SOLVED: ID Gardenia Species By Leaves?

Summerville, SC(Zone 8a)

Can you identify the species of gardenias by leaves? I was lucky to get two gardenias at a local swap. They are probably two different species because the leaves are so different .. I'd really like to know which ones they are so I know whether or not they are hardy in my zone.

One has broad, very glossy leaves and the other one has thinner less glossy leaves.

Thanks!

This message was edited Sep 28, 2012 2:46 PM

Thumbnail by Xeramtheum
Lee's Summit, MO(Zone 6a)

IMHO, the first one isn't a Gardenia. The second appears to be.

Keaau, HI

The 1st one is maybe a Tabernaemontana, Crepe Gardinia / Crepe Jasmine.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tabernaemontana

Need to see the flowers to determine a species.

Summerville, SC(Zone 8a)

Thanks .. I didn't think it was possible just with the leaves .. I guess they'll both go in the greenhouse this winter.

Lee's Summit, MO(Zone 6a)

Anne, I was thinking Tabernaemontana, too - just went out and looked at mine, to compare with your picture - they appear to have identical leaves - I couldn't think of the botanical name - always called it crepe jasmine. Mine has double white flowers, the size of a quarter and no fragrance, although I have smelled some that do have a fragrance.

Jacksonville, FL(Zone 8b)

My first impression was also Tabernaemontana. It is marginally hardy in my Zone 8b garden in Jacksonville, FL. I would agree with you that overwintering in your greenhouse is best.

I have the 'Flore Pleno' double flowering type, but I frequently see the single flowering type for sale in the big box garden centers.

Jeremy

Lee's Summit, MO(Zone 6a)

Hmmm, Jeremy - wonder why mine is hardy in my yard and yours only marginally?

Summerville, SC(Zone 8a)

Thanks everyone!

Darwin, Australia

In regard to the first plant: I agree that, without flowers, an id to species will be be difficult. However, there are a couple of things to look for which will help to narrow it down.

Tabernaemontana will have milky latex (family Apocynaceae). Gardenia do not have milky latex.

Check to see if your plant has interpetiolar stipules (see attached pic for an example). If so, it confirms that your plant is either a Gardenia or another genus in the same family (Rubiaceae) as interpetiolar stipules are a very reliable character of that family.

BTW the image is not mine (found on the net & used for illustrative purposes only).

Thumbnail by Darwiniensis
Summerville, SC(Zone 8a)

No milky sap and yes to interpetiolar stipules (that was a new term for me!). So it probably is a gardenia or cousin thereof?

Thumbnail by Xeramtheum
Darwin, Australia

Yep, Rubiaceae for sure! And I think it probably IS a Gardenia... maybe a cultivar of Gardenia augusta. Your plant appears to be putting out some whorls of 3 leaves in addition to the more usual pairs of opposite leaves. I have certainly seen Gardenia exhibit this trait before. Waiting for flowers will allow further ID.

Ben

Summerville, SC(Zone 8a)

Thanks Ben for the ID and the botany lesson.

Darwin, Australia

You are very welcome. Happy gardening!

Keaau, HI

Please post photos of the flowers when they produce.

Summerville, SC(Zone 8a)

Will do!

Summerville, SC(Zone 8a)

They finally bloomed! Kay identified the Daisy for me, first picture .. here is a picture of the 2nd plant - Gardenia jasminoides var. fortuniana?

Thumbnail by Xeramtheum Thumbnail by Xeramtheum
Lee's Summit, MO(Zone 6a)

Anne, both are beautiful - I can almost smell them now!

Summerville, SC(Zone 8a)

The Daisy doesn't have much of a fragrance like the other one - more like a suggestion of a fragrance .. at least to my nose.

Lee's Summit, MO(Zone 6a)

It's probably mental - picture Gardenias - imagine fragrance.

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