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Recipes: What's for dinner? (Part 38)

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Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


October 24, 2012
7:14 PM

Post #9314573

We came from here: http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1281737/

And sadly my own dinner menus have gotten short shrift over the past several weeks. I did make a big pot of green chili last weekend (froze the remains) and we had homemade lasagna last night. But I'm definitely in a slump/funk/whatever. I just need to get busy chopping and cooking - maybe this new thread will light a fire under my cooking mojo. It'll have to wait until after the UT/SC game, though - Saturday morning we're headed to Columbia and then Charleston for a long weekend.

Thumbnail by Terry
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

October 25, 2012
5:36 AM

Post #9314809

Great - a new thread!

Winter veggies growing well thanks to some cooler weather - even have a volunteer mustard just outside the garden area.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

October 25, 2012
5:58 AM

Post #9314818

thanks for the new thread Terry! I'm doing some visiting with family for a few days so no cooking for me - except for a dessert I'll make for them tomorrow night. Something with apples.

Tam
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

October 26, 2012
2:38 PM

Post #9316292

Where are you visiting this week, Tammy?

Bubba, so jealous about your fall garden. Please send progress reports. I did not get a fall garden in this year because we are doing a bit of traveling. We are fenced for deer, an acre around the house and garden, but they will come over if we (or the dogs) are not around for a while. Boo hoo.

Terry, you'll leave your cooking slump behind as soon as the official kick off date for holiday baking begins. Don't know exactly when that is but it can't be too far off, can it?

We have been in and around the yard most of the day trying to take care of a few things before first frost. That should happen between now and when we get back to Maypop. We are picking the last of our peppers and tomatoes; also beans for drying. I have to stuff some geraniums and more tender plants in the house and figure out what to do with two huge pots of Brugmansias gifted by a DGer at our RU this past June.

I am making an embellished pizza and salad. Cooked criminis, onions and garden peppers this morning for toppings. I brought up two lovely, fresh ovoline mozz to top the pie. Need to keep meals simple to get things done. Oh, and last night when we came up, I brought a rack of babyback ribs. We had been gifted a jar of homemade raspberry syrup, for pancakes and to make salad dressings, long ago and don't really go for sweet stuff. So I chopped up a chipotle with a little adobo to give the sweet some heat and added a tad of red wine vinegar. Goodness gracious, great balls of sweet, sour, smokey fire! I made a sweet potato and onion hash from leftover sweets and we had more stir fried brown rice and veggies. Burp.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 26, 2012
2:46 PM

Post #9316300

I am inspired!
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

October 26, 2012
2:59 PM

Post #9316308

Go for it!
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

October 27, 2012
9:05 AM

Post #9316910

I just scored three hundred pounds of pecans from the grower this week . Sending two hundred pounds to kid , and in laws. They better share the goodies with me . Ridiculous price and won't tell , but almost free . If avaliable next year, will have some to sell to friends at cost .
Edens_Gardener
Clay Center, KS
(Zone 5b)

October 27, 2012
1:47 PM

Post #9317171

Tonight is a fresh loaf of home made bread, a salad and cream of mushroom/chicken soup (roasted a chicken yesterday, so using left overs. Also "fixin" for a potluck at church tomorrow, so, busy afternoon in the kitchen, while listening/watching Kansas State football in the background. It's Homecoming weekend and we always have a large alumni crowd on Sunday.
I'm awestruck at the idea of 300 pounds of pecans..

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

October 27, 2012
3:30 PM

Post #9317226

I kinda am, too. I'd eat spiced pecans until I exploded.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

October 27, 2012
4:57 PM

Post #9317306


We are having veggies a la extemporaneous. Okay, I made that up but it sounds pretty sexy. I have to use the last of the garden veggies before we leave for Miami. Anything else hanging out in the fridge is fair game as an add in. I am seriously getting my taste buds arranged for Miami food...stone crabs, curried goat, roti, Cubano.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

October 27, 2012
5:20 PM

Post #9317329

Bah Humbug! (LOL)
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

October 27, 2012
5:24 PM

Post #9317333

Hahaha. Well you are not having to make pending lists of squeezing in a toilet paper roll's worth of family and friends in under two weeks. Meal time counts as a visit you know.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

October 28, 2012
8:36 AM

Post #9317878

Eat lots of sea food for me , Laurel . The local Chinese buffet always has shrimp cooked five ways and raw oysters , clams , fried fish , imitation scallops . This time , everything was so salty , it wasn't fit to eat and the last time , it was sub- standard . Don't know how I'm gonna get my fix , it's 35 miles across Corpus to another good place for a good selection of my favorites .
Have a safe trip and enjoy .
gardenglory
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 9a)

October 28, 2012
9:54 AM

Post #9317924

I almost cant sit here thinking about those stone crabs. Heck, Id take some just plain ole king crab legs at a buffet. No more in town tho. I think all the college students have eaten the buffets out of business.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

October 28, 2012
10:19 AM

Post #9317941

That could be, G G, and I forgot to add king crab to my list above .

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

October 28, 2012
11:54 AM

Post #9318047

We're going to an oyster and ham dinner at a local fire hall tonight, even though the town is under voluntary evacuation due to Sandy. I guess they have to do something with all those oysters! Two other couples who were going to join us live further south and say that the highways going north are clogged with cars evacuating the barrier islands, so they're staying home. Can't say I blame them. I have a big pot of white bean and ham soup simmering on the stove; sounds like a good thing to eat during a hurricane, no?
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

October 28, 2012
11:54 AM

Post #9318050

I am scurrying about pulling in the last of the orchids and house plants while trying to get ready for the trip. It's dipping down to the thirties tonight. SO has been very helpful in sealing up greenhut. I have to run the heaters twenty four seven to keep the orchids happy. One more big variegated ficus and a fish tail palm and think that should cover it.

Sally, sorry to hear about your buffet knowing how much you love them. I'll eat some seafood but have to get my fill of Jamaican and Cuban food. Again, we have very good seafood here in Atlanta.

I'm thinking about Tam in Pennsylvania and Gh_gal in New Jersey. Gh_gal lives on the water and has a farm with animals. Hope they are able to batten the hatches for the storm without a problem. Don't know who else is affected, but hope everyone is okay. Our daughter keeps calling for advice. She lives in the D.C./Maryland area. She is with the Department of Natural Resources and her office is in Annapolis. All the state parks have been evacuated and closed. People are told that government offices may be closed through at least Tuesday.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

October 28, 2012
11:55 AM

Post #9318051

We crossed. Glad all sounds okay your way.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

October 28, 2012
12:56 PM

Post #9318108

Although far inland, we are expecting heavy wet snow coupled with winds of 40-60mph. We'll likely have power outages for several days because the trees will fall like matchsticks. All the utility crews are geared to go northeast.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

October 28, 2012
3:14 PM

Post #9318238

Prayers for all affected,DG'ers and all . Please God, take care of all your helpless , animals and infirm .
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

October 28, 2012
3:58 PM

Post #9318274

Darius, hope you stay safe. We are under lots of trees in Atlanta and Maypop and have had serious damage to both houses with our famous ice storms. Do you have a generator?

Not many photos posted recently so thought I'd share a dinner photo that includes my cast iron skillet cornbread. It was drizzled in blackstrap molasses. I served this cornbread with chicken and vegetarian Brunswick stews at the wedding weekend. None of the guests from outside of the deep south knew what blackstrap was.

Lots of cooking going on the next few days with several goals in mind. First, we don't enjoy eating out all meals when we travel. I also don't like to spend a lot of time cooking and shopping so we travel with some home prepared food and ingredients. Even though I am going to my other home our time there is limited. We will be entertaining several nights so some preparation is necessary. Second, I like planning foods to eat for the actual trip. It's like planning a picnic that has to last three meals. Can't eat the same way traveling all day in a car as we would if we were at home. Third, youngest son is perhaps too proficient in the kitchen. If left to his own devices, with food to cook from scratch, the kitchen will look like a fat rendering factory when we return. He fries everything and grease is everywhere (even the floor). I've found he's not too chef proud to accept already prepared food. Unfortunately he does have his standards and is not happy with store bought prepared food. Wonder where he got that from? There will be a portion of roast turkey breast for our trip and a some for him. Half a lasagna for us and half for him. Pork shoulder and white bean chili to share as well as tortillas to stuff it in. The remainder of the meals will be out for us or be my favorite dinner...salad.

Thumbnail by MaypopLaurel
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

October 28, 2012
5:32 PM

Post #9318361

I'm back from visiting family in central Pa. My sister & Brother in law came in from Ca so my brother (from Pitts) & I each drove in so all siblings would be together for a rare visit. Was really fun. We made up the Wild-caught alaskan salmon, fresh steamed broccoli & mashed potatoes. With the apple crisp I'd brought with me. My sister & DBIL went to Pitts to visit with my brother's family. I'm so glad they are flying home tomorrow morning. I just hope they make it out before the storm reaches there.

We are well stocked & now have a generator! Woo Hoo.

I picked up 3/4 of a steer while in the area. A family friend sold it to us (my brother got the other 1/4). My friends are thrilled to have so much grass fed, antibiotic free beef! I took 30lbs (which is probably more than I should have). But I'll try to use it for meals for dad.

Stay safe everyone. It sounds like we're in for some fun ahead.
Tam

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

October 28, 2012
6:38 PM

Post #9318440

I haven't wanted a generator, but as I age I'm re-thinking it. My sis and I looked online today but a beginning price tag of $899 stopped us cold. $599 she could handle, and I have no means to contribute except to fetch one and feed it to run.

The power has been off twice this evening already and the storm isn't even really here yet. I'm gathering ingredients for one-pot meals to cook on the woodstove, and I made 2 skillets of cornbread this afternoon.

I still haven't found a cornbread recipe (or corn meal) that suits me. Laurel, yours doesn't look crumbly... what's the secret? More flour? I use blackstrap in things like baked beans, would never have thought to drizzle it on cornbread. But then, I also don't add sugar to my cornbread.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

October 29, 2012
6:32 AM

Post #9318790

The storm is expected to hit this afternoon, leave tonight, and then winds will come around from the south briefly before the whole system passes off. They're calling it a tropical storm for our area now. We are closer to the Delaware Bay than to the ocean, so hopefully that means that we'll have less of an impact. However, it's still three hours to high tide on our river and it already looks like a typical high tide now. I'm sure it will overflow its banks and maybe go over our dock, but our house is on high ground so we are hoping that we'll be fine.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

October 29, 2012
6:34 AM

Post #9318792

Home Depot has 4,000 watt generators for mid 3 to high 4 hundred dollar range. That's enough to run a good size space heater plus lights, etc.. You can rotate your fridge and freezer as needed. That size will run about eighteen hours on one fueling. Having a hard wired one is ideal but so expensive. I have to have back up power because of the orchid collection. We are out of power for three to five days at least once a winter here in Atlanta. Last time I was near hysterical when the house got to 42 degrees and the greenhut was 36. We would be much warmer at Maypop with the firplace and woodstove but I can't leave the 'chids behind.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

October 29, 2012
6:40 AM

Post #9318795

Keep us posted about the storm. We are pretty blustery here with wind and road advisories. Gusts up to 45 m.p.h..

Darius, about the cornbread, I use either one part flour to two parts cornmeal or one part masa harina (finely ground corn meal) to two parts regular corn meal. I use no fat/oil except to grease the skillet. Instead of the fat I use creamed corn. If the blackstrap fans are with us I'll poke a few holes in the bread coming out of the oven and drizzle with molasses while hot. I've learned to not leave the bread in an iron skillet unless you want it to taste like iron later.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

October 29, 2012
7:44 AM

Post #9318858

Thanks, Laurel. I didn't look at HD for generators because there's not one close by, just the 2 Lowe's within 30 miles each way. Lowe's (online) does show one cheaper generator, but it won't power very much nor run long on 1 fueling.

I bought a small used gas stove last month and had it converted to propane, and I have a small tank of propane so I can cook and can what's in the freezers if necessary. Plus I took out the small ventless propane heater that was here when I moved in, and put it in the barn. I'm sure I could hook it up again for my sister's bedroom on the other end of the house where the heat from the wood stove doesn't reach.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


October 29, 2012
8:38 AM

Post #9318936

I ate my weight in lowcountry food last weekend. Tomorrow I have an early morning date with the gym and a late afternoon appointment with my kitchen appliances.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

October 29, 2012
8:44 AM

Post #9318943

Darius - are you OK for water w/o power? That's what pushed us into buying a big one. We bought a little one to keep the freezer & fridges going for Irene. We splurged for a big one after the Halloween snow last year - we went 8 days w/o power and really missed the water more then anything. It did get chilly & we were lucky it wasn't colder outside.

We've had almost an inch of rain so far. The power apparently was out last night while we slept. But its all fine here so far. Thankfully our worst issue with water is the runoff from the properties above us. We're on a ridge of a mountain and the road winds around a steep section and dumps a river onto our driveway whenever there is a big rain. It flooded the greenhouse twice. Last time it pulled up one of the steps and so we decided to replace them. So now there is a landing about a foot higher than surrounding ground at the top of the steps down to the greenhouse so we're hoping the water goes around it and not down the steps. Crossing my fingers!

Tam
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

October 29, 2012
9:13 AM

Post #9318984

Mmmm, lowcountry!

I massaged that 1/2 turkey breast with jerk and he is resting in the fridge. Will roast later. We will have rice with peppers, onions and tomatoes and iron skillet greenbeans. Meanwhile, emergency appt. with the dentist. My six month old crown went flying across the room when I flossed. No good deed goes unpunished. It's intact but he better use something more than school paste to stick it back on.

We have no water at Maypop if the power goes out. We stock ten gallons of drinking water and keep a 40 gallon garbage can filled in the basement for toilet flushing. We don't have a generator there which is why I'm wanting to get that freezer emptied. In my younger days I could tote water buckets from the cistern but that's an uphill haul. Bad enough when I have to haul water up one flight of stairs from the basement. :)

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

October 29, 2012
10:31 AM

Post #9319063

We've been toting water from the cistern to flush toilets. But that's hopefully forever in our past. :-)

I've decided to call it an early day in a few hours and do a little baking. I promised DH an apple crisp as I walked out the door with the one I baked last week w/o leaving him a sample.

Tam
gardenglory
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 9a)

October 29, 2012
11:00 AM

Post #9319108

When we lived in Roanoke, we had a well. Never lived with snow and ice and the electricity was forever going out. First time it went out I got the brilliant idea to put some snow in the tub to melt, so we could flush the toilets. OK, so what works in FL isnt so great in Va. in the winter. Needless to say, with no electricty, the house was frigid and the snow not only wouldnt melt, it made things colder. After that, the Holiday Inn on 419 was on my speed dial for future storms.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

October 29, 2012
11:03 AM

Post #9319114

We have city water in the house, and it's never been a problem with power outages. If that fails, we have a spring about 40 feet from the house; the water is drinkable but I'd boil it for safety. I usually have 3-4 bottles (4 gal.) of drinking/cooking water on hand because the town water is too chlorine-tasting.

We are creek-front so there's always water available for flushing, and it's not very far to tote it here, maybe 50 feet and fairly level.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

October 29, 2012
11:16 AM

Post #9319124

I tried the "melt the snow" method but it takes so much snow that its not worth the bother. The cistern is a bit of a walk (up hill) but we haul up(4) 5gal buckets and that lasts quite a few flushes. We rented a room in a cheap hotel for showers and brought the water back for dishes in large containers meant for camping last time the power went out. But it was awful with the chlorine (sorry to hear you suffer with city water Darius!)

The wind is really picking up now. 1.5" of rain so far.

Tam
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

October 29, 2012
1:14 PM

Post #9319283

Love the speed dial solution. I too am helpless in the snow. We will be spending the night in Gainesville on the way back. That's where I shed the shorts and get back into fleece before continuing on to Atlanta. We drive from Miami to Apopka for lunch and orchid shopping with DG friends, then on to Gainesville and then home. We drive straight through on the way down.

Okay, off to make a white bean chili to go while the turkey breast does its thing. Oh, and about the crown. The dentist decided he does not like the way it is seated and is having a new one made. Meanwhile, the old one is the temporary.

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

October 29, 2012
2:39 PM

Post #9319378

we are 2 hours away from Atlantic City. Windy some rain, we still havelight, our minds are bright and our bodys are warm so baked potato and lamb chops. Pot in 1/2 hr so far, L chops can go on grill, but very windy. We'll see

Laurel, are you off to see Jim, love his wife, beautiful, Chids collector. Met him at Fred Rumps house in Napels. FL gorgeous grounds.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


October 29, 2012
2:52 PM

Post #9319395

Thoughts with all of you-all affected by this storm.

Has anyone made tasso? It looks easy enough to make...just takes some patience.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

October 29, 2012
3:25 PM

Post #9319436

Terry, I've not made tasso per se by salt curing. We hot smoke butts several times a year to use in the same way as tasso. I like to think this is the kinder, gentler way and maybe a bit healthier.

Helene, you are a trooper. I'll be thinking of you and your family tonight and tomorrow as you weather the storm. I'm gathering your flight for Wednesday is canceled? I've not been home to see the news but will turn it on shortly. That you still have power is very good news. I heard from DD several hours ago. She is in Maryland. They still have power but expecting it would not last Things are flickering and lights are going out across D.C. They recently bought a generator.

Jim and Patty are both beautiful people. Jim gets a fat head so don't tell him I said so. They have stayed with us and shared Thanksgiving as well as visited twice at Maypop. The last time was this past July to celebrate the weekend of our daughter's wedding. Jim and I started meeting in Apopka several times a year when I am traveling back from my house in North Miami Beach. When we first met, Jim was a novice grower and I helped him build his collection. I still point and say "buy it" when we shop together. Especially ones that are not good for my situation. We orchid shop and hug. Patty knows. lol I know Fred too. I heard Fred did a wonderful RU several years back.

I've been up since five for several days running and am running out of steam. I have to set up the second heating system in the greenhut tonight because we are going into the lower thirties. The very last of the orchids that can take it down to almost freezing have to come in. Unfortunately they are large and heavy. My back is feeling the last few days.

Cooked ingredients for lasagna that will also work for chili so I'll split it up and make some of each. Think it would be best to wait until tomorrow to assemble and cook the lasagna. The jerk turkey breast is done. There's surely is a dinner in there somewhere if anyone is hungry.



This message was edited Oct 29, 2012 5:50 PM

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

October 30, 2012
7:42 AM

Post #9320064

yep, had dinner and the trees fell on the power lines. Will have to be creative today food wise.No electric here. Was horrible night as the storm hit kand

We have limited generator activated electricity.water but not hot Covered as far as food and such. Although limited as I was leaving Wed. changed to thursd. as the kids are going on Vac. on Frid.. Now who knows. Will know more tomorrow..

They have a vermont cast iron stove, a little engine that could. it heats the downstairs pretty good.

My dh and I went to Freds RU was very very nice, that's where I met Jim and wife.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

October 30, 2012
8:14 AM

Post #9320113

We're on generator power here. Cell service is sketchy but thank goodness for landlines! The DSL is up too.

The greater eastern Pa & NJ/NY area sure got hit bad! It sounded like the house was going to blow away last night. But we're fine and better than most thanks to the generator we bought after the storm last Oct. (We didn't get it until mid-summer!) No oven but we have the gas range & microwave. I am planning to have salmon & steamed broccoli for dinner.

Tam

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

October 30, 2012
10:04 AM

Post #9320208

We seem to have come through the storm all right except that we lost power at about 11 p.m. last night and the generator kicked in. That has come in very handy since we installed it - at the end of June we had a derecho storm and were out for five days. Ours is a whole-house generator and even powers my studio and the garage, so it's been a lifesaver. When our kids were small we used to manage with the gas stove-top, the woodstove, and kerosene lanterns, but the hardest part was no water, which was a hassle for flushing toilets and washing up.

I went out this morning to survey the damage with DH; he had tied the boat ramp and dock bench together and then both to a tree by the dock, and it's a good thing, because overnight the water came up high enough that they would both have floated away. They were all askew on the dock, which is amazing because their combined weight is extremely heavy. But they're both wood, so they float.

DH went up on the street and talked to some of our neighbors earlier, and only the people on our line through the woods lost power. It's always like that. Still, I think we got off easy!

Thumbnail by greenhouse_gal   Thumbnail by greenhouse_gal         
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digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

October 30, 2012
11:20 AM

Post #9320272

Happy dance for you all .

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

October 30, 2012
12:30 PM

Post #9320315

I am glad you got whole house generator. They were talking here, my kids of doing just that because of last year, but didn't. Just about every rd here has trees down, so we actually can't get to main rd. Rt 22, to get gas for generator and both work from home. So syphoning from cars. Neighbors got together and moved two huge trees from in front of the house. Ruined three chain saws, lucky one neighbor is in fire wood business (side line - he accepts trees and makes fire wood for needy) so he knew what to do and used his huge back hoe to remove them, push them off the road. It's not dire, never the less a mess.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

October 30, 2012
3:22 PM

Post #9320459

If you have frequent outages it's not a bad idea. Ours works on propane because we don't have a natural gas line here, which is a shame, but it's still been a tremendous convenience when we've needed it. That must have been one huge tree to ruin three chain saws! We've had to handle some very big trees too and it's not fun.

Lamb chops and risotto with porcini and asparagus tonight. Easy and tasty. We have the woodstove running for the first time this season and it feels very nice!

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

October 30, 2012
4:18 PM

Post #9320511

Leslie, glad to see you made it through with few problems. Halloween Hurricane "Sandy" has almost been a no-show here, not much worse than a typical winter storm. We have several inches of snow, ans should get more in the next 24 hours, but it's manageable.

Off topic:
Laurel, all this talk of hurricanes has my mind rambling. You haven't said when your parents moved to Miami Beach, but my grandparents moved to Miami (and my grandmother's brother to the Redlands) just before the 1926 hurricane that turned their home to kindling. They all survived. My great uncle probably provided fruit from Redlands to your folks' restaurant!

Hurricanes photos from 1926. The photo of Bakers' Haulover bridge is impressive!

I have a copy an old publication, Memories of Old Miami (1905-1929), by Hoyt Frazure as told to Nixon Smiley. No copyright date. There is a picture of cutting trees in 1905 to make way for Lincoln Road that is simply amazing.

Thumbnail by darius   Thumbnail by darius   Thumbnail by darius      
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MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

October 30, 2012
5:27 PM

Post #9320554

I am running back and forth with preparations. Off early tomorrow. Of course we have not yet eaten dinner. Being in the oven does count though. :)

Darius, my dad moved to S. FL in stages because he was doing business there but lived in NYC. He started going there around 1940. He was in the wholesale produce business and my mom, who came there in the mid forties, ran high end hotel kitchens and restaurants. That's how they met. He was providing her hotel with produce. Dad and his brothers would buy and sell produce in the N.E. in warm season months. Mostly to the old Catskill hotels and boarding houses and some in NYC. Then they would drive down US1 to S. FL, procure produce in winter, and drive it back to the Bronx. He and his brothers went off to WW ll and eventually moved the business to S. FL after the war. But he enlisted out of Miami in 1942. He was friends with a young Bill Stuckey during the war (Stuckey's) and after the war Bill Stucky provided the stands while dad and his brothers created the gift baskets with citrus, confections (like pecan rolls and coconut patties), jams and marmalades that were sold along the highway stops.

Those are awesome pictures. I used to go feed sharks and rays off the Baker's Haulover pier (cheap dates). As for Lincoln Road; I get dewy eyed recalling shopping trips with my mom. The journeys were on the level of Terry's vacation trips with Swimmer Girl. It involved getting all dressed up, eating lunch out and mom buying me clothes she thought were age and style appropriate. That part was not such a happy memory. She loved Chanel and believed having two Chanel suits was better than having twelve of anything else.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

October 30, 2012
5:51 PM

Post #9320562

LOL, I'm in partial agreement with your mom. Chanel suits were so awesome, but then my mother was a dressmaker in Coral Gables and Chanel suits fit my frame, but what do I know...

Back to dinners... I'm cooking down a beef stew with kitchen sink ingredients. It's the remains of yesterday's beef chuck roast and everything I can think of to throw in, home-canned green beans, home-canned corn and tomatoes, a few blue potatoes I found (yuck, they turn grey), parsnips and rutabagas, and of course the regular carrots and onions. I might even throw in a few chunks of winter squash when everything else is almost soft.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

October 31, 2012
5:25 AM

Post #9320866

I'm glad to see that everyone got through Sandy okay.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

October 31, 2012
5:43 AM

Post #9320890

This is a holiday meal for me...We're having pumpkin gnocchi served over kale, green salad and pumpkin/pecan bundt cake.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


October 31, 2012
5:49 AM

Post #9320892

Celene, that sounds wonderful.

I'm going to whip up a pot of some kind of soup for tonight...it is not really cold and blustery, but the frost in the air just FEELS cold and blustery. Last night was a banquet for Mr. Official...so dinner was catered. Tomorrow night I'm meeting up with some folks, so dinner may be hit or miss for my family. Maybe by Saturday our schedules will finally settle down enough for me to cook more than one meal in any given 7-day period.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

October 31, 2012
10:54 AM

Post #9321189

Back on line after 24hrs w/o phone (nor DSL/internet). I took a drive - we were really lucky! Looks like a lot of folks got hit bad.

Dinner will be salmon patties & broccoli. With apple crisp for dessert.

Tam

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

October 31, 2012
3:44 PM

Post #9321387

Kids are over for dinner and I've been working on a chili recipe that calls for added pumpkin and dark chocolate. Looks and smells really good; I'll be serving it with grated cheese and sour cream, plus corn chips and guacamole. DGD and I like beans so I added more than the recipe called for. For 700 g of beef (that's about a pound and a half and I had over two pounds of deer meat) I used three cans of kidney beans. Additional ingredients were diced tomatoes, coriander, cumin, cinnamon, and oregano, plus small cubes of pumpkin, and onions and garlic. It didn't require browning the meat first, which was nice.

We got our power back this morning at about 9:30. They were projecting a return date of Nov. 4 so we're grateful!

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

October 31, 2012
4:19 PM

Post #9321411

Very interesting chili! Never would have thought to add pumpkin or chocolate. I may try the pumpkin but I think chocolate deserves better. :-)

The salmon patties were good.
Tam
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

October 31, 2012
6:17 PM

Post #9321508

Chocolate is a staple in many Mexican dishes . I haven't tried it in chili but will try to remember next time I make some . I'll just add it to a bowl to see if I like it .

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

November 1, 2012
6:52 AM

Post #9321812

Indeed - I've had mole sauce on a number of dishes and its delicious. I was (mostly) just joking - I love chocolate anything (well... maybe not chocolate covered ants or grasshoppers).

I've got cabin fever - have barely left the house since Sat. We may just need to go out for dinner tonight.
Tam
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

November 1, 2012
8:11 AM

Post #9321878

Mole is one of my favorites . Chocolate is good plain , in milk , ice cream , with pecans , almonds, in peanut sauce . Gosh , I bet I'd even like it on eggs or picante sauce , or in Iced tea . LOL

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

November 1, 2012
5:19 PM

Post #9322264

The other day while we were housebound due to Sandy I made us both some hot chocolate, in our French coffee bowls. Normally I only make hot chocolate when it snows, but boy did that taste good!
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

November 1, 2012
6:02 PM

Post #9322294

I did try a chocolate grasshopper many years ago . It tasted like a chocolate cigarette

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

November 1, 2012
6:18 PM

Post #9322309

I got my Invisalign trays today, so I had some squishy Chinese noodles.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

November 1, 2012
7:05 PM

Post #9322351

We have power! Woo Hoo!

My dentist said my teeth were too tight together for invisalign. I hope they work for you Celene.

Digger - that's about what I'd expect. Brave girl!

Dinner out was fabulous!
Tam

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

November 1, 2012
10:36 PM

Post #9322482

Power! Woo Hoo! Great for you, Tam. The stories out of NJ and NY are awful.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

November 2, 2012
5:59 AM

Post #9322598

I just spoke to a DG friend in NJ. She said there is no gasoline for all the generators so even those with generators are w/o power much of the time. I tried to talk her into driving here but she doesn't want to leave home.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

November 2, 2012
6:23 AM

Post #9322620

My entire family was in New Orleans when Hurricane Katrina hit...

In many, many ways, the folks hit on the east coast are exceedingly fortunate that the emergency responders are already on the scene, there. Unfortunately, like many in NOLA, this seems to be a retired generation that has lost so much, and it will take years to recover.

My prayers are with them, their families, the responders, and the officials who are in charge of this recovery operation. Also, I pray that neighbor will help neighbor, and that communities will come together to assist each other, as they can. Those with food, share with those without food. Those with clothes, share with those without clothes. Those whose homes were relatively unscathed, open your doors to the homeless who have no homes. Those able-bodied enough, especially reach out to help the elders and the children, and give them a sense of hope for the future. They are the most frightened and vulnerable.

I wish I could leave my job today, get to the East coast, roll up my sleeves, and dive into the mass of humanity, there, in need.

Ya'll pray for a windfall for me, ok, cause I'd give it all away to those folks, in a New York minute...

This is my prayer. And, thank You, God, for those you spared.

Amen.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

November 2, 2012
7:06 AM

Post #9322670

Oh , Linda , I'd be right behind you .
Still waiting to hear from Pirl . I'm getting scared now . It can't be very good for her . Praying .
gardenglory
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 9a)

November 2, 2012
8:17 AM

Post #9322743

I just saw something really distressing. Please, this is not political, I dont know anything about unions, but I just saw where people had shown up in NJ from many southern states to pitch in and help get things back up and running. I had to hear it twice, but it appears that the unions in NJ are not letting any other workers in to help rebuild. Whatever thats about, I hope some compassion rules soon. You just wish you could take them a meal or something, its getting so cold. Im afraid all I can send is prayers.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

November 2, 2012
8:43 AM

Post #9322755

My D H is retired and union . I showed this to him and he agrees , that's inhumane and a black eye for the local unions . Off my soapbox . That isn't politics , that's plain stupidity , someone will answer for that .

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

November 2, 2012
9:06 AM

Post #9322759

I just came home from NJ.My DD SIL live very rural. You have no idea what just happened on past Sunday between 6-8 PM. The tree damage in their area is sur-real. hence you couldn't get from one block to the next. could'nt go down the Mt to Whihouse (town) or up the Mt to Califon. Neighbors banned together to remove 2 huge trees in front of their place opening up the street They are seeing to have light in 2-3 weeks because there are less populated, ^The Key everywhere is you can't help if you can't get there, wether because of water or streets shut off by falling trees. Right, generator but no gas. no where in NJ.

At the airport, the horror stories of some couples that happen to meet and know of each other through firehouse. was sur-real. One built his house 2 years ago. Can't go in. and what with all those fires???

Sat next to a young lady from Manhattan,she has never seen anything like this.Lower Manh. closed up under water. Friend lost all their belongings including that of their 3 childre and stories upon stories.

I will agree , same as when Katherina hit and yes, the electric companies had back up from other states already on Sunday, and yes other agencies and the Governors where right there, contra to New Orleans. Like in New Orl you can't do anything if you can't get there.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

November 2, 2012
9:49 AM

Post #9322791

I cannot even imagine how bad it is up there. I probably don't want to know. It reminds me too much of the chaos in the book, "One Second After" when there was no electricity, no transportation and no food.

My cousin, who commanded a Search and Rescue battalion in South FL, took 30 men to NYC during the 911 mess. The local unions wouldn't let them do anything but place plywood over the fire hoses so the trucks wouldn't tear up the hoses. What a waste of trained manpower when folks were still trapped in the rubble. Idiots.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

November 2, 2012
10:43 AM

Post #9322830

I was thinking how much we've learned from Katrina. The response is night & day different.

I googled this and am not sure its really true. It was reported by one crew from Georgia who said they were asked to affiliate with a union and given the impression it was required for them to work. I don't see anything other than this one person speaking for a crew of 6. There are a lot of non-union crews working with the unions so I tend not to believe it. Or if it did happen, I bet it was just an idiot and not someone with any real authority.

Tam

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

November 2, 2012
12:01 PM

Post #9322865

The Hurricane Katrina experience is very near and dear to my heart, and I don't wanna turn this thread south with all that I manage to contain in my emotions on that subject. I'll just say this one thing, and you won't hear from me again about Katrina --

"our officials (in the past) have airlifted supplies, provisions, rations, clothing, water, temporary tents, etc. to Third World nations halfway around the world, faster than they responded to the city of New Orleans..." That I saw emergency pumps, and our President on the scene, within TWO days of Hurricane Sandy says a whole lot to me...

'Nuff said.
gardenglory
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 9a)

November 2, 2012
12:06 PM

Post #9322868

WOW

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

November 2, 2012
3:49 PM

Post #9323024

Dinner is a big pot of chili of sorts. I found 3 red peppers in the garden so I used those, the left over cabbage from a few weeks ago, pulled out some roasted 'mater sauce, a pound of ground beef and cooked up a cup of my own garden rattlesnake beans. It smells good.

Tam

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

November 2, 2012
4:14 PM

Post #9323036

I've been in the voting line since 5:30, and was just about to ask what's for dinner! Good thing I ate a late lunch!

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

November 2, 2012
6:15 PM

Post #9323160

I had a veggie BLT&A. Nothing fancy or special, but good.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

November 2, 2012
6:18 PM

Post #9323163

I'd give you a bowl of chili but its a little far. It was really really hot but very tasty.

Tam

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

November 2, 2012
6:56 PM

Post #9323194

I've discovered my half-sis, who shares this house, will often eat If I cook something. So now at least once a week I need to cook something I can share. I doubt it will help her weight (84 pounds) but I'm encouraged if she even eats anything, much less something nutritious instead of junk food.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

November 3, 2012
6:48 AM

Post #9323453

That's great Darius! Sounds like you'll want to make something packed with nutrients & calories.

Tam

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

November 3, 2012
8:28 AM

Post #9323544

darius - it's a good thing you do for her.

Making vegetable soup - sharing with the manager of the condo complex. He is very helpfull to me in lifting things. small repair etc. They love it.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

November 3, 2012
3:00 PM

Post #9323776

Nothing fancy. I have a pork tenderloin in the oven, just with EVOO, s & p, and a sprig of fresh rosemary I cut from the garden this afternoon. Also a couple of sweet potatoes baking. I had planned fried green tomatoes but I think they need a couple more days to blush.
gardenglory
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 9a)

November 3, 2012
3:16 PM

Post #9323783

Pork tenderloin here as well. Wrap them in bacon and put on grill. Sweet potatoes, yellow squash and a pot of kale. We have never eaten it and I hope it taste better than it smells. Its just so healthy Ive got to give it a chance.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

November 3, 2012
6:05 PM

Post #9323911

DH ate at work today, so no meal for dinner. Tomorrow--sirloin tip roast with shitake mushrooms, mashed sweet potatoes, and broccoli. I will probably have a veg pot pie.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

November 3, 2012
7:16 PM

Post #9323956

I'm off for a week in Ca. So have fun cooking folks!
Tam
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

November 4, 2012
2:38 PM

Post #9324539

T bones on sale so stocked up . That's tonight with sweet potatoes , baked . Will also mix pecans with blu cheese and stuff inside hamburger that is half and half beef and venison . Will grill that too cuz the coals will still be hot . Good hamburgers tomorrow for lunch

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

November 4, 2012
2:50 PM

Post #9324549

Those burgers sound yummy!

I have a pot of browned pork chops and onions simmering with fresh sauerkraut.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

November 4, 2012
3:29 PM

Post #9324575

Yum , I bought two pork chops for a big breakfast later in the week . I'm either gonna celebrate the results of the election or mourn that day . Either way food will help sooth me > LOL

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

November 4, 2012
3:30 PM

Post #9324576

Those burgers do sound good, and so do the pork chops! We're having Italian sausage with broccoli raab over ww rotelle. Just remembered I had the raab lurking in the nether regions of my refrigerator. Last night we went out to celebrate our anniversary and I had rack of lamb with pesto, which was delicious.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

November 4, 2012
7:47 PM

Post #9324812

I have never eaten lamb . Never seen it in store in south .Maybe I just wasn't looking in the right place .

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

November 5, 2012
4:28 AM

Post #9325022

That and duck are my favorites. A lot of people don't like it; I don't know whether you have to grow up eating it or what.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


November 5, 2012
4:30 AM

Post #9325025

I love duck, but it's much richer than chicken, so I love it in small quantities. Lamb, not so much. My husband likes it though...and bless his heart, if it's on the menu when we're out somewhere he will most likely order it since he never gets it at home.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

November 5, 2012
6:29 AM

Post #9325146

I like lamb, too. Never had duck...
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

November 5, 2012
7:07 PM

Post #9325681

Short story , I gave my EX m i l the keys to the bank account one year because she wanted us there for Thanksgivingand I told her to spend as much as she wanted to get the fixings . We were in northern Indiana in our 18 wheeler . Drove straight through to Converse La and just made it to her house at 12:00 noon Thanksgiving day . She had dinner ready and had cooked 2 ducks . 2 ducks , mashed potatoes and gravy . I held my temper , but was pi- - ed . we had driven all day to get our load off in Indiana , unloaded and drove straight south with no rest to eat ducks . She had also invited her two sisters and the husband of one . two ducks for six people and taters , gravy . Needless to say I don't buy duck for that reason .

This message was edited Nov 5, 2012 10:11 PM
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

November 6, 2012
5:59 AM

Post #9325890

I know It is a little late for "Sandy", but may be handy for the Nor'easter -

http://www.redcross.org/find-help

It may take a couple of hours, but they will contact you with information on someone you are looking for.

Looks like the CenterPoint crews will be there a while longer.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

November 6, 2012
6:40 AM

Post #9325927

Sally,
PLEASE forgive me for ROTFLMBO!!!! But, I think I can top your duck.

The last Thanksgiving I spent with my mom (she had been diagnosed with lung cancer, and came to share some time with me), we had gone to the store together to buy a ham, cause, before fried turkeys, our family just wasn't big on dried out bird. We were used to either hams or hens for the big dinner.

So, we get the ham home and I find this recipe with the coca cola and brown sugar glaze with cherries stuck all over it with toothpicks, and we cook the ham. It sure smelled good!

Thanksgiving morning, neither of us felt like getting out of our jammies, so, since it was just the two of us, we didn't. Come time for dinner, we were still in our jammies, and heated up the ham and sliced into it. Only, it didn't look quite like ham -- sort of greyish brown, and more stringy, and not that nice hammy pink.

Then, we tasted it, and it SURE didn't taste like ham! It tasted like a Chinese stir fry. So, I retrieved the wrapper that read "Pork Butt". We laughed the rest of the day eating that glazed pork roast, and wondering how BOTH of us let that one get by us!

That was one of the best Thanksgiving dinners I ever had.

Linda

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

November 6, 2012
6:54 AM

Post #9325936

I spent the night with my niece helping with the twin babies and the 5-yr-old.

I cooked dinner. SHRIMP SCAMPI, for the first time, ever. I used a conglomerated recipe from The Pioneer Woman, a copycat recipe from Caraba's Italian Grill, and two recommendations from posts on both websites. Then, I added my own spin to it.

I had been sweating bullets all day long, cause my niece is a foodie. Her idea of a vacation is hitting all the five star restaurants. Except, her new pallet is nothing like it was when she grew up in New Orleans, and I find her food seasonings to be very strange to my Creole pallet. Most of what she cooks tastes quite bland. Healthy, but bland...

So, here I am, trying to impress her cosmopolitan pallet, satisfy my own pallet, and stay true to my Creole, Crescent City roots. "If it ain't seasoned well, it ain't down home!"

It was totally FANTASTIC!!!! I mean, short of overcooking the pasta and the shrimp, it's pretty hard to ruin Scampi, right? She's still commenting on how good it was. And, if I might say so myself, it was FANTASTIC!!! And, I didn't even add seasonings (other than the garlic and onions) except a small amount of salt to the pasta water, and a BAM! of fresh chopped parsley for finishing!

Crusty garlic bread, and some Moscato wine (Can you say "a POUND of sugar?")

Spot on.

Ya'll give me great cooking courage on this thread...

Thanks for your examples.
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

November 6, 2012
7:00 AM

Post #9325942

You forgot to make the bread pudding, GG! LOL.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


November 6, 2012
7:13 AM

Post #9325950

Sally, sorry about your duck experience. I'd probably harbor a grudge against the bird, too :-)

Tonight is Tuesday. So...I think it will be taco night. It's fast and easy (well, once I get the oil heated up to fry the store-bought tortillas, it goes fast...when I break over and make my own, it's a little slower getting everything on the dinner table.) And my children's eyes still light up when I mention tacos for dinner, no matter how old they are, or how many times I've served them tacos for dinner.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

November 6, 2012
7:22 AM

Post #9325961

You know, I've been looking at two loaves of white bread I am never going to eat, thinking, "I really should make a bread pudding before these go bad..."

Problem is, these days, the bread gets moldy before it gets hard. It used to just get stale, and nice and crispy -- perfect for bread pudding. Guess I'll have to dry it out in the oven...

Hey, Bubba!
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

November 6, 2012
4:37 PM

Post #9326461

I don't do bread pudding , I do biscuits instead . Sara Lee bread lasts forever . My son left some at his house and a month or so later , I found it . For some reason I opened it and got the surprise of my life , IT WAS fresh . I even tasted it and it was fresh enough to eat . I didn't but I do buy it often now . !00% whole wheat of course .
Good story G G . I like to put a butt in a roaster with butter , lots of brown sugar and sweet potatoes , salt . Cook on low on top of stove covered or in oven covered . Good eating . Oops , here comes another five lbs .

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

November 6, 2012
5:02 PM

Post #9326481

Tonight we had duck confit with Pommes Sarladaises (potatoes cooked Sarlat-style with a touch of duck fat) and a salad with the last of our tomatoes. It was really good!
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

November 6, 2012
7:52 PM

Post #9326567

I heated him up a packaged meal and heated up some toms ,corn,onion and okra from a can . He said it was delish . I'm watching the election returns and don't have desire to cook . Returns more important that I see it as it happens .

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

November 7, 2012
6:32 AM

Post #9326801

I had leftovers last night and watched the returns. Today, I made turkey kibbee, brown rice pilaf, and a salad with tomatoes, feta, and parsley for dinner.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

November 7, 2012
7:44 AM

Post #9326866

My niece requested SHRIMP SCAMPI for a second night in a row, plus enough for leftovers for her DH!!!

YUMMY!!!
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

November 7, 2012
11:23 AM

Post #9327061

Oh well , I might as well have gone to bed early .

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

November 7, 2012
2:24 PM

Post #9327198

Digger, at least you had a clear idea of what happened. I tracked the election on my computer and I think I missed a lot of important commentary that way.
gardenglory
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 9a)

November 7, 2012
2:54 PM

Post #9327225

well, for a start, they explained except for the over 50% on the dole, its going to get alot more expensive next year for those who work. I think they said come Jan. 250$ a month is the least anyones payroll tax deductions are going to go up, so hang tight.
I say eat what, and while you can. Today is my poor husbands birthday, all I can manage is some chinese food and german chocolate cake with scrambled eggs in the frosting. I gave it a shot. Not a good temperer when it comes to making cooked frosting with eggs in it. He loves that coconut frosting tho. Ill hide it under the ice cream.



This message was edited Nov 8, 2012 8:41 AM

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


November 7, 2012
3:02 PM

Post #9327235

We often have German chocolate cake for birthdays here, too :-)

Tonight is meatloaf, mashed potatoes, green beans and probably mac 'n cheese, just because my family thinks meatloaf isn't complete without those on the side. I rock their world with new foods pretty frequently, but some menus are mainstays and shouldn't be messed with.
gardenglory
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 9a)

November 7, 2012
3:07 PM

Post #9327242

I wish I could get that tempering down. It can sure set me in a stew, but always is well received. I pick out as much of the scrambled white as I can
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

November 7, 2012
5:18 PM

Post #9327344

How odd . As much as I love sweets , I prefer cake that doesn't need frosting ,or the gooey is baked in .

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

November 7, 2012
5:39 PM

Post #9327414

When I lived in Miami back in the Dark Ages, the Cuban bakeries sold cakes frosted with a thin, clear fruit-flavored glaze. Far less sweet than regular bakery cakes. Strange because the Cubans loved their sugar.
gardenglory
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 9a)

November 8, 2012
4:00 AM

Post #9327631

The cuban bakeries in Tampa used to use a glaze such as that. It was great. I miss alot of things from those bakeries. For al the sugar in the cokes I drink, I dont know why, but I dont care for icing on cake. That why there is one cake in the kitchen that just german chocolate and nothing else. Maybe a touch of ice cream if I eat it.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


November 8, 2012
4:48 AM

Post #9327658

I'm the opposite - I won't drink sugared drinks, but I could scarf up my weight in sweets if I gave myself free rein. I'm tempted to try a Chantilly cake (very similar to German chocolate, but Hawaiian. You can either leave out the nuts and coconut in the icing, or replace the pecans with macadamias.) For those of you that have struggled with overcooking the eggs, have you tried a double-boiler? It's my go-to method for any buttercream-type icing that requires cooking.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

November 8, 2012
8:43 AM

Post #9327857

Tempering is not difficult, it just requires patience ...you cannot hurry the blend of the hot and cold. You need to add very small amounts of the hot liquid to the egg. Too much and the egg starts to set up. Dump in a big splash and enjoy your scrambled eggs. It shouldn't take multiple tries to figure this out.

I don't understand why you think fifty percent are on the dole, GardenGlory. I am on social security, do you consider that being "on the dole" I earned those benefits, and I paid the maximum for many years. And I pay taxes.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

November 8, 2012
9:05 AM

Post #9327874

My 2nd Shrimp Scampi!

Thumbnail by Gymgirl
Click the image for an enlarged view.

gardenglory
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 9a)

November 8, 2012
10:54 AM

Post #9327961

No...I dont consider that being on the dole.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

November 8, 2012
12:09 PM

Post #9328033

To me the 50% refers to the ones that receive welfare benefits and Don't have anything wrong with them . I have two neighbors on each side that have two kids and both are pregnant again . One not married altho she lives with the children's father and he hasn't worked two weeks in three years , fired from both jobs after a few days . The other is with her husband that lives off the children's benefits and that's fine with the wife . I do get tired of contributing to people that can work and too busy holding the hand out , palm up . I think some senator said that 50% of the welfare and benefit people do not deserve the checks the other 50% are legitimately drawing help which I'm glad to pay out of my meager S S check . Anyway that's how I would describe "dole "
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

November 8, 2012
12:49 PM

Post #9328056

I'd like to return to cooking please. We returned home a few hours ago and youngest son surprised us with two plates of curried chicken in the fridge to reheat. Such a sweetie pie! Trouble is we stopped in Macon, Georgia at a famous BBQ joint called the Smok'n Pig. http://www.smoknpig.com/ We are stuffed! The pulled pork sandwiches must have had a half pound of meat each. I picked Brunswick stew and collards for a side and my honey had the stew and fried okra. The okra was truly fresh, not the breaded frozen stuff. I need to go off feed for a week or so. We huffed and puffed our way through that huge meal only to realize we should have wrapped and carried out half. Burp. It's good to be home.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


November 8, 2012
2:32 PM

Post #9328158

Who has a good recipe for Brunswick Stew? I'd love to fix some now that the weather has turned nippy.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

November 8, 2012
3:42 PM

Post #9328232

You don't need a recipe for Brunswick stew, Terry. I can give you directions that will walk you through it though. First you need a few pounds of already cooked meat, preferably pork or chicken. Rabbit is good if you have a spare. :) Some use ground meats but I prefer to use a small dice/minced or shredded. The basics...

Onions (1/2" dice)
Celery (1/4" dice) Optional
Baby lima beans
Tomatoes (chopped canned)
Corn (whole kernel)
Potatoes ( 1/2" dice) Optional depending on region but I always use them.


The sauce is a base of stock or water and canned tomatoes and their juice. I use about two quarts of home canned tomatoes. The flavor comes from a sweet and sour balance that is tweaked per your taste. There are a variety of ways you can do the sweet and sour part. I'll give you a few. Here goes a loosely strung recipe (you know me and recipes)...

With olive oil in a six to eight quart, non-reactive pot, sweat an onion and two stalks of celery for about five minutes or until translucent. Add one or two quarts of stock/water. Add salt and pepper as you would guesstimate for a finished pot of soup. The amount of water vs. tomatoes and their sauce varies, you'll see.

Add limas. If using frozen limas, cook one package as directed. I have a problem here because I use dry and it takes hours but realize most will use frozen. When limas are barely tender add tomatoes. If you want a tomato rich version use one part stock/water and two parts tomatoes and juice. Otherwise reverse it.

Add meat, potatoes and corn.

Now to make it a stew. Some use ketchup, vinegar, brown sugar, mustard and Worcestershire with varying degrees of cayenne for heat. I process my own BBQ sauce and use that to make the stew. So I would recommend buying a big bottle of your favorite BBQ sauce and loading it into the stew. Now taste. It needs to be made sweet and sour but more on the sour side. You will add apple cider vinegar and brown sugar. Start with 1/4 cup of each and see if you like it more sweet or more sour and keep adding 'til you get it right. I add cayenne here and adjust as I go. Same with salt and pepper. If you think something is missing you can try mustard or Worcestershire but I don't use it. Between our home canned tomatoes and starting with dry beans the flavors seem to be right. If you do use dry beans be aware that they will stay tan and never turn green. That's it. It's really a way to use leftover meat and some down home produce. I have made twists and turns using field peas instead of limas, leftover grilled corn. varietal peppers, turkey and sausage. It's all good.

This message was edited Nov 8, 2012 7:48 PM

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

November 8, 2012
5:11 PM

Post #9328311

Laurel, I may try making something along the steps you mentioned. Hard for me to do, though, because there's just me to eat it. To make a tasty batch would feed several people!

I used to stop at a BBQ place in Valdosta GA when I went south to visit my mother. YUM. Always got a quart of Brunswick stew on the way down, and again on the way back. Haven't had any for years, though. Years before that, I'd actually stop in Brunswick for stew but when I moved to Atlanta, I didn't take I-95 anymore. I really don't remember if it was any better, or not.
gardenglory
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 9a)

November 8, 2012
5:24 PM

Post #9328325

We had friends in Ga. that my parents would take me to visit every year. I think they went just for the drive to Brunswick to get the stew. I didnt see what the big deal was. Now... now I just love it and remember it and am so glad it got in my brain early.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

November 8, 2012
5:31 PM

Post #9328337

I 'spects I'll start cooking more of the "odd bits" again, since I'm reading "Deep Nutrition" on an inter-library loan.

The book is written by an MD and her chef husband, and avoids all the "do it my way" food plans. So far I love the background, and the research, and how she's tying it altogether in a way that makes sense. The first few chapters are full of genes, chromosomes, DNA, yada, yada... so it's not for the faint of heart.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

November 8, 2012
6:29 PM

Post #9328395

You can see I'm really compromised with the "do it my way" recipes, Darius, though I made five gallons of a chicken Brunswick stew and several gallons of a vegetarian version for DD's wedding weekend fling and it freezes perfectly. That aside, do you think you'll ever be by this way again? The place we ate at in Macon also has a place in Valdosta. Gardenglory, that's only a little over an hour from you. They have been on the Food Network challenges. We usually stay the course homeward but decided to off road to taste the product. Well worth it. I have to add that we arrived at ten in the morning and they opened the doors and served us at ten thirty. We were, after all, on the road. I can handle Chinese at 6 a.m. so why not BBQ at 10:30 a.m.? I did it for the sake of this forum. lol

Something to add to the meal... it was served with what they called "BBQ bread". It was a thin, maybe 3/4 inch sheet of cornbread that was griddle re-fried. Southern food at its best flavor/worst healthiness. lol

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

November 8, 2012
7:06 PM

Post #9328422

I never thought about making and freezing a batch of Brunswick stew. I'll keep it in mind, Thanks!

I suppose if I can eat leftover Brussels sprouts for breakfast, then anything goes.
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

November 9, 2012
5:59 AM

Post #9328640

DW pan fried some pork ribeyes with bell pepper strips, and made her famous honey carrots. Washed it down with a bottle of white wine.

No leftovers.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

November 9, 2012
8:20 AM

Post #9328784

Don't think I've ever eaten pork ribeyes, Bubba. Sounds like a good dinner. The famous honey carrots reminds me of a farm stand down the street from Maypop that sells boiled peanuts. The sign reads "ALMOST FAMOUS!!! (but not quite yet)".

I have cooked meats that went down to Miami frozen. Still good but need to be used. I'm soaking lima beans to start a Brunswick stew for tomorrow and am making Tuscan white bean and kale soup with turkey for tonight. There's a hunk of stale pumpernickel and another Parmesan baguette that will make tasty, fat garlic croutons for tonight's soup.

Gardenglory, about the tempering...M5's advice is good. I want to add that you should start with room temperature eggs. You slowly add enough of the hot liquid to warm the eggs (as said) and then slowly add the warm egg mixture back to the hot.

I was reading previous posts about Katrina, etc.. We took in a family (single mom and her two sons) for three months after Katrina. The oldest son was about to start his first year of college at Xavier University. I was able to obtain a one year, renewable hardship scholarship at Oglethorpe University here. The younger son attended our neighborhood school. They never returned to NOLA.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

November 9, 2012
8:37 AM

Post #9328805

Lots of people never returned to NOLA...

And, worse, a lot of the world-famous food has changed because new franchises bought the old businesses under the same names and brought in outside cooks who don't have a clue...

I was at Cafe Du Monde with a friend, and commented on how the Beignets just didn't taste "right". Then she told me that CDM had been sold to some Orientals who were running the place under the old name.

The music is the only "real" thing left, although, I started hearing strains of drum beats in music all over the country after the storm. Couldn't figure out why the sound was so familiar. Then, it hit me! Our local musicians had relocated all over the country, and brought those famous Mardi Gras and Jazz sounds to wherever they were now playing.

I'm sure there's some back woods, dark hole, joint in Everyman's America, enjoying an authentic bowl of Chef K Paul's "Shrimp Chippewa" wondering who that new cook is...
gardenglory
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 9a)

November 9, 2012
8:56 AM

Post #9328814

Kale...had it for the first time last week,
First we were at the health food store and I saw the most beautiful black perfect leaves in a bunch. It was my first time seeing tuscan/black kale. Bought it, cooked it. loved it. Thought, ok great, we must like kale and its so good for us. Was at Publix, and the only Kale they have is the Glory brand in the bags already cut up. Well...its a good darn thing I didnt try that first or I would have never come near the stuff again...awful, vile, yucky stuff. Cooked them both the same way. Health food market...here I come. Got to get some chia seeds anyway. They are doing wonders helping my daughter with her weight.
I would love that bean/kale soup recipe, or just a heads up where to get the recipe. I know Rachel Ray uses it in soups all the time. MaybeIll check over at food network.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

November 9, 2012
8:59 AM

Post #9328817

Gardenglory,
How did you cook the kale? Recipe?
gardenglory
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 9a)

November 9, 2012
9:09 AM

Post #9328830

I cooked some bacon, removed the bacon and then tossed the kale in the hot pan until the kale had just wilted. Threw in a ham bone and some water( or stock, ummm) well added a little liquid and let it cook till tender. The one was delicious, the other, plain awful. Any ideas welcome, like I say, it was the first time I had done it. Basically its how I cook cabbage but I dont use much liquid with cabbage.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

November 9, 2012
9:37 AM

Post #9328859

Fine cooking has a good kale and bean soup recipe
Tam

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

November 9, 2012
12:42 PM

Post #9329007

boil kale in chicken broth to dones desired. then saute 1-2 cloves shopped garlic in OO toss kale in this S and P to taste.

Or pre same way toss in saute of onion, garlic, chopped tomato. cook til tomato is done and toss kale in this. Works for string beans. Add a spritz of lemon juice at the end.

Cook Kale to well done chop fine. Make rue with butter, chopped garlic, 1C parsley than chopped ,flour. Take away some of the rue, now add kale and boil up the rue with some milk, adding from saved rue as needed to make a nice creamed kale. S and P. I make a batch of rue and freeze it for use with making creamed spinach which I love.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

November 9, 2012
2:34 PM

Post #9329117

Our garden kale is tender and tasty enough to saute in a bit of olive oil with garlic and a pinch of salt, then finish with a scant amount of water or broth to steam for a few minutes. I have grown many types and like them all. I blanch and pack the extra. We usually end up with six to twelve quarts in the freezers. I am operating off of last year's kale since we have no Fall garden this year.

My Tuscan bean soup, like most everything I cook, is approximate and never exactly the same. It always starts with Cannelloni beans cooked from dried. It has chicken stock made from roasted, boned chickens, garlic, onions, carrots and kale. Sometimes there is meat and often not. Since the beans are cooked from dried, they are more toothy, it's a different method than if you use canned. My beans will not fall apart the way I prepare it where as the canned ones would. Here's the way I'd imagine it using bought ingredients that compare in quantity to mine...

1/2 medium onion, 1/4" dice
1 carrot, 1/4" dice
1-2 large garlic cloves, minced
1 quart low sodium chicken stock
2 cups steam sauteed kale
2 cans Cannelloni beans
2 C. cooked white meat such as ground pork, or cooked diced chicken or turkey if meat is desired.
Salt and pepper to taste.

Sweat the onion, carrot and garlic with a pinch of kosher salt or sea salt until translucent, about five minutes. Add the stock and simmer gently for 20-30 minutes. Add the cooked kale and simmer gently for 15-20 minutes. Add the beans and meat and simmer an additional 15-30 minutes. Adjust seasonings as you go. Serve topped with croutons. Homemade toasted breads cut in one inch chunks or larger work best. Add a generous sprinkle of grated Parmesan, Pecorino Romano or another Pecorino. I have also topped this with a blop of goat cheese which turns it into a different creamy soup.

Now that sundown is so early I have to be off for Shabbat by 5:40 p.m.. but if there are any questions I can answer on Sunday. It's an easy dinner to prepare if you have a few ingredients made in advance.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

November 10, 2012
4:18 PM

Post #9329884

Here are a few photos of last night's cannelloni and kale soup showing the progression of preparation. It's an under one hour dinner. Leftovers freeze well too.
1. The sweated vegetables and stock.
2. Garlic Parmesan and pumpernickel croutons in progress.
3. The soup.
4. The finished dish topped with croutons and Pecorino Romano. Pecorino Romano is a sheep's milk cheese with a stronger flavor than Parmesan.

Thumbnail by MaypopLaurel   Thumbnail by MaypopLaurel   Thumbnail by MaypopLaurel   Thumbnail by MaypopLaurel   
Click an image for an enlarged view.

MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

November 10, 2012
4:29 PM

Post #9329887

Also took some phone photos of our BBQ lunch in Macon, GA at Smok'n Pig. Sorry, but phone photos keep coming out a little yellow. Can you believe this pile of meat and sides cost $8.00? That would be a fifteen dollar plate in Atlanta.

Thumbnail by MaypopLaurel   Thumbnail by MaypopLaurel         
Click an image for an enlarged view.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

November 10, 2012
5:13 PM

Post #9329916

Hi everyone! I am back from my week in Ca (business). Its so nice to be home and able to prepare my own food. I did have a fabulous lunch at an Indian restaurant there so it wasn't all bad. :-)

Tam

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


November 10, 2012
5:43 PM

Post #9329941

We enjoyed BBQ after being served another big slice of humble pie in Knoxville today. Sigh...
gardenglory
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 9a)

November 10, 2012
6:02 PM

Post #9329955

OO Lord, the GATORS almost did me in today. How they pulled it out Ill never know. No excuse for that play. BUT Then when Alabama got it taken to them...LOVED it. Ga now desimating auburn, so that leaves us out of the SEC playoff.
That said...Tennesse was always our arch rivals, but in the most fun way. It was always a blast when TN came/comes to town. Gotta love that Rocky top, and you dont fear for your life because the fans are actually nice. What happened to them today, killed me. How do they go on, they're just kids and that was a bitter pill after such a long season.

I think all I had today was a tuna sandwhich. Ill be making up for that tomorrow I hope.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


November 10, 2012
6:26 PM

Post #9329975

It's been a looooong dry spell since we sang Rocky Top enough to annoy anyone; I'm extremely tired of eating this particular pie. I was glad we were able to share a slice with Alabama fans. today :-) I'm going to kick back and watch Rear Window for the umpteenth time, and admire Grace Kelly's grace and wardrobe...it's escapism at its best.
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

November 11, 2012
2:59 PM

Post #9330530

GymGirl,
I'll bet some of the restaurants in Laffette still have the same owners and chefs.
But our favorite (Houston) German restaurant is under new ownership - meals right after the switch tasted the same, but what they catered at Saint Arnold's Oktoberfest had several changes. Now we hesitate going back.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


November 11, 2012
7:42 PM

Post #9330758

Gymgirl wrote:Lots of people never returned to NOLA...

And, worse, a lot of the world-famous food has changed because new franchises bought the old businesses under the same names and brought in outside cooks who don't have a clue...

I was at Cafe Du Monde with a friend, and commented on how the Beignets just didn't taste "right". Then she told me that CDM had been sold to some Orientals who were running the place under the old name.

The music is the only "real" thing left, although, I started hearing strains of drum beats in music all over the country after the storm. Couldn't figure out why the sound was so familiar. Then, it hit me! Our local musicians had relocated all over the country, and brought those famous Mardi Gras and Jazz sounds to wherever they were now playing.

I'm sure there's some back woods, dark hole, joint in Everyman's America, enjoying an authentic bowl of Chef K Paul's "Shrimp Chippewa" wondering who that new cook is...


http://www.cafedumonde.com/history/fernandez-family-history

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

November 11, 2012
8:50 PM

Post #9330785

???

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

November 12, 2012
9:20 AM

Post #9331122

I superduperscored a bunch of new Calphalon at a close-out sale, so I am either making pumpkin pancakes or pumpkin waffles for dinner. Gotta try out my new stuff!
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

November 12, 2012
10:22 AM

Post #9331207

Congrats on the superduperscore, Celene. Was there a waffle maker in the score?

We have an orchid society meeting tonight. The weather is turning wet, then colder. Soup's on (chicken veggie). I thought I was defrosting chocolate frosting for a pound cake but it ended up being chopped liver! Guess we'll have chopped liver sandwiches with the soup. We have a lovely sundried tomato bread for the sandwiches.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

November 12, 2012
10:29 AM

Post #9331212

That's funny on the "chocolate" defrosting, Laurel.

I need to get back to eating more liver. There's a vendor at our farmer's market who lives about 2 miles from me, and they raise rose veal. I like calf's liver much better than from a grown beef. I need to call them as the seasonal market is closing soon.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


November 12, 2012
11:44 AM

Post #9331259

Good thing you discovered it before glopping it on the pound cake, huh?

It's dreary and rainy here...it is definitely a chicken pot pie kind of night and since I didn't get it made last week, now's a great time.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

November 12, 2012
2:42 PM

Post #9331418

Today was gorgeous - sunny and almost 70. I had chicken with black beans cooking in the crockpot because we had a lot of errands to run and then had to pick up our granddaughter from school, and she and her dad are having dinner with us. I'll serve the chicken with corn chips and guacamole.

Last night I made merguez lamb sausage, without the casings, and we had it with couscous, chick peas, zucchini, onions and strips of red pepper. I was trying to reproduce a dish that we had from a market in France this fall, and I got close. Here's the vendor and his gorgeous pans of couscous and meat:

Thumbnail by greenhouse_gal
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

November 12, 2012
5:14 PM

Post #9331556

He's awfully cute GG.

I made us a veggie stir fry with cannelloni beans. Was very good. (going back to plant-based diet for a while. I need to clean up my system and drop a few pounds.)
Tam

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

November 12, 2012
7:58 PM

Post #9331667

Isn't he? He was really nice, too. I just paid 6 for couscous with merguez sausage, but he also made me a "cadeau" (gift) of two of the kefta as well as two of the merguez. DH and I had it for two different light dinners! Doesn't it look delicious, though?

I love cannellini beans. They're great with all sorts of things!

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

November 13, 2012
7:39 AM

Post #9331974

Now that I am in FL and alone not too much cooking going on. "Harry's continental Kitchen" take out comes handy
http://www.harryskitchen.com/.

This is their Restaurant, in front of it is a fast food store very handy for vacationers and across the street is the deli which features take out made in the Restaurant. Choices are so many your head spins. Very busy. Never liked much in all the 24 years I trade there, but now since the kids (30yr olds) have taken over, the place is hopping and food very up to date.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

November 13, 2012
9:24 AM

Post #9332056

Helene, that looks pretty decent! Makes me think of what the food was like in Cayo Hueso/Weso (Key West) in the 1950's when people still cooked and ate real food.

I assumed Longboat Key was in the chain of Keys at the southern tip of FL. I was surprised to find it near Tampa and St. Pete!

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

November 13, 2012
10:01 AM

Post #9332095

one half is in Sarasota and the other Manatee county. 30 minutes from City of Sarasota. We have bird key, St Armands and lido key, then Longboat key, further north Anna Maria Island, from the tip you can see the Tampa Bay Bridge, beautiful bridge. Maybe Harrys Lasagna tonite.
gardenglory
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 9a)

November 13, 2012
10:57 AM

Post #9332134

I just love longboat key...or used to, been awhile. Great shopping, and a cuban and bb soup at the columbia for lunch. Just a nice relaxing place.
Of course, that was back when FL had 3 area codes ;-)

This message was edited Nov 13, 2012 5:02 PM
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

November 13, 2012
11:54 AM

Post #9332198

LOL. I recall our phone number. Union 6-7268.

We are having grilled tenderloin, smashed potatoes with chipotle in adobo and pan sauteed broccoli with garlic and Parmesan.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

November 13, 2012
2:08 PM

Post #9332308

I picked up a few gorgeous lamb chops today, but they will go in the freezer in portions as I already have supper defrosted.

I'm looking for a free-range duck for Thanksgiving, or even a goose. Local pickings are non-existent except factory ducks at Kroger. Boo Hiss. I could get one from California for about $100 which includes shipping. I Think NOT!

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

November 14, 2012
6:02 AM

Post #9332801

I dropped off a couple roosters from this summers' hatches with a menonite farm. They butcher them for less than $2 ea. They are organic growers and I picked up the followign for less than $15: large bag of brussel sprouts, large head of cauliflower, about a pound of parsnips, 2 large florettes of broccoli and 3 large shallots. Amazing! I'll pick up about 25lbs of sweet potatoes when we pick up the chicken today. I sure do love living where I do!

Tam
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

November 14, 2012
11:26 AM

Post #9333110

That is a big bonus of where you are living, Tam. What will you do with all those sweets?

Darius, we've got a boat load of Canada geese that spend the winter here. Would that work? I've never had a Kroger duck. Free Union Grass Farm has whole ducks for $7 a pound. http://www.freeuniongrassfarm.com/#!products/vstc1=duck Worth the trip?

We were supposed to go to Maypop today but didn't. I've had an Achilles tendon issue for some time that's suddenly gone from bad to worse. After a few days on NSAIDs and ice packs it's better. I'm pampering it now so it won't wreck our TG trip. Something easy like pizza tonight. There's broccoli and mushrooms to top it with. SO grilled red peppers and red onions last night and eggplant the night before. I think it will be a veggie kitchen sink pizza.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

November 14, 2012
12:21 PM

Post #9333142

Laurel, Free Union could be an option, although the drive would add $100! Planning ahead next year, I could pick up a couple on my medical visits to Charlottesville and store them in the freezer until needed/wanted.

My local vendor who keeps promising free-range ducks just referred me to another vendor, but I suspect his ducks are penned, and fed conventional feed, $7.50/lb. I might as well get Kroger's frozen factory duck, about $20-25 for a good-sized duck. Didn't look at the price per pound.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

November 14, 2012
6:11 PM

Post #9333420

I had another stir fry w/a mix of veggies, chick peas and a hand ful of cashews. And a big salad of greens.

Laurel - I love cutting up the sweets into fries, tossing in a little OO and roasting. YUM.

I forgot I also go 2 heads of savoy cabbage with the rest of that haul for $15! We got the 2 roo's back and they are in the fridge for a couple days and then to the freezer in a rub of salt. The flock will be very pleased to have them gone too!

Tam

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

November 15, 2012
7:54 AM

Post #9333784

Check out Maple Leaf Farms, Darius; I don't think their duck is nearly that expensive.
http://www.mapleleaffarms.com/index.php?pg=100
They have it in our grocery store right now for a reduced price, but I already have one in my freezer. Maybe I should get another anyway.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

November 15, 2012
9:47 AM

Post #9333877

Thanks, Leslie. Their prices look very good, although I didn't check shipping costs. I bookmarked it for the future.

However, I had already ordered a local duck this morning. Totally free-range, no pens of any kind, and no commercial feeds. I have a problem with commercial feeds because most are GMO and contain soy. Soy is a goitrogen and affects my thyroid. This man says after leaving the brooder, his ducks are turned out to forage like wild ducks do. I've dealt with him for several years, been to his farm a few times, and I trust him.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

November 15, 2012
2:23 PM

Post #9334096

Does this sound good?

CITRUS CURRIED BRUSSELS SPROUTS

Dressing Ingredients:
1/4 cup vegetable or chicken broth
1/4 cup fresh orange juice
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 teaspoons curry powder or any curry or masala mixture you like
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon black pepper

Remaining ingredients:
4 cups trimmed Brussels sprouts (about 1 pound)
1 1/2 cups water
1 cup uncooked couscous
1/3 cup or more finely shredded carrot
1/3 cup golden raisins
3-4 tablespoons pine nuts, toasted

Directions:

To prepare dressing, combine first 7 ingredients in a large bowl, and stir well with a whisk.

Steam Brussels sprouts, covered, 8 minutes or until tender. Drain and quarter.
Bring water to a boil in a medium saucepan; gradually stir in couscous.
Remove from heat; cover and let stand 5 minutes. Fluff with a fork. Add Brussels sprouts, couscous, carrot, raisins, and pine nuts to dressing; toss well.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

November 15, 2012
3:36 PM

Post #9334128

No. Does it sound good to you? I'd try it. Maybe it comes together somehow. I don't know how though. Great that you found a duck. I wince at $5 a pound. We had a brief foray into raising Pekins years ago but had chronic problems with racoons killing them.

Made a salad topped with pickled lemon peppers from the garden, kalamata olives and feta. Used cilantro as a green along with the Romaine. Made a veggie strata getting ready to go in the oven. We are hors d oeuvres-ing on the chicken liver pate that was supposed to be chocolate frosting. There's a good bunch of it to use up fast.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

November 15, 2012
3:54 PM

Post #9334145

Yes, it does sound kinda interesting. I may try it the next time I have Brussels sprouts. I'll probably leave out the curry, though.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

November 15, 2012
4:29 PM

Post #9334180

What cuisine would these flavors most resemble, in your opinion, Darius? I'm trying to imagine citrus, which is tropical Asian with a brassica, which is Roman, and curry powder, an English concoction. Golden raisins (sultanas) are Turkish while couscous is African. I question adding raw carrots in dishes that are otherwise cooked. IMO, it's a cop out for texture. I see this as an example of (con)fusion food. LMK how this recipe works. I'm interested.

I was recently gifted a dish that had croutons, apples, couscous, fermented chickpeas, cilantro, olives and sultanas in a dressing. I could not figure out what I was supposed to be eating. It tasted healthy, fresh and just plain weird.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

November 15, 2012
4:51 PM

Post #9334211

Laurel, I just like the appeal of citrus with Brussels sprouts. I usually dress my broccoli with fresh lemon juice.

Supper was fried green tomatoes and 2 over-easy eggs.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

November 15, 2012
5:35 PM

Post #9334234

I am in love with roasted cauliflower with either fresh lemon or fresh lime juice. YUM. I'm been roasting my brussel sprouts a bit and then tossing in garlic and letting roast a bit more. Toss off in a bit of balsamic vinegar.

Left overs for dinner here.
Tam

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

November 17, 2012
7:46 AM

Post #9335406

I'm trying my first Saag Paneer. Just started getting Cook's Illustrated and this is my first recipe from the mag.

Cheese was easier even than mozzarella! Its in the fridge. Will do the sauce tonight for dinner.
Tam

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

November 17, 2012
2:38 PM

Post #9335690

When I went to pick up my duck (Peking variety) this morning, a neighbor (from my town) was at the farmer's market and had some frozen veal liver, so I bought a pound, plus an assortment of fresh greens. Most of the vendor's there are organic, just not certified because of the cost, and the government hoops. Also picked up some shucked oysters from Kroger's.

BTW, I did check conventional duck at Kroger's, $2.49/pound. I'm going to brine this one in a citrus brine.

Tam, I love Cook's Illustrated.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

November 17, 2012
3:35 PM

Post #9335734

Let us know how the sag paneer turns out, Tam. I've made it and think it is easy. Years ago, SO noted that the Indian shoppers at our Costco always had large amounts of milk in their carts. Many gallons. He asked what they did with all that milk and I told him they make fresh paneer and yogurt. Seeing four or even eight gallons in a basket is not unusual. We will be having Indian food, including sag paneer, goat curry and tandoor boti (lamb marinated in yogurt and spices and then cooked in a tandoor oven) Monday night. It will be take out, picked up by DD, for a late night feast on our arrival in D.C.. Comes from here http://www.tiffinrestaurant.com/

We are having leftover Brunswick stew and cornbread tonight. The fridge is all but cleared except for food for youngest son who comes over and manages the house, orchid greenhut and animals when we travel. I will finish off a special mini-TG dinner for him tomorrow night. Feeling growing guilt about not doing TG here this year especially because of confusing arrangements from the multi-blended "other side". It's the way of today but we have no experience in our family with the complexities of family get togethers where the family doesn't speak. (?_?).

There's a huge batch of fresh collards with home smoked ham simmering on the stove and destined for TG. Punting the planned slow roasted tomatoes and green beans. New guest list calls for menu changes.

Darius, Kroger oysters are on sale here. Maybe it's the same for you? Did you mean you were going to try a Kroger duck too? I'd be curious about the comparison for the price difference.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

November 17, 2012
4:00 PM

Post #9335744

Laurel, I will probably try a Kroger duck later... depends on home my sis likes duck. It will be interesting to see any differences. I suspect the differences are more in the cellular level affects on the body, not taste.

Yep, the Kroger oysters were on sale. $6.99/pint of standard or selects, fine for stew, not so great for frying. I didn't know they could be frozen, and my sis isn't sure if she likes oyster stew, so I may just make a small batch of stew and freeze the rest. Might even simmer them first in a bit of milk and butter.

I considered oyster dressing for the bird... but the last time I had it, many years ago, my mother used canned oysters. Yuck. Totally put me off oyster dressing!

Your take-out dinner/late feast on arrival in DC sounds wonderful!

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

November 17, 2012
4:38 PM

Post #9335770

I had to send Gary out to buy more milk this morning Laurel. :-) The paneer was easy but the rest was a bit complicated. I have a really lousy blender and so I ended up using my immersion blender. I would not call it an easy recipe. But it turned out really good. I would probably use less cheese next time.

Darius - I really like how the authors of recipes explain the process to get to the final recipe. It helps understand why the instructions and ingredients are called out. I wasn't sure I liked the lack of photographs with the first issue but have decided its so much easier to read with the black print on white and the terrific narrative is very instructive. Yep. I like it too.

So I'm off the vegan diet! lol

Tam
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

November 17, 2012
4:53 PM

Post #9335775

LOL, Tam. Does that mean you are sufficiently purged for our meet up?

Darius, our Kroger oysters are $4.99 for 8 ounces. If I don't get oysters on this trip I'm going to pop. I'm lobbying for raw oysters this trip.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

November 17, 2012
5:00 PM

Post #9335784

Oh I'm definitely cleaned out Laurel. :-) I'm gonna keep up with a huge focus on plant -based foods but won't worry if I have a few meals with dairy, eggs or even a little meat.

Tam

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

November 17, 2012
6:52 PM

Post #9335877

i don't understand - how can anything be done with pasteurized Milk???

We made cheese yogurt etc. with whole unp. milk easy peasy, but with boiled?
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

November 17, 2012
7:03 PM

Post #9335882

It's not bacterially clabbered, Helene. The curds are created by acidyfying the milk.

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

November 17, 2012
8:12 PM

Post #9335919

TU oh I see

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

November 18, 2012
7:08 AM

Post #9336114

OK. Now I gotta ask. What does "TU" mean?

The paneer is simply milk heated to boiling, buttermilk & a little salt. It curdles in about a minute then strained in cheese cloth. Very easy. Now its not the tastiest cheese but works with the sauce.

Tam
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

November 18, 2012
7:59 AM

Post #9336142

It means thank you for us young and hip types. Right, Helene? She meant to put TU, OIC. Geez, Tam, get with it!

helenethequeen

helenethequeen
Longboat Key, FL
(Zone 9b)

November 18, 2012
8:05 AM

Post #9336148

I meant TU, FAMH

I NJ at my DD house. SIL works from home has office in barn, DD has office on huge landing on stairway to their suite. I have my suite on the main floor off to the side, B, BR and craft room

We communicate via texting as this does not interfere with their work, it seems.
What are we cooking, who is doing shopping, cooking, hootsch run and such. Everything is 1/2 hr drive away in dif. directions. Was quite educational.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

November 18, 2012
9:08 AM

Post #9336188

TU Laurel. Last one I didn't know was LMK. So I'm slowly becoming educated. Without any teens, I just don't text much. Or is that TMI :-)

Well.. I am trying to use up the beef I bought last year. I'm seriously considering donating some of it to the food bank. We eat it in very small amounts when we have it. Anyway - I cut up a 3lb round steak and made a big pot of stew, put 8oz back for a future stir fry and set aside 5oz for a beef and broccoli dinner tonight. (The stew is in the slow cooker and will be lunches or dinners for DH for a while. Some for the freezer, though I don't think it freezes really welll.)

Tam

lourspolaire

lourspolaire
Delray Beach, FL
(Zone 10a)

November 18, 2012
10:11 AM

Post #9336235

Dinner for 6 tonight at "Chez Forest": cocktails (cosmopolitans, I guess), spanakopitas as an appetizer, a nice Pinot Grigio A.O.C., baked ham, scalopped potatoes, green bean casserole for the main course and cranberry & lime loaf for dessert. Easy menu, comfort food and truly good eats.

Take care, all.
Sylvain

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

November 18, 2012
12:24 PM

Post #9336309

Gosh Sylvain, I'd come just for the Spanakopita! It's so rich that using it as an appetizer sounds about right.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

November 18, 2012
3:07 PM

Post #9336438

Sylvain, I would come for the spanokopita as well. Okay, maybe I'd come for the cosmos and Pinot. Plus, Delray is cool (though a little sleepy).

The mini-TG for youngest son is almost complete. He has a roasted chicken, herb dressing with onions, carrots, celery and mushrooms, collard greens with home smoked ham, and whole cranberry/apple/citrus relish. I need to bake his dressing which will happen shortly.

We had pizza a few nights ago and will do something similar tonight. I have several leftover cooked veggie combinations that will work as toppings plus feta, mozz, artichokes and fresh mushrooms. Made a salad from the last of our salad greens. Looking forward to our Indian dinner tomorrow night.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

November 18, 2012
3:54 PM

Post #9336464

Sylvain - do share that cranberry & lime loaf recipe! I'm on the hunt for cranberry dessert recipes.

Tam

lourspolaire

lourspolaire
Delray Beach, FL
(Zone 10a)

November 18, 2012
6:14 PM

Post #9336572

Cranberry lime loaf

Makes 2 loaves, or 1 Bunt cake.
Difficulty: easy
Expense: minimal
Yield: 2 loaves.

Preheat oven to 350F, setting the rack in the middle of the oven.

In a large mixing bowl, using a hand-held mixer, cream together:
6 tbsp soft butter,
3/4 cup sugar and 3/4 cup Splenda - OR 1 1/2 cups sugar
2 eggs.

Add: 1 bag fresh cranberries,
4 cups all purpose flour
1 large pinch salt
1 teaspoon baking soda - make sure there are no lumps.
3 teaspoons baking powder - make sure there are no lumps.
1 1/4 cup fresh lime juice
all the zest of 2 limes
2 cups chopped walnuts
1/4 cup cranberry juice (pure cranberry juice, unsweetened. I am partial to Northland brand. Ocean Spray doesn't cut it for me.)

Mix everything with a wooden spoon, cleaning the sides of the mixing bowl. Do not overwork the batter.
Split evenly into 2 buttered and floured loaf pans (very important).
Allow the batter to sit undisturbed on the counter for 5 minutes.
Note: Because of the Splenda, it won't raise as much as if you had used 1 1/2 cup sugar. Gotta watch those carbs, but it's your loaf so do what you want.

If making 2 loaf pans, bake 60 minutes and check for doneness with a toothpick. It's done when the toothpick inserted in the center of the loaf comes out clean.
I generally bake mine in a Bundt pan. It takes 75 minutes to bake, every time.

Let cool 10 minutes and unmold right away.

The loaves keep well and freeze well, too. I keep leftovers in the fridge, wrapped in a zipper bag.

Enjoy.
Sylvain.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

November 19, 2012
6:06 AM

Post #9336937

Thanks! Thats perfect. I have a big bag of organic limes & a bag of cranberries I've been hoping to use. I will give this a try.

Tam

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

November 19, 2012
6:55 AM

Post #9336989

Recipe sounds good, Sylvain.

My Kroger oysters were a disappointment. About his time last year, I got some fresh oysters from over on the Virginia coast, and they made a terrific oyster stew. Same recipe.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

November 21, 2012
4:45 PM

Post #9339372

Darius,
How do you make your oyster dressing?

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

November 21, 2012
5:29 PM

Post #9339396

LOL, I've never actually made oyster dressing, and don't even have a recipe. My Dad often made it when I was young and we lived on the coast where oysters were available and cheap. Never understood why later my mother decided to use canned oysters, Yuck.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

November 21, 2012
5:55 PM

Post #9339417

I've got a rustic pear tart "kit" ready so I can make my mom one fresh Fri. And an apple clafoutis for my dad & his wife for tomorrow. Yep. I'm on the road for the holiday. Will be meeting up with Laurel on Sat. Can't wait to meet her in person!

Have a wonderful Thanksgiving everyone!
Tam
gardenglory
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 9a)

November 21, 2012
6:02 PM

Post #9339424

I was wondering about the oysters. Do you eat them or just swallow them. Ive always wondered where the taste comes from, if you dont chew them. Stupid question I know, but its always has intrigued me.

Everyone be careful in your travels and have a good one.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

November 21, 2012
7:30 PM

Post #9339507

I understand that most folks swallow whole raw fresh oysters. When I fry them, or make oyster stwe, I chew them. I've never tried one raw.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

November 21, 2012
10:53 PM

Post #9339595

Love raw oysters! That's coming Sunday. You chew them. They have a lovely briny taste and ocean smell and, though soft, not mushy or slimey. They must be perfectly fresh; just shucked. I like them with a squeeze of lemon and a little cocktail sauce.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

November 22, 2012
12:10 PM

Post #9339992

I eat 'em like Laurel . Can't imagine anyone trying to swallow them whole , what would be the point ?Besides some of them are so big ,they would choke a horse .

lourspolaire

lourspolaire
Delray Beach, FL
(Zone 10a)

November 23, 2012
7:06 AM

Post #9340447

I love oysters on the half shell. My wife can't bear to look at them. There was a restaurant in Fort Lauderdale called Grumpy Dick's. They featured oysters on the half shell for $2 for a dozen on Wednesdays at dinner. The waiter knew that when I showed up on Wednesdays, it was 4 dozen oysters and 2 beers. I love them with lime juice and cocktail sauce. I bite into them and chew them. Gail prefers oysters Rockefeller because they're cooked. Then, we'd have fish & chips or something like that. I believe Grumpy Dick's is still doing brisk business, but it's 40 miles away from here now.

Take care, all.
Sylvain

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

November 24, 2012
5:57 AM

Post #9341104

DH eats raw oysters, I don't eat meat at all. We went to some oyster place in Boston, and they had nothing for me. I had coffee. lol
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

November 24, 2012
7:34 AM

Post #9341177

DW & I can down several dozen on the half-shell at a single setting. With spicy bloody mary's - Pappadeaux makes the best - they use horseradish as well as Tabasco and course black pepper - serve with a large celery stock, wedge of lime/lemon, and some HUGE olives.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

November 24, 2012
8:13 AM

Post #9341205

I don't really like oysters. I tolerate clams. Just too chewy for me. I think you need to grow up on 'em to really like 'em.

Tam
gardenglory
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 9a)

November 24, 2012
8:40 AM

Post #9341220

We were at a buffet last night and they had oysters on the half shell. Once I got close, It was a no go, I just couldnt get it in my mouth. I guess I will continue to just get pleasure watching others 'down' them. The lady at the table next to us just kept sucking the insides out of mudbugs. I mean I can eat there little tail meat, but this was...well I finally had to change sides of the table ;-x

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

November 24, 2012
11:01 AM

Post #9341312

Watching people down oysters and slurp crayfish would have made me take my meal to go. lol I know it's how you're supposed to eat them, but ew. I know it's me.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


November 24, 2012
5:45 PM

Post #9341583

I like Mountain Oysters, but that's another story altogether :-)

Now that Thanksgiving has passed, are we ready for a new thread?

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

November 25, 2012
6:08 AM

Post #9341824

I think we are, and we're also at the magic 200-post point. Thanks, Terry!

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

November 25, 2012
7:14 AM

Post #9341873

Yes please. :-)

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

November 25, 2012
1:11 PM

Post #9342147

I met up with Laurel and her family yesterday. She's just as interesting in person as in our virtual world here.
We had lunch at a Lancaster County restaurant. And then visited an historic house built by one of the first
Menonite families to arrive in Pa (1710 or something like that). Unfortunately she got the coldest weather of
the season so far!

Here's her amazingly photogenic family - Laurel, SO Steve, DD Emily and new husband Evan. And one of the two of us.
We're standing in front of the blacksmith's shop

I'm off to make Sylvain's cranberry & lime loaf.
Tam

Thumbnail by Tammy   Thumbnail by Tammy         
Click an image for an enlarged view.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


November 25, 2012
1:20 PM

Post #9342158

Here we go: http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1288872/

You cannot post until you register, login and subscribe.


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