Photo by Melody
Guess what time it is? It's time for the DG County Fair! Now in it's sixth year, enter your blue-ribbon photos or mouth-watering recipes for a chance to win a gift subscription! Click here here to get all the details, dates and entry rules.

Tomatoes: Winter Tomato Project

Communities > Forums > Tomatoes
bookmark
Forum: TomatoesReplies: 5, Views: 105
Add to Bookmarks
-
AuthorContent

paulgrow

paulgrow
Allen Park, MI
(Zone 6a)

November 8, 2012
3:24 PM

Post #9328207

I'm experimenting to see whether or not I can get some heirloom plants to produce fruit in the greenhouse.
We have a 1000W grow light to aid mother nature.

I have a variety of plants.

As for pollination I hung a fan from the ceiling blowing directly on the plants about 6 hours a day.

If anyone has any suggestions please let me know

Thumbnail by paulgrow   Thumbnail by paulgrow
Click an image for an enlarged view.

JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

November 8, 2012
9:45 PM

Post #9328495

First off, I say get them potted up in larger containers- those are in tiny cell packs, and are way overgrown!

paulgrow

paulgrow
Allen Park, MI
(Zone 6a)

November 9, 2012
6:07 AM

Post #9328654

Thanks, that's next on my agenda

dyzzypyxxy

dyzzypyxxy
Sarasota, FL
(Zone 9b)

November 9, 2012
1:29 PM

Post #9329058

Paul, use really deep pots for tomatoes - 3 gallon or bigger nursery pot for each plant would be good. They like to send their roots really deep! Tomatoes are originally tropical plants, and can last 2 or 3 years, but they get really woody and ungainly, and less productive.

I used to rescue tomato plants from my garden in Utah and keep them going on a sunny windowsill in the basement there all winter. If I could keep the right temperature, they would set fruit nicely. (gotta watch not to bring in bugs if you rescue from the garden, though) Keep the soapy water spray handy, I spray at least once a week to keep aphids and whiteflies at bay.

- Lots of water, and as much sun as possible.
- Night temperature is pretty critical for fruit set, between about 50 and 65 night time temps work best. 70 to 80's daytime is fine. They love heat.
- You can use a tiny paint brush to pollenate the flowers if your "wind" doesn't work. The fan will help you keep fungal diseases like powdery mildew at bay.

Here are 'Momotaro' tomatoes I grew from seed planted in September. Flowering and about to set fruit if it will only stay warm! Second pic are my Earth Boxes growing grape tomatoes, eggplant, peppers and two kinds of broccoli.

Thumbnail by dyzzypyxxy   Thumbnail by dyzzypyxxy         
Click an image for an enlarged view.

paulgrow

paulgrow
Allen Park, MI
(Zone 6a)

November 9, 2012
1:53 PM

Post #9329085

We have a automatic irrigation system, I have the heat set on 75 but on sunny days it gets to 85 or higher.

Thanks for the info

dyzzypyxxy

dyzzypyxxy
Sarasota, FL
(Zone 9b)

November 9, 2012
2:15 PM

Post #9329101

You might want to let it fall to 60 - 65 or so at night, Paul. If it's too warm at night the plants will stop setting fruit, too!

Down here in the summer that's when we know tomato season is over, when the nights get too warm and the tomatoes stop setting. Usually some time in May.

You cannot post until you register, login and subscribe.


Other Tomatoes Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Blossom End Rot tiG 34 Mar 17, 2013 10:29 PM
TOMATOES ARE SPLITTING oblambert 31 Sep 11, 2012 7:13 PM
Principe Borghese/Juliet in containers? shane478 7 Feb 19, 2009 4:20 AM
Disease? Any idea what this is? BudZander 31 Apr 21, 2010 6:48 AM
Tree Tomato ?? faronell 10 Aug 3, 2007 1:23 AM


We recommend Firefox
Overwhelmed? There's a lot to see here. Try starting at our homepage.

[ Home | About | Advertise | Media Kit | Mission | Featured Companies | Submit an Article | Terms of Use | Tour | Rules | Privacy Policy | Contact Us ]

Back to the top

Copyright © 2000-2014 Dave's Garden, an Internet Brands company. All Rights Reserved.
 

Hope for America