What's for dinner? (Part 37)

Murfreesboro, TN(Zone 7a)

Looks like it's time for a new thread. We came from here: http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1277503/

Tonight is a pot of chili. I'm trying to stock up on some reheatable things the guys can nosh on for the next several days (Swimmer Girl and I are headed off on fall break on Friday).

So what's cooking at your place?

Thumbnail by Terry
So.App.Mtns., United States(Zone 5b)

Tam, I posted a recipe for a butternut chowder 3-4 years ago on the recipe forum here. Butternuts are my favorite winter squash, and this recipe was terrific! I'll see if I can find it.

Missouri City, TX

Finally bout ready to plant the fall/winter garden - and attend as many Oktoberfests as we can.

Dahlonega, GA

I'm in limbo trying to get ready to leave for Tex . Johnny's boy in hosp, and trying to leave by next Wed . . May have to just go by Lindas house to pick up fall plants to put out on the coast . The boy will be ok . Just going to have to make up his mind to take better care of his diabetic diet .
A big pot of chili sounds good , or a big pan of sausage and jalapeno cornbread . Meal in one .

Northeast, PA(Zone 6b)

I made a slow cooker stew: squash, chickpea & lentils. An Eating Well magazine recipe. Was very good.

tam

So.App.Mtns., United States(Zone 5b)

Tam: Trust me, it's fabulous! I had exceptionally good organic smoked bacon, which I think added a LOT.

Butternut Squash Chowder
From the Abingdon Farmer’s Market near me, when a culinary school had a booth...

Serves 6

1/2 pound smoked bacon, diced small
1/2 cup onion, diced small
2 tablespoons garlic peeled and minced
1/2 cup celery. Diced small
1 cup carrots, peeled and diced medium
1/2 cup flour
1 bay leaf
2 cups butternut squash, peeled and diced medium
1 cup sweet potatoes peeled and diced medium
3 cups chicken stock (I used canned chicken broth)
1/2 cup red bell pepper, diced small
1-2 tablespoons fresh thyme
1 cup heavy cream
salt and pepper to taste

In a large sauce pot with 1 tablespoon of oil, render the bacon on low heat until crispy.

Add carrots, onions, celery, garlic bay leaf and sweat for 5-10 minutes. Do not brown vegetables.

Season with salt and pepper. Add flour to make the roux, and cook for 2 minutes.

Add chicken stock and bring to a boil. Reduce to a simmer and add squash, sweet potatoes, red bell peppers and thyme. Simmer for 20 minutes or until squash and sweet potatoes are tender. Use a stick blender and mash about half the vegetables for a creamier soup, optional.

Add heavy cream and simmer for another 10 minutes. Adjust seasonings and serve.

Variations: You can add corn, shellfish, tomatoes or any other vegetable you like. (I wouldn’t… it’s fabulous as it is!)

So.App.Mtns., United States(Zone 5b)

For those of you who like cukes, this showed up in my mailbox... recipes for dried cukes as chips, when you have processed enough pickles!

http://ruralspin.com/2012/09/26/3-recipes-for-dried-cucumbers/

Northeast, PA(Zone 6b)

With those ingredients, it couldn't be anything but delicious Darius! Thanks. Saved off to my recipe file.
Tam

Southern NJ, United States(Zone 7a)

That butternut squash chowder looks really good. Tam, would you like my recipe for squash and mushroom lasagne? I made it once and it was wonderful; I'll make it again this winter. We served it as a main dish when we had another couple over, had it once ourselves, and brought the leftovers to a friend's house as a side dish.

Butternut Squash & Wild Mushroom Lasagna

Ingredients:
Mushrooms:
1/2 ounce dried porcini mushrooms
3 tablespoons olive oil
3 large garlic cloves, minced
1 1/4 pounds assorted mushrooms (chanterelle, oyster, shiitake, portobello), coarsely chopped into small pieces
-- Kosher salt and ground black pepper, to taste
2 tablespoons minced parsley
Bechamel:
3 1/2 cups whole milk
2 garlic cloves, smashed
1 bay leaf
2 sage leaves
4 tablespoons butter
4 tablespoons flour
1/2 cup reserved porcini soaking liquid
-- Kosher salt and ground black pepper, to taste
Squash:
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 cup chopped yellow onion
3 cups 1/2-inch diced butternut squash
1/2 cup fruity white wine
1 1/2 tablespoons minced fresh sage
-- Kosher salt and ground black pepper, to taste
Assembly
1 pound fresh pasta sheets, boiled for 2-3 minutes if package requires
11/3 cups grated Gruyere cheese
1 cup grated Parmesan cheese
-- Fried sage leaves (optional)

Instructions:
Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

For the mushrooms: In a small bowl, cover the porcinis with 3/4 cup hot water. Let soak for about 15 minutes, then strain, reserving 1/2 cup of the porcini liquid for the bechamel. Chop the porcinis and set aside.
In a large saute pan over medium heat, heat 1 1/2 tablespoons of the olive oil until hot but not smoking, and add the garlic. Saute for about 2 minutes, until the garlic is fragrant, then add half of the mushroom mixture, including the porcinis. Saute, stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are softened and slightly browned. Season to taste and set aside. Repeat with the remaining oil and mushrooms, then add to the reserved mushrooms and mix well. Add the parsley, toss to combine, and set aside.

For the bechamel: in a small saucepan over medium-low heat, warm the milk with the garlic, bay leaf and sage leaves until just about to boil. Remove from heat, cover and let sit for about 20 minutes, to infuse the milk.
After the milk has been sitting for about 15 minutes, melt the butter in a medium saucepan over medium heat and add the flour all at once. Whisk for about 3 minutes, until the flour is completely combined with the butter. Pour the milk through a strainer into the roux, add the porcini liquid and heat the sauce slowly, letting it simmer and whisking often, until the sauce has thickened, about 20-25 minutes.
Season to taste with salt and pepper, then remove from heat and set aside.

For the squash: In a large saute pan over medium-high heat, heat the olive oil until hot but not smoking. Add the onions and the squash all at once and saute, stirring occasionally, until the onions are softened and the squash is starting to caramelize, about 10 minutes. Deglaze the pan with the white wine and let cook until completely evaporated, about 3-5 minutes. If at this point, the squash is still not cooked, add 1/2 cup of warm water and cook until evaporated and squash is softened, repeating as necessary. Season to taste and stir in the minced sage. Set aside.

For assembly: Oil a 9-by-13-inch baking dish. Pour 1/2 cup bechamel in the bottom of the dish and spread evenly. Cover with pasta sheets, cutting as necessary so that 1 layer of pasta fits uniformly. Pour another 1/2 cup of bechamel, then layer with 3/4 cup of the mushroom mixture and 1 cup of the squash mixture. Sprinkle over 1/3 cup of the Gruyere cheese and 1/4 cup of the Parmesan. Repeat two more times the exact same way, then cover with another layer of pasta. Spread the remaining bechamel over the top, then sprinkle with the remaining Gruyere and Parmesan cheeses.

Cover loosely with foil, and cook in the 350° oven for 30 minutes. Remove the foil and continue to cook until bubbly and golden, about 15-20 minutes more.
Let stand for about 15-20 minutes before serving.
For a more festive look, garnish with fried sage leaves. (You can use uncooked sage leaves and add them during the last 15-20 minutes of baking.)

Nutrition Information:
Per serving: 460 calories, 19 g protein, 43 g carbohydrate, 23 g fat (10 g saturated), 81 mg cholesterol, 295 mg sodium, 5 g fiber.
Course: Main Dish
Yields: Serves 8-10

Northeast, PA(Zone 6b)

Ah ... I have that recipe in my stash! I just looked at it when saving away Darius'. I'll need to give it a try this weekend. Thanks!

Tam

Floyd, VA(Zone 6b)

Hi everyone. I'm a lurker here from time to time. Darius, I think I'll have to try that butternut squash chowder one of these days. Sounds delish! This summer I made summer squash and corn chowder several times, so this will be something for the fall and winter season.

Martha

So.App.Mtns., United States(Zone 5b)

Hi, Martha... glad to see you here! I am actually thinking to make that butternut chowder for our Thanksgiving get-together. I made a cheddar corn chowder for the RU this summer and it seemed to go over well.

Floyd, VA(Zone 6b)

Darius, sounds like a wonderful idea for the Thanksgiving get-together. I've been mulling over ideas for that weekend as well.

Martha

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

I'm back and it's good to be here. Been trying to catch up on the threads. This year was a difficult fast. Still a bit woozy. I think I didn't drink enough water going into the fast on Tuesday and I was too sick to eat much of anything by sundown Wednesday. I'm feeling so much better now but thought I was going to pass out during services yesterday afternoon. After being in synagogue and starting the fast the night before last, and there all day yesterday, we did not break fast until sundown.

We have brisket that was made pre-holiday and will be eating some tonight. I am still not very hungry.

Murfreesboro, TN(Zone 7a)

Glad you're on the mend, Laurel - that doesn't sound like fun at all! I'm in the throes of packing for our trip - we're headed to NYC tomorrow evening.

Southern NJ, United States(Zone 7a)

I haven't fasted since I was a teenager; it's too hard for me to go without food. Sounds like it didn't work very well for you this year, Laurel; sorry to hear about that!

We are heading for France for about three weeks shortly, so we're up to our eyeballs in last minute chores and preparations! So much to do to get the place ready for the fall and winter before we leave. We'll have someone there taking care of things, but we can't expect them to deal with any major crises so we're trying to crisis-proof the place as much as possible! We pulled the docks and boat in, DH has made his fall wine, and we butchered 18 cockerels the other day. We had planned to leave them in with the rest of the chickens while we were away so they'd put on an extra one or two pounds, but we discovered that they were piling up just inside the automatic door and were forcing some of the hens to stay outside overnight, so they had to go.

I made braciole with brown gravy and egg noodles last night; haven't felt like any real gourmet efforts with everything else that needs to be done!

Dahlonega, GA

Don't feel guilty G G . It's take out or snacks the last few days before our trip for the winter . When I get the kitchen cleaned and all the dry groceries packed , don't even think of dragging something out to eat .By the time I get the plants wintered in , packed , things I'm taking to leave there , fridge cleaned out , freezer food separated to carry or to leave (last minute job ), dogs bathed ,then I can sit back and let him pack into cargo trailer .Who's cooking ? Not Me .

SE Houston (Hobby), TX(Zone 9a)

Digger,
What's the new arrival date?

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

You ladies sound super busy. Where are you going in France, Leslie?

We are having either veggie/bean burritos or egg and veggie burritos for dinner. We are still up to our ears in peppers and tomatoes.

Southern NJ, United States(Zone 7a)

End of this month, Laurel. We're visiting two sets of friends and I'm bringing pharmaceuticals and goodies from King Arthur for one, and a pepperoni and some other stuff for another. It usually takes us several days to decompress once we get there, though; there's so much work involved in getting the place ready, like Digger says, and ours is only for a few weeks!

My tomatoes have succumbed to early blight, all except the currant type and some volunteers. We still have peppers but not that many.

Dahlonega, GA

G G , we're down to leaving for sure next Wed morning . I have to stop by my mothers grave for a visit , in Farmerville La . Probably Thursday afternoon . That will put us in Houston sometime Fri . It might be best to leave the plants on the porch . We have our numbers to keep in touch . If I see it's Sat , I'll call in time to see if you'll be around .
This has been a real hassle the last three weeks . So easy to come through Mobile . I also have a sister I haven't talked to in 22 years , I doubt if she will make the trip from N Little Rock to see me , but am trying to play it cool . Just bear with me , please . I sure would like to see you all . If all else fails , we might be able to make a trip to Houston when the pecan harvest comes in . Kill two birds with one stone . I'll give you a call sometime Friday to see if we can touch base , love to see you , and Johnny wants a hug .

Northeast, PA(Zone 6b)

Sounds like a wonderful try Leslie!

We had salmon patties for dinner - left over salmon from last night. With a nice glass of wine. Was not an easy week at work!

Tam

Longboat Key, FL(Zone 9b)

dinner tonight: SIL is meat (DD doesn't do cooking VP for ATT and works late) making grilled chicken breast.

I am Vegetable: Potatoe slalad, no mayo. Garnished with scallions. I don't incorporate fresh onions when I know there will be left over as the onion is not a good choice for 2nd day. And fresh string beans in Tomato
(we still get fresh at the farm) and canned garbanzola. They love this combo. Make salad with this combo too.

Thumbnail by helenethequeen Thumbnail by helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL(Zone 9b)

tidbit: we get 'Ramapo Tomato" at one of the farmers stands. it is so delicious.

It was introduced by Rutgers University as the perfect NJ Tomato.And it is.
However it moved away from the sommercial growing window, but interest is rekindled through Rutgers efforts and perhaps it will show up in many supermarkets????Somehow I remember reading that the seeds were actually brought back from Israel and regrowing has started..

Northeast, PA(Zone 6b)

I gorged on several BLT sandwiches for dinner. It hit me that the last tomatoes are coming off the vine so it'll be a long wait for my next one. I love the Kellogs Breakfast tomato. Delicous, prolific and tough. The bacon was from a local meat processor who makes wonderful lean (for bacon) nitrate free bacon.

Tam

So.App.Mtns., United States(Zone 5b)

Tam, I think there's no such thing as "nitrate-free bacon"... most processors that claim nitrate-free use celery juice instead, which is high in nitrates (and of varying/unknown amounts of nitrates depending on the celery).

I cure my own bacon, and prefer to use the commercial "pink salt" because it has a known (measured) amount of nitrate. Besides, nitrates are found in most of all the veggies we eat!

ps, I'm NOT trying to start an argument, LOL, just voicing my opinion. BLT's sound good with either choice of bacon!

Northeast, PA(Zone 6b)

Oh no! I did not know that Darius! I'll have to investigate. I've read that nitrates are now thought to play a part in Alzheimer's. As it breaker down the blood/brain barrier to allow deleterious chemicals into the brain. And Alzheimer's runs in my family. At least I don't have it often!

Tam

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

Actually, any bacon that is not cured is nitrate free. Trader Joe's and Whole Foods carry uncured bacon. Does it taste like "bacon"? No, bit it is nitrate free. If you otherwise don't have cured meats as your primary protein source I don't see the issue with nitrates. As Darius says, they are a part of the food we ingest. Now that we have all learned recently that the rice we eat may contain high levels of arsenic are we giving up rice? We'll also have to give up apples and other fruits/veggies with a propensity to take up arsenic from the soil.

We had a veggie soup made with saved beef stock(s) last night. One of the stocks contained smoked meat so the flavor was fantastic. Even though we know smoking is carcinogenic we love to live on the edge. :>) There was grilled corn, garden mustard, soybeans and other interesting goodies, both fresh and freezer ferreted, contained within. I also cooked a huge batch of short grain brown rice earlier in the day and made a mound of rice in the middle of each soup bowl before adding soup. I've got lots of brow rice to use during the week. Tonight we are having homemade pizzas and a Greek salad.

Longboat Key, FL(Zone 9b)

my Sister in law still has a old old fridge converted in a smoker and this bacon from this contraption is nitrate free and very flavorfull as she uses garlic in the brining part of ham/beacon. also smoles homemade hungarian sausage....OMG I am time dating myself - I am ANCIENT

Northeast, PA(Zone 6b)

Interestingly, it appears uncured is the same deal Laurel. Found a few citations including a Cook's Illustrated article from 2010.
But I also found in my quick research (as in 30min at most) vegetables contain nitrates as well. There is probably a difference between nitrates in veggies vs what we get in processed & cured meats but that's for another day. :-)

I am going to try fermenting garlic. I'll try it in humus I think.

Tam

So.App.Mtns., United States(Zone 5b)

BTW, new research in the last 10 years indicates Alzheimer's is Diabetes 3... do a search.

Murfreesboro, TN(Zone 7a)

Dinner for us was a ny strip cooked by a chef on a 1400 btu flame. It was extremely tasty. The fact we walked most of 5th avenue and crisscrossed the southern half of central park might have made the food taste wonderful, too. Tomorrow we will visit wall street and the 911 memorial then catch a broadway show.

Northeast, PA(Zone 6b)

Terry - that sounds like a wonderful day in NY! Do you know what show you're going to see?

Murfreesboro, TN(Zone 7a)

Tonight we will see wicked. It's rainy here in NYC which makes the trk to the theater a little less fun but we won't complain too much.

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

Terry, sounds like you girls are having lots of fun despite the weather. Eating NY strips while in NY is, well, so NY (though you could have eaten Delmonicos). You could even eat Delmonicos at Delmonicos.

Helene, I told SO about the fridge smoker which led to reminiscing when fisheries would smoke marlin, etc. dockside on Miami beach/S. Miami. Well to clarify what you meant about "dating myself", it was when fridges were all metal. Since I recall, it must date me as well. I recall that was around the time I had pet trilobites.

We are dining on previously made and frozen empanadas topped with fresh tomato sauce and cotija cheese, a chopped salad and sauteed Mexican zucchini. I can't tell a difference in their flavor but they are often less expensive at our market. They are shorter and fatter than regular zucchini. The theme here is to winnow down the larder(s) before Thanksgiving though we are strongly weighing going to D.C. for the holiday.

Northeast, PA(Zone 6b)

I had a really simple dinner - scrambled eggs & a green salad. (more grazing then composed dinner).
Tam

SE Houston (Hobby), TX(Zone 9a)

I love eggs, any time of the day!

Dahlonega, GA

No cooking here . Kitchen's clean and food packed . Catch up Sat or Sun.

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

Pork shoulders were $1.19 a lb this week at Kroger. An 11 pounder landed in my basket. I trimmed out the fat while butchering four pounds from the blade for lean sausage. Ground and made sixteen, Southern style, breakfast sausage, 1/4 pound patties (that's too many adjectives, I know but I eliminated the "large" lol). We eat them one at a time with big salads, either on giant homemade biscuits or tortas, for dinner so that's eight meals. The remaining butt got messaged with salt, pepper, garden oregano, cumin, garden garlic and chipotle in adobo and spent the night in the crockpot. I woke at 1:30 a.m. to unbelievable aromas wafting up the staircase. The crockpot contents got packaged into four containers for pulled pork burritos. Three went to the freezer.

We had cheeses and artisinal bread, garden tomatoes and pickled beans and cucumbers with olives last night. I'm making carne asada con papas tonight. We won't eat since we had Thai for lunch but I had to cook the meat. I had yellow curry and coconut milk vegetables and SO had Panang curry chicken.

Northeast, PA(Zone 6b)

Great deal Laurel!

I made a crockpot full of squash/lentil stew at the request of my DH. Was very good.

Tam

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