layer of peppers

Topping for casserole

The ratio for batter is
1 Heaping tablespoon of flour to 2 eggs

You may need 4 to 8 eggs for topping it depends on the size of casserole
Keep eggs cold and whip egg whites to stiff peak then add flour

To egg white batter (when flour and egg white are incorporated)
Add egg yolks 1 at a time to egg white batter
Incorporate all egg yolks and pour over casserole and cook until golden brown and hot.

Cook at 350ºF for approximately 45 Min. to 1 hour

Hatch chili’s have 2 to 3 times more flavor than anahiems

Enjoy this recipe
Stan
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 30, 2012
8:25 AM

Post #9259201

Well Darius , You hit the jackpot with my D H .
He hardly orders anything except Chili Rellenos when we go out for Mexican . I'll get together my peppers next trip to town and suprise him , he will blow you and your friend a hug .
Wish I was in N M to get a fifty pound bag of already roasted peppers . Thanks .

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

August 30, 2012
8:30 AM

Post #9259207

Howdy! Just poking my nose in to see what you all are cooking while I'm on the road this week.

Thanks for the new thread Terry!
Tam

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


August 30, 2012
9:09 AM

Post #9259268

Safe travels, Tammy!

Thanks for the recipes Laurel...I'll look them over before I plunge in. But I've got plenty o'pears, so I suspect I'll have enough to make several different recipes - I just need to get moving, since they aren't getting any younger or firmer :-)

Growing up in SE Colorado (a stone's throw from NM), I adore and crave the Anaheims - they are my favorite pepper, by far. I usually roast, peel and freeze as many as I can, but this year my one Anaheim produced prolifically until the heat wave hit and then a combination of heat and plant maturity seemed to do it in. Maybe the farmes' markets will have some (although they don't roast 'em here like they do back there.

paulgrow

paulgrow
Allen Park, MI
(Zone 6a)

August 30, 2012
10:27 AM

Post #9259354

Terry

Try Pear Butter, recipe in Ball Blue Book.
Use the crockpot, very easy.

Paul

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


August 30, 2012
12:59 PM

Post #9259518

Thanks Paul - I have rough-chopped pears simmering to run through the foodmill and make into pear butter. I think I'm going to change up the spices a bit, with some ginger and star anise, as well as nutmeg and ginger.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

August 30, 2012
7:21 PM

Post #9259930

There is something similar on organic gardening. http://www.organicgardening.com/cook/spiced-pear-cardamom-butter

I love straight canned pears. Peeled, halved, and in a sugar syrup.

Dinner was beef tacos. DH is off the next four days. We'll see if he actually takes the time off or end sup logging onto work. He's been on OT a number of weeks. One of the products got posted last week so there maybe a little down time.

I have shinny yellow spots all over some of my red tomatoes. Anyone know what would be causing it?

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

August 31, 2012
4:20 AM

Post #9260133

Terry, I just cored and sliced and dried my pears in the dehydrator. They're great for snacks and to mix in with hot cereal, or any other recipe that calls for cooked pears. I have one for braised goose and pears which is really good.

Whatever fruit is in season here, I love to grab one and eat it when we take the dog on her walk to get the papers, first thing in the morning. Mostly it's peaches and then pears. Berries don't really lend themselves to that but figs sort of work. I have a few pears still ripening on the porch and then that'll be it, since we don't do apples that well.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

August 31, 2012
6:35 AM

Post #9260244

There is a desert that we make on rare occation. Has pears in it and I think uses almond flour. It's one of those where you slice the pears and pour the batter over it.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

August 31, 2012
6:39 AM

Post #9260248

You did but not alone the lines of what human expectations are on how a greeting goes.

If he's a huge amount of trouble then you might want to pre call 911. Then at least they have a heads up that he's in the area.
Debsroots
Northwest, MO
(Zone 5a)

August 31, 2012
2:22 PM

Post #9260739

Our local grocery store has fresh portabella mushrooms on sale for $1.49 per pound. This is a great buy, so I have purchased 5 pounds and am in the process cleaning out the gills, slicing the caps and dehydrating them. I will use the stems for soups.

Is there a way of canning mushrooms to use at a later date, or can I make cream of mushroom soup and process it in a canner for later use. What about freezing mushrooms...would that also work?

Thanks for any and all help.

MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 31, 2012
2:23 PM

Post #9260741

Susan, re: the above post; must have missed something. The spots are usually caused by stink bugs. Google "stink bugs, tomato damage, photos" and see if that's it. The above mentioned pear tart is a favorite during Passover since the crust contains nut flour instead of grain.

Made a pot roast before we left Atlanta and will make pot roast sandwiches with griddled onions and homemade grain mustard for dinner. We'll have a veggie/pickle/olive platter to go with it. It's hot here (91) and the traffic was terrible coming into the city. It looked even worse going out. I am working this weekend and coming week so needed to be in the city for the holiday.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 31, 2012
2:30 PM

Post #9260749

You cannot can dairy products in a home kitchen and your mushrooms will get funky if you freeze them uncooked. I suggest you cook them, separating the stems from the caps, and freeze them in individual portions, wrapped in plastic wrap. Then place all the mushrooms in a large freezer bag. When you want to make soup or sauce or braise, pull out a packet and add to your recipe. Make the packets smaller than you think you will need. You can always use two if you need more.
Debsroots
Northwest, MO
(Zone 5a)

August 31, 2012
2:31 PM

Post #9260752

Laurel,

I knew you would come through for me.

Thanks so very much.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 31, 2012
3:04 PM

Post #9260788

:)

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 31, 2012
3:34 PM

Post #9260829

Deb, I have canned baby bella mushrooms, just using the USDA guide. I canned mine in half pint jars, and I'm glad I did. The canning intensifies the mushroom taste and one half pint jar was enough for a pot of soup for 2 people. I must say that later when I opened them and made a cream of mushroom soup, it was really superb!

BTW, probably the yellow spots on your tomatoes are specifically the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, or at least that's how mine look. They invaded here from New England 2-3 years ago and were moving west and south. When you cut the infected tomatoes, you will see a hard white area in the outer wall, much larger that the yellow spots on the outside. If there are only 2-4, I cut them out for processing; more than a few and there'd be little tomato left to work with. There is no known remedy found so far for this particular stink bug. http://ento.psu.edu/extension/factsheets/brown-marmorated-stink-bug
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 31, 2012
4:39 PM

Post #9260871

Deb, here is the link to the USDA canning section that includes mushrooms. http://www.foodsaving.com/G4CanningVegetables-VegetableProducts.pdf Darius makes a good point for storing the 'shrooms canned if you plan on using them with their liquid. I think they retain more of their original texture and flavor if they are sauteed and frozen for omelets, quiches, risottos, ravioli etc. I think they are better frozen if they are going into a pasta, rice or potato dish straight up. If they are going into a sauce, the 'shrooms and their liquid would be great if home canned. Think about how you want to use them and try both ways. I always cook mine in olive oil to freeze, even if I use butter to reheat.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 31, 2012
5:14 PM

Post #9260903

There's an alternative: Duxelles, Essence of Mushrooms, cooked into a paste. I like James Beard's Recipe best; he frowns on chopping them in a food processor... he said that alters the texture and flavor, and he just uses butter rather than adding onions, shallots or herbs so they are more versatile for later use. After I made mine (4 pounds of baby bellas), they almost filled an ice cube tray to freeze.

I'd rather NOT depend on my freezer because we often have power outages here in the mountains, but I did freeze these. YUM!
Debsroots
Northwest, MO
(Zone 5a)

August 31, 2012
6:09 PM

Post #9260954

Thanks for the replies, I may try various ways since you are all giving me such great advice.

SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

September 1, 2012
3:57 AM

Post #9261212

Thank you for the information. I did see something yesterday that looked like the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug. We thought it was a soldier bug. It was on the tomato and scurryed away when I went to pick it. I'm not happy reading that it can migrate into the house. Because of a mild winter, we have a lot more bugs then we normally see. With the drought there has been no grass mowing for months now.

On the post, that was suppose to be on another thread so I have no idea how that happened.

Dairy can also be frozen.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 1, 2012
5:11 AM

Post #9261246

What's for dinner ? Nothing . Weekend Gold Miners annual picnic today , ALL day , and sure won't be anything cooked for dinner .

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

September 1, 2012
6:51 AM

Post #9261306

Those stink bugs were first found in Allentown, Pa Just 15min from me. :-( They do get in the house but you have to be careful how you handle them 'cause they do stink when excited or squished. I keep a jar that I scoop them into and then dump into the compost when they are all dead.

Gotta big tomato haul and just got a gorgeous pie dish & casserole dish (Polish Pottery). So I think a tomato pie will be on the menu!

Tam
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 1, 2012
8:14 AM

Post #9261370

I could eat a whole one by myself . One of my favorite things and my maters are all gone . Guess the next one will be made from canned maters . Lucky girl .

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

September 1, 2012
3:44 PM

Post #9261727

We're going to a Pre-Labor Day dinner at our sailing club tomorrow, and I don't know what we're doing on Monday. Tonight we're having some oven-baked organic porkchops that I bought, plus the last of our 2011 sweet potatoes and some of our limas. It's hot outside but nice in here - otherwise that would be too heavy a meal for late August!
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

September 1, 2012
3:54 PM

Post #9261736

I'll keep it in mind about indoors. Looks like I will be picking tomatoes with gloves until I get a better handle on where they are at.

Dinner was Thai Basil Chicken (Gai Pad Grapow) with rice. DH cooked and it turned out really well.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 1, 2012
4:21 PM

Post #9261773

My maters are gone . I stopped and bought some from a neighbor .

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

September 1, 2012
4:23 PM

Post #9261776

I thawed a piece of wild salmon, and picked a few fresh asparagus spears from the garden... but I think I'm too pooped to cook. May just have some Boursin on some Bremner wafers.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

September 1, 2012
5:07 PM

Post #9261826

Sounds like a great meal when you're not pooped Darius!

I am pooped now! I cleaned the barn - the garden will benefit from the compost-to-be that I hauled out today. I am making a variant on the tomato pie. I made the teff tart crust and roasted some of the tomatoes and mixed those in with the fresh. Its in the oven now. And I am starvin' :-)

Tam

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

September 1, 2012
5:10 PM

Post #9261830

Speaking of teff, anyone have experience with using Einkorn?

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

September 1, 2012
6:01 PM

Post #9261878

That's new to me.

The tomato tart was delicious!

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

September 1, 2012
6:55 PM

Post #9261923

Einkorn is an ancient wheat, maybe the oldest wheat. It has 14 chromosomes, and when it naturally crossed with wild goat grass, it maked emmer wheat (with 28 chromosomes). Modern (genetically altered) wheat has 42 chromosomes.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


September 1, 2012
7:14 PM

Post #9261935

Dinner was take-out fetched by my wonderful husband while I peeled, cored and diced the last of the bushel of pears. The last batch of pear honey is roasting; a huge bowl of pears and fresh-squeezed lemon juice and sugar is macerating in the fridge until tomorrow when I'll make pear preserves, and THEN I can really wipe down and mop up the sticky mess that is my kitchen. (I do clean as I go, but there are always the small dribbles and splats that have to wait until whatever I'm canning at the moment is completely done.) I'm thinking maybe chicken salad tomorrow, and then ribs or something for Monday.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

September 2, 2012
4:44 AM

Post #9262083

We use Einkorn pasta. We switched over to it from most whole wheat pastas about a year ago. It's hard to explain why we like it so well. It mostly has to do with blood sugar issues and how good we feel physically after eating it. It's like the grain version of kale for us. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Einkorn_wheat

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

September 2, 2012
7:50 AM

Post #9262262

Darius - I didn't think modern wheat was genetically modified (unless you mean the GMOs of the last couple decades). You can still get modern non-GMO wheat.

I did look up Einkorn but have never seen it though. I'll keep my eyes open for it - sounds interesting.

Tam

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

September 2, 2012
9:06 AM

Post #9262353

Tam, I didn't mean GMO wheat, but all modern wheat has been modified over many centuries.
There's some info on Einkorn here:
http://thedeliberateagrarian.blogspot.com/2012/08/the-deliberate-agrarian-blogazine.html

Amazon carries Einkorn pasta, cookies and wheat berries.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

September 2, 2012
9:33 AM

Post #9262371

Tammy, that threw me, too. Nice to know that that's not what you meant, Darius!
Debsroots
Northwest, MO
(Zone 5a)

September 2, 2012
10:54 AM

Post #9262431

I have made this several times and it is very yummy...of course you can lighten it up a bit by replacing 1 cup of the half and half with 2% milk and adding some cornstarch for thickening.

Roasted Red Pepper Sauce

2 large red bell peppers
2 tablespoons minced garlic
1/4 cup fresh basil
3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2 cups half-and-half
1/4 cup grated Romano cheese
4 tablespoons butter
salt and pepper to taste

Preheat broiler. Grill peppers under the broiler until the skin is blackened, and the flesh has softened slightly.
Place peppers in a paper bag or resealable plastic bag to cool for approximately 45 minutes.
Remove the seeds and skin from the peppers. Cut peppers into small pieces.

In a skillet, cook and stir the garlic, basil, and red peppers in 3 tablespoons olive oil over medium heat. Cook for 10 minutes, so that the flavors mix.

Stir in the half-and-half and the Romano cheese; cook and stir until the cheese melts. Add the butter, and stir until melted. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Simmer for 5 minutes.

Place over your favorite pasta...we use whole wheat to take away some of the negative for using half-and-half :)


Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

September 2, 2012
12:51 PM

Post #9262519

I made a really tasty tomato soup with the roasted sauce. I just whizzed it up with the immersion blender and then thinned it a bit with milk. (it would have been good with a little veggie or chicken stock but I didn't have any handy). All the ingredients (but the milk) were from my garden. Ahhhh... that's eating local.

The roasted pepper sauce sounds good too!

Tam

Larkie

Larkie
Camilla, GA
(Zone 8a)

September 2, 2012
1:44 PM

Post #9262549

Baked/broiled chicken wings glazed in mustard & sf maple syrup.. Roasted jalapeno's..Chicken was marinated in garlic, onion, mustard, lime juice, salt, pepper and paprika.. sprinkled with red pepper flakes before cooking..
Fresh roasted green beans and tomatoes broiled with Feta cheese.



Larkie

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


September 2, 2012
3:09 PM

Post #9262623

Debsroots, Tammy and Larkie, those all sound delish! We're under a tornado watch here - not too worried about it, but this air is so humid you need a machete just to cut a path out there.
Edens_Gardener
Clay Center, KS
(Zone 5b)

September 2, 2012
3:23 PM

Post #9262637

Still 96 degrees at 5:20 pm in North Central Kansas, but no tornado watch here, take care Terry. actually no precipitation in the daily forecast.
Tonight is eggplant Parmesan, sweet corn and a small serving of pasta on the side, Colorado Peaches in peach galette for dessert. Such a short window for Colorado Peaches!

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

September 2, 2012
5:25 PM

Post #9262754

Stay safe!

We had dinner out at a Kenyan restaurant. I had Green gram grains. Really good!

Tam
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

September 2, 2012
5:30 PM

Post #9262757

Terry - I hope it's only a watch and nothing else. Be safe.

Eden - No precipitation in KC either. Amount of rain the last couple of days was close to 6 inches which explains the creeks being high. Love sweet corn and peaches this time of year.

Darius - Did they have flour also?

The soup and sauce sounds lovely.

Dinner was BBQ chicken, pears, baby greens, carmalized leeks with white verjus in a whole wheat tortilla.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

September 2, 2012
6:55 PM

Post #9262842

Susan, I don't remember if the flour they had was from an outside vendor, where the free shipping over $25 wouldn't be valid.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

September 3, 2012
11:46 AM

Post #9263456

We are going up to the lake with our son and little granddaughter; to that end I am marinating some lamb chops in teryaki, sesame oil, and lemon juice and we'll grill them and serve them with tabouli, which is currently soaking in the refrigerator. Then I shall add lemon juice, tomatoes, and cucumbers. And maybe chick peas...

Last night there was a catered dinner at the clubhouse, with chicken, grilled veggies, and ribs. Very good.
kathy_ann
Judsonia, AR
(Zone 7b)

September 3, 2012
11:56 AM

Post #9263468

I'm broadening my horizons , coming here looking for new ideas, as if pinterest wasn't enough for me lol tonight we're having venison meatloaf and mashpotatoes with gravy and zipper cream peas.

tomorrow I'm putting a pork loin roast on with a can of cok e in it, and then some bbq sauce, potatoe salad not sure what else.

We had chili lime chicken tostados the other night,

and for a snack on friday night we had zuchinni and feta balls with tzatziki

Going to spend 3 days at deer camp this weekend, I'll be cooking for me and my husband on Friday night, maybe a couple others, looking for ideas.


I'm thinking about maple mustard glazed salmon one night this week also, need a couple ideas for side dishes.


I cleaned out my freezer yesterday, and had to get in it to finish cleaning it all the way to the bottom, we moved it, then I put everything back in and organized, I actually know what's in there now, ALL KINDS of veggies, greens, zipper cream peas, corn, lima beans, squash, I need to use them. lol and tons of diff varieties of fruit, but I don't have time to do desserts during the week time.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

September 3, 2012
12:02 PM

Post #9263472

Hey Kathy Ann, nice to see you here! Are the deer camp facilities primitive, or is there a cabin kitchen?
kathy_ann
Judsonia, AR
(Zone 7b)

September 3, 2012
1:36 PM

Post #9263561

We have a park model camper set up down there, with electric, , gas, and septic , the whole works, all the comforts of home but the stove is pint sized, lol there is a camp house wiht a full size stove, if I want to use it. Most of the time I choose not to.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

September 3, 2012
1:57 PM

Post #9263576

So that means you can cook whatever you choose... how nice!

I have no suggestions since I'm wrestling with a 3 day menu for relatives coming in a week. Cheddar Corn Chowder for Sunday evening (any leftovers for lunch Monday), and by her DH's request, pinto beans and cornbread for Tuesday night. Just need something for Monday night that's not "soupy". Hard to plan meals for folks you've never met and have no idea how they usually eat.

I thought about local, fresh caught trout for Monday night, but it's been so hot no one's fishing, not even at the higher, cooler elevations. Since they live in New Mexico, I want to introduce them to typical Appalachian local or regional fare.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 3, 2012
3:02 PM

Post #9263634

grilled bbq chicken , bush's bbq beans , sweet cole slaw . Can't get more red neck than that . LOL. Hot pecan pie , with ice cream . (or peach cobbler )

All kidding aside , Darius , hope the company is a treat for you , and cinnamon toast with hot chocolate is a nice breakfast snack .
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

September 3, 2012
3:29 PM

Post #9263657

Go with the chicken or pulled pork. Not everyone likes fish.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 3, 2012
3:41 PM

Post #9263674

My kids don't eat pork . I didn't raise him that way .
kathy_ann
Judsonia, AR
(Zone 7b)

September 3, 2012
3:52 PM

Post #9263687

I use to eat cinnamon toast as a kid. Forgot about that. Even better is toast with nutella. Everything is better with nutella lol
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

September 3, 2012
4:14 PM

Post #9263728

Darius, I would think a squash casserole might be good on the menu and it is tomato season after all. How about a platter of fresh tomatoes and herbs and oil. Are you not doing meat? If you are, you could do buttermilk fried chicken (or tenders) to go with that squash casserole and a plate of fresh heirloom tomatoes drizzled with whatever you come up with. If you're staying veg. you could do grilled tomato and cheese sandwiches with the squash casserole and collards. You could make chicken fried something out of whatever meats (pork? venison?) are in your freezer with white gravy and biscuits. Why are there not black eyed peas, knuckle peas, peas and snaps (available on the southern frozen food aisle of every grocery store if you don;t grow them) on the menu? Pinto beans are not southern. Okay, I'll be there in the morning to cook. lol
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 3, 2012
4:26 PM

Post #9263737

Sure pintos are southern , Laurel , can't get further south than Texas .Season with pork belly , molasses, onion and chili seasoning (I like WM brand best ) , jalapenos .
I have kin north of the Mason Dixon line that eat kidney beans .
Hey Darius , a taco salad would be good made with Fritos and kidney beans .Use fried , drained hamburger , and all the garden things that Laurel suggested .Good for dinner on a hot day .
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

September 3, 2012
4:38 PM

Post #9263750

Pintos are not Appalachian fare, Sally, which is what Darius suggested she was aiming for. Her guests could otherwise eat them in Arizona as they grow pintos commercially there.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

September 3, 2012
6:36 PM

Post #9263909

LOL, good suggestions! Pintos were NOT my choice, but my cousins' DH who was raised in Alabama. Actually I think he just wants the southern-style cornbread, but I'm not sure pintos and cornbread will ever make the menu now that I've given it more thought. Remember, I'm NOT a cook, just someone who likes to cook.

I shelled about half a pound of Cherokee Trail of Tears black beans today, but I need to get out the ladder to pick those above my head. They could possibly end up on the menu (if I have enough) since they are local to the Southern Appalachians, but not likely. Breakfasts will be a choice of buttermilk biscuits and sausage gravy, or applewood smoked bacon, grits and eggs if I can get some fresh eggs. Early apples are in, so side dishes of fried apples are in.

I may end up doing chicken and dumplings if I omit the pinto beans. Cornbread goes with anything I'll serve for supper. (Yeah, I know y'all have dinner at night... but here in the mountains, dinner is midday and supper is at night.)

I have apple butter, pear butter, and numerous jams and jellies to go on biscuits, plus pickled beets, pickled cauliflower, pickled rhubarb stalks and even pickled garlic buds and scapes (although mine are all lacto-fermented) as side dishes and condiments.

This message was edited Sep 4, 2012 8:31 AM

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


September 3, 2012
8:23 PM

Post #9264071

We didn't do ribs tonight, but we did have pork chops, pasta and some green beans. I'm thrashing for menu ideas for the rest of the week. Every time I ask my family what they want,they groan and say they don't know. So if they don't know, neither does the cook...pfffft.

Glad you found your way here, Kathy Ann! Have fun at deer camp!
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 4, 2012
6:15 AM

Post #9264330

My favorite breakfast is three fried very light with biscuits ,grits ,sausage gravy on the side .Darius , I wish I was there too . Can't get any better than chicken & dumplings . That's one of my standard stand by's for hurry up . Always works, and easy .
I'm starving now .
I hate to think of you up on a ladder . Do be very careful or better yet get someone else to climb it . Hugs

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

September 4, 2012
6:26 AM

Post #9264341

we are having "Lena;s Chicken" ( very good italian cook)and light version of pasta alfredo.I have made this for showers, after wakes or for picnic. A win every time.

Chicken pieces, salted, spritzed with OO or kept quite moist ( not dried with p towel) rolled in italien bread crumbs with grated parm added, dot with butter or OO and baked for about 1 hr. Can be served hot, room temp or cold.

The original recipe called for the chicken to be rolled in warmed butter rolled in crumbs and baked. We watch our fat intake.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

September 4, 2012
6:28 AM

Post #9264342

Darius - The meals you have planned sound good. BTW - I add herbs to the biscuits when I make chicken and biscuits. It always adds another flavor level.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 4, 2012
6:29 AM

Post #9264344

I'll be trying that , Helen

This message was edited Sep 4, 2012 8:30 AM
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

September 4, 2012
6:31 AM

Post #9264348

Dinner is my version of a chicken pot pie. chicken post pie with twice the veggies, no dairy, and topped with herbed spoon biscuits. DH request from this weekend.

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

September 4, 2012
6:49 AM

Post #9264359

your own italien bread crumbs" add finely chopped basil (I am oregano sensitive - so no here) finely chopped flat leaf parsley, salt ,pepper, sweet paprika (the hungarian in me) tyme, optional. And grated imported parmesan cheese.

We get the chicken at the small town butcher (fresh from the farm) or I use "Murphy's" or "Bell Evans"

I thought I'd share.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

September 4, 2012
12:50 PM

Post #9264747

We had an early pick up today for Second Helpings, our food redistribution project. I've been up since 4:30 a.m.. Spent the last few hours preparing the first section of the wedding table toppers for quilting. It's ready to mount on the frame. Trouble is SO is building me a new frame and he's off woodworking. Can't complain; too tired to stitch. Maybe a power nap will help. Another good excuse...it's raining.

I got a veggie pot pie at Whole Foods this morning. We have never bought a made one, or made a bought one for that matter (okay I'm beginning to blither). I was thinking I might try to remove the top and jazz it up or maybe add Parmesan to the top crust. I'll make a salad. That's all I've the energy for.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

September 4, 2012
3:47 PM

Post #9264904

I made a short run to Sam's down in Bristol today for paper goods and kitty litter. On the narrow road back to my neighborhood, I spotted a tiny veggie stand, honor system. That woman usually has one all summer, but not much this summer. (I'm thinking they are seasonal residents.) Anyway, I bought 2 hefty butternut squash, 50¢ each, 5 nice sized tomatoes for $1, and 5 yellow crookneck summer squash for 5¢ each. That helps take the edge off the imported Parmesan I picked up in Abingdon after a stop at the farmer's market!

I'm going to section a tomato or two, add EVOO and basil... and maybe the 4 asparagus spears I picked a few minutes ago. I don't normally get a second cutting of asparagus because I seldom cut the stalks down this early, but I had the man doing the weedeating 2 weeks ago hack them down. I just might do that again next year!

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

September 4, 2012
3:58 PM

Post #9264920

If you have been making (or contemplating) tomato pies, this savory Tomato Cobbler may interest you.
http://eatingfloyd.blogspot.com/2012/09/cooking-floyd-tomato-cobbler.html

BTW, Floyd is a small town about an hour and a half from here. I might have looked at property there of I had been aware of it.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

September 4, 2012
4:32 PM

Post #9264960

DD and her SO go to Floydfest every year since they met. http://www.floydfest.com/ It's like southern Woodstock. His undergrad degree is from VA Tech. and they both play banjo. They meet up with lots of musical friends for a weekend of camping, dancing and old time music. They love the area. I love Staunton.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

September 4, 2012
4:36 PM

Post #9264966

I haven't been in Staunton in years, but what I remember couldn't hold a candle to Floyd.
kathy_ann
Judsonia, AR
(Zone 7b)

September 5, 2012
4:17 AM

Post #9265454

You got a bargain Darius. I didn't think they had those type of road side stands anymore. I remember them as a kid. Butternut squash is wonderful. You got a bargain!
kathy_ann
Judsonia, AR
(Zone 7b)

September 5, 2012
4:18 AM

Post #9265456

Sorry I said that bargain thing twice. Lol. I didn't think I was getting old but not really sure.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

September 5, 2012
8:10 AM

Post #9265684

Here's a blip on "modern wheat" that was hybridized in the 1960'd and 1970's... before GMO gene slicing.
http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-505269_162-57505149/modern-wheat-a-perfect-chronic-poison-doctor-says/
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

September 5, 2012
10:11 AM

Post #9265822

SO is going to grill a petite fillet and I am making a kitchen sink veggie and cornbread casserole. Salvaging older veggies.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

September 5, 2012
3:43 PM

Post #9266158

Dinner is left over potpie. I think next time I will be 4x the veggies. At 2x I'm still complaining there is not enough veggies in it. It's the best part and rest of it is not bad either.

Fall seeds are sprouting. We still need to get a row cover on yet.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


September 5, 2012
3:59 PM

Post #9266188

Last night was chicken and noodles over mashed potatoes. It wasn't fall, but it sounded good. Tonight is one of our catch-as-catch-can nights, so there are leftovers and other tidbits to munch on. Tomorrow night is probably meatloaf, sides TBD.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

September 5, 2012
4:34 PM

Post #9266216

I've got an old pork chop from my freezer diving on the stove plus new sweet potatoes in the oven. Had the tomato pie for lunch. :-)

Tam
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 5, 2012
4:48 PM

Post #9266243

Had crock pot BBQ steak , leftover sides, sliced tomatoes

Larkie

Larkie
Camilla, GA
(Zone 8a)

September 5, 2012
4:56 PM

Post #9266251

I am having my fill of fresh boiled peanuts..They are still hot.

Larkie
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

September 5, 2012
5:05 PM

Post #9266264

Darius, your farm stand visit sounds like a real find. We used to love to visit the farm stands in our 'hood. They too are honor systems in the can.

I did want to comment on the veggie pot pie. Huh? Must have missed something. Ten bucks for a ten inch pie filled with corn, peas and little square carrots. Obviously frozen fare whether organic or not. I was expecting mushrooms or maybe peppers or squash and herbs. Maybe something interesting. It was bland. If you judge a pot pie by being able to slice and serve in solid sections that one is a serious contender. It had so much flour added to the sauce component that nary a bit runs out from the sides of the crust. Really a starched pie. :) On the plus side, the dough was buttery. I added a lot of Parmesan to that top.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

September 5, 2012
5:27 PM

Post #9266302

What a shame that the veggie pot pie was such a disappointment. I would have expected better from Whole Foods!

We used some of the smaller crabs in our freezer tonight for red gravy over linguine. They were good but messy, and the sauce was out of this world. With it I served grilled veggies - zucchini, peppers and tomatoes. DS and DGD were here to enjoy it with us. DGD had her first varsity tennis game today but they were rained out partway through.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


September 5, 2012
6:40 PM

Post #9266393

I picked up a package of frozen puff pastry sheets today with the intent of making a hearty (but not sliceable!) chicken pot pie next week - I had a single-serving at Jason's Deli, and they used a square of puff pastry for the top, and I was pleasantly surprised by it, so I figure I'll give it a whirl in a homemade version. I also picked up a good-looking chuck roast to prepare this weekend. I don't care what the calendar or thermometer say, I'm ready for fall weather :-)

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

September 5, 2012
6:45 PM

Post #9266399

Terry - I made individual pot pies with puff pastry & they were fabulous! I used 14oz ramikins. Will be curious to hear how it works for you!

I use the other sheet for a roasted tomato tart. I brushed the pastry with honey mustard and topped with roasted cherry tomatoes & carmelized onions and a sprinkling of parm cheese. Those were a huge hit at a recent dinner party.

Tam
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

September 5, 2012
7:13 PM

Post #9266430

You can also use a tin with large muffin forms for individual pies. Tam, the roasted tomato and onion tart sounds awesome.
gardenglory
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 9a)

September 6, 2012
7:05 AM

Post #9266830

I buy the puff pastry shells. I just cant tell you how we love creamed chicken in them. Once you get the creamed chicken, you can add any veggies, make it like chicken a la king, whatever. Its clearly fattening fare, but that creamy sauce with the layers of crisp pastry, just yummy.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

September 6, 2012
7:28 AM

Post #9266849

I don't dare go there. lol

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

September 6, 2012
11:41 AM

Post #9267134

I use a ton of veggies - mushrooms, onion, garlic, onion, carrots (sometimes red bell pepper) and thicken with cornstarch. And chicken of course. (I don't use a lot of meat). Filling in the bottom of the container with a topping of puff pastry. The topping has more calories than the body of the dish does! But it does add flavor & texture that's really nice.

Tam
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

September 8, 2012
4:15 AM

Post #9268702

We leave out the thickener and cream. Carrots, peas, onions, celery, parsley, and chicken with a whole wheat, buckwheat, rosemary, and thyme drop biscuit on top. I do throw in a small amount of butter as flavoring with the peanut oil that I use to saute the veggies. The veggies end up slightly carmalized in the baking process.

The roasted tomato pie sounds very good. Did you top the pastry after you took it out of the oven?

Dinner last night was shrimp boil with a tomato-basil salad and a red quinoa, carrots, onions, broth & herbs side dish.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

September 8, 2012
4:34 AM

Post #9268710

BTW - I started last night making our own shrimp boil spices. Does anyone have a recipe that they use?

gg - the crab dish sounds good.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

September 8, 2012
1:06 PM

Post #9269087

We made a grilled eggplant, grilled pepper, tomato, and basil sandwich today. It was very good.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

September 8, 2012
1:37 PM

Post #9269114

Because I'm always curious about the origins and uses of foods, I found this interesting...

The history and science of meringue
http://boingboing.net/2012/09/04/the-history-and-science-of-mer.html
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

September 9, 2012
2:21 PM

Post #9270031

Darius, thanks for sharing the link. Great article. We love meringues. I usually make them once a year, for Passover, when we entertain a lot but can't eat most grains. They make the perfect desert with fruit compotes or custards made without starch thickeners. I needed a lot of egg yolks for several tiramisu desserts this past year and had a lot of whites in the freezer. While stuck for a dessert assignment for a pot luck I flashed on those egg whites and made a zillion meringue cookies; chocolate, almond and pecan. They disappeared fast.

My mom made the most memorable mile high lemon and key lime pies ever! Freshly squeezed lemons and key limes with lots of zest. Wish I had her baking talent.
Edens_Gardener
Clay Center, KS
(Zone 5b)

September 10, 2012
5:11 PM

Post #9271309

Looking for inspiration, weather says mostly summer, mind says "ready for cool weather recipes". Meal is "low-country shrimp boil, sliced tomatoes, Colorado Peaches" What else sounds good???
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 10, 2012
5:38 PM

Post #9271338

Chocolate cake and Icecream. Or just make a smoothie out of the peaches and ice cream . I love ice cream best in winter .I had my share of it this summer.
How about cottage cheese with it ? Makes a nice salad , add sliced bananas.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

September 11, 2012
4:39 AM

Post #9271685

Last night I made broiled trout, but since I only had 2 for the 3 of us, I pan-fried a couple of catfish filets dipped in buttermilk then cornbread for my cousin's DH. I made zucchini-tomato "towers" (http://appalachiantoalpine.blogspot.com/2012/09/cornmeal-crusted-zucchini-and-tomato.html), fried green plantanos, string beans with home cured/herbed salt pork for flavoring, and a pan of cornbread. Yummy, and my cousin but especially her DH, were happy campers

Tonight it's chicken and dumplings. They leave in the morning heading back west, while I also leave to go up to UVa for more medical appts.
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

September 11, 2012
4:52 AM

Post #9271695

Made some Bison encheladas last night - no left-overs.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

September 11, 2012
10:33 AM

Post #9272023

Darius, sounds like you kept your guests well-fed and happy. Hope it was a nice visit! And good luck with the medical appts!
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

September 11, 2012
12:09 PM

Post #9272075

Edens, I've been thinking cool weather recipes but trying to stick to lighter fare. Mean time, gumbo, drunken chicken http://germanfood.about.com/od/meatbasedrecipesandmenu/r/drunken-chicken.htm and beef burgundy, come to mind.

Last night was the annual Atlanta Orchid Society pot luck and orchid auction. I was assigned a side dish and made farfalle tossed with roasted cherry tomatoes, Marconi peppers, and garlic from the garden. Tossed the pasta and veggies with grated pecorino and a chiffonade of basil.

Youngest son is coming for dinner tonight. SO is grilling NY strips. I am making garlic and rosemary roasted fingerling potatoes and a salad with gorgonzola/yogurt dressing.
Edens_Gardener
Clay Center, KS
(Zone 5b)

September 11, 2012
2:59 PM

Post #9272221

Laurel, thanks for the ideas. I copied the Drunken Chicken recipe to my files. Sounds good.

Susan, you asked earlier about the shrimp boil spices, here is one that is very similar to Zatarain's ingredients with the exception of the cloves,

This recipe is from from Emeril Lagasse's "Real and Rustic Cookbook,"
Emeril's Seafood Boil Seasoning Mix
Yields: 1 cup
1/4 cup mustard seeds
3 tablespoons coriander seeds
2 tablespoons whole allspice
2 tablespoons dill seeds
1 teaspoon whole cloves
6 small, dried red chilies crumbled or 1 tablespoon crushed red pepper
8 bay leaves
Combine all of the ingredients together in a jar. Cover and shake well to mix.
When ready to use, place in a square of cheesecloth, draw up the corners, and secure with kitchen twine. Add this bag to the pot of boiling water.

MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

September 11, 2012
3:22 PM

Post #9272258

We had drunken chicken for one night of Hanukkah. It is a traditional Germanic dish. I used a large (Costco size) family pack of chicken thighs for the recipe. There were lots of leftover thighs, sauce and veggies to store. I froze two thighs per container with veggies and sauce. SO complained that it was not enough to eat only one thigh but boy did he change his mind. It is rich. We ate a container this past week. It seems to only get better. The chicken is dredged and then sauteed. There is a bit of a mess to start, but the ease of cooking the assembled dish in a large crockpot and then freezing the leftovers made it a very worthwhile preparation. I would have served what came from the freezer this past week, and prepared last December, to company.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


September 11, 2012
5:20 PM

Post #9272414

I snubbed my nose at the 80-plus degree temps and made a pot roast last night. Tonight was Tuesday, so we had tacos with meat and beans and all the trimmings.
Edens_Gardener
Clay Center, KS
(Zone 5b)

September 12, 2012
5:47 AM

Post #9272856

As time passes we find ourselves eating smaller quantities, so your notes on the drunken chicken are helpful. Thanks for sharing.
kathy_ann
Judsonia, AR
(Zone 7b)

September 12, 2012
6:08 AM

Post #9272878

LOL Terry I cooked a pot roast last night too , I often find myself cooking winter foods in the summer months.

That zuchinni tower looks delicious!

I guess left overs for supper tonight, I'm not feeling very creative this week. lol

Although either chicken & dumplings or chicken/dressing sounds divine!!
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 12, 2012
6:24 AM

Post #9272889

I have a large pork roast in the slow cooker with B B sauce on it as posted by Herbie43 a year or two ago . Be good pulled pork for everything .
BTW , where is Herbie ? He just disappeared . I went to his profile page and a lot of his threads are closed , mostly about his beloved Ava , grand daughter . Also just says the day he signed up , nothing about how long he's paid to . What gives ? He had some great recipes to offer .
gardenglory
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 9a)

September 12, 2012
6:37 AM

Post #9272902

I miss him and all the family pictures and food too.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

September 12, 2012
8:13 AM

Post #9273004

Herbie took his wife on a trip to France and told everyone he was no longer going to post. I think they were moving to another area after their trip. No one that I know of has heard from him since then.

Laurel, how long do you cook the Drunken Chicken in the crockpot? The recipe calls for top of the stove cooking. It looks really good, though.

Larkie

Larkie
Camilla, GA
(Zone 8a)

September 12, 2012
8:17 AM

Post #9273008

I have seen some post from his on the other site..
gardenglory
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 9a)

September 12, 2012
9:49 AM

Post #9273075

I was wondering about that, I cant figure cubits out and ATP doesnt have anything to do with cooking. Glad to hear he is still posting someplace.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 12, 2012
9:57 AM

Post #9273081

Welllllll, , , He needs to come back
gardenglory
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 9a)

September 12, 2012
10:12 AM

Post #9273104

Well it just took me about 10 seconds and I found the cubits, how ironic, 1st post up today was herbie 43 posting a recipe for citrus chicken.
Twin lakes chef was right there too. Back to see who else.

whoops, that was july. still we know he is ok and off to check again

This message was edited Sep 12, 2012 12:15 PM
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 12, 2012
10:17 AM

Post #9273110

Now I need to get into cubits . . I google and it wants to teach me how to add and subtract .
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

September 12, 2012
10:18 AM

Post #9273112

Leslie, mea culpa on the drunken chicken but I never timed it. I think it was around eight hours. When the chicken was fork tender in the crockpot it was done. I have a six quart oval roaster crock pot. Made a raft of veggies on the bottom and then a double layer of chicken. Then deglazed the pan, adding flour to brown a bit and then the wine. Adjusted seasonings. Poured the sauce over the chicken. I recall adding a little extra wine to top the chicken. The house smelled divine. I did not use the bacon.
gardenglory
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 9a)

September 12, 2012
10:19 AM

Post #9273113

I typed in cooking cubits, he is in cooking divas, but if you go to the home page it list them all.
gardenglory
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 9a)

September 12, 2012
10:20 AM

Post #9273114

Rachel Ray made drunken chicken just the other day and it looked so good. I actually put wine on my list.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

September 12, 2012
10:31 AM

Post #9273119

Beschwipst means "drunk" in German and huhn means "hen. I think the name Beschwipster is a play on words as in if beschwipst = drunk, beschwipster = more drunk.

I used onions but not leeks and regular all purpose flour.

Larkie

Larkie
Camilla, GA
(Zone 8a)

September 12, 2012
11:46 AM

Post #9273176

cubits.org
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

September 12, 2012
12:24 PM

Post #9273193

Made pot roast for Monday night dinner. Included carrots, sweet potatoes, apples, onions, parsnips, etc. Turned out well and we've had left overs.

SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

September 12, 2012
12:25 PM

Post #9273194

FYI I understand the new owners get a little testy about the new site getting traffic directed to it.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


September 12, 2012
12:55 PM

Post #9273221

SusanKC wrote:FYI I understand the new owners get a little testy about the new site getting traffic directed to it.


Well...the not-so-new owners (it's been almost 3 years now) aren't any more likely to read every single forum post anymore than the previous owner(s) were.

As far as Melody and I are concerned as the site admins, our stance is what it always has been: we don't care if someone mentions another site as long as they're not tooting their own horn. But using one website's membership to actively promote another website or recruit members is just plain bad manners, and that is what caused the most heartburn and heartache for us.

Personally, I'd rather we stick to food talk in this thread :-)


digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 12, 2012
2:15 PM

Post #9273295

Your right Terry ,about sticking to cooking . Asking about a loved member from the past , I didn't think anyone would care . I could have sent him a dmail but was afraid he might have passed away and no one to answer . I never go to the other place , I don't understand why anyone would .
Thanks for the heads up on help . You know who you are .
Back to cooking , I dropped some sour mash in my crock pot B B Q and it gave it some extra flavor . My D H won't miss it (I hope).
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

September 12, 2012
3:40 PM

Post #9273365

LOL on the sour mash, Sally. Hope it didn't come from that pile of corn husks our neighbors have on the empty land behind our pond. Don't say.

The three of us only managed to eat two NY strips last night so I am using the last one to make steak and cheese sandwiches with caramelized onions and peppers from the garden. I've got an open jar of homemade BBQ sauce if that moves me at the moment. We have pickled beans for a side.

I'm with you, Terry. Down with heartburn.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 12, 2012
5:06 PM

Post #9273422

Black label Jack

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

September 12, 2012
6:30 PM

Post #9273479

We had friends over to help us crush grapes for DH's wine. They worked hard and we fed them well afterwards: cantaloupe, crabs from our river, linguine with white clam sauce - clams caught by DH, grilled veggies, and ice cream for dessert. For the linguine I used some of the liquid from the crab pot and added it to the pasta. It was super. Our friend said it beat any dish he'd had in expensive restaurants in Cape May, so I was pleased. And the grapes are all crushed and in the barrels! Very productive day.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


September 12, 2012
7:14 PM

Post #9273523

digger good choice - did he miss it?

Yum on the clams and linguini!
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 12, 2012
8:45 PM

Post #9273639

No , he didn't even look at the bottle when he poured his nightly toddy . Course I was diverting his attention while he poured, so he got a little too much in the glass . LOL Everything was super good . I'm kidding of course , as long as I left him enough for his toddy , he wouldn't care if it was all gone . He could buy more tomorrow .
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

September 13, 2012
8:30 AM

Post #9273969

I agree I would rather stick to cooking topics. Yes the heartburn issue is my version of what testy is. BTW - I really hate the quote box. It's like typing everything in caps and it comes across that way.

Dinner last night was left overs from Red Snapper a modern asian restaurant. http://kcredsnapper.com/

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

September 14, 2012
5:27 AM

Post #9274784

Good Morning... I don't remember when I last posted, but my company has come and gone, hopefully feeling well-fed. I left on Wednesday morning before they did, as I had several medical appts. up in Charlottesville. Our last meal together was Tuesday evening, chicken and dumplings. I used Paula Deen's chicken and dumpling recipe but just for the dumplings, which were more like little half-inch squares of spaetzle and light/fluffy. For dessert I made a Grits Pie.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

September 14, 2012
7:40 AM

Post #9274908

Hope you passed your tests with flying colors, Darius. It did indeed sound like your guests were well feted. I've made grits souffles before but never a pie. Does it have a crust?

Due to the overabundance of cherry tomatoes I find myself roasting multiple trays of tomatoes several times weekly. I've discovered a method that works best for me. Toss tomatoes in olive oil and smashed garlic with a sprinkle of kosher salt, roast at 350 degrees an hour before bedtime. Turn the oven off and leave them until the next morning. I've tried the very slow, low method but this works equally well and uses a fraction of the fuel.

Last night we had a goat cheese pizza with lots of roasted tomatoes, mushrooms, caramelized onions and grilled peppers. Some red pepper flakes. Roughly chopped spinach was mounded over the veggies. The spinach pizza mountain was drizzled in garlic and oil and topped with a hefty amount of pecorino. Ahhh! I'm going to have leftovers for lunch.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 14, 2012
7:57 AM

Post #9274927

That pizza makes me hungry . I know ,,,I have leftover chic and dumplins in the fridg .
How do you make your dumplins , Darius ? I use self rising flour a little extra salt , milk , and let them set five or ten minutes to puff up before dropping in . Fluffy good .

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

September 14, 2012
9:35 AM

Post #9275020

Sally, these dumplings were just AP flour, salt and ice water. Roll out to 1/8", let rest a few minutes, then cut in 1" strips, pull off 1/2" pieces into the boiling broth.

Laurel, the Grits Pie was basically a custard made with grits, baked in a pie shell. I could have done without the pie shell, but it wasn't a homemade one either. I cut the recipe sugar by 1/3, and didn't eat the grocery store pie shell. To me, they are as bad as dried parsley... bleck.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 14, 2012
12:33 PM

Post #9275182

O K, only difference is I use milk and S Rising and drop by t-spoons . Thanks
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

September 14, 2012
1:36 PM

Post #9275220

Darius, so it's a sweet pie. The souffle I make is a grits and egg custard with herbs and spices of choice and grated cheddar. I layer the grits with roasted peppers and onions, sometimes roasted tomatoes and fill a buttered spring form pan. Then I add extra cheese to the top and bake until set. Makes good reheats and can be sliced and fried like polenta. The ribbons of veggies between the layers are pretty.

I roasted tomatoes last night and SO has returned from the garden with another grocery bag filled with tomatoes. Oy!

SO is going to smoke a tritip. I've had enough meat for the week. Think I'll stick to a salad and maybe a taste of the meat.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

September 16, 2012
12:00 PM

Post #9276731

I found these chick pea and spinach patties at Costco that are just great. I'll be figuring out how to make them at home, lol. They're falafel-ish in flavor. Having those, an as-yet-undetermined starch, and a salad.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

September 16, 2012
12:19 PM

Post #9276745

Tonight, at sundown, begins the Days of Awe, also known as the High Holy Holidays. It starts with our New Year. We are having a traditional roasted chicken with herbed potatoes and carrots. I am making roasted tomatoes stuffed with spinach, onions and breadcrumbs. A round challah, instead of an elongated one, celebrates the life cycle (circle). Apples and honey for a sweet year.

As always, I will not be social networking during the holidays. We spend a lot of time in synagogue and end the period with a twenty four hour food and water fast for Yom Kippur. That will start at sundown the 25th and go through sundown on the 26th. Will see you all after the 26th.

L'shana tova (A good year)
Laurel
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 16, 2012
1:39 PM

Post #9276800

See you then
I need to go to Cosco . It's so far away in Atlanta . I keep hearing about it .

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

September 16, 2012
1:46 PM

Post #9276816

Sounds good, Celene... might try some myself (homemade, no Costco here).

Laurel, enjoy the holidays!
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 16, 2012
1:49 PM

Post #9276820

Ha ha , Darius , you have a lot more energy than I do .

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

September 16, 2012
3:39 PM

Post #9276908

Happy New Year Laurel, I've enjoyed these high holidays with friends. Have a good year.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

September 17, 2012
3:43 PM

Post #9278114

I'm back from another week of business travel.

Enjoying the last hurrah of the summer garden too. I made a zucchini pie, roasted tomato w/onion & kale cream sauce w/whole wheat pasta & a peach cobbler. The peaches were not good but worked just fine in the cobbler.

Tam
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 17, 2012
6:00 PM

Post #9278237

Had tuna salad with boiled eggs , fresh frozen peaches , canned pineapple slices , cottage cheese , cheese , sliced tomatoes on the side , sprinkled crutons on the top.' Nuff left for sandwiches tomorrow .

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

September 17, 2012
6:13 PM

Post #9278259

I made brisket, challah and torta di miele e mela for my family, they had dinner long before I got home from work. DH and I had spinach salad with warm mushroom and onion dressing, a sprinkle of candied pecans and some veggie bacon and challah.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 17, 2012
6:54 PM

Post #9278303

I love a few candied pecans in my green salad .

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


September 18, 2012
3:23 PM

Post #9279208

Celene, that sounds really good.

Laurel, I hope you have a peace-filled and joyous holiday

We will probably have stroganoff tonight...it will be just Middle Son and me. Swimmer Girl has dinner plans, and Mr. Official is working late (budget cycle is never pleasant.)

Tomorrow night I'm trying a new parmesan/mesquite chicken salad using pre-cooked mesquite chicken breasts. Thursday night might be "Philly cheesecake" stuffed green peppers. We like stuffed bells, but the beef cheese and 'shrooms will be a decidedly different twist on the usual. (This is what happens when I peruse Pinterest for recipes :-)

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

September 20, 2012
8:52 AM

Post #9281049

we had meatloaf with mushrooms, carrots and peas and mashed potatoes. Fam loved it as they don't cook such old fashioned meals.

Thumbnail by helenethequeen   Thumbnail by helenethequeen   Thumbnail by helenethequeen      
Click an image for an enlarged view.

gardenglory
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 9a)

September 20, 2012
9:29 AM

Post #9281094

Do you cover the meatloaf with flour before you cook it to thicken the sauce as it goes? When do you add the mushrooms?

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

September 20, 2012
9:50 AM

Post #9281104

yesterday:1+ lb ground pork, 1/2+ lb ground sirloin (that is what is used here for burgers and was left over)
2 slices of good italian bread (dry crumbs ground in food processor - not bread crumbs), chopped onion, chopped parsley 1 sm clove of garlic, salt pepper to taste, 1 egg. Make dough shape into a loaf coating it with flour. shove in the oven bake at 350 for about 1 hr and 10 min.uncovered

in meantime saute mushroom with chopped onions, or scallions some parsley (i love parsley) until soft. add boullion cube and 1/2 C water and thicken with some flour. Set asside.
Sometimes I cook the mushrooms in some cream of mushroom soup. But here we are organic at my DD house.than just top themeatloaf with this is very good also

when meatloaf is about 1/2 hr in oven scrape some of the brown residue with some water added, stirr in the mushroom mix. and bake another 1/2 hr or so. Nice and tight no need to use loaf pan. Delicious grilled the next day or served as sandwich.
for fancy set some hardboiled eggs in center of the loaf very pretty


This message was edited Sep 20, 2012 11:53 AM
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 20, 2012
10:53 AM

Post #9281193

That looks like a GOOD meatloaf . I sometimes make a long groove down the center , fill with sharp cheese , close the gap and cook like that with cheese in center.

Larkie

Larkie
Camilla, GA
(Zone 8a)

September 20, 2012
10:58 AM

Post #9281196

Lots of times I fill the center with cheese of choice & sliced dill pickles just for a different taste..I always use oatmeal instead of bread... I almost always have a tomato based topping on our meatloaf.. Now y'all have me wanting a meatloaf sandwich.. Guess I will have to get busy and cook one tonight..Those mushrooms look delicious too..

Larkie

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

September 20, 2012
12:28 PM

Post #9281260

oh oh hidden cheese on top does sound good.

No, oat meal too dense plus had too much of it as a kid as breakfast rationing. in school in Europe after the war. Oatmeal only in fruit cobbler,crumble.
But than the sky is the limit in each household. But we do learn from each other

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

September 20, 2012
2:03 PM

Post #9281335

I'd love me a meatloaf sammie with a nice slice of sweet onion on it. I haven't made meatloaf in ages. Might be a good idea for dinner one of these nights. Not tonight though, I've got a chunk of salmon thawing. What's a good quick sauce for salmon??
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 20, 2012
2:06 PM

Post #9281338

Lemon pepper white sauce is good .

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

September 20, 2012
2:30 PM

Post #9281355

... with some capers?

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

September 20, 2012
2:54 PM

Post #9281370

Mmmm that sounds good.
gardenglory
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 9a)

September 20, 2012
4:04 PM

Post #9281420

Lemon and capers are totally sympatico in my book.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

September 20, 2012
4:15 PM

Post #9281428

And fortuitously I had both on hand. That is not always the case...

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

September 20, 2012
4:16 PM

Post #9281429

Me, too. I often make chicken picata using them.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 20, 2012
4:32 PM

Post #9281443

Is it just me , but capers are like eating salt tablets soaked in vinegar ? What do they taste like to the rest of you ?

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

September 20, 2012
5:28 PM

Post #9281493

LOL, maybe you should rinse them Sally.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 20, 2012
6:27 PM

Post #9281533

Is that the secret ?If so , I'll try a bite or two on salad .It could be I'd like them .
Anchovies do the same , can't eat them either . Don't think you could rinse them . lol

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


September 20, 2012
8:18 PM

Post #9281627

digger, I like a few in my chicken piccata and other Italian dishes, but I don't eat huge quantities of them. Then again, I struggle with olives - similar issue with the saltiness. (But that's a food aversion that came from eating too many green olives in one sitting when I was a kid.)

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

September 21, 2012
5:39 AM

Post #9281864

I crave salty foods like capers or olives. Anchovies, not so much.

I've been reading through this discussion and now I want a veggie pot pie. I think I'd like broccoli, lunghi di Napoli squash, carrot, celery, onion, mushroom, mmmm. The Viet store by my house always has exotic mushrooms for less than the grocery store sells regular white mushrooms, so maybe some fancy mushrooms in there.
gardenglory
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 9a)

September 21, 2012
5:43 AM

Post #9281868

I bought my first tin of anchovies last night. I too love salty things, but tried anchovies on a pizza and they were to strong fishy wise. Rachel Ray seems to love to melt the anchovies in olive oil with garlic, she lets them totally cook down. Swears you dont taste the anchovy, it just makes for a salty taste. We shall soon find out.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

September 21, 2012
6:26 AM

Post #9281899

I love many salty things but I simply cannot eat the common pimento-stuffed green olives. (The one exception is slicing a few into picadillo when I make it, maybe because it's traditional and the taste is different when cooked.) I buy Kalamata olives usually once a month, and occasionally the tiny Niçoise olives when I can find them. I love foccacia layered with chévre, thyme, roasted red peppers and Kalamata olives.

My favorite green olive is the Castelvetrano olive, but they don't keep nicely (bright green) for long. My favorite natural foods' store carries Kalamata and Castelvetrano olives in bulk, much cheaper than the olive bars in grocery stores.

I also like anchovies (esp. in a Caeser salad), but discovered a long time ago that the fishiness taste depends on the brand (as in how they are processed and what storage medium). More costly ones are generally (but not always) better quality. A little goes a long way...
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 21, 2012
6:30 AM

Post #9281904

Tell Rachal that there is a thing called a salt shaker that will do the same thing , then she won't have to melt them down , or spend the extra money . Duh .
I need to restrict salt anyway , so I don't push it .
I do crave sweets .
All your combinations sound so good , except the salty .
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 21, 2012
6:33 AM

Post #9281906

I do love all olives , just go easy on the overly salty ones . Our little town is too far away from Atlanta to get a lot of the foods that aren't "common"
gardenglory
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 9a)

September 21, 2012
7:05 AM

Post #9281932

well your missing out on one of the best combos of all sweet and salty. YUM
As for the salt shaker, we are far to 'close' as it is. I had a major breakthu this month and swithched from margarine to smart balance low sodium. I could eat a half stick of fleishmans margarine on just about anything. No other brand tho. Dont like butter. Ive spent a fortune over the years trying to get off that margarine. I dont know what made me pick up that smart balance low sodium, but it was a life changer and hopefully saver for me. Not to say I will bake with it, however. The taste buds are certainly interesting little 'things'

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

September 21, 2012
7:14 AM

Post #9281938

There is anchovy paste in a tube made by Reese, in Morocco, which isn't bad and allows you to just add a small amount to sample the results. I like the brand, and it's better than opening a whole tin and wasting a portion of it.

Larkie

Larkie
Camilla, GA
(Zone 8a)

September 21, 2012
8:15 AM

Post #9281999

I love any sweet and salty combo.myself, with anchovies being the only exception I can think of.. Have tried a few different brands and had them in restaurants.. Just fishy to me..But then again, I do not like fish & tried all kinds, cooked all ways.I love the following recipe for olives and cheese.These are so good and so easy..You can take out 2 or 3 to cook or a pan ful.

Olives en Croute

2 cups
(8 ounces) grated Cheddar cheese
1-1/4 cups flour..Can also use Baking mix, such as Jiffy or Bisquick
1 stick butter, melted
About 40 pimiento-stuffed olives, drained


Work the cheese, flour and butter together to form smooth dough. Mold about 1 teaspoon of dough around each olive and shape into balls. At this point you can freeze the balls on a cookie sheet, then transfer to a plastic bag for indefinite storage in the freezer..Bake at 350 degrees until golden brown..


Larkie
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 21, 2012
9:57 AM

Post #9282108

That sounds good . Might fix that for a Christmas snack.

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

September 21, 2012
12:16 PM

Post #9282279

I do similar with sausage meat and walnut inside.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

September 21, 2012
12:20 PM

Post #9282283

Uh,
Does anyone besides me add some evaporated milk to the meatloaf mixture? I find that the meatloaf comes out extra juicy that way, and not at all dry. Once the evaporated milk is added, don't work the meat too much (sort of like overworking pancake batter and getting tough and chewy vs. light and fluffy)...

Linda

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

September 21, 2012
12:41 PM

Post #9282302

No, but I soak bread in milk, then squeeze out the excess before adding it to the meatloaf mix. I just bought some from the butcher today, you made me want meatloaf sandwiches.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

September 21, 2012
12:46 PM

Post #9282306

Meezersfive,
I've done it that way before, too.

I think they're making a LOT of us want meatloaf today!

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

September 21, 2012
1:30 PM

Post #9282332

we used to soak the bread in water/milk and than squeeze dry and add to meat. But since there is water added to the meats ( that should not be allowed)i do the dry crumbs of day old bread and it comes out nice. i do the same for meatballs holds the meat dough together nicely.
meatloaf is such a comfort food to some.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

September 21, 2012
1:43 PM

Post #9282343

Well, now I think I should make a meatloaf...haven't made one in years. Don't know if I have enough ground beef in the freezer, though.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

September 21, 2012
1:53 PM

Post #9282352

Then, "Happy Meatloaf Weekend" to you, one and all!

(Friends of the Meatloaf Band) ^:-)^^:-)^^:-)^^:-)^^:-)^
gardenglory
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 9a)

September 21, 2012
2:05 PM

Post #9282358

I mixed one up and have it ready to put in the oven tomorrow. Im not sure if we will use it all for sandwiches or have some mashed potatoes
with some. My husband would vote for all sandwiches, I go for it with the veggies and potatoes. Perfect for the first day of fall.

Larkie

Larkie
Camilla, GA
(Zone 8a)

September 21, 2012
2:40 PM

Post #9282385

Gymgirl,

I do.. My grandmother and Mama did, so I do. Evaporated milk makes it so moist.

Larkie

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

September 21, 2012
3:32 PM

Post #9282425

i too vote "Happy Meatloaf Weekend" LOL. and Happy many ways to make it.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

September 21, 2012
4:38 PM

Post #9282464

A last blip on anchovies... An article on anchovies in the NY Times says "the vile anchovies that are strewn on pizzas all over America really are vile. Good imported anchovies can be delicious, potent, sweet and saline all at once."

The whole article is an interesting education on anchovies, and using them in recipes.
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/02/18/dining/a-little-fish-much-maligned.html?pagewanted=all&src=pm

ps, it also says The only product to avoid completely is anchovy paste. It is made with the lowest grade of anchovies and really saves no time. It is almost as easy to take a few anchovies and pound them to a paste with a mortar and pestle.

This message was edited Sep 21, 2012 6:40 PM

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

September 21, 2012
5:17 PM

Post #9282506

Time to upgrade my anchovy larder. The shrimp recipe sounds delicious!

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

September 21, 2012
5:26 PM

Post #9282517

Yeah, me too!

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

September 21, 2012
5:28 PM

Post #9282520

I use it with a pretty light hand, so I haven't noticed anything awful about it...but of course, as soon as I get some really good ones, I'll be spoiled for life.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

September 21, 2012
5:47 PM

Post #9282539

Trying some "good quality" foods over the years has spoiled me for a number of foods I relished when I was younger, LOL.

I'm not really a foodie, but once having a taste of truly top quality foods there's no going back (except when I have to really pinch the pennies). Top quality doesn't always mean expensive... just look at home-grown tomatoes and salad greens as examples.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

September 22, 2012
4:27 AM

Post #9282791

The other day when I made linguine with clam sauce for friends, they were surprised to see me throw a tin of anchovies into the pan. I never even mash them first; they disintegrate in the sauce and just add depth to the flavors. You don't even know they're there. I also use Thai fish sauce if a crab or clam sauce lacks punch.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

September 22, 2012
5:44 AM

Post #9282822

Farmer's market deal of the day: Meat CSA that someone didn't pick up, that I helpfully offered to take :) It includes a bison chuck roast. I know it's lean...I know it needs to be braised or some kind of moist heat...what do I do with it?? I don't have any clue what it tastes like to know how to serve it or what to serve with it for sides?

I also have six bison burgers, which I will probably freeze, chicken halves, chicken chorizo, stew lamb, and eggs. Not a bad haul!

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

September 22, 2012
5:59 AM

Post #9282839

Celene,
Talk to Bubba_MoCity about the bison roast. He knows all about bison roast, having owned a successful buffalo burger established that hosts an annual bison roast night


Linda

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

September 22, 2012
6:29 AM

Post #9282870

Well, he sounds like the right guy!! Thank you!

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

September 22, 2012
11:24 AM

Post #9283140

Celene, what a great haul! I'd use the bison the way I'd use a venison chuck roast, or even a grass-fed beef chuck roast. Any kind of braising with wine and maybe mushrooms and/or onions would work well.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

September 22, 2012
1:42 PM

Post #9283211

Great haul, Celene!

gg, what's the green bean you grow? I'm thinking of trying a couple of different ones next year.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

September 23, 2012
4:49 AM

Post #9283694

Darius, I love Fortex pole beans but they succumbed to some sort of virus this year and I didn't get a lot. Now I'm looking for a variety that's resistant to mosaic bean virus. I think watering overhead rather than bothering to lay down drip irrigation contributed to the problem, though. There's also a purple pole variety that's really good - Trionfo Violetto. That had a really nice flavor, too.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

September 23, 2012
5:04 AM

Post #9283699

I grow Trionfo di Violetto as well, but mine just dried up this year--no rain for two months :(

I did the roast like I would a beef chuck roast: Browned it in the pan, then threw in some sliced onions to brown, deglazed with beer, added some beef stock, and after 3 hours, some carrots, celery and mushrooms. Served with cheddar/chive mashed potatoes, green beans and whole wheat rolls. The meat-eaters liked it.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

September 23, 2012
10:44 AM

Post #9283963

Sounds good, Celene.

I liked Trionfo di Violetto because it was so easy to see the beans among the foliage, and it also had a very nice flavor.
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

September 24, 2012
6:10 AM

Post #9284679

For those inquiring minds that want to know:

Bison is lean, but not as lean as ostrich or emu.
Today's commercial herd is grass raised in HUGE pastures with plenty of water and shade, so there is no "gamey wild" flavor.

Y'all are a bunch of "foodies" so you know that freezing breaks down the cell walls of meat, tenderizing it, however, please thaw before cooking.

For patties - hot & fast is my recommendation. About a minute on the first side @ 450f, flip and repeat, then one more flip and watch the juices that rise. When they change from red to clear - pull that pattie - the internal temperature just hit 140 and will continue to cook, but all the juiciness is still in there. BTW: NEVER mash a burger - it removes the natural juices and will give you a dry burger. Personally I hate what I call "jerky burgers".

For roasts or short-ribs: Low and slow, but first, season and/or marinate, then brown all sides in a very hot cast-iron skillet.
I have a couple of large electric roasters, so after browing each piece or small batch, I place them in a roaster. Set on 275f and it will be ready in a few hours. When roasting, I usually quarter cut and use potatoes, onions, carrots, celery, garlic, bell peppers (all colors) as a base or rack for the meat - if I use the roaster rack, it goes in first, so the veggies are partially supported, too.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

September 24, 2012
6:26 AM

Post #9284694

Thanks, Bubba, just what I needed. I used a Le Creuset casserole for my roast, so it was "low and slow" but not in an oven--on the stovetop.

For the burgers, I was planning on serving them with sauteed balsamic onions and mushrooms for moisture. I knew the trick about not smooshing the burgers, why does everyone *do* that??

I've cooked emu several times, I was just worried because this was a more pricey chunk of meat.
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

September 24, 2012
9:14 AM

Post #9284880

So --- how did the bison roast turn out?
.
I have used a pair of cooking appliances in the past. If the roasts are small (3-5#), I season and wrap them in maple cured bacon, tied with cotton butcher twine, then use a Showtime rotissarie for 2.5 - 3 hours. Every 30 minutes I stop the rotissarie and remove the drippings. The go into a turkey roasting pan in the oven @250 with the cut veggies. I am able to get 2 of the small roasts on the spit, and for the traditional Chrisrmas party usually did 4-6 roasts, so it was an all day cooking affair. As each spit was done, I would allow it to rest for a few minutes, then crack off the bacon - it was nothing but char. The nice thing about doing it that way was all the bison meat was not burned. Then I would add those roasts to the oven pan and start another set on the spit.

Of course, doing that inside would mean that we would have roast smells in the house for a couple of days even with the downdraft vent running full speed.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

September 24, 2012
9:19 AM

Post #9284884

Mine wasn't dry-roasted, and DH has issues with cholesterol so I have to be careful about stuff like bacon, that's why I picked the moist heat. I don't eat meat, so I can't personally tell you, but everyone liked it.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 24, 2012
9:47 AM

Post #9284922

I was given two slaughtered emus in exchange for cleaning a third one for a man that raised them . He was getting out of the business . . NEVER AGAIN . 'nuff said .

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


September 24, 2012
12:33 PM

Post #9285027

We have eight emus for neighbors. I have stood eyeball to eyeball with them. I'm not about to try wringing their neck...
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 24, 2012
3:17 PM

Post #9285252

Protect your eyes . He slaughtered them when I went to town to get zip locks . Those buggers can bite .

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

September 24, 2012
6:04 PM

Post #9285381

Emus are unpleasant birds personality-wise. Though if someone was trying to kill me, I'd probably be grumpy, too.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


September 24, 2012
7:34 PM

Post #9285468

Our neighbors seem to like me. Or maybe they just like my rotten tomatoes :-)

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

September 25, 2012
2:26 PM

Post #9286231

I think the eyelashes are just hilarious! Oops! I mean alpacas!

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

September 25, 2012
2:32 PM

Post #9286234

The eyelashes on her neighbors? Or her neighbor's alpacas...hee hee hee
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 25, 2012
4:57 PM

Post #9286333

Alpacas are beautiful .

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

September 25, 2012
7:23 PM

Post #9286443

A DG friend who lives about 45 miles away gave me a half-pint of a Kimchee she just made. I've looked at recipes, and jars of it in Asian stores, but never haven gotten around to tasting any. She says she altered the recipe so it's not fiery hot.

We'll see...

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

September 26, 2012
5:08 AM

Post #9286624

Oh, I love kimchee. I've got a jar of it in my refrigerator right now. We started getting it when our Korean daughter arrived as a 3 1/2-year-old, and have been eating it ever since. But once her tastebuds got acclimatized to Western food she thought it was too spicy!

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

September 26, 2012
5:10 AM

Post #9286627

Darius - I've had kimchee a few of times and never thought it was fiery hot. I hope you enjoy it!

I've got a lot of butternut squash and am looking for recipes other than soup & sweet dishes. I'm trying a stew tonight with lentils and chickpeas. Any ideas welcome!

Tam

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

September 26, 2012
5:13 AM

Post #9286631

You are so lucky! I love kimchi, my aunt used to make the veggie version for me, super-hot and no fishy bits. Never, ever let the dog steal kimchi, the gas will kill you. Even she was embarrassed.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

September 26, 2012
5:25 AM

Post #9286641

Tammy, you can use them to make gnocchi, you can dice the flesh and roast it with some olive oil, salt, pepper and cumin (or whatever). It also makes fantastic ravioli filling, or you can cook a halved squash like a twice-baked potato. You can use them in any baking recipe that calls for pumpkin. If I'm ambitious and looking for a nice presentation, I slice the whole squash into rings, peel the rings, and roast them with stuffing.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


September 26, 2012
5:52 AM

Post #9286661

October is almost here, and there's a hint of fall on the air for most of us. Time for a new thread:

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1281737/

You cannot post until you register, login and subscribe.


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