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Mosaics and Stained Glass: Terracotta pot restoration!

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biddy52
BROOKFIELD
Australia

October 24, 2012
1:57 PM

Post #9314266


This message was edited Oct 24, 2012 5:01 PM

Refer to the thread below - couldn't get the photo in this one!

This message was edited Oct 24, 2012 5:11 PM
biddy52
BROOKFIELD
Australia

October 24, 2012
2:10 PM

Post #9314271

Post #9314260
Post #9314266
Dear Bev,

The original pot was a roughly glazed terracotta "dragon" pot - a $25 Reject Shop find back in the 1980's (like a $2 shop) - after 20 years, it was faded and rough around the edges so I decided to clean it up. Which is where my passion for mosaics began really, upcycling, repurposing! Using broken plates, which would have gone to land fill!

This gives you an example of how the mosaic pot colours can enhance the plant!

Of course not everyone is into mosaics - but it can be catching!

Love your opinion! Regards, Di

Thumbnail by biddy52
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Sundownr

Sundownr
(Bev) Wytheville, VA
(Zone 6a)

October 30, 2012
7:31 PM

Post #9320651

Biddy, that pot is precious and doesn't interfere with the plant at all . . . kinda brings attention to it! Thank you for posting the pic!

I have a few mosaic projects started (2 tables and a counter top), but are now buried under smaller projects. I want to use the same color pieces (tiles, broken ceramics, etc) in hopes of a consistent theme in the yard and patio. One of these days I'll get them finished, maybe with a few pots to match. I hope they all turn out as well as your pots. Thanks for the inspiration!
--
Bev
biddy52
BROOKFIELD
Australia

October 31, 2012
1:59 PM

Post #9321301

Sundownr wrote:Biddy, that pot is precious and doesn't interfere with the plant at all . . . kinda brings attention to it! Thank you for posting the pic!

I have a few mosaic projects started (2 tables and a counter top), but are now buried under smaller projects. I want to use the same color pieces (tiles, broken ceramics, etc) in hopes of a consistent theme in the yard and patio. One of these days I'll get them finished, maybe with a few pots to match. I hope they all turn out as well as your pots. Thanks for the inspiration!
--
Bev


Thank you Bev- good luck with it. I preferred that plant to what I have in it now. We moved back from Qld to Vic about 12 months ago and I lost a lot of my plants in the process! The good thing is what lived are looking good now! Thank goodness for photo's!

You really get hooked don't you? I have no sooner completed something when the mind is off on another tangent! It really is helping me mentally and although a strain physically, I find I still "have to" achieve the goal! I am toying with submitting for an exhibition - a bit scary for me - but I think I need to push and get out of my comfort zone - I have time - as it will not be until 2013 - time will tell!

Sundownr

Sundownr
(Bev) Wytheville, VA
(Zone 6a)

October 31, 2012
6:22 PM

Post #9321513

Biddy, you don't have a thing to lose by submitting your goodies for exhibits! You may also get orders to make custom pieces!
biddy52
BROOKFIELD
Australia

November 1, 2012
1:05 PM

Post #9322086

Sundownr wrote:Biddy, you don't have a thing to lose by submitting your goodies for exhibits! You may also get orders to make custom pieces!


Thank you for your encouragement - it is much appreciated! Let you know what transpires!
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

December 25, 2013
9:31 AM

Post #9734178

I'll take it and where did you get the fish , I want that too .
biddy52
BROOKFIELD
Australia

May 27, 2014
10:49 PM

Post #9851140

[quote="digger9083"]

Sorry digger9083, I haven't been on for a while - I think you mean the iron fish? It is a candle holder - the candle goes inside - it belongs to one of my girls, not sure where she got it, but I love it too!
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

May 28, 2014
6:57 AM

Post #9851342

Love to see more . Don't stay away so long .
biddy52
BROOKFIELD
Australia

September 5, 2014
4:26 AM

Post #9933353

This is Monsieur du Gras and his lady friend, The Maid from Lorraine. Currently at an Exhibition in Kyneton, Victoria, Australia. My husband wrote stories about them!


Monsieur du’ Gras
M. Marcel Mars J’Ouvert 1875 – 1950 (aka Monsieur du’ Gras) was a direct descend of Louis J’Ouvert who along with a French delegation and some Italian guy, put a petition “de grandee” formally requesting Pope Gregory XIII in 1582 to make the Tuesday before Ash Wednesday a holiday. One paragraph of the petition read. “The good people of France need to empty-out their food chests and closet stores from all fresh meats before the holy 40 days of lent”. The petition went on to say that this would be called a Carnivale… (The Latin word for removal or farewell of flesh/meat).
Pope Gregory XIII after some consultation with “another” Italian guy, proclaimed “Carnivale Tuesday”, the day before Ash Wednesday as an official holiday on his new Gregorian calendar … And so Fat Tuesday was born. Ahh! That should read in French “MARDI GRAS” was born. That’s right folks Mardi Gras means Fat Tuesday in Anglais!
… And so the people of France and a few Italians guys on the French-Italian boarder all got together in towns and villages everywhere with the same idea… “Let’s get a fat cow, kill it, parade it on ambers of fire and eat like pigs, drink all the plonk in the Taverns, have sex with all the maidens in the next village and live like there’s no tomorrow … “Maybe...Let me think… we should wear masks… yes! I think the idea of masks is good no! wii wii game on!”
To continue, Monsieur du’ Gras was born Marcel Mars. J’Ouvert in Orleans, France, on Tuesday 2nd March, 1875 (Mardi Gras). Carrying the “Gluttonous” gene his birth weight was 10.5 kilograms leaving his twin brother but a shadow naturally tattooed as a birth mark on around the regent of de Gras’ belly button.
At the turn of the century (1900) aged twenty five Monsieur du’ Gras found himself on the railway station in Orleans with a day old croissant in his pocket and a used one way ticket to Paris. His line of credit had run out in every Bakery, Butcher shop, Tavern and accommodation quarters in his home town.
He loved to tell tall stories about himself and first impressions of Marcel were always pleasant. He came across as a friendly man that always wore fine clothes, a beret on his head tilted to the right, a bow tie given to him by his good friend Ivan a Croat (cravat), and a new fashioned wrist watch. Saw himself as a bit of a lady’s man, a French Dandy you might say! To strangers, Marcel would come over as a straight soft spoken well educated man. This was due to the fact that he would attend classes at the University of Paris even though he was officially listed as a persona non grata.
Whilst within the University grounds, nearby Café’s and late-night “Rooms” that he frequented most people called him “Mardi Gras Marcel” or “Monsieur du’ Gras “ a reference to his gastronomic ways of excessive eating and drinking. His plump, rotund features could only be described as over-whelming, not to mention overpowering when it came to bartering with inexperienced young shop assistants … and his catch phrase “I will gladly pay you next Tuesday for some of your fine wares today!” which was an irresistible line to the local women of the night. One can envisage a young French actor Gérard Depardieu re telling the tale as M. Du’ Gras.
He was lazy by nature and could also be seen as a coward due to his non committal intelligent ways of getting out of fights, heated arguments or the ability to weasel his way out of paying his share of the bill at the local eateries. Pushing the bill to the floor or leaving it on somebody else’s table was an everyday occurrence. This family peculiarity and “Gluttonous” gene was also passed on to his great nephew J. Wellington (aka Wimpy). “You don’t get to look like me sitting at home spooning French onion soup by the fire side” Du’ Gras would say to the children in the local square when they would call him fat names…!
And yes, in truth, M. du’ Gras was nothing more than a Scam artist…but a loveably one…here today Dianne Crea has captured his true spirit. A likeness in mosaic for all to witness. A dedication to all that love food, wine and song. A reflective statement in mosaic “Of times gnome by…”
Raise your glass to Monsieur du’ Gras – and so says all of us!

Copyright Dominic Crea 2014

AND

THE MAID FROM LORRAINE…
The exact details as to where and when The Maid from Lorraine was born are simply not known although the consensus of opinion believe it was in the now northeast of France in the region of Lorraine which boarders with Germany. Her real name has been forgotten over the years and yes there are stories in different provinces of France, parts of Switzerland and even Italy that have similar caricaturists of “The Maid From Lorraine”. To this day in some villages still believe The Maid From Lorraine was a saint. She, has been confused with Joan of Ark – The Maid from Orleans’s, Saint Teresa of Gutenberg, and even the non-gender Saint Perris the Paroles
The confusion between TMFL and Joan Of Ark aka The Maid From Orleans (TMFO) is very strong. Joan of Ark was actually born in Domrémy a small village in the Lorraine Region of France/Germany around 1412. Hello! So was our Lorraine. In fact Joan and Lorraine were school mates. Joan was born the daughter of Jacques d'Arc and Isabelle Rom'ee. Whilst Lorraine was adopted by Geppetto and Gustina Carnevale.
As years went by baby Lorraine grew up and helped with the bakery and eatery and as Geppetto and Gustina grew older Lorraine took over the running of the business.
Over time Lorraine’s Tart or as the locals called it a Kuchen which is German for cake and yes the French pronounce it Quiche were famous all over the region and the recipe spread near and far.
Today we know the popular dish as Quiche Lorraine which is enjoyed all around the world, even by real men who gastronome themselves in darken rooms with no windows.
The mosaic caricature that artist Dianne Crea portrays gives an impression of a loving Lorraine dressed in her Sunday Best! The flow of the mosaic pieces truly acknowledge the artist as a true master in her art . It is obvious to the eyes that many an hour was spent on every intricate piece put in place to make a Bizarro mosaic of The Maid From Lorraine with so much detail.


Enjoy our crazy sense of humour!

Thumbnail by biddy52
Click the image for an enlarged view.

digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 5, 2014
2:28 PM

Post #9933801

Ha ha , love it .
biddy52
BROOKFIELD
Australia

September 5, 2014
4:38 PM

Post #9933865

Thank you digger9083. Regards Di

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