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Beginner Gardening Questions: Pet friendly fertilizer

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Forum: Beginner Gardening QuestionsReplies: 3, Views: 32
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tsitra
St Petersburg, FL

October 16, 2012
11:01 AM

Post #9307112

Any recommendations for fertilizer that won't make my dogs sick if they accidentally eat it? I usually use osmacote or the bayer 2 in 1 systemic rose/flower care. Thanks :)
ecrane3
Dublin, CA
(Zone 9a)

October 16, 2012
12:44 PM

Post #9307204

Any organic fertilizers should be OK (fish emulsion, blood/bone meal, etc). A word of caution though--while those things may not harm dogs, I've found that some of them are VERY attractive to dogs and cause my normally well behaved dogs to all of a sudden turn into digging machines, destroying my garden, eating the soil, etc (mine only act like this with organic fertilizers, chemical ones have no interest for them). So while organic might be safer, chemical ferts like the Osmocote or the Bayer stuff may not be as attractive so they wouldn't eat them in the first place.
purpleinopp
Opp, AL
(Zone 8b)

October 18, 2012
8:27 AM

Post #9308836

If you're talking about plants in the ground, start a compost pile and focus on improving your soil so you can get away from store-bought gadgets like fertilizer.
WeeNel
Ayrshire Scotland
United Kingdom

October 22, 2012
1:13 PM

Post #9312370

I agree with purpleinopp and would rather use my own compost that is made all year round from all my garden waist and my household stuff from the kitchen plus shreaded newspapers etc. That way I know what is in my soil but I also try never to refuse any horse manure from any horses and sometimes it's already well rotted down other times it's fresh and I need to stack it and allow it to rot down, any animal manure is ready when it resembles a good crumbling composted soil and there is absolutely no smell from it, then it can be laid on top of the soil OR dig it into the soil where either way it holds in moisture, keeps weeds away, feeds the plants and also act's as a way of adding air to the soil around the roots when dug in, if laid on top of the soil, eventually the worms will take it down under the top soil.
Good luck, Weenel.

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