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Northeast Gardening: To Improve Soil Porosity, does LeafGro=compost?

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Forum: Northeast GardeningReplies: 4, Views: 33
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VioletV
Baltimore, MD

October 16, 2012
8:25 PM

Post #9307564

The soil delivered to my garden last year turned out to be not- so- good. Now I am trying to repair it. I need to make the soil lighter, "fluffier", easier to dig into. Now the soil is so dense and sticky that it clings to my trowel in big hunks when I try to plant something. I am wondering, does LeafGro improve soil like compost does? LeafGro is listed as a soil conditioner rather than compost. Is there another product/material rather than LeafGro that would be more beneficial to my dense, sticky garden soil?

Thank you for any suggestions you might have to offer.

ROBINDOG

ROBINDOG
Thomaston, CT

October 17, 2012
6:50 AM

Post #9307827

I have never heard of LeafGro...sounds like you have clay soil...some sand would help to improve it...I added bagged sand to my garden, after I found the landscaper used soil right out of the river to fill in my garden...

gardenmart

gardenmart
Saugus, MA
(Zone 6b)

October 18, 2012
7:54 PM

Post #9309371

Some sand. Compost if you can get enough of it. Sometimes your town lets you take back the compost from the leaves and clippings they collect. My son got some from a local nursery. Fabulous stuff.
Martha

RosemaryK

RosemaryK
Lexington, MA
(Zone 6a)

October 19, 2012
3:43 PM

Post #9309974

Play sand isn't too very expensive at the hardware store, but it is very heavy. Like martha, I'm in favor of lots of compost. Some nurseries sell really good stuff that doesn't have weed seeds. It is fairly light to shovel too. Can't say I know anything about the LeafGro product, but compost isn't all that expensive in bulk, especially because of the results it creates. Some farms sell cow manure too, and I'm told people get it by the dump truck. I've had more access in the past to free horse manure that I could fill large garbage bags with. That was pretty much like getting grass compost.

JWLW

JWLW
Atkinson, NH
(Zone 5a)

October 21, 2012
2:45 PM

Post #9311456

Violet V: LeafGro looks good from their web site. http://www.menv.com/leafgro.shtml

Look for http://www.mulchandsoilcouncil.org/ approval.

Be careful how much sand you add too much will create another problem. Compost is the best way. Another thing you should do is get an organic soil test and follow the advice they give you.
Check with your county extension for how and where to get the test. http://extension.umd.edu/local/index.cfm

Have a great evening,
John



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