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Organic Gardening: List of seed varieties to keep away from

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cristina
Temuco
Chile
(Zone 9b)

November 29, 2012
5:06 PM

Post #9345716

I did find this information.

http://www.agardenforthehouse.com/2012/02/forewarned-is-forearmed-veggie-varieties-owned-by-monsanto/

I am keeping a copy of the list on me at all the times to avoid buying any of their varieties. I do not want any of them in my garden.

cristina
cissy48
North Westport, MA

November 30, 2012
3:35 AM

Post #9346007

Thank you for the list. A quick guide is always handy. I will Post it on Seeds of Sustainability face book page. thank you
I am seeking a list of ALL GMO seeds and plants. My daughter informed me that Papya (?sp) is on it.








gardadore
Saylorsburg, PA
(Zone 6a)

December 7, 2012
9:58 PM

Post #9352739

That list is not a complete GMO list. It is simply a list of seeds offered in the Catalog for Seminis/Monsanto and does not mean that they are all GMO. A number of them are even old open pollinated varieties that have been around for years. The writer simply wants to avoid purchasing any seeds carried by Monsanto on principle because of their practices and that is fine. But check carefully to be sure which are truly GMO varieties. I think that could be some work at this point! But it is a valid concern and I avoid the problem by planting primarily heirloom or open pollinated varieties of veggies.
cristina
Temuco
Chile
(Zone 9b)

December 8, 2012
10:26 AM

Post #9353039

I know that they are not GMO seeds, mainly corn, soybean, canola, rice, and cotton seed oil are so far GMO, nevertheless I have made the choice of not buying ANYTHING that may be from Monsanto. For me is a sort of principles and a phylosophical choice. Monsanto is not only present in USA but all over any agricultural country, and Chile is one.

Also I will not buy any product containing papaya from Hawai, and also zucchini grown in the US and Canada that are GMO.

As I said, is a matter of choice.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 9, 2012
3:06 PM

Post #9353984

Thanks, Christina. I posted a similar list on my blog last year. It's so easy to support Monsanto unknowingly...
Gracye
Warrenton, VA

December 10, 2012
5:08 PM

Post #9355066

Hello all, I found a company that I am going with for 2013. "Southern Exposure Seeds." I really like their products, descriptions, and suitability for my area. VERY interesting! Spent a wad, on vegetables and also flowers. We'll see what happens, and I will keep you informed. But, so far, I have a great feeling.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 15, 2013
3:29 PM

Post #9386385

Cristina, thank you VERY much for posting this! I share your concerns, and I had no idea this was going on. I will also carry this list with me, and refer to it when making my seed purchases. A company like this, with these practices, I will NOT support!

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

January 15, 2013
3:46 PM

Post #9386404

Southern Exposure is pretty decent, although I've had some questionable seeds from them, mostly just tomatoes and winter squash. I think that has to do more with their seed suppliers, though, because they don't grow all their own.

I've never had questionable seeds from Seed Saver's Exchange nor Baker's Creek.In fact, if you'd spend the money to join Seed Saver's, you'd get an annual book listing thousands and thousands of farmers/gardeners who offer heirloom seeds they've saved for generations, sometimes getting them just for postage. Many of the varieties I've looked at are totally unknown in the commercial market anymore. "If it doesn't ship and be storable for weeks, the commercial market won't sell it"... and no consideration is ever given to nutritional value...

We NEED to grow out and save that kind of seed!

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 16, 2013
3:25 AM

Post #9386777

On the 24th of this month, I will be starting the first of many college classes for my first degree in Environmental Sciences (gotta start somewhere, right?). Being a mature working adult, I will start with just 1 class, and as it turns out, it will be an advanced English/Rhetoric class, focusing on "Argument". I've been "collecting", as it were, ideas for topics on which to write, as I know I will need to, and I think this is a HOT topic!!!
Quoting: "If it doesn't ship and be storable for weeks, the commercial market won't sell it"... and no consideration is ever given to nutritional value...
To my mind, that equates to blasphemy!!! So the general public at large should be denied proper nutrition because the big businesses out there can't make a big enough buck from it!?!?!?!

**Takes a deeep breath** ... I need to go take my blood pressure medicine now, Sheeesh!

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

January 16, 2013
6:54 AM

Post #9386933

speediebean... if you choose that subject for an "argument" topic, you will spend the rest of your life on it! I've been writing a blog for several years now, and health (and therefore healthy food) has more-or-less become the focal point even though it started out just as a home-gardening blog.

The can of worms that's BigAg/BigBiz is so insidious that it's downright scary, and the general public hasn't a clue.

ps, I see you are "somewhere in Maryland". I lived in MD for many years... first on Wilson Point (Middle River, just east of Baltimore) and later on the Severn in Annapolis. Many of my distant relatives located near the Deep Creek Lake area after the Civil War. (Is war ever civil??)
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

January 16, 2013
9:31 AM

Post #9387146

Good luck, Speedie. Based on your posts, you'll do fine.
Didn't know about SSE membership or extended offerings. Good to know.
Don't want to stray off topic but the mention of nutrition - what was the big deal about the study a month ago stating that organically grown produce wasn't any more nutritious than "conventional" produce? Was wondering who was behind that study.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

January 16, 2013
10:42 AM

Post #9387208

Cindy, that's probably true... in general. The higher brix (nutritional value) has more to do with soil nutrients, whereas "organic" simply means not subjected to carcinogens while growing.

Most of our soils are deficient in minerals.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 16, 2013
10:53 AM

Post #9387221

Darius, heh heh, that's ok, then I shall spend the rest of my life on it. =) What the heck, may as well go for broke, I already started changing my tune after reading about how tomatoes are grown in Florida... I'm pretty sure that slavery (yes, you heard me right!) market has declined greatly since that publication.

Interesting, and here I always thought "organic" pertained to "not subject to synthetics and/or chemicals"... not all synthetics/chemicals are carcinogens, yes? No? Funny, the FDA doesn't have anything very definitive to say about it (not "funny-haha"), I guess it's not big money to tell us "Oh yes, please grow your own food, it's better for you!".

Cindy, thank you for that very kind compliment! =) I didn't hear about this study being done, who did it? (or, should I say, "Who botched it?"). =)
coleup
annapolis, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 16, 2013
7:04 PM

Post #9387700

Here is a list of seed suppliers I found on the Farmwars site: http://farmwars.info/


FARMWARS SAFE SEED COMPANY LIST

The following companies have been determined to NOT have any association with biotech interests, and DO NOT sell seeds sourced from companies owned by Monsanto. Last update: April 08, 2012

SEED COMPANY:

Horizon Herbs
Seed Site
Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds (http://rareseeds.com)
Amishland Heirloom Seeds
Hudson Valley Seed Library
D. Landreth Seed Company
Seeds Trust
High Mowing Organic Seeds
Uprising Seeds
Wood Prairie Farm
Organica Seed
Southern Exposure Seed Exchange
Fedco Seeds
Family Farmers Seed Cooperative
White Harvest Seed Company
Heirloom Organics
Seed for Security
The Living Seed Company
Sow True Seed
Adaptive Seeds
Seeds Now
Livingston Seed
Sustainable Seed Co.
Grow Organic
Victory Seeds
Botanical Interests
The Ark Institute
My Patriot Supply
Underwood Gardens
Heirloom Seeds
Wild Garden Seed

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

January 16, 2013
9:53 PM

Post #9387812

speediebean, perhaps I mis-spoke (or wasn't clear) about organics and chemical applications... Since I have so many health issues from chemical exposure over the years, I consider ALL garden chemicals to be carcinogenic.

coleup... (Judy? Sorry, I forget names far too easily)... good list, thanks for the update. I just had an unpleasant comment on my blog where I listed seed companies (several months or more ago) with Monsanto links. The person accused me of posting false information about Jung but I see they are not on the "good" list you posted either.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 17, 2013
3:39 AM

Post #9387864

A wonderful list Judy, thank you! Now I will have to pay more attention to the seed companies we use at work and try to encourage BossLady to switch if necessary. =)

And thank you Darius, I'm really enjoying your blog... perhaps a bit too much, I **do** after all have chores to attend to. ;)

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

January 17, 2013
4:23 AM

Post #9387881

The list doesn't mention Pinetree, although they state that they don't use GMO seeds. I wonder why they're missing.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 17, 2013
5:18 AM

Post #9387906

After perusing Pinetree's website, I, personally, think they should be added to Judy's list (however, if she has reasons for not including them, then we respect that)... Here is a direct quote from a statement found on Pinetree's website:
Quoting: Many of you have contacted us asking about Pinetree's position on genetically modified seeds and the recent acquisition of small companies by larger corporations. After 33 years, Pinetree remains a small family business. In the front cover of our catalog we state "We sell no seed that has been developed using genetic manipulation. We do not view technologies as being good or bad things in themselves, but people can certainly employ them in pernicious ways. We also think that developing countries are best served, focusing on the agricultures that they have the material and manpower for. Not some Western notion that ignores indigenous materials and tastes." Moreover, Pinetree has signed the Safe Seed Pledge in the past but has chosen not to this year because we do not feel it is worded strongly enough and is used more as a tool for marketing than a political statement. More than promise not to "knowingly" sell or buy GM seeds, Pinetree promises not to sell or buy them. Period. In the interest of full disclosure, Pinetree has purchased seeds from Seminis in the past. We did not purchase their seeds this year, nor do we intend to in the future. Our relationship with Seminis predates the Monsanto acquisition by many years and we had always felt they were a responsible company but have chosen not to support Monsanto in any capacity. Pinetree will continue to meet the needs of the home gardener and provide our customers with more and more organic and heirloom choices in the coming years. We are committed to the ideals of sustainable agriculture and environmental stewardship and appreciate your support. Please feel free to contact us with any questions, Melissa and Jef


I found this information here: [HYPERLINK@www.superseeds.com]
coleup
annapolis, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 17, 2013
6:14 AM

Post #9387954

Good research Speedie.
I'm sure if you passed this info on to Barbara Peterson at the Farmwars site that she could update her list of seed sources with no biotech interests or seeds sourced from companies owned by monsanto as Pinetree no longer purchases seed from Seminis as they had last year when list was made.

Please note that It is not my list!. Also, I do follow the Farmwars site and Barbara's work and over the tears have found info there to be mostly credible though ahead of the curve in some areas of interest to me personally.

Great to see that Pinetree has moved beyond the pledge. Wonder how any of the lists of safe seed, nongmo seed, non monsanto or biotech supporting seed sources, etc will shift or change for 2013 planting season?
Many reasons to be growing and saving our own now, cause even if we can't remember what they are.lol. we will be assured of where they have come from and how they have grown.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

January 17, 2013
8:17 AM

Post #9388077

Love the statement by Pinetree!

I certainly agree with them, both about the limits of the safe seed pledge, and its possible use as a marketing ploy.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 17, 2013
8:46 AM

Post #9388108

Yes, though I'd go so far as to call it a "probable" use as a marketing ploy... and yes, I'm picking up jaded cynical habits from somewhere. ;)

I couldn't find how to share a comment in the farmwars website, so I sent Barbara an email with that info about Pinetree. It may be that I would have to be a member in order to post a comment. Oh well, the email went through. =)

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

January 17, 2013
9:37 AM

Post #9388161

I just read an interesting article from Countryside magazine, with some details I didn't know... here's a few snippets:

The American nursery trade is a 39.6 billion dollar a year industry. With the purchase of Seminis in January of 2005, Monsanto is now estimated to control between 85 and 90 percent of the U.S. nursery market.

Monsanto holds over eleven thousand U.S. seed patents. When Americans buy garden seed and supplies, most of the time they are buying from Monsanto regardless of who the retailer is.

Consider this, in 1981 there were approximately 5,000 vegetable seed varieties available in U.S. catalogs. Today there are less than 500, a 90 percent reduction.

Before it was acquired by Monsanto, Seminis eliminated 2,000 varieties of seed from its inventory. The first things to go were the older open-pollinated varieties; vining petunias, butterfly weed, butter beans, German green tomatoes, and other heirlooms grown by gardeners for generations, replaced by genetically engineered varieties.


http://www.countrysidemag.com/issues/90/90-2/Jerri_Cook.html

This thread has now brought up a whole new personal inventory for me. At what point do we, as gardeners, need to take responsibility for ensuring the continuity of nearly extinct heirloom varieties? It's not just saving the seeds in a jar somewhere because most of them have to be grown out occasionally and the new seed saved.

That makes me wonder about the viability of seeds saved in deep freeze seed vaults in some remote frozen tundra...

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 17, 2013
9:47 AM

Post #9388170

I received a reply from Barb, and she will contact Pinetree in order to update the "Safe Seed list". =)

I have, for YEARS, wondered about the viability of those seeds saved in deep freeze in those vaults.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

January 17, 2013
2:58 PM

Post #9388452

Speediebean, thanks for contacting Barb. I was reacting to the statement in Pinetree's catalogue that you quoted here when I mentioned them. Unfortunately their catalogue only just arrived and I've already ordered just about everything I need from other sources. I'd love to support them, though!

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 17, 2013
3:28 PM

Post #9388481

Greenhousegal, Aaaaaah, I get it now. Sorry, didn't mean to be stepping on your toes, just thought I'd follow up on what you mentioned with a few more details. I think Judy was referring a little more specifically to a lack of association with Monsanto when she shared that list. Barb was very appreciative of the info, and her reply to the email sure was prompt! =)

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

January 18, 2013
4:32 AM

Post #9388909

Speedie, no toes stepped on! I was impressed with the lack of association with Monsanto too!

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 21, 2013
4:22 AM

Post #9392047

I will definitely be checking into the companies we buy our seeds from at work, that's for darned sure!! AND the histories behind the growers that we buy from as well. I can only think of a few of 'em off the top of my flat head at the moment, but most of 'em are local, if I remember correctly, and we do sell a lot of heirlooms.
terri_emory
Alba, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 22, 2013
1:54 PM

Post #9393907

speediebean, good luck with your classes and I love your "name".

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 22, 2013
2:46 PM

Post #9393940

Aaawww, thank you Terri! =) ****HUGGS!!****
Gypsi
Fort Worth, TX

May 19, 2013
1:55 PM

Post #9526083

Because spring often comes early in Texas, I order next year's seeds this spring, and refrigerate (not freeze). I've had very good luck preserving viability. I'll have to get a Pinetree catalog. Thanks for the info.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

May 19, 2013
4:04 PM

Post #9526228

I just downloaded the Pinetree 2013 catalog in PDF form, already having ordered last Fall what seeds I needed for this spring from SSE and Baker's Seed. I save and grow out most of my favorite veggie seeds every year, but sometimes a new infusion is needed, and unfamiliar heirlooms to try.

I HATE how paper catalogs in the mail accumulate, only to be thrown away later... even as I enjoy the color photos they include. I've taken to relying on photos from actual homeowner growers on the DG plant database. Much more realistic than professional "stock photos" anyway.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

May 19, 2013
4:06 PM

Post #9526232

I just downloaded the Pinetree 2013 catalog in PDF form, already having ordered last Fall what seeds I needed for this spring from SSE and Baker's Seed. I save and grow out most of my favorite veggie seeds every year, but sometimes a new infusion is needed, and unfamiliar heirlooms to try.

For example, I'm considering the rare Alabama black butterbean this year. I'm already growing out a few other rare heirloom beans in danger of extinction.

I HATE how paper catalogs in the mail accumulate, only to be thrown away later... even as I enjoy the color photos they include. I've taken to relying on photos from actual homeowner growers on the DG plant database. Much more realistic than professional "stock photos" anyway.
Gypsi
Fort Worth, TX

May 24, 2013
6:45 AM

Post #9532260

M & M Mars owns Seeds of Change? A chart - who owns what in Organic. Pretty neat. Mainly foods but some seeds too

http://www.cornucopia.org/wp-content/themes/Cornucopia/downloads/Organic2013.pdf

pollengarden

pollengarden
Pueblo, CO
(Zone 5b)

June 20, 2013
3:40 PM

Post #9566711

Gypsi-
I have considered buying seeds a year in advance for things I want to start early.
How does it work for Onion family seeds? They are supposed to have short viability.
Gypsi
Fort Worth, TX

June 20, 2013
4:06 PM

Post #9566723

I don't know, as I haven't bought any onion family seeds except some garlic chives this year (which are still in the refrigerator) Onion sets are my usual onion route, and they don't keep well at all.

pollengarden

pollengarden
Pueblo, CO
(Zone 5b)

June 21, 2013
6:24 AM

Post #9567336

Garlic chives run rampant once they get started, at least here they do.. I still think they are worth growing, but you might want to allow for that.
We are having a miserable year here weather-wise. I usually buy veggie seed - but this year I am making a point of saving seed from anything that copes with this hot dry windy weather.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

June 21, 2013
6:28 AM

Post #9567342

You can develop your own landrace varieties. That's the advantage of OP seeds, too. Diversity is so important when dealing with changes in climate conditions and disease/pest pressures.
cytf
Staten Island, NY

August 8, 2013
12:16 PM

Post #9625110

Hi Darius, this is my firsts time in this forum and I have learned a lot about seeds. I am one of those home gardeners that enjoy saving seeds . Last year my friend gave me a Big Boy tomato plant it did not produce many fruits but I got a good size one and I decided to save some seeds , to my great surprise the plant I grew this year have the largest tomatoes you will want to see. I think she does lot of her ordering from Park Seeds.Did I do the right thing saving those seeds?Please advise

pollengarden

pollengarden
Pueblo, CO
(Zone 5b)

August 8, 2013
1:53 PM

Post #9625188

cytf: Big Boy is a Hybrid, and hybrids are a cross that does not come back true to type - it will throw back to its parents or grandparents. Just like seeds from unintended crosses in your yard, it usually is NOT as good as the parent. But some offspring from hybrids are okay.
I have seen some crosses that were larger than the parent but either seedy or bland or both. If yours are tasty, save seeds from the best one (biggest or earliest or tastiest?)
Gypsi
Fort Worth, TX

August 9, 2013
5:32 PM

Post #9626189

well I am thrilled with my Sand Hill Preservation seeds, ok with Annie's Heirloom, none of whom seem to be on that list. And the Hopi Red Dye Amaranth seeds did very well when started in pots. For salads choose the small young red leaves, but they are stunning 6 foot drought hardy plants, and if you don't look, they taste like leaf lettuce! woohoo, I picked my dinner. I also have sweet potato leaves from my Sand Hill plants, cucumbers and tomatoes from my neighbors (hers went in earlier and got more moisture, so I helped her pick today, banana pepper from the one from RU, Thai Basil I think came from Sand Hill, my old fashioned mild oregano, hard boiled eggs from my hens, a bit of crumbled REAL bacon, and a bit of crumbled goat cheese with about a teaspoon of russian dressing. I am all for growing my own food! Don't think I ate any monsanto, my neighbor grows Celebrity tomatoes though.
Gracye
Warrenton, VA

October 13, 2013
7:42 AM

Post #9684833

Update to my experience with Southern Exposure Seeds:
After the absolutely INCREDIBLE summer crop I had with all of my seeds (I supported this company ONLY this year), except spinach, I tried, for the very first time, a winter garden. Put in two types of turnips, onions, spinach (the third try was to be my final but BOY OH BOY do I have LOVELY spinach and can't blame the company for the rabbits or my inexperience with germinating this crop), beets, and peas, you just would not believe how wonderful my garden is growing.
I admit, I wussed late summer, and on a whim and urgent desire to plant SOMETHING (I had placed an order for my seeds the same day-need discipline, methinks), I bought some Burpee lettuce seeds which are quite the disappointment due to failure to thrive as my Southern seeds have! In fact, after inadvertently burying some old lettuce seeds (SESE spring seeds) when I did a bit of cultivating, the Southern lettuce seeds have SHAMED the Burpee seeds.

I can see the heath of the Southern seeds vs. Burpees (I have tried Burpee seeds for other crops in the past), and it would take an act of God to make me stray from SESE. In fact, I did something that was horrible when putting in the fall crops...based on my experience with the non SESE seeds, I planted extra seeds, and had the WORST TIME thinning them out...oh, I'll caution you to NOT DO THIS if you do buy from them! I had forests of seedlings...and what a painful decision on what ONE seedling to keep and which MILLIONS (it seemed) to yank...!
terri_emory
Alba, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 14, 2013
6:54 AM

Post #9685482

Gracye, I enjoy Southern Exposure Seeds as well. Burpees used to be better (I think) than they are now. The same with a few of the rose nurseries. What my grandmother loved about the old nurseries is now gone.

I'm not trying to tempt you away from Southern Exposure, but have you looked through Victory Seeds online catalog? I've been enjoying seeds from them as well. Just a little enabling...nothing to get alarmed about ☺

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