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Voting Booth: What do you use or mulch?

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(Zone 7a)


October 1, 2012
9:50 AM

Post #9292186

There are a total of 108 votes:


Shredded leaves.
(13 votes, 12%)
Red dot


Bark or wood chips.
(21 votes, 19%)
Red dot


Landscape plastic or fabric. (do you put anything over it?)
(1 votes, 0%)
Red dot


Gravel or volcanic rock.
(3 votes, 2%)
Red dot


Pine straw.
(8 votes, 7%)
Red dot


Compost.
(9 votes, 8%)
Red dot


I don't mulch my beds.
(4 votes, 3%)
Red dot


Other, or several of the above.
(49 votes, 45%)
Red dot


Previous Polls

Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 4b)

October 1, 2012
9:55 AM

Post #9292201

I use all the detritus from my garden beds in the fall, with as much leaf stuff as I can get. Also run up to the 2" tree trimmings through the grinder. This is our first year doing this and I can't believe the amount of mulch we have produced. Hope it thaws out so I can actually spread it before winter. Topsoil is already freezing.

CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

October 1, 2012
9:57 AM

Post #9292207

I use Cypress mulch. It doesn't rob the soil of fertility. Lasts longer because it doesn't break down.
Good job of keeping weeds down.
First picture taken April 13. Same bed September 29.
Bernie

Thumbnail by CountryGardens   Thumbnail by CountryGardens         
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DreamOfSpring

DreamOfSpring
Charleston, SC
(Zone 9a)

October 1, 2012
10:19 AM

Post #9292235

I use pine straw mostly. Pine straw is the most common mulch in my area.

I prefer the look of that dark red mulch (shredded wood/bark), but will never try that stuff again. One year I paid $$$ to have a truck load of the dark red mulch delivered and applied to all of my front and side beds. A few weeks later I found those repulsive and odoriferous stink horn mushrooms growing in all of the areas where I had installed the red, wood mulch. Some research later I learned that wood serves as a substrate for stink horn mushrooms which can be nearly impossible to eradicate in my, subtropical area (where we get an avg 52in rain annually and 'enjoy' humidity of 80-100% much of the time). To get rid of the mushrooms, I paid the gardener (again), this time to remove all of the red mulch and replace it with pine straw. That was years ago, and I haven't seen (or smelled, gag) any sign of the stink horns since. So, I guess, I'm sticking with pine straw.
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 4b)

October 1, 2012
10:44 AM

Post #9292285

I guess I am thinking in terms of enchancing the soil not just keeping down the weeds. And I don't have access to the type of mulches you all have.
bonehead
Cedarhome, WA
(Zone 8b)

October 1, 2012
11:32 AM

Post #9292352

Primarily compost, but also shredded leaves in the fall. I am fortunate to have a good compost facility close by which delivers by the dump truck and always has a spring special of some sort (usually 15% off). That load lasts through the summer, then when I do fall cleanup I cover with leaves.
OutsidePlaying
Laceys Spring, AL
(Zone 7a)

October 1, 2012
11:32 AM

Post #9292353

Mostly pine straw but I also use compost and for the vegetable garden I use straw and weed block fabric with straw on top of it between the rows after I plant. I hate to weed! But I do pull up the fabric at the end of the summer.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 1, 2012
2:47 PM

Post #9292607

This is my first year for Raised Beds, and I'm hoping to collect all the leaves from my neighbors to use as mulch.

Never used it before, and still learning why, how and when to use it in my veggie beds. I don't get weeds (so far) in the raised beds. However, if I collect enough of the leaves, I'm going to use some of them on the pathways between the raised beds. Still trying to decide on pathway material, and I'm not quite there yet, and leaves are free (except for the energy expenditure!!).

Besides, as an added bonus, once they break down and the worms come, I can just scoop them and the leave detritus up and over into the raised beds in the springtime. Instant organic amendment!

Linda
tonyjr
Union City, CA
(Zone 9b)

October 1, 2012
3:03 PM

Post #9292633

mostly redwood compost sold in bags / bales . I save the leaves from the fig and peach tree , at least the ones I can save before it rains - snails hate all
pepper23
KC Metro area, MO
(Zone 6a)

October 1, 2012
5:19 PM

Post #9292845

I usually leave my leaves where they fall in my garden beds in the fall and the rest of the year I usually use hardwood or cedar mulch. Lasts longer and has no dyes.
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 1, 2012
7:49 PM

Post #9293050

Voted pine straw for mulch because I have access to a good (free) supply.

I also rake the leaves in the fall and let them sit for a season before I add them.
But I don't add the leaves as mulch, rather to enhance the soil.

I do have one succulent bed that I've used gravel as a mulch but it was more to serve to keep the bed cooler but didn't consider that as a serious mulch when I voted. Kristi
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

October 2, 2012
1:40 AM

Post #9293241

I live in the woods. Need I say more.
Vickie

JuJu55

JuJu55
Jasper Co., MO
(Zone 6b)

October 2, 2012
3:14 AM

Post #9293250

I vote for Other... use shredded leaves for compost and beds.



This message was edited Oct 4, 2012 6:48 AM
marti001
Somerset, KY
(Zone 6b)

October 2, 2012
4:13 AM

Post #9293268

I voted for other, because I use leaves, cardboard, veggie scraps and anything else that I can find, or afford to add to my beds. The neighbors think I'm crazy because I collect their bags of leaves before the trash truck gets here.
Beach_Barbie
Kure Beach, NC
(Zone 9a)

October 2, 2012
8:50 AM

Post #9293523

Hardwood mulch. I do like the neat and tidy look it gives my beds and when it decomposes, it helps improve the soil. The unaltered soil is basically sand since I live 2 blocks from the beach.Over the years, between the mulch and my compost, I have really improved the soil.
Barb

flowAjen

flowAjen
central, NJ
(Zone 6b)

October 2, 2012
10:25 AM

Post #9293603

Shredded leaves, pine needles and bark or wood chips

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

October 2, 2012
10:28 AM

Post #9293609

Mostly all or any,depend on the plant setting most of the time. Rock type mulches around the dry warm temperature sun lovers ,wood around the deep moisture overs.It's all good!lol

themoonhowl

themoonhowl
Prairieville, LA
(Zone 9a)

October 2, 2012
11:30 AM

Post #9293660

Here we use pine bark, pine straw and leaves. Under no circumstances do we use cypress mulch. In earlier times, cypress mulch was a by product of the lumber industry. Now, all cypress mulch comes from clear cutting. Some of the trees harvested for mulch are 1000 years old and once our beloved cypress groves are gone, we all lose as many will not regenerate growth.

http://lmrk.org/issues/cypress-mulch/endangered-cypress-forests.html
marti001
Somerset, KY
(Zone 6b)

October 2, 2012
11:41 AM

Post #9293663

I had gotten 4 loads of wood chips from a tree trimmer in 2010. They are nice and broken down now and I'm adding them to the garden.

Need to find me some more.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

October 2, 2012
11:47 AM

Post #9293665

themoonhowl; I don't live there so all I can say ,petition, petition , petition, .Maybe to begin with a web ,organization. State ownership of state land where federal laws do not apply,and as we all know, fed money goes to disaster relief , It does not care about a bunch of old trees that nobody thinks about of tomorrow!!

themoonhowl

themoonhowl
Prairieville, LA
(Zone 9a)

October 2, 2012
12:29 PM

Post #9293708

Thanks Juhur, it is an ongoing battle with an already embattled legislature and a dictatorial governor. But we aren't giving up. One of the most useful tools is a boycott of the product. If there is no money in it, they will stop selling it...in theory at least. As for web sites, that is what Riverkeeper is, and there are a number of other organizations here dealing with environmental issues such as LEAN, LA Nature Conservation, Mississippi River Delta restoration...among others.

This message was edited Oct 2, 2012 2:33 PM

vitrsna

vitrsna
Colima
Mexico
(Zone 11)

October 2, 2012
1:47 PM

Post #9293804

I voted "Other" because, living in an area where cocos are common as ants, i use coconut by-products for mulch, a combination of the fibers and peat portion of a coco. It is so inexpensive here, i hesitate to say just how inexpensive it is. These are products formerly considered "waste", so the selling of them helps the local economy, the environment, and me and my garden. It protects seedling roots from the heat of the sun, it is attractive without use of dyes or paints, it retains an incredible amount of water...i guess i use half the water i used to use on the garden. No more drooping sad plants. At present, i am trying it out as a seed germination medium also. I have built up the soil with a good amount of nutrients including nitrogen, so i am not worried about nitrogen depletion. I do keep an eye on the plants...they will let me know if they need more nitrogen.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

October 3, 2012
6:21 AM

Post #9294491

Our own garden waste, lawn clippings, tree trimmings, leaves all go in mulch bins, for ;ater use in the raised vegetable beds. Flower beds are mulched in wood chips, natural, picked up from our recycling center. We don't take their compost because it is often saturated with weed killers, fertilizers, and othr unknowns, and takes a long time to break down and become usable.

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 3, 2012
8:19 AM

Post #9294601

We use mostly shredded cedar mulch on the flower beds, but I have one bed where I use the leaves from the oak tree that fall. Tried "official" mulch there once and it floated away in the first good rain we had. Went back to the leaves that were there for years! In our veggie garden we use shredded leaves or straw.

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

October 3, 2012
8:45 AM

Post #9294635

Not much winter here- other - because I also use living composts - when we use anything at all, if you lay stuff on the ground, the fire ants boil up and take over,
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

October 3, 2012
8:55 AM

Post #9294650

Though I voted for Pine Straw it's actually crushed pine needle mulch. I use it in all the gardens except for the most recent (new) garden where I used pine mulch as a test. It's easy on the feet in paths and it stays put and won't blow around even in the worst of winds.

Thumbnail by pirl
Click the image for an enlarged view.

OutsidePlaying
Laceys Spring, AL
(Zone 7a)

October 3, 2012
10:00 AM

Post #9294716

Marti in KY reminded me of cardboard! How could I forget to list that! I use cardboard and newspaper all the time under straw of any kind and a lot of other mulches.

themoonhowl

themoonhowl
Prairieville, LA
(Zone 9a)

October 3, 2012
10:10 AM

Post #9294723

Just be careful using paper and cardboard near the house. Termites love paper products and can build quite a large nest before they are noticed.
Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

October 3, 2012
1:56 PM

Post #9294946

Large flat rocks with phlox or tyhme in between them is nice.

If it is low growring juniper rugs -- black plastic and gravel.

Wheat straw for almost everything else????
Seems to be working except for occassional contaminants of my most hated enemy the poison hemlock.
Kelli
L.A. (Canoga Park), CA
(Zone 10a)

October 3, 2012
3:36 PM

Post #9295034

I use unshredded leaves because that is what I have.
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 3, 2012
4:48 PM

Post #9295089

Pirl ~ very pretty! Not only is it attractive and stays in place, rainwater filters through it with no trouble. I don't use the 'crushed' but notice it will become crushed when laid in the walkways. I later add that to the beds too.l
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

October 3, 2012
5:09 PM

Post #9295110

Thanks, Kristi. Each year I add more to the paths since walking on them does pack them down.
Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

October 3, 2012
7:07 PM

Post #9295217

Okay,
I tried not to look dumb and googled it -- I still could not find out what pirl is,
What it is like, where do you buy it, how much is it?
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

October 3, 2012
7:50 PM

Post #9295251

It's about $8.00 a bag, plus tax, at our local Agway up here in NY but it's native to Georgia so it has to be available elsewhere. We buy a lot of it. They are long pine needles, soft and easy on the hands when putting it down. This can't be the only supplier so it's worth asking about at a few major nurseries.

In the second photo it's covering caladiums, just planted. They grow up right through it - no problem.

Photo #3 shows it when we had just put down the weed barrier cloth and stapled it in place, then put down the pine needles and spread them out.

The fourth photo shows it in a garden setting.

If I can be of further help please let me know.

Thumbnail by pirl   Thumbnail by pirl   Thumbnail by pirl   Thumbnail by pirl   
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Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

October 3, 2012
9:49 PM

Post #9295349

Thank you for going to all the trouble to even send us pictures. It is pretty.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

October 3, 2012
9:57 PM

Post #9295356

That's sweet of you to post! My pleasure.

Sharon Whitney, hybridizer and grower of many Japanese irises, uses something very similar at her Eartheart Gardens in Maine. I've been there a few times and she doesn't grow as many hybridizers do, in soldier straight lines. All of her JI's and all of her paths are the long pine needles and it's a very unifying look for the garden and so pleasant for walking around her beautiful plants. I suspect her pine needles come from her own pines that line the rear of the property thereby saving her a lot of money. Wise woman!

Thumbnail by pirl   Thumbnail by pirl         
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greenbrain

greenbrain
Madison, IL
(Zone 6b)

October 4, 2012
3:03 AM

Post #9295413

I use pine straw because it's plentiful thanks to my huge white pine, doesn't look too bad, & it works. I'll actually use whatever I can get for free.
Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

October 4, 2012
7:11 AM

Post #9295558

Free for me is the hay that my hubby and son bales.
and big rocks -- I live in a county called Rockcastle so as the name implies there are big rocks about.

But hay has so many seeds -- you have to really put it on heavy and keep doing it. It does make rich soil though.
Straw is easier and less expensive.
But I am not putting it around such beautiful flowers like those iries in the those beautiful pictures. I am putting mine around berries and hazel nut trees.

I did put down cypress mulch around the house when I first planted all my little shrubs..
It does not wash away, it last for a long time, and I think it is resistant to bugs and insects as in termites.
Sorry The Moon How -- but it is great stuff.

I would like to put in some pretty blooming stuff beside just mums in the fall. I will have to see if pirl is in my neck of the woods.

themoonhowl

themoonhowl
Prairieville, LA
(Zone 9a)

October 4, 2012
7:21 AM

Post #9295566

Liquidambar2, the bagged crushed pine straw is just pine needles run through a shredder. It is a "Southern thing"...grin You can achieve the same look if you have a mower that catches the grass in a bag...just run the mower over the whole needles. I have never understood why chopping the needles up made them so much more expensive, other than it takes a little more crushed straw to cover the same area as baled pine straw. It does have a softer look in the garden beds. We have 3 huge pines here and my DH runs the mower around and under them and viola! I have shredded pine straw mulch. Here is a link with some info for you.

http://www.gomezpinestrawllc.com/FAQAboutpinestraw.html

CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

October 4, 2012
7:26 AM

Post #9295571

Yes, they cut down Popular & Pine trees here in Minnesota to make paper products. Nobody whines here. They do have a program though.

themoonhowl

themoonhowl
Prairieville, LA
(Zone 9a)

October 4, 2012
7:27 AM

Post #9295573

Yup, cypress mulch is a great product and was widely used down here, but unfortunately, it is no longer a by-product. There is nothing sustainable about the way the cypress is collected...whole groves are cut down and destroyed with no hope of regrowth. That is why so many southern gardeners use pine bark, pine nuggets and pine straw...that is a sustainable resource.

themoonhowl

themoonhowl
Prairieville, LA
(Zone 9a)

October 4, 2012
7:35 AM

Post #9295577

At least pine forests are being managed and replanted...I am not familiar with how Poplars are maintained.

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

October 4, 2012
8:56 PM

Post #9296301

My favorite is grass clippings...but my present garden is located on a slope and in the summer we have heavy rains that just doesn't allow for mulching as it would get washed away, DARN!!!! The next best is chopped leaves...Sure miss being able to use them. Planting close helps knit the plants and shades the ground. Hate wood chips as they are uncomfortable to walk on when working in the beds and get blown away when the winds rise above 20ish, also very hard to do digging and or plant maitanence. Tried black plastic in the beginning, oh yuckkkk, never, never, never!!! Tried sheet weed control type after black plastic, oh my...yuck again, have to cut holes for every new plant, found out it was a waste of money and also traps weed seed, making it harder to weed...

Pix 1 west side of my slopping border
Pix 2 east side of my slopping border

Thumbnail by warriorswisdomkathy   Thumbnail by warriorswisdomkathy         
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pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

October 5, 2012
5:44 AM

Post #9296414

You're right, Kathy!

It was disaster when we tried black plastic weed barrier within gardens - horrible to try and plant anything. The weeds find their way out but it's hard to get to them. Their roots anchor themselves in the threading of the weed barrier.

We thought wood chips would be the answer for a few paths on one side of the house. They're uncomfortable and even with weed cloth in place under them, the weeds grew in the decomposing wood. Horrid! They didn't blow away here even with 60 MPH but we wish they'd have blown somewhere...anywhere!

For the vegetable garden I've used Shredded Straw and we both love it.

1. Shredded Straw
2. It would be a crime to let Jack's hard work go to weeds!
3. Just planted and the straw just put down. It's neat, clean, nice to use and feels like the Ivory Flakes of my memories.
4. The black plastic weed barrier is just for the paths with no covering. Using it there does work.
5. Even when the tomatoes are grown and producing the straw is still in place and doing a fine job of keeping soil temperature more constant and keeping the soil moist.

It's ideal for the vegetable garden.

Thumbnail by pirl   Thumbnail by pirl   Thumbnail by pirl   Thumbnail by pirl   Thumbnail by pirl
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Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

October 5, 2012
6:11 AM

Post #9296428

-Arelene
That is one more veg garden!
thanks for sharing.
You have it manicured like a flower garden or a herb garden.
My gosh you have even laid down side walks in it!
I do well just to try to remember where last year the tomatoes and- well rotating the crops and getting a few tobacco sticks in ground for a few beans or those flimsy little tomato cages up and more sticks driven into the ground - no,no,no not mulch too!

You are right about those weed cloths nothing I could do with them made me happy. They are always a waste of money ,like the the plastic edgings ( they always come out of the ground and end up laying flat,and never do what they were made to do)

Warrior Wisdom Kathy
Black plastic covered over with big rocks or gravel is best for those permanent backbone plants like shrubs and ground hugging junipers not for flower gardens because you are right ,we gardeners are always changing our minds and diggin here and pulling up there. many holes would soon be dotting the permanent barrier.
Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

October 5, 2012
6:16 AM

Post #9296431

Kathy you have a very pretty place. You have one of those cottage style flower gardens that I could spend the day in, with a book on identifying plants! very nice!

I can,t tell what your garden path is made of,is it some kind of flag stone, or is it some kind of ?? Plastic?

This message was edited Oct 5, 2012 8:20 AM

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

October 5, 2012
2:28 PM

Post #9296781

Lol...Would you beleive it's old low pile carpet from a church that was replacing it with new carpet. My friend was going to bury it on their property and I asked for any and all... I rolled out large pieces of it and cut into 4ft widths, thought it would be wide enough for two people to walk down the path side by side. I must admit it needs a bit of work as I've had some very heavy rains that have washed some of the soil from underneath...Maybe I'll have time in the next year (or so) to get it fixed like I want...am thinking of adding cardboard underneath and doing a better job of pinning it down...Sure was the right price tho...I still have a bunch yet to finish more paths as I finish garden areas...It does keep my shoes clean when it's wet tho...I believe they call it repurposing...lol...(flagstone is just a dreammm!!!!). It's taken me five years to claim back the this bit of prairie but I finished this border this year and now onto others...namely the backyard now, hope I can get a bit of it finished yet this season...and the four legged creatures leave it alone...Kathy

Some of the other living mulches, I allow the Viola Johnny Jump Ups to seed in everywhere, along with verbascums and flax.
Hey Pirl...looks good as usual, lol...I'm still planting more clems. this fall and just clipped a trash bag FULL to root as many as I can this winter...

This message was edited Oct 5, 2012 2:35 PM

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Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

October 5, 2012
2:53 PM

Post #9296804

Ohhh a carpet;
My father loves carpets. He puts them around his tomatoes to keep the weeds out since he is 85 and has a hard time weeding.

1st picture;
Okay let us see how much I have forgotten
Foreground lavendar,left verconia speedwell, the middle -- Rocket ???, right shasta daisy and the back gound is rebukia

2nd picture
campbells and big ferns ( I use to have them- if they are not columbines?_

3rd picture pansy and johnney jump ups or all they all the same?
4th picture climatitis and oh I use to have that plant too, I can't remember -- is that Russian Static?
5th is columbine and the white long spike thing - it that white verconica speedwell?
marti001
Somerset, KY
(Zone 6b)

October 5, 2012
3:17 PM

Post #9296829

0I'm collecting carpet to use to kill weeds and give me a place to walk between the rows of raised/container pots for my veggie garden.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

October 5, 2012
3:23 PM

Post #9296834

Have been there done that ,and occasionally still doing that!lol Another many seem to do.sh sh secrets!!

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

October 5, 2012
6:00 PM

Post #9296967

Liquid...lol...here I'll help ya a bit...

1 top center to the right: Wild sunflowers, Daisy Becky (48"), Penstemon strictus Rocky Mountain Blue at 36", unopened Catanche carulea, Lavendula Munstead, Veronica spicata Sight Seeing Blue at 28" (the tallest veronica available), canter is Malva, there are grouping of 5+ plants each...

2 Background (purple) Hesperis matronalis (several hundred plants), ferny thing is Daucus carota which gets to 6-7 ft tall, and is biennial (think there was about 20ish), ya probably a few weeds tooo, shhh..

3 All viola Johnny Jump Ups which I let reseed with abandon, some iris setosa to the left and various other perenns in early spring

4 Various clems with cosmos in the front and Gypsophila paniculata (see new pix...is gypso and clem Prince Charles

5 the white is Verbascum phoenicium alba, Aquilegia (columbine) and Centaurea montana Amethyst in Snow back toward carpet and Asclepias incarnat Ice Ballet bottom right.., plus various other perenns...

This message was edited Oct 5, 2012 6:04 PM

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warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

October 5, 2012
6:07 PM

Post #9296977

Ooops, Daucus carota in bloom, yes it's related to the ditch flower but this one is taller than most men and is related tocarrots

Thumbnail by warriorswisdomkathy   Thumbnail by warriorswisdomkathy         
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Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

October 5, 2012
6:24 PM

Post #9296988

OHHHHH Babies breath --- yeah --- that is it.
I at one time was really good and now I have forgotten. I think I will get my book and head for Col next summer and learn them all over again. Only in my dreams --- I will just get my book out and look at your pictures.
You know though ---that fifth picture - I was not familiar with Verbascum or come to think of it ., or Hesperis matronalis ---well it should be interesting to read about them.


Daucus carota!!!! It is so big, and so pretty!

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

October 5, 2012
6:28 PM

Post #9296993

And fragrant too...Just to let ya know the hesperis is bannned in most states as it's a prolithic reseeder...that's why its in the middle of my garden and also Very fragrant tooooo, one of my first bloomers in early spring.
Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

October 5, 2012
6:36 PM

Post #9296997

Oh, I looked it up - yeah - dames rocket. I could only remember rocket. I use to buy packets of seeds every year - of dames rocket and not once did they come up. Nope, - prolific seeder up in Col but not here in Kentucky -- unless they were radiating 'em and then laughing at us buying seeds that did not germinate.

I loved the picture of them. So that is what they could have looked like in my cottage garden - IF I COULD HAVE EVER GOT THEM TO GERMINATE.

Well Congradulations with it --- it is really pretty!

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

October 5, 2012
6:43 PM

Post #9297003

DAUCAS COROTA etc Queens Annes lace, Butterflies love it ,I don't, except it makes great mulch if you can keep the seeds out of it. Had one this year about 8 feet tall.
Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

October 5, 2012
7:53 PM

Post #9297061

There use to be a Queens Annes lace or aucas Corota that grew by our barn. It was really big and pretty. It is almost a shrub -- well it is a shrub more than a herb, don't you think?
What is that smaller version they call Wild carrot or queens anne's lace too??? It is nothing compared to the big one.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

October 5, 2012
8:01 PM

Post #9297065

I have seen it as either (shrub or herb),including the purple cultivar,I think cultivation practices ,hybrid cross breeding,has added a few aspects to the plant.(the carota).
Of course things like willows(salix species) are also an herb and they are a small to huge tree. Definitions are definitions?
Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

October 5, 2012
8:42 PM

Post #9297111

Are you serious? Really ! Willows are considered herb
I will have to look up those definitions -- because I really just thought -- well come to think of it I have not really thought on it that much.
I guess it is not just size that makes a herb. but maybe if the stems are hollow or -- hmmmm I was ready to go to bed, but I will have to look that one up first.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6a)

October 5, 2012
8:56 PM

Post #9297130

Look in any Medicinal herb manual,SALIX ,used for aspirin, dye, rope,and rooting hormone, and as you have read ,no doubt, people like to make trellises and stakes and wreaths from them. Useful plant if you have the knack.
Etc I do not endorse any use of this information as real,lol only protecting myself even if I am not that defensive.
Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

October 5, 2012
10:37 PM

Post #9297189

I found all kinds of definitions
Darn it kept me up -- I will never get up tomorrow morning.
But an herb -dies back to the ground at the end of the growing season is the one I like best.
But I see what you mean about the willow and the definition of medicinal and useful.That is kind of neat to think of willow that way.
Thanks!

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