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Vegetable Gardening: Preserving Jalopenos. Need help.

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FountainMan
McKinney, TX

October 28, 2012
10:48 AM

Post #9317975

Dispite the cold snap we're having here in Texas my Jalopenos are ripening. I'm getting ready to harvest which isn't much of a problem. The problem is I don't know how fast the Jalopenos can be consumed and the last time I put them in the fridge they got mushy and soft. Right now I think I'm looking at 125 peppers getting ready to ripen.


BQ: When the peppers are prepared I want to take the seeds out for future planting. Not sure if there is a process to preparing the seeds for planting. Some plant seeds require hot water. Some require freezes. Or do the seeds come out ready to plant?

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

October 28, 2012
11:50 AM

Post #9318044

You can pickle them or dry them; once dried, you can grind some into powder if you want for cooking.

Dried red fruits are called morita.
Dried, smoked red ones are chipotle.

To save seeds, you have to let them fully ripen (turn red) on the plant, Then just remove the seeds and let them air dry on a paper plate or something.

Solace

Solace
Monte Vista, CO
(Zone 4a)

October 28, 2012
1:21 PM

Post #9318152

You can blanch them (add to boiling water and boil for about 3 to 5 minutes), drain, and freeze them in small (1/2 cup) batches to add to pinto beans, stews, chili, chile con queso (makes a great con queso/cheese dip). You can slice them and freeze without blanching, if you don't mind them being soft after they thaw- it won't matter, probably, if you're adding them to stew, beans, con queso, etc. A little jalapeno goes a long way.
FountainMan
McKinney, TX

October 30, 2012
2:58 PM

Post #9320431

Awesome. They're red. I've got more than I know what to do with. Thinking of also giving some to the neighbors. The garden is doing so well I'm thinking of making a temporary greenhouse by draping a clear plastic sheet over the pen where the garden is and someway heating it. Not sure how cold it will get this winter.

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

November 3, 2012
5:37 AM

Post #9323405

Wouldn't need heated too much- depending on space you are covering- a single lite bulb would work, covering keeps frost from touching the plants. It's the wind that does damaj! Tears plastic, drags it over the plants, beats everything up- tears out of the fasteners holding it down, etc. Sunlite changes in winter and sometimes the plants slo down simply because the sun isn't strong enough for them...this wind prob drags along into spring- bricks on the plastic don't always work. Good luck
donbo7011
Brooksville, FL

November 9, 2012
4:49 PM

Post #9329220

par boil in white vinegar before freezing to maintain their color.
FountainMan
McKinney, TX

November 10, 2012
2:06 PM

Post #9329796

Well here's this years production.

Note the tomatos aren't ripe but this usually takes place on the counter. I wanted to get everything in before the cold front.

Thumbnail by FountainMan
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Solace

Solace
Monte Vista, CO
(Zone 4a)

November 10, 2012
3:12 PM

Post #9329845

40 to 60 mph winds here today and around 30 degrees right now. This is SOME front! Snow on the mountains around here, and more coming, looks like. Can't even see the mountains just a few miles away, due to snow/rain. It rained last night, here, and that was a blessing, since it's been so dry. I went out to lock the chickens up and it was pretty miserable out there. Good thing they have a heat lamp and are out of the wind. I've seen 70 mph winds here topple trees before...not a hurricane this far inland, but a mountaincane, lol. I hope you folks east of here stay safe during any storm activity this might be stirring up for your area.
FountainMan
McKinney, TX

November 10, 2012
5:52 PM

Post #9329948

[quote="Solace"]40 to 60 mph winds here today and around 30 degrees right now. This is SOME front! Snow on the mountains around here, and more coming, looks like. Can't even see the mountains just a few miles away, due to snow/rain. It rained last night, here, and that was a blessing, since it's been so dry. I went out to lock the chickens up and it was pretty miserable out there. Good thing they have a heat lamp and are out of the wind. I've seen 70 mph winds here topple trees before...not a hurricane this far inland, but a mountaincane, lol. I hope you folks east of here stay safe during any storm activity this might be stirring up for your area. [/quote]
Thanks. Yes were bracing our selves. I've got a huge weather station though. Storms are more intresting when you see them in numbers.

You can see my weather here http://www.wunderground.com/weatherstation/WXDailyHistory.asp?ID=KTXMCKIN27

FountainMan
McKinney, TX

November 10, 2012
5:56 PM

Post #9329951

Weather like gardening is something I could talk for hours about.

We're ready for the front. Below is my weather station. Would never be without it. Storms are more intresting when you measure them.

Thumbnail by FountainMan
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Solace

Solace
Monte Vista, CO
(Zone 4a)

November 10, 2012
7:50 PM

Post #9330028

Wow, how nice to be able to track your weather, not relying on a weather station somewhere else. Looks like you save your data for future comparisons. That's great.
ERNIECOPP
Vista, CA

November 10, 2012
9:47 PM

Post #9330059

Fountainman,
Always good to find someone else interested in the weather. I have been fortunate enough to have sailed my boat to Hawaii several times and as far as New Zealand once. A good part of that was done before the mid to late 80's, when modern forecasting became available.

We did fine, just watching the trend of the barometer, and the cloud patterns, plus one bit of old sailor's lore. We were able to locate where the worst part of the storm was, and how it related to our position this way. "Face square into the wind. Extend your right arm straight out your side, if in the Northern Hemisphere, and that will point towards the center of the storm.
So we could then tell whether it is going to get better or worse, or whether it was directly approaching or going to miss us.

Now, with dependable single sideband radios and computers we can download Grib files that tell us exactly what is going to happen everywhere. I no longer sail, but am still very aware of the weather. Our weather here in Southern CA is so mild it is kind of boring and while i would not want it to do a lot of damage, I would like to have a good storm once in a while.

Ernie
FountainMan
McKinney, TX

November 11, 2012
8:30 AM

Post #9330274

[quote="ERNIECOPP"]Fountainman,
Always good to find someone else interested in the weather. I have been fortunate enough to have sailed my boat to Hawaii several times and as far as New Zealand once. A good part of that was done before the mid to late 80's, when modern forecasting became available.

We did fine, just watching the trend of the barometer, and the cloud patterns, plus one bit of old sailor's lore. We were able to locate where the worst part of the storm was, and how it related to our position this way. "Face square into the wind. Extend your right arm straight out your side, if in the Northern Hemisphere, and that will point towards the center of the storm.
So we could then tell whether it is going to get better or worse, or whether it was directly approaching or going to miss us.

Now, with dependable single sideband radios and computers we can download Grib files that tell us exactly what is going to happen everywhere. I no longer sail, but am still very aware of the weather. Our weather here in Southern CA is so mild it is kind of boring and while i would not want it to do a lot of damage, I would like to have a good storm once in a while.

Ernie
[/quote]Funny you mentioned New Zealand. That's were my weather station software program was developed. It's a program that processes all my weather station equipment. Graphs, data logs, internet uploads, etc.



FountainMan
McKinney, TX

November 11, 2012
8:57 AM

Post #9330285

[quote="Solace"]Wow, how nice to be able to track your weather, not relying on a weather station somewhere else. Looks like you save your data for future comparisons. That's great.[/quote] Thanks, I think weather stations are the single most valuable tools a gardener can have. I don't trust the NWS as far as I can throw them. Especially when stations can be miles away reporting every hour which to me is like molassas on a winter day. Knowing how variable weather is and how localized it is I set up my own station. It's nice. the station is over 1000$ after all the options but tracks just about everything. Wind speed, direction, temperature, humidity, air pressure, rainfall, solar radiation, leaf wetness, soil moisture, soil temperature, evapotranspiration, dew point, heat index, wind chill, and builds it's own forecast.

It does log the data using a data logger and computer. The software program is nice. It keeps track of all the data provides graphs and charts and sends the data to online weather sites with personal weather station networks like Weather Underground. Also sends to the NWS through CWOP/MADIS.

As sophisticated as it sounds you can get a good station for under 100$. Lowes Home Depot and Wal*mart sell Acu-rite stations which have been proven to be accurate for the price but they too have optional computer interface avalible that works with the same program.

I highly recommend weather stations to gardeners.

http://www.davisnet.com/news/enews/e_news_archive/2012-06.asp

There's an article that's down a bit about gardening with weather stations.



FountainMan
McKinney, TX

November 11, 2012
9:21 AM

Post #9330300

A tour of my weather station

Photo 1 is the software program that logs graphs and displays all the data. Also exports the data to internet sources. Even hooks up to a camera that takes pictures of the current weather.
Photo 2 is the growth station. The striped device on the left is a leaf wetness sensor used for disease tracking. The large cylinder is a rain gauge. Under that is a temperature and humidity sensor. Not shown are the soil moisture and temperature sensors. Of course they're buried. A moisture probe and temperature probe are placed together one pair is at 6" and the other 18". This station is installed in the veggie garden where I got the peppers.

Photo 3 is the main temperature humidity and rainfall. The white plates on the bottom house another temperature and humidity sensor. The black cone on top is the other rain gauge. And on the front is the wireless transmitter.

Photo 4 is the reciever display. This recieves the info from outside and displays it and graphs it and does a whole bunch of cool things. Then sends the data to computer

Photo 5 is the tower. As displayed in an earlier post of mine the top of the pole mounts the anemometers. Another temperature and humidity sensor, and a solar radiation sensor.

This message was edited Nov 11, 2012 1:22 PM

Thumbnail by FountainMan   Thumbnail by FountainMan   Thumbnail by FountainMan   Thumbnail by FountainMan   Thumbnail by FountainMan
Click an image for an enlarged view.

ERNIECOPP
Vista, CA

November 11, 2012
4:12 PM

Post #9330581

Fountain,

Your weather station is fantastic, and i am sure it gives you lots of interesting information.

It does not surprise me that it was developed in New Zealand. Agricultural exports are such a large part of their production they are very dependent on the weather. A lot of their weather comes directly from the Antarctic regions, so they get a lot of pretty bad weather.

I have friends over there, and they nearly always mention weather when they write.

Ernie

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