Moving right along, How am I doin

Toledo, OR(Zone 8a)

Not sure where this post went but I thought I had it here. Anyway, Moving right along with my first quilt.
I have all the 12 blocks done and I'm beginning to attach them to the inner border. Then there is an outer border then the binding
Its going to be a pretty bit quilt by the time all the borders and binding get attached. The two pieces actually line up on the last pic but its just twisted.
There are 3 more rows to add then the borders.

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Oracle , AZ(Zone 8b)

Gourd, that is an awesome first quilt!! With your wonderful creative talent in so many crafts I knew you would " hit the ground running" with quilting.! Kudos to you!!

(Karen) Traverse Cit, MI(Zone 5a)

Awesome job. Quite an endeavor for your first project. Hope you are loving it.

(Barb) Manchester, NH(Zone 5a)

Jan, that is going to be gorgeous. And I'm happy to see you took the time to make your points and corners meet where they should. So many first quilters rush through it, are not satisfied with the result and then never try again. Taking the time, every time, is what makes it so stunning.... I'm really proud of your accomplishment!!! Are you going to quilt it yourself or have it done by a long armer? And what have you chosen for a batting and backing? I know - I'm so nosy - but the quilt is stunning and I am curious!!!!

Fleming Island, FL(Zone 9a)

Jan - the fabrics btwn the blocks are the "sashings". Then the "borders" go around the outside. The squares where 4 sashings meet are the "cornerstones".
I'm with Barb, you did a wonderful job. I know folks who have been piecing for years & still can't figure out how to get sharp corners.

Toledo, OR(Zone 8a)

Thank you Qwilter, not sure how to refer to all the extras. I appreciate the advice and info.
Barb, not sure about how I am going to quilt it as there is a very reasonable long arm quilter lady that lives just above the quilt store so I may have her do it as I really don't have the room to do it here. I am going to use Warm and Natural batting and I have a nice flannel sheet that I am planning on using for the backing but I may change that when I get the top all done. Depends on the size sort of. I think this is going to be big enough to fit a queen size bed when it is done. eheheh.
I am so excited that all the corners matched up and there are a few of the flying geese that don't connect on the rectangle and with the fabric I was using, a vintage toile it was hard to get a good variation and accurate placement for all the pieces.
I am getting excited about my next quilt already. Not sure what I am going to do but hopefully it will be better then this one. I am thinking I will get it together with my log cabin blocks. Still working on that.
Thank you all for your kudos
Made my day

Fleming Island, FL(Zone 9a)

Ah oh, she is hooked!!!!! Already planning the next quilt before 1 is done.

Toledo, OR(Zone 8a)

Hahahaha... you are such great inspirational friends. How can I go wrong?

(thunder)Wildwood, FL(Zone 9a)

awesome Jan AWESOME I knew you could do it !!! welcome to the world of quilting addiction !!!!!

Marietta, OH(Zone 6a)

Love those colors, Jan! You're very talented.... no question that you'll make wonderful quilts!

(Barb) Manchester, NH(Zone 5a)

Fellow Quilters-- a question. I have heard conflicting reports regarding using sheets for backing. How do YOU feel about this?

Victoria Harbour, ON

Wow, piece of art and on your 1st attempt..love the fabrics and the color
Amazing..bet you now have the bug

Fleming Island, FL(Zone 9a)

As long as it is a good quality, 100% cotton sheet, no problem. Need to avoid those silky ones with a very high thread count. They are too "limp" and a real pain to try & get on the long arm.
Flannel sheets work great.

(Barb) Manchester, NH(Zone 5a)

Thanks for the info Jean...

Toledo, OR(Zone 8a)

I am so flipping excited. I just added the second row and everything matched up perfectly. Yee Haw! ! ! OMG... now that I have been bitten by the quilting bug I absolutely need to get rid of the extra bed in my spare room as in the 6 years we have lived here it has only been used 3 times, I think they could use the couch if need be. I need more room. hehehe

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Fleming Island, FL(Zone 9a)

We have created another quilting addict!!!!

(Pat) Kennewick, WA(Zone 5b)

OH ya!! We gotta another ADDICT!!! My Best friend gave me a flannel sheet sheet set that was better quality than any yardage I've ever handled, I would not hesitate to use THAT fabric. Like was said earlier, it all depends on the quality of the fabric. With your craft experience, I am NOT at all surprised your work matches first time out of the chute!

Heck, if you only used the bed 3 times, for that little of use, a motel is good option! I wish I could free up room that easily.

(Karen) Traverse Cit, MI(Zone 5a)

I love using cotton sheets for quilt backings and especially flannel sheets. I watch for sets I like on sale. I use the flat sheet for the backing and then give them the bottom sheet and pillow cases so it makes a set. Early spring is the best time to buy flannel sheets, the price is right.

(Barb) Manchester, NH(Zone 5a)

Do you wash before using Karen?

(Karen) Traverse Cit, MI(Zone 5a)

Yes I do because there is a lot of shrinkage with flannel.

Toledo, OR(Zone 8a)

Good to know.

Oracle , AZ(Zone 8b)

Welcome to the world of quilting. Your life will never be the same. :^)

Longboat Key, FL(Zone 9b)

Quoting:
Welcome to the world of quilting. Your life will never be the same. :^)


Just more of a life.

if you were to use the quilt for bedding or bed cover, washed flannel is a good thing. But for a couch throw I would use 108" wide backing with a pretty complimentary pattern to show it off.

Toledo, OR(Zone 8a)

Heheh, thanks Mork, I am ready for a change and I'm not talking about a change in life, just a subtle change of pace. heheh

Toledo, OR(Zone 8a)

I don't know how but I ended up with one extra block. How cool is that? I can make a sham to go with it. heheh or a little pillow.
I sort of freaked out and went back to make sure I hadn't done something weird and missed a block somewhere but that was just impossible. ehehe

Marietta, OH(Zone 6a)

you could always center it on the backing or add a light solid to it and make it the label on the back corner....? or the sham would be good too... might as well use it!

(Cheryl) Wilmington, MA

Great First quilt Jan you are a natural! Welcome to our addiction lol
Cher

Toledo, OR(Zone 8a)

Okay, I am hand quilting using an echo stitch vs stitching in the ditch. I have everything all safety pinned together and have started my stitching.I fear this is going to take me a long time. I would do it on my sewing machine but everything is so bulky I can't figure out how to move it around so I have resorted to doing it by hand. Wish me luck.

(Barb) Manchester, NH(Zone 5a)

Jan = just remember to start in the center of the quilt and work out toward the edges. I usually do two or three inches wide and then check to see if the backing or front needs to be smoothed toward the edge some more. Usually does. I try hard to avoid a lot of looseness ....Guess I just don't pin close enough or something......
Edited to add: I can't wait to see how it comes out....

This message was edited Dec 23, 2012 7:10 PM

Toledo, OR(Zone 8a)

WHOOPS, good thing I read this. I started at the top and was going to work my way down. I haven't done too much so I can take it out if it doesn't match up. Its just so big. I am trying to figure out how to hold it to start in the center. I guess I will figure it out. eheh

(thunder)Wildwood, FL(Zone 9a)

u tube has some good videos on hand quilting.

Fleming Island, FL(Zone 9a)

They sell plastic & metal "U' shaped gizmos. You roll the quilt then slip the "U" over to hold it in place.
You really need to keep the section you are working on flat or your stitches won't be lying flat. The goal is needle straight down, across the scant bit, then straight up.

Now back to doing it by machine...... You use the "U" shaped gizmos mentioned above to roll up the quilt. And a Walking Foot if you do not have a machine that can be set for "free motion". And again you start in the middle and work out so no more then 1/2 is ever under the throat plate. It can be tight, but I've done a queen size on my machine. It also helps to set up a couple extra tables around the machine to hold the weight of the quilt. My machine sat in a sewing table. I'd pull it out from the wall and put a folding table behind and then put another table in front & to the left to hold the weight of that side of the quilt. And this is not a fast process. Your arms & shoulders will get tired from maneuvering the weight & pushing the fabric thru the machine. I was never able to quilt for more than 2 hrs at a sitting.

Toledo, OR(Zone 8a)

Thank for the info. I am rethinking this and I might go get some wood slats and make my self a frame that I can roll it up on and tack it to. I remember way way WAY back when I went to a quilting bee there was something similar to that with four clamps, one in each corner. It could be rolled up when not being stitched on. I have some of those plastic tubes but not sure how I can fit it under my presser foot.I need to think though this. I tried doing it in my lap, starting again from the center and that was really bulky and a challenge so then I got a large embroidery hoop but that made it too tight to put stitch through as my fingers just don't seem to want to push the needle up and down like it should. Errrr.... that long arm quilter is sounding better all the time. heheh. She has a shop over the quilt shop.

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

If you lap quilt it on a hoop then place the quilt on a flat surface and push down in the center to loosen the section. This will make the tension loose enough to needle up and down correctly.

I took my most recent piece off the frame yesterday. Otherwise I'd have photos to show. My older frame is a pair of saw horses with notches along the top to accommodate 2"x2" rails. The 2" rails have strips of fabric attached with heavy duty staples and then the basted quilt layers are basted with a long sculpture needle or pinned every few inches with safety pins onto those strips. I can roll the quilt in two inch increments and the tension is good because of the square rails. Large quilts can be pulled off the frame, rolled up and easily stored. The downside is the sawhorses take over a space.

SO made me a couple of portable frames where the rails are 1" dowels with fabric strips attached. The stretchers are 1"x2" with 1" slots drilled for the dowels. There are four small holes drilled around the circumference near the dowels' ends and a hole through the 1" side if the 1"x2" that aligns with the dowels. Four 16 penny nails serve as a stop pins. Each time I advance the quilt I remove the nails, roll the quilt and reset. I can either put this frame on a stand or suspend it by sturdy cord (in this case bootlaces) from chairs.

I have always started quilts on a frame. Sometimes I'll quilt the piece at three to four inch intervals on the frame then remove the quilt to a hoop to add stitching. Quilting on a frame is more difficult because you are stitching in all directions whereas on a hoop you turn the hoop and position the piece towards yourself.

Toledo, OR(Zone 8a)

Well, right now I have it rolled up on both ends and have it on my ironing board lowered so I can sit in a chair and do it. I don't have any tension though so I think I like the saw horses and 2x2" boards. Can you possibly take a couple of pics of the frames you are talking about, I like the idea of the dowels too. ??? so many???
Thanks

(thunder)Wildwood, FL(Zone 9a)

if you are going to get into hand quilting in a serious way....this is a grace frame, I have one and I love it. it was pricey, but well worth it. I keep it in my front hallway, we rarely use the front door, and there is enough room to sit at the frame, and someone could still walk by if need be.

I also have a few different size hoops. if you use these you need to have quilt in there looser than you would put ...say a piece to embroider....

and I also have a very old frame similar to this http://www.quilting-tidbits.com/quilt-frames.html pretty easy to put together, you could make feet for it, or put on top of chairs...can be stood on edge, behind couch, to get it out of the way, I always wanted to hang it from the ceiling on some pulleys , crank it up when not in use??!!

similar version, much smaller http://www.quilting-tidbits.com/quilt-frames.html

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Toledo, OR(Zone 8a)

I remember using one similar to the boards and chairs when I went to a quiliting bee when I first got married back in 67. Holy crap, that was a long time ago. hehehe. I like the looks of the Grace frame. I will have to check them out. See if I can afford to save up for one. Thank you so much for the info.

Toledo, OR(Zone 8a)

/Yep, I knew I had good taste. The Grace frames run between $300-$400. I do really like them and the way they can be folded up and put away. I will have to check and see if I can find a used one somewhere.

(thunder)Wildwood, FL(Zone 9a)

with more and more people getting into long arm machines...I would think there would be some available. not bad pricing really, they were $300. twenty years ago.!!

Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA(Zone 7b)

I will be happy to share photos of what I've got. Give me a day or two. I have spent a fair amount of time looking for used Grace frames like the one Thunder posted. No luck. I'm a little wary of its stability with a large piece like a queen size quilt. BTW, that is the largest size the frame can handle. Thunder, have you done anything that big on your frame?

Maybe stop quilting for a few days until you decide on how to tension your piece or use the hoop with slack. I'll post photos ASAP. Stitching without the tension needed to go directly up and down = a running stitch not a quilting stitch. The quilt sandwich will be joined but the effect is different.

Hand quilting is growing in popularity too so good quality rectangular frames or antique hoop stand frames are like hens' teeth.

This message was edited Dec 25, 2012 5:58 PM

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