Bug eating my bell pepers

Arlington, TX

Anyone know what this is, took a big chunk out one of my Bell Peppers

Thumbnail by Easybake Thumbnail by Easybake
SE Houston (Hobby), TX(Zone 9a)

Whatever it is, it looks pretty evil!

Ayrshire Scotland, United Kingdom

It's a Caterpillar, don't know what type of moth / butterfly it's from so get rid or it will move off to become a butterfly and than back to lay more eggs that hatch out to the picture you show and the whole cycle will start all over again, you don't have to kill it, maybe pop in a jar and take it a walk to the countryside, OR do as I do, remove the insect and it's other family members as if you have one, there are bound to be many more, I fill a tray with them and some seed food from kitchen and put this out for the birds, they love this and will reward you by searching out the other bugs that eat your plants.
Good luck. WeeNel.

Arlington, TX

I only found the one, even after looking very carefully thru out all the plants.
poured some alcohol( didnt have any bug killer that day) on it which killed it pretty quick.
I did get some organic pesticide and sprayed everything just in case i did miss something.

just kind of wanted to know what it was.


Lebanon, CT

WeeNel, I am going to try that this summer. You gave me the best laugh of the day, thank you.

Charlotte, NC(Zone 7b)

WeeNel - you must have read my mind. :)

To add to what WeeNel said: Black wasps will pick-up small caterpillars and feed them to their young. This might have been why you could not find other caterpillars, Easybake. Either birds or wasps had already eaten them.

Magnolia, TX(Zone 8b)

Did you try showing it to our bug forum? I think its a moth, but not a good one

Contra Costa County, CA(Zone 9b)

There is an biological pesticide specific to caterpillars. It is a bacteria that only attacks caterpillars. Best applied when they are very small, because they need to eat the leaf that has been sprayed to ingest the bacteria. Obviously if the caterpillar is very large, it will have to eat several leaves or chew holes in the fruit to get enough of the bacteria in its system.
The bacteria is sold under many product names, but read the active ingredients. Bacillus thuringiensis. There are several strains of this bacteria, some are more effective on mosquitoes, so make sure the package specifies that the target is caterpillars.

Liberty Hill, TX(Zone 8a)

Most of the time the lable will say BT on it.

Poughkeepsie, NY(Zone 6a)

BT will kill them. Those and Tomato hornworms give me the "willies"!

Liberty Hill, TX(Zone 8a)

Tommy what are "those"? I like to sqoosh them!

Poughkeepsie, NY(Zone 6a)

The "Willies" is another way of saying goosbumps/disgust.

Liberty Hill, TX(Zone 8a)

I know what you meant by "Willies". I didn't know if "those" meant that, as yet, unidentified cat. ?

Magnolia, TX(Zone 8b)

It is a cat, not a moth, found it the other day but lost it...pretty butterfly it was...

Magnolia, TX(Zone 8b)

oh, maybe a Long tailed Skipper cat

Delhi, LA

If it had horns it would look like a tomato horn worm. If it is like them, the best way is just to pick them off. Usually poison is unneccesary.

Magnolia, TX(Zone 8b)

The tomato horn worms turn into hawk moths- or hummingbird moths.

Liberty Hill, TX(Zone 8a)

Has anybody figured out what kind of Cat that is?

Charlotte, NC(Zone 7b)

Lisa - I don't know the answer, but BT-kurstaki strain should kill it.

http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/insect/05556.html

Liberty Hill, TX(Zone 8a)

It probably died of old age by now.

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