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Vegetable Gardening: Do you peel garlic when planting?

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DonShirer
Westbrook, CT
(Zone 6a)

September 29, 2012
12:11 PM

Post #9290037

I've read several sites with information on planting garlic, but none say whether you should peel the bulblets or leave on the papery coating.
What's your advice?

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 29, 2012
12:28 PM

Post #9290048

I never peeled garlic before planting and I had very successful harvests.
But I cannot tell you if you will have a better bulb if you DO peel the cloves ... I just never done it because the bulbs grew just fine.
Good luck !
JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

September 29, 2012
12:33 PM

Post #9290051

I leave mine as they are- I would think if you peeled them they would be more vulnerable to disease & insects- but thet's just a guess!
tommyr2006
Poughkeepsie, NY

September 29, 2012
2:41 PM

Post #9290137

No need to peel.
samthehavanese
Mohrsville, PA
(Zone 6a)

September 29, 2012
3:55 PM

Post #9290219

Don't peel them. Just separate the cloves and plant about an inch deep with the points up.

Solace

Solace
Monte Vista, CO
(Zone 4a)

September 29, 2012
4:35 PM

Post #9290253

With the exception of beans and peas, Garlic is great to plant all over the garden, even beneath your fruit trees to prevent fungus. I also repels aphids and may even repel moles. I plant my Garlic 2 to 3 inches deep since I am in zone 4a at over 7600 feet altitude, and I mulch it heavily over winter. I grew it for the first time this year, and had a great harvest with an heirloom German Hardneck variety, and enjoyed harvesting the scapes when they started curling, cooking with the chopped scapes. Mmmm.

Thumbnail by Solace
Click the image for an enlarged view.

DonShirer
Westbrook, CT
(Zone 6a)

September 29, 2012
4:43 PM

Post #9290259

Thanks for the fast response. I think I'll peel half of them just to see if it makes any difference, but not peeling saves a lot of effort.
mauryhillfarm
Vashon, WA
(Zone 8b)

September 29, 2012
11:26 PM

Post #9290583

I never peeled before planting for 25 years and the garlic grew just fine. Then my field got hit with a nasty allium fungus (lasts in the soil for many years), so I prepared a new area for planting away from the other part of the garden and used a sanitizing regimen for planting. I peeled the cloves of a rare variety I wanted to keep and dipped them in rubbing alcohol before planting. the fungus was not trasnfered to my new plot using this method. The plants grew just fine, no better or worse when the cloves were not peeled.
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

October 1, 2012
10:06 PM

Post #9293178

I don't think you need to peel, but doubt it hurts unless you damage the clove in the process. Sometimes the garlic skins slip off on their own when I separate the bulbs.

-Rich

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 2, 2012
10:15 AM

Post #9293586

The only thing with peeling is bruising or damaging the bulbs in the process. I just poke a hole and place the bulb in without peeling. The peeling is considered the "seed coating" and the plant is able to break through it when emerging.
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 6, 2012
4:55 AM

Post #9297246

DonShirer wrote:I've read several sites with information on planting garlic, but none say whether you should peel the bulblets or leave on the papery coating.
What's your advice?


http://www.growveg.com/growblogpost.aspx?id=262&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed: growveg/HURk (GrowBlog)

This site says
Quoting: "What do you do about the cloves where the paper skin comes off as you are separating them? This happens to me a lot when I prepare to plant. Part or most of the paper wrapper will separate from the clove. Can you still plant these?"

What a great question! Garlic bulbs naturally shrink as they cure, and then shrink more in storage. This is the natural course of things, because dormancy lasts only so long, and the cloves must get busy changing into new plants. This natural shrinkage makes garlic cloves easier to peel, but naked cloves are not what you want in your garden. The wrapper/skins contain chemical compounds that do various things inhibit the emergence of a sprout until roots have formed, deter invasive microbes, and probably leach "come hither" signals to appropriate strains of garlic-friendly bacteria.


The article has much other information if interested. Kristi
JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

October 6, 2012
8:04 AM

Post #9297402

Thanks, Podster for the link-it is very informative. I have always added steer manure before planting, but have read some posts that said not to. i am just about ready to plant my garlic. Our 1st frost came early yesterday- so all my tender garden is gone. I have been pulling plants all week, and now must complete the task.

Nola_Nigella

Nola_Nigella
New Orleans, LA
(Zone 9b)

October 6, 2012
8:57 AM

Post #9297434

I put in my garlic far too early here, and now it's growing scapes wheneve my back is turned. I'm hoping they do their vigilant job of keeping the bugs (and vampires) out of the garden, at least, but just another lesson for me in subtropical gardens.
DonShirer
Westbrook, CT
(Zone 6a)

October 7, 2012
5:09 AM

Post #9298237

Thanks for that link, podster, it was very informative.

Another source I found was thegarlicstore.com
They have a growing guide and a video available.

Solace

Solace
Monte Vista, CO
(Zone 4a)

October 7, 2012
8:52 AM

Post #9298440

I've decided to plant some of my garlic harvest inside the greenhouse for the anti-fungal properties. I don't peel it, by the way.

I ordered another type of hardneck for next season, but was notified that there's a phytoplasma? problem with garlic this year, so will not plant it near anything else this year. I was hoping to plant garlic beneath my fruit trees, but not if there is a possible phytoplasma problem, I think not. I may plant some of last year's garlic beneath the trees. Best get to it asap, 'cause it was 23 degrees here this morning. Aarghhhh.

Blessings, all.

DJ
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

October 7, 2012
8:10 PM

Post #9299105

Solace wrote:I've decided to plant some of my garlic harvest inside the greenhouse for the anti-fungal properties.

Is there actually any evidence that planted garlic will do anything?

In cooking, you have to cut it or mash it even to make the "healthy" compound in garlic active. Old herbal descriptions of garlic use always described the process of mashing the raw cloves as the first step in preparation. We now know that the breaking of garlic cells releases an enzyme (allicinase) that then transforms the inactive compound alliin into an active form (allicin). That's why baked or especially microwaved garlic, while it is pleasant to eat, lacks the active compounds and healthy properties found in other cooked types.

Yes I know it's counter-intuitive. We've all been fed the philosophy of "best is raw, next best is least processed". Biology cares not a whit for our philosophy. I find it refreshing to remember that nature was here first and operates well without us - or our interpretations, prejudices and fantasies.

-Rich

Solace

Solace
Monte Vista, CO
(Zone 4a)

October 7, 2012
10:04 PM

Post #9299163

I have plenty of pests that can bite into the garlic to release that allicin, which I understand has some pesticidal properties or at the very least, is a pest deterrent, as well...but who knows? If there's garlic growing around every aspen and fruit tree on the place, next summer, at least I will have tried. :)
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

October 9, 2012
12:50 PM

Post #9300743

Solace wrote:I have plenty of pests that can bite into the garlic to release that allicin, which I understand has some pesticidal properties or at the very least, is a pest deterrent

I really don't enjoy bursting bubbles, but I don't like people to be disappointed by false expectations either.

Allicin, once produced and exposed to air, has a very short period of activity unless it is "fixed" (e.g. in oil or somehow otherwise preserved, if you'll pardon the perfumery reference).

And garlic itself is subject to all sorts of pests and diseases. The University of California at Davis Integrated Pest Management guidelines (http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/selectnewpest.onion-and-garlic.html) lists 15 diseases and 5 insects that commonly infect/attack garlic, so it is hardly a panacea.

At least you'll enjoy eating the garlic. If it survives... ;o)

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 9, 2012
3:12 PM

Post #9300889

Nola_Nigella,
There's still plenty of time to replant your garlic! Go buy a bag of garlic from your local Sam's Club/Costco, or the Farmer's Market, or down in the French Quarter at one of the stands, or from a local producer, or from a nearby Whole Foods Store that sells organic.

I haven't planted mine yet -- nor have I purchased it! I'm going to Sam's Club. First time planting garlic, and, I'm growing my own onion transplants for planting in late December-mid January.

But, I DID score enough FREE CEDAR today to make my garlic/onion planting beds!

Linda

Solace

Solace
Monte Vista, CO
(Zone 4a)

October 9, 2012
3:25 PM

Post #9300898

rjogden, thanks for the info and valuable opinions on things. I have also used crushed garlic mixed with murphy's oil soap and water to spray around for pests. I'm not an expert, though, but if something works I tend to keep doing it. If not, it's history. :)
JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

October 9, 2012
5:12 PM

Post #9300975

I have about 150 garlic cloves that are ready to plant, but the space is still being used by some late corn. So today I put them in some temporary homes so they can get some roots started. I just put them deep enough to be covered, about 2" apart. Then when their permament bed is ready and enriched with steer manure compost, they should have a bit of a head start for the winter. I always have real good luck, and I just use grocery store garlic.
Gymgirl, I too am growing seed onions-WallaWalla- they are doing great, about the thickness of a drinking straw. Before a hard freeze comes I will dig them up and plant them somewhere protected-as yet unknown!

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 9, 2012
8:22 PM

Post #9301141

That's great news Jo!

When did you sow your seeds? I started mine about 13 days ago.
GrowingNVegas
Las Vegas, NV
(Zone 9a)

October 9, 2012
8:49 PM

Post #9301168

I planted my onion seed yesterday. Zone 9a

Gymgirl, The Siberian seeds I ordered finally came in today (backorder issue on another product). I will drop them in the mail tomorrow. Congrats on the free cedar!

I will be growing garlic for the first time this year. I am planning on planting sometime in November?!? I have two varieties I ordered from Jung Seeds (Not the company that had the back order issues).

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 10, 2012
7:27 AM

Post #9301413

Just remember that garlic takes approximately SEVEN to EIGHT months until harvest, so be sure to plant in a spot you do not intend to use for awhile!
jomoncon
New Orleans, LA
(Zone 9a)

October 10, 2012
9:24 AM

Post #9301529

Here in New Orleans, I planted my garlic about 10 days ago. I had purchased a warm winter assortment from Gourmet Garlic. I checked on them this morning & several have little green shoots coming up!

The assortment I received included Early Red Italian, Applegate Giant, Inchelium Red, Rogue River Red, and Native Creole. I had no idea there were so many different varieties of garlic!! It'll be interesting, in 7-8 months, to see how the tastes differ.
Jo-Ann

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

October 10, 2012
10:36 AM

Post #9301575

It seems to early to plant to me; I won't plant until the end of this month.

Nola_Nigella

Nola_Nigella
New Orleans, LA
(Zone 9b)

October 10, 2012
4:02 PM

Post #9301791

It definitely feels too warm for garlic, but I'll give it another try in a few weeks and leave the others in the ground. Maybe it'll serve against the bugs? Last year, it didn't freeze ever, so who knows what'll come around!

Thanks for the encouragement, y'all, it'll all work out one way or another.
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 10, 2012
5:46 PM

Post #9301861

I leave an heirloom garlic planted in a perennial bed year around as is common in this area.

It is right on schedule and beginning to sprout. Like most bulbs, the weather does not seem to affect their growth cycle.

Nature is still in charge.
jomoncon
New Orleans, LA
(Zone 9a)

October 11, 2012
6:55 AM

Post #9302248

On my morning walk through the garden today, I can see several of my garlics beginning to sprout!
Jo-Ann
terri_emory
Alba, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 11, 2012
7:11 AM

Post #9302264

I usually plant my garlic on Halloween. When I first moved down here to NE Texas one of the locals told me that was the traditional date to plant garlic in this area. I works for me as it is easy to remember and garlic kind of associates with Halloween. Ward of the werewolves, plant garlic--or is that vampires? We are supposed to have very near to a full moon on H'ween this year. Perhaps I'll plant to the moonlight! With the coyotes (erzatz werewolves) howling in the background. Then go in and watch "Young Frankenstein", my favorite Halloween movie!

By the way, I don't peal my garlic before planting either...

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 11, 2012
8:05 AM

Post #9302304

What's the planting medium for the garlic bed? I'm going to build the frame for a small bed this weekend, and have a couple bags of MG garden soil and some leftover pine bark fines to fill it. I'm thinking I should add a bag of composted manure or some Black Kow compost.

Lemme know!

Thanks!
terri_emory
Alba, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 11, 2012
10:59 AM

Post #9302434

My last two garlic beds were first year lasagna beds. So losts of compost, shredded leaves, bone meal, some grass clippings...that sort of thing.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 11, 2012
11:22 AM

Post #9302455

Thanks, Terri!
TX_gardener
Brady, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 13, 2012
9:28 AM

Post #9303933

Gymgirl wrote:What's the planting medium for the garlic bed? I'm going to build the frame for a small bed this weekend, and have a couple bags of MG garden soil and some leftover pine bark fines to fill it. I'm thinking I should add a bag of composted manure or some Black Kow compost.


Linda, in your earlier post you mentioned the free cedar -- how are you planning to use that?
Mary
TX_gardener
Brady, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 13, 2012
9:34 AM

Post #9303935

Oops, forgot to ask: any thoughts on planting garlic in cinder-block holes? I'm thinking one or two cloves per the 4 inch holes? Had another question but my mind just burped... I'll be back when I remember what to ask!
JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

October 13, 2012
9:45 AM

Post #9303941

TX- I would not put more than 1 garlic in a cinder block hole- any more they would not have growing space. Some of mine grow to nearly 4" across.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 13, 2012
10:04 AM

Post #9303962

Hi Mary,
My first use of the cedar pickets is to face the outside of all the pressure treated pine raised beds I'm building. Then, I found Anna White's DIY website where she's using the cedar pickets to, duh, make the raised beds. So, I'll go ahead and use the 2x4 pieces to build a small frame for the garlic and onion bed, and all future beds will be made from the cedar pickets and called cedar lumber.

There are many small DIY projects I can use the other pieces for in the garden. I have plans for some small benches. Once I seal them with tung and linseed oil over a period of months, those cedar cast offs will be worth their weight in gold.

Linda
TX_gardener
Brady, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 13, 2012
10:10 AM

Post #9303972

Linda, as I continued to read various posts/threads (many, many, hard to keep up!) I realized ya meant to use your cedar for building --- I use cedar MULCH so when ya mentioned cedar guess what my mind was thinking...

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 16, 2012
7:28 AM

Post #9306896

I purchased garlic cloves at Whole Foods Store yesterday. They're in the fridge until I get the garlic bed built in the next couple days.

Solace

Solace
Monte Vista, CO
(Zone 4a)

October 16, 2012
9:31 AM

Post #9307045

Gotta get mine in the ground soon.
jomoncon
New Orleans, LA
(Zone 9a)

October 16, 2012
2:12 PM

Post #9307291

I planted my garlics on 10/01, and here they are today. It took them about 10 days to emerge, although I still have some that haven't come up yet.

Thumbnail by jomoncon
Click the image for an enlarged view.

podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 16, 2012
6:12 PM

Post #9307468

Linda ~ how come you put the garlic in the fridge? JC... Kristi
JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

October 16, 2012
7:10 PM

Post #9307509

I was also wondering why the cold treatment for the garlic. I always leave mine at room temp-If they start to sprout-that's OK-

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 17, 2012
6:08 PM

Post #9308373

I read on a garlic starting tutorial that the fridge makes them produce larger cloves.
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 17, 2012
6:27 PM

Post #9308402

Interesting ~ I was curious.
TX_gardener
Brady, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 19, 2012
5:49 AM

Post #9309567

Look at this link: http://www.gourmetgarlicgardens.com/growing.htm#anchorplanting

Lotsa info and looks to be much to do for planting prep

If you wanted to plant garlic in containers how deep should they be? I may try planting garlic from the grocery in cinder-block holes but want to use containers for the garlic I've ordered.
DonShirer
Westbrook, CT
(Zone 6a)

October 20, 2012
6:53 AM

Post #9310412

Thanks for the link, TX

That's the first reference I've seen that says peeling is advised (for home gardeners, at least).

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 20, 2012
8:04 AM

Post #9310442

That article says 6" for growing garlic. Plant 2" into the soil.
TX_gardener
Brady, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 21, 2012
5:13 AM

Post #9311056

Thanks! What about all the "prep" of the bulbs: soaking in baking soda & liquid seaweed and then in alcohol? Overabundance of caution? Hard to believe very many gardeners use all that...

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 21, 2012
8:24 AM

Post #9311192

I came across this video yesterday regarding peeling or not peeling your garlic. Unfortunately, he doesn't take you out to the garden to actually PLANT the garlic, but it's informative.

[HYPERLINK@www.youtube.com]

Solace

Solace
Monte Vista, CO
(Zone 4a)

October 21, 2012
12:21 PM

Post #9311355

All I did was seperate the cloves, stick 'em in the ground, cover with soil and grass clippings (loosely), let them overwinter, started watering in the Spring, and wait. They did beautifully. Huge bulbs at harvest. Didn't pre-treat or peel anything.
MaryE
Baker City, OR
(Zone 5b)

October 21, 2012
7:37 PM

Post #9311689

My neighbor grows garlic as a commercial crop, and got me started as well. We just finished planting 400 pounds in field rows that grew potatoes, cabbages, carrots, beets and other crops last year. No special preparations, just separate the cloves from the bulb shortly before planting, and put them in the ground 2-3 inches deep at 6 inch intervals with the root end down. They are almost all hardneck varieties, and will be ready to harvest in July.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 30, 2012
6:57 AM

Post #9319992

I just came back from a long long time overseas.
I did plant my garlic early this year because I didn't have a choice.
I did plant cloves at the end of September. Now I am back and each clove is already sprouting with at least 2 leaves 12" tall.
(I will take some picture later ... after I unpacked my suitcases ... ah ah)

Last year I spent a fortune ordering garlic from the internet and I just had a few bulbs ...
This year I went back to my original plan.
I bought a bag of garlic at Cotsco. Maybe $4.
The garlic came from California.
So far so good : all the cloves did sprout !

By the way ... broccoli, kale, bok choi, radishes, lettuce are enough to feed 100 people ... weee

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 30, 2012
7:34 AM

Post #9320049

Welcome back drthor! We've been missing you!

Glad your garden is flourishing! Post pics soon!

Linda

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 4, 2012
6:51 AM

Post #9324246

Here are the pictures of my garlic already growing.

Thumbnail by drthor   Thumbnail by drthor         
Click an image for an enlarged view.

Solace

Solace
Monte Vista, CO
(Zone 4a)

November 4, 2012
8:01 AM

Post #9324303

drthor, that's a beautiful sight. I don't have mine planted yet, sigh...
samthehavanese
Mohrsville, PA
(Zone 6a)

November 4, 2012
5:44 PM

Post #9324673

Planted 80 cloves today to go with the 40 I planted 2 weeks ago. Most of the first batch have sprouted. Was a little later than I wanted for the second batch. We'll see what comes up in Spring.
MaryE
Baker City, OR
(Zone 5b)

November 4, 2012
6:48 PM

Post #9324761

My Chinese Pink, a softneck, thinks it's spring and is up 2-3 inches. It's in for a rude surprise! I probably should have referigerated it instead of planting it when I got it (Territorial Seed). I'll know for next year that it might do this. None of the hard necks are up, and none of the elephant garlic.
JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

November 4, 2012
7:35 PM

Post #9324803

Mary, they should do just fine- mine always get frozen back 2 or 3 times every winter- they just regrow and produce like crazy!
MaryE
Baker City, OR
(Zone 5b)

November 4, 2012
9:30 PM

Post #9324909

Hi Jo, thanks. I hope mine do likewise. You're in my neighborhood, sort of. Same hot and dry, then cold and dry desert kinda weather. What garlic varieties do you grow?
JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

November 4, 2012
10:04 PM

Post #9324915

My garlic is always from the grocery store- and not necessarily organic. I have always had good results with them. I plant about 150 each year .

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

November 5, 2012
6:38 AM

Post #9325157

I've had store-bought garlic (Whole Foods, so, I hope it's at least not sprayed with growth inhibitors) in the fridge for almost a month now. Still trying to get my raised bed built and in place. But, glad I hadn't planted out yet, since our temps are still roller-coastering in the 80s during the daytime, and around 65 at night.

My poor beet and turnip seedlings don't know what to do.

I covered them with a clear plastic tarp this morning, cause we're due for severe thunderstorms and maybe some hail by noon and later tonight. But, it's bright and sun shiny right now.

I Just hope I vented the tarp enough, so they don't fry before the rain!

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 18, 2012
12:32 PM

Post #9336315

My garlic is doing great!

Thumbnail by stephanietx
Click the image for an enlarged view.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 18, 2012
1:37 PM

Post #9336368

Here some pictures of "garlic" I couldn't resist to take last month.
The first two are from a farmers market in Civitavecchia (Rome - Italy).
One braid of garlic sold for Euro 7.50
The third picture was taken outside a restaurant in Venice (Italy) ... huge garlic and tomatoes too.

Thumbnail by drthor   Thumbnail by drthor   Thumbnail by drthor      
Click an image for an enlarged view.

Solace

Solace
Monte Vista, CO
(Zone 4a)

November 18, 2012
1:57 PM

Post #9336377

I think I would like Italy! ;) Great pictures, drthor.
terri_emory
Alba, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 19, 2012
9:56 AM

Post #9337181

very pretty! wish I could learn to braid garlic like that. never seems to look like that when I do it! LOL!
MaryE
Baker City, OR
(Zone 5b)

November 19, 2012
10:27 AM

Post #9337204

Beautiful garlic braids! They've had centuries to perfect the art. How much is 7.50 euro in US money?

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 19, 2012
3:02 PM

Post #9337402

Euro 7.5 = $9.5
MaryE
Baker City, OR
(Zone 5b)

November 19, 2012
9:24 PM

Post #9337743

Good buy! I've seen them for $25, as they are more of a novelty here. I'm growing some softneck garlic and hope to sell some garlic braids in a few years. I have never made one. The ones you showed have a few more bunches than what I have seen.
DonShirer
Westbrook, CT
(Zone 6a)

November 20, 2012
4:30 AM

Post #9337834

I noticed my garlic came up last week, both the peeled and unpeeled samples. I'm piling leaves over the shoots for mulch.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

November 27, 2012
9:04 AM

Post #9343749

Steph,
Your garlic is beautiful! I'd grow it just cause it's pretty to look at!

I still have my garlic in the fridge, and the temps are just now starting to drop (again). This roller coaster ride is killing me...

Turnips finally started taking off, and the beets are trying, but, with this intemperate weather, I don't know what'll happen.

Sure hope I haven't waited too late to plant the garlic. This'll be my first time.
terri_emory
Alba, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 27, 2012
12:49 PM

Post #9343906

Gymgirl, I've plant garlic as late a Christmas. It was slow taking off, but it did fine. I'm in 8a, so I bet yours will be fine too. Never know 'till you try! ☺
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

November 28, 2012
9:57 PM

Post #9345138

terri_emory wrote:Gymgirl, I've plant garlic as late a Christmas. It was slow taking off, but it did fine. I'm in 8a, so I bet yours will be fine too. Never know 'till you try! ☺

The recommended planting dates for garlic here in North Central Florida (8a, but not like Western 8a) are from September through February. Longer time in the ground usually equates to larger bulbs.
kmom246
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)

November 29, 2012
8:15 PM

Post #9345884

When I was in z6b, I also planted garlic as late as mid-December, and had a good crop.
nancynursez637
Madras, OR

January 22, 2013
6:47 PM

Post #9394198

And the young seed stems or scapes, are super to eat or use in salads, baked potatoes, stir frys. They sell out as fast as I harvest them at teh market
kathy4836
Indiana, PA
(Zone 5a)

January 22, 2013
7:25 PM

Post #9394228

Don't peel them. Speaking from personal experience; the first time I planted garlic, I peeled them and planted them. Instead of getting garlic bulbs, they broke down into mush. In fact, they disappeared altogether! The next time I planted them, I left the peels on and got a really nice crop of garlic! I always plant my garlic the week of Columbus Day. Didn't get around to it last October. I'll try a spring planting this year!

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

January 22, 2013
7:39 PM

Post #9394241

I never thought about it before reading this, I always separated the cloves and planted them, thought I missed something for a minute or two...
My red garlic looks good despite the zero weather ,, Will plant more shortly.. Grounds hard frozen

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 23, 2013
6:22 AM

Post #9394515

kathy4836
Thanks so much for your explanation. Funny !
MaryE
Baker City, OR
(Zone 5b)

January 28, 2013
10:35 AM

Post #9400223

Kathy, maybe when you peeled the cloves, you cut off the flat end where the roots start to form.

My neighbor (commercial grower whom I helped with planting last fall) has his website up now. http://www.marvelousroots.com He will be adding to it as he has time and more products and pictures.

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