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Accessible Gardening: Practical Matters for Physically Challenged Gardeers #16

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Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

December 18, 2012
5:48 PM

Post #9361825

Welcome to Practical Matters for Physically Challenged Gardeners #16. We came from here:
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1273434/
This thread is all about sharing the everyday joys and tribulations of gardening when there is some sort of limiting physical condition to contend with. The contributors here are dealing with a wide range of mobility challenges. Others have visual limitations. And, still others, conditions that cause energy deficits such as Depression, CFS or just too many birthdays. We welcome new comers. Jump in and growl and grumble about the frustrations, brag about your accomplishments or simply pass some time with people who can relate to what you are trying to do.
We are in the process of creating a list of books and websites we have found helpful. Feel free to add any books or websites that have been helpful to you or to comment on the books/websites in the list.
WEBSITES: Please let us know about any sites you have found especially helpful or if you found links invalid.
Thrive
http://www.carryongardening.org.uk/
-This site addresses gardening with various types of challenges. This website is based in the U.K... Some gardening vocabulary might be unfamiliar to U.S. gardeners. This is not a major issue, however. Highly recommended
-AgrAbility
http://fyi.uwex.edu/agrability/about/
AgrAbility is a program for disabled farmers and ranchers. The focus is on agriculture rather than horticulture. The link is to AgrAbility ďAbout UsĒ page. If you need info such as how to get from a wheelchair into a pick-up truck, this is the place to go.

-Gardening from a wheelchair
http://www.mda.org/publications/quest/q31garden.html

BOOKSóAll, except one. of these books are available in audio format from the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped. The exception is ďGarden UnseenĒ which is only available in Braille at the time of this post. This list was compiled by a visually impaired person; there may be print books available that are not on the list. Please correct the oversight, if you know of any. The books in this list are, of course, also available in print and may be at your local library.
-Garden Unseen by L. Stevens
-Accessible Gardening for People with Physical Disabilities by Janeen R. Adil (We especially liked the list of recommended vegetables for containers and raised beds found in this book.)
-The Enabling Garden: A Guide to Lifelong Gardening by Gene Rothert--Written by a horticultural therapist employed at the Chicago Botanic Garden. It should be kept in mind that this book was written 17 years ago. Some of the information on raised bed building materials is outdated, but it is still worth reading since the author gardens from a wheelchair. He possesses both academic and first-hand knowledge.
-Gardening Through Your Golden Years by James W. Wilson
-Accessible Gardening: Tips & Techniques for Seniors by Joann Woy
Very comprehensive. No matter what problems advancing age is throwing at you to spoil your gardening fun, you should find a way to keep gardening in this book. Mobility limitations, visual impairment and more subtle issues such as balance are all addressed. Will possibly be updated later this year. .
--The Able Gardener: Overcoming Barriers of Age and Physical Limitations by Kathleen Yeoman
A good book for those new to gardening and those who garden on the west coast. Some information may be outdated, but much garden knowledge stands the test of time well.

We are adding Jim Wilsonís Container Gardening this time around. Since container gardening is a technique so many of us use, Iíve been on the lookout for the best book on the subject. So far, this one is the one I like best.
I spent most of the day working on my pull-behind lawn sweeper. My back doesnít complain nearly so much about riding around on the lawn tractor as it does about raking pine straw. I will do the sweeping tomorrow, weather permitting. (Jim)


This message was edited Dec 18, 2012 7:51 PM

This message was edited Dec 19, 2012 11:57 AM

This message was edited Dec 19, 2012 12:11 PM

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

December 18, 2012
8:19 PM

Post #9361930

Staying outside all day doesn't sound so bad! (Jim's last post on the old thread.)
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

December 19, 2012
10:26 AM

Post #9362278

But, obviously, I shouldnít try to start a new thread after spending all day outside. I should have waited until I had rested and my mind was sharp. (Well, as sharp as a mind can get under the influence of Tramadol..)
I donít know any way to correct my goof up on the title. Should I just let it stand or make a 16-b thread? (Jim)

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

December 19, 2012
1:40 PM

Post #9362454

Ahhhh, let it stand, I didn't notice. You can't change the title of a thread. You could edit the to and from posts to mention it... what spices do you associate with Christmas? Cinnamon, ginger, allspice, nutmeg/mace, and clove, that's my top five. But I'm taking requests (it's for an article).
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

December 19, 2012
5:30 PM

Post #9362608

That would be my top 5 too. Add the flavors of pepermint and orange and you have Christmas.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

December 21, 2012
1:14 PM

Post #9363962

Yeah, I was unsure how to get orange and peppermint in--neither is a spice, you know. It wasn't published today--I think I will go back and add orange and peppermint (a fruit and an herb). For sure, those two are very strong flavors/smells/sensory experiences.
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

December 22, 2012
2:03 PM

Post #9364856

Carrie, I know the Lady Bird Johnson articleís appearance is keyed to her birthday, but it shows up at the perfect time to remind people of a great resource. I was on the NPIN website yesterday. I want to turn the windswept NE corner of our property into a natural prairie, but I want the plants that are unique to the moister Gulf Coast parries. The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center site had a list of gulf coast prairie plants. They seem to have a recommended plant list for every inquiry and I keep finding new ways of using the site. December is dream garden design time.
One catalog isnít going to make it to my Christmas Day stock pile. Kay recognized the feel of the R.H. Shumway catalog. That particular catalog does have a unique look, but I think it is a sure sign of seed catalog addiction when one can recognize a specific seed catalog by touch. ROFL.
I harvested chard. Now I have to search online to find out what to do with it. :-) (Jim)
Photo #1 and #2: A few December garden surprises.
Photo #3and #4: Is this the bird equivalent of having pizza delivery? No wonder I didnít get any grapes off this vine. You donít prune muscadine grapes as severely as you do other varieties, but a little more pruning to keep it open does seem in order.
#5: One of Kayís odd container combinations. Artichokes and snow peas.

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carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

December 23, 2012
11:08 AM

Post #9365437

Regarding Kay's "odd container combinations:" as long as all participants in a combination are happy and healthy and coexisting, it's a great combo to me. I think it's lovely. And yes, agreed to your comment about LBJ, the Mrs. Crazy gift-buying and wrapping and people changing their mind about where they will spend Christmas day, night, Eve, YIKES! Grandma got run over by a stocking disguised as a ham, but DSD refuses to eat ham, so we're making Christmas Chili instead!
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

December 25, 2012
2:15 PM

Post #9366912

Merry Christmas, Everyone!!!
Kay laughed at the idea of eating ham to celebrate a Jewish manís birthday, but I was able to spout the relevant New Testament passages so ham it isÖ.all dressed up with pineapple and cherries. I think we are all suffering from turkey burnout. Itís a cool, rainy day here. Chili sounds good!
We all liked the new article, Carrie. When we decided to experiment with a locavore diet, there were two items Kay and Nadine wouldnít budge on. Coffee and the warm spices they consider mandatory for holiday cooking such as cloves and nutmeg. Iím not a coffee drinker and we can grow our own ginger here. (Ginger I consider necessary because I love ginger beer. (You can freeze ginger for winter so I am able to keep myself supplied year-round from the garden.) But, I couldnít imagine life without cinnamon so we have compromised on our locavore experiment when it comes to coffee and spices. There is a fair trade program allowing individuals to buy directly from coffee and spice growers meaning the people who actually do the work growing coffee and spice crops are better compensated for their work. Iím looking into direct, fair trade sources for the exotic food stuffs we use. I read about a locavore couple in Canada whose eating experiment doesnít include any compromises. Thatís impressive! We are in a region where it can be done fairly easily. If we plan for things, like putting up ginger for winter use, it is relatively painless.
When you seriously think about giving up spices, you begin to see how spice merchants like the Dutch East India Company amassed such wealth and power.
Kay harvested purple-topped turnips yesterday. Nadine declared she didnít like turnips and I declined the greens, but would eat the roots. Kay insisted we at least try a bite. Nadine and I ended up eating our words and all the turnips, roots and greens. They tasted nothing like what comes in cans or is served as part of school lunches. Those turnip sources have probably given turnips their bad rep.
Hereís hoping everyone enjoys their Christmas Day whatever they are dining on. (Jim)

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

December 26, 2012
6:18 AM

Post #9367285

Yeah, Jim, I didn't put anything in there about an ounce of cloves being worth three sheep etc. And there are all kinds of fair trade issues that come into play and I also didn't talk about the Portuguese-Spanish-English races to try to cultivate nutmeg ginger cinnamon and clove. Obviously ginger is not a big problem but the other ones ... whew boy.
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

January 5, 2013
9:54 AM

Post #9376151

Iím not sure if the strange sights found in a January garden are scary or laughable. A little of both, I guess. (Jim)
Photo #1&2: Bizarre mushroom.
Photo #3: Very large cactus. This guy is definitely more on the scary side.

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carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

January 5, 2013
10:29 AM

Post #9376179

Not Halloween pictures but January? And the cactus doesn't rot? I think of FL/AL/GA as very humid, too humid for cactus, but I really have only been to Disneyworld in the past 20 yrs, so my thoughts don't amount to much.
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

January 6, 2013
1:52 PM

Post #9377396

Those do look more appropriate for Halloween, donít they? There are cacti that donít mind our humidity as long as drainage is good and there is a little wind to keep powdery mildew at bay. We have a native species of opunctia (prickly pear cactus), yecca and, of course, saw palmetto. Kay tells me you can find cacti on the windward side of the Virgin Islands so I guess they are very adaptable.

The Texas and Oklahoma people who immigrated here in the 50ís felt right at home. The Florida ďpanhandleĒ is a major beef cattle raising region. (We are very close to the Florida state line and have more in common with the panhandle than with the upper parts of AL.) Northwest Florida is very different from the touristy south Florida. We are sometimes called ďThe Forgotten CoastĒ or ďThe Redneck Riviera.Ē Lol. Our sandy soil doesnít support the lush greenery common in the upper south, except in the Ďalluvial bottom landĒ around waterways.

One reason I think the Sunset zone system will eventually be more used than the USDA system is Zone 8 covers so many different climates. When I think zone 8a, the lush interior of Alabama comes to mind and Iím sure that is a far cry from your version of8a, Carrie.

Paperwhites are popping up everywhere now and redbud trees are beginning to bloom. . Chomping at the bit to seed some small fruited tomatoes indoors. Waiting another week or two would probably be best. That way the peas will be finished and the tomatoes can take their places. In mid-March.

Photo: Ooookay, narcissus in the company of red mustard. lol.

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Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

January 11, 2013
3:15 PM

Post #9382263

Camellia...camellia... camellia...and a redbud... nope thats another camellia. So... camellias can have red buds and redbuds are sometimes white I'm So confused.
Inquiring minds want to know, if the flower is white is it still called a redbud? :-) (Jim)

This message was edited Jan 11, 2013 8:08 PM

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Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

January 13, 2013
11:24 AM

Post #9383720

This is a redbud right? although, it still looks pink to me lol. (Jim)

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carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

January 14, 2013
9:30 AM

Post #9384609

A redbud (Cercis) is a genus of plants, a red bud is a bud that is red. Does that help? I know it might not help you tell them apart.
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

January 14, 2013
3:47 PM

Post #9385028

No hope for it. Need to take on the Latin and the Greek Botanical names indeed time to go study Latin.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

January 14, 2013
6:02 PM

Post #9385181

Jim, I took French in school, never Latin. I just try to remember what I learn--wait, I also took Chemistry, which has some Latin chemical roots. Like Au is the element gold, aur- as a prefix means golden foliage, usually, or means gold in French, and so forth.

Anybody take Cymbalta? I'm interested in side effects.
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

January 16, 2013
11:11 AM

Post #9387240

Great article yesterday, Carrie!!! Iíll never look at a bottle of molasses the same way again. It is hard to imagine molasses as dangerous. That article definitely benefited from the pictures.
The weather has been more like April than January lately. We all have early onset garden fever. I canít imagine winter is through with us already though. The few occasions weíve had snow, it has been in Feb.
Kay is helping eldest DD prep the CanDo Garden area for a vegetable garden. EDD is doing well, but she tires easily and doesnít have much strength. After the initial prep, the work shouldnít be beyond her though. She is enthusiastic about having a garden space of her own. She will probably have to start her own DG account eventually as full of questions as she is. I doubt even Kay can field them all. . Nadine is starting her own tomatoes. There is going to be some friendly competition between the three of us for best tomatoes this year, but we all benefit at the dinner table from that kind of competition. Iím looking forward to it. We all have our favorite tomato variety and method of growing. Topsy-turvy bags and eBuckets are my chosen grow methods for the year and Iím going with old varieties like ĎCherokee Purpleí. Nadine likes a mystery variety of grape tomato that volunteered in the compost pile one year. It can completely cover the walls of the sunken garden in a season keeping us in salad tomatoes deep into summer. The cooler condition in the sunken garden means that the plants donít go dormant in the high summer heat. EDD hasnít made her mind up about a variety, but the growing method will be traditional.
I guess you could say Kay is focusing on the bones and overall structure of the land this season. She is growing more trees and shrubs. Many from seed. She and I will probably never see some of the trees mature, but the world probably needs more people who can think long term. I hope I live long enough to see all the new Cercis canadensis and Cercis chinensis trees she is planted as early forage for the bees come into flower. There! That wasnít so hard. Lol. I think calling them redbuds was just a way for the ladies to sneak more pink flowered things passed me. I wonít fall for their tricks if I learn the botanical names. That one was simple. Just family name and Latinized region of origin or place of first discovery by the namers.
Off to discover if there really is a red redbud or if I should settle for camellias as a source for early season red. (Jim)

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

January 16, 2013
3:09 PM

Post #9387500

Thanks, Jim. It's not that hard to make enlargeable pictures like that, and SO much more effective than the tiny ones, but we're not supposed to make "hotlinks" to Flickr pictures. We're supposed to save the picture to our journal and then link to it there, for example. So...I guess I won't be doing that as much any more. It was effective, though. Man, I could get lost in those old newspapers.

It's funny; you have EDD, and I call mine DD#1, and there's also DD#2.
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

January 25, 2013
8:56 AM

Post #9397177

Hi all, Been depressed and kept busy crocheting.Made an afghan,houseshoes,catbeds,and a small scatter rug. It's nice to be back to the land of the living. It was so good to hear you talk of spring things. THERE IS HOPE!!!!!
I've got some seeds but is too early to start anything yet. Maybe in 2 more weeks. Have been living on peanutbutter sandwiches.Tell me something good to cook. It's also nice to be on line too. I appreciate Jim calling me... When I'm depressed I can't talk about it.
Have also had my fill of TV.History,Science and news.I feel like I know more about politics than I ever, ever wanted to know. Have come to the conclusion that all politicians should be locked up and the key thrown away. Let my cats and dogs take care of the government.They would get along better.LOL Am proud I can complain about our government.All and all I love it anyway.
Found some old magazines next to my puter that I thought I'd lost.Now I'll be reading instead of sleeping.
I had to buy a new tire and will need to buy another one next month.It went flat at Walmarts and I refuse to buy tires at Walmarts so I drove around on a donut till I could get another. Life can get intresting sometimes.
Am looking forward to spending a day at Hobby Lobby and Lowes in the near future. Whatever I spend is to me like spending for a ticket to Disney World.Well worth it.
I had'nt thought of Amargia as like N Florida. But I guess it is.
A question...Can one camp anywhere on the beach in ALA. Or do they have designated camping areas? Yes It's getting that time of year again when I get the urge to just take off. I really do hope you ALA guys get to come up this way. I don't have a bear to intertain you with this year tho. My cats and dogs will do their best for you tho.
My neighbors have Emus too. The drive up my mountain should be good for a thrill or two. It is a good highway. And I'll cook better than peanutbutter sandwiches. Have you ever had butterscotch pies? My favorite thing to cook.
It is now eleven AM. time to go to sleep.
Vickie

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

January 25, 2013
4:09 PM

Post #9397566

What is in a butterscotch pie?
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

January 28, 2013
9:48 AM

Post #9400170

Hey, welcome back, Vickie! Kay says she prefers dogs and cats to bears. Lol. Iíve noticed she doesnít go wandering in the woods by herself since I convinced her of the possibility of bears in our woods. What the reality of rattle snakes and swamp cats couldnít do, the mere possibility of a bear has accomplished. Geneticly far northern types seem to have an ingrained fear of bears and wolves even if they have never actually seen one. Or, maybe, it comes from growing up listening to all those scary folktales about bears and wolves.

I made the statement that I wasnít afraid of any land animal, but Nadine and Kay burst out laughing. Okay, so maybe I have some issues with wasp.

There arenít many places you can camp right on thebeach anymore. The coastline is getting so built up. I canít understand building right on the beach front in such a hurricane prone area, but people sure do it. . Plenty of public beaches remain though and there are camping sites not too far away. As retired military, I have access to the beach on Tyndal AF base so that is where I usually go. If you still have a military ID or go to the trouble of renewing it, you should be able to get access to such places. They are usually well kept. Last time we wnt, we saw raccoons come out of the woods and play on the beach. There arenít many places you can see things like that any more. A woodland right up to the strand large enough to support wildlife has become a rarity.

We are getting more heirloom tomato seeds in a trade. That will be good. Eldest DD needs as many fresh fruits and vegetables as we can get her to eat. Getting enough vitamins and minerals is a problem for those with cirrhosis. She is frighteningly thin. Iíve started several jars of sprouts. That may be a way to get more nutrients into less food. Iím using the canning jar with the canning ring top holding the screen in place method for now. If it works out, I will step up to something more sophisticated. Iím sprouting lentils and chickpeas we already had among the dry beans for now. I want to try sprouting things like broccoli and clover when I can find a source for untreated seeds fit for sprouting. Alfalfa seeds are easy to find, but that is the one I have to avoid. It has chemicals that are harmless to most people, but could be bad for a body not easily able to rid itself of toxins.

We harvested the first asparagus spear yesterday and one of the peach trees is flowering. That particular tree is a good producer when it manages to avoid late freezes. Bells of Ireland are up and irises are beginning to put in their appearances. At least I think they are irises. They are in the iris bed anyway. I guess there are good reasons Iím in charge of the veggie growing and not the flowers. Lol. (Jim)

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katiebear
mulege
Mexico

January 28, 2013
10:02 AM

Post #9400191

Check www.bulkfoods.com for seeds for sprouting. The enzimes in sprouts help with digestion so they are really good for you.

I'm mostly lurking here but I'm aroun.

hugs, katie

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

January 28, 2013
11:31 AM

Post #9400289

I think you can sprout quinoa, too, Jim--it's a seed, not a grain. Spring, already? Wow. We cancelled a planned trip to Boston this weekend because it is so cold there!

And I love that place, Katie. Only can shop there once every few years, though.

This message was edited Jan 28, 2013 2:39 PM
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

February 1, 2013
7:50 AM

Post #9404722

Thanks for the link, Katie. There are many things that caught my interest on that site in addition to sprout seed.
Vickie, do you just make butterscotch pudding and put it in a pie shell to make butterscotch pie? I think we have a couple of packets of butterscotch pudding. It is my favorite flavor.
Nadine suggests St. Andrews State Park (Panama City,) if you make it down this way. (I think St. Andrew was a military reserve at one time.). Iím afraid my serious camping days are over. I need that comfortable bed at the hotel on base. Of course, you could camp out in the CanDo Garden. No Gulf nearby though, just a creek. We had a campfire there last night. Now, thatís my kind of camping. Only steps away from my bed and spa tub. BTW, was that garden named after you or did you and Kay have a case of great minds thinking alike? Iím slowly selling off my comic book collection to fund a trip your way in late spring or early summer. That will take care of two birds with one stone. Kay is tired of shuffling around the boxes and boxes that contain my collection. Kay has a sister near Houston and one near the OK border above Dallas so we will make a big, roughly circular trip of it. Kay is the youngest of her bunch of siblings. She is afraid if she doesnít get out to see them again soon she may not have the chance.
Are you up to growing tomatoes in containers this year, Carrie? I think it is time in your region to start the seeds, if you want to go that route. You will have a completely different set of tomato growing issues in your new home. I donít suppose getting the tomatoes to ripen before high heat pushed the plant into dormancy was ever an issue in MA.
Winter popped back in to remind us it still rules. The forecast is for 8 hrs. of below freezing temps. I hate the timing because the little boy is still being held hostage in the storm bunker and I doubt the mentally disturbed man who kidnapped him thought to install a heating system in the shelter. (I assume news of that local situation has gone national. There seem to be news crews from everywhere near the site. ) Negotiations are still going on. Letís pray the child is free soon.
The sprouting experiment is a success. Dried chickpeas and lentils from the grocery store sprouted well. They have a nutty taste I like. Iíll try quinoa next. I heard sprouts recommended as a survival food for situations in which the power is out for a week or more and heat for cooking is not easily available. That is a use for sprouts I never thought of, but it makes sense. Sprouts provide an easily stored, high nutrient, good tasting food without the need for cooking. (For everyday cooking, I like them in stir fry dishes.) Adding sprout seeds to our hurricane season emergency stash seems like a smart idea . (Jim)

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

February 1, 2013
1:55 PM

Post #9405149

Uh, er, I haven't grown ANYTHING except paperwhites, amaryllis and coleus since we've been here, Jim. I killed the tarragon I scored at a round up but most of the other stuff, well, some of the other stuff is still alive.

I still don't have a way to get outside w/out a LOT of help, and I'm afraid that anything I tried to grow would burn up. It was 115* quite regularly last summer.

Will you be calling on ME when you make your big circular trip? I think if you go from Houston to OK north of Dallas, I'll be right on the way! Just don't come 4/27/2013; we're going to CT that weekend. There may be a RU around then...have you ever been to one of those? And Debra is very near here too! We'll have our Accessible Gardening West sub-committee meeting.
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

February 3, 2013
8:28 AM

Post #9406839

That sounds like fun! I wonít have to take notes at this committee meeting will I? lol. Maybe I can be in charge of the refreshments. Iíll bring some heirloom tomatoes and we can have an heirloom tomato tasting. It looks like we will be growing tomatoes in a big way this year.
I keep meaning to go to our local RU but something always comes up at the last minute. Maybe, Iíll have better luck making it to an RU in TX.
Iíve been reading what I think of as a ďthorns and rosesĒ article. You always see them around Valentineís Day. One of those exposes about the dark side of the cut flower industry. (Iíll probably go for live miniature roses if I buy Kay any flowers this year.) I did learn something new though. Botanically speaking, roses donít have thorns. They have prickles. I still think, outside the happy realm of garden geekdom, roses will continue to have thorns. It sounds more poetic. Lol. (Jim)

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

February 3, 2013
10:07 AM

Post #9406963

THAT should be my Valentine's Day article this year! I wrote a book review of 'Flower Confidential' by Amy Stewart and she talked about the cut flower industry and rose breeding and how the thorns and smell have been bred out in favor of roses that can be shipped and packaged and stored without losing their rose-bud look. Just then they decided that book reviews couldn't count for articles. (When you see one, it's written by someone on salary.)

I'll appoint Debra in charge of refreshments
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

February 4, 2013
1:20 PM

Post #9408327

I'll try to be there. When is it again? I've had a stomach virus that just hung on.
I really want you to come up here. But I can surely come down there to Dallas area too. And if things work out can go to Alabama next fall.I still love to camp out. Our family reunion is in Oklahoma in Sept.I have'nt had an outdoor fire yet...too cold. Am jealous.
Oh Jim,Yes I've been hearing about that poor child and say a prayer several times aday for him.and that he and that guy have bonded enough to keep him safe.
Carrie, There are some rose fields near the A&M RESEARCH Center in Overton that still grow roses that have a good rose scent. Its on ST hwy 31 between Kilgore and Tyler.They also sell roses(with THORNS) at a stand on 42 (31 intersects with 42) in Kilgore.during bloom period.
I think you'd injoy the drive Carrie.And I think it's WC accessible.Am not sure you can do anything but drive thru the rosefields.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

February 4, 2013
1:32 PM

Post #9408335

I'm supposed to be getting a new power chair in 4-6 weeks...I'll wait until then.

AND, I think we are going back to Cancun in the end of February. And then CT in April. Hot diggity dawg!
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

February 6, 2013
9:45 AM

Post #9410210

Well, the hostage crisis wasnít resolved peacefully, but it has been resolved. The ordeal is finally over for the little boy. Physically, at least. Emotional healing from that kind of trauma will take years.
Another trip to Cancun sounds like a blast, Carrie. I like making return visits to a destination. You can appreciate a place more deeply after the novelty has passed. This time if you are served nopalito you will know you are eating a prickly pear pad. Lol.
The back pain has been worse than usual lately so Iíve been doing lots of reading. Iíve read Flower Confidential . in my opinion, it gives a more balanced picture of things than the other ďthorns and rosesĒ stuff you see in print around Valentineís and Mothers Day . (f I remember correctly. Amy Stewart called those sort of exposes ďBLOOD and rosesĒ articles. That is a more accurate description when you include the exposes on the Colombian cut flower industry. Did our government really think moving the cut flower industry to that part of the world would help curtail the illegal drug trade ? That seems NaÔve.
A cooler filled with fragrant, locally grown flowers next to the cash register, is a part of my girls dream for their own coffee /bakery shop. (Did I say ď..girlsĒ? Uh-oh. You know you are getting old when you think of 20 and 30-something women as ďgirls.Ē) I might as well say ďmy daughtersĒ. I donít think of them anymore as my god-daughter or step-daughter. With no living fathers, they are simply daughters to me now.
We want to factor your mountain into our trip, Vickie. Kayís oldest sister grew up near where you are and Kay wanted to take pictures of the place to bring to her. Arlene canít travel, but we can still give her a virtual visit to her childhood home. It must be a beautiful place. It seems to haunt the people who lived there with pleasant memories. It was during WWII that Miss Hlen and her oldest daughters lived there. They had to have been poor and struggling, but they still speak of their years in Arkansas with a smile.
The doc prescribed Lortab5 for a while to handle the muscle tension and pain so Iím feeling better than I have been. Finally able to get some sleep. I just wish DD#1 did not work at a bakery. She doesnít drive and a bakerís work day starts obscenely early. Nadine and I take turns driving her to and from work so it isnít really too bad. Iím still walking the property every day on Kayís arm so I get to see all the little seasonal changes. My none-to-clandestine love affair with my snapdragons continues. Youíve got to love them! They take a break in high summer, but the remainder of the year they just keep on keepiní on. (Jim)
Photo: Snapdragons hanging out of my deck rail planter.


This message was edited Feb 7, 2013 9:12 AM

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carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

February 6, 2013
1:26 PM

Post #9410429

Lovely! I hear you about your daughters. Are girls different from boys? I mean duh, obviously, totally, but I have 3 step-sons and one step-daughter. The daughter is the one who turns to Dad for car loans, school loans, amnesty from prior loans. I'm the c.f.o., DH comes to me for can we afford to loan her money from our retirement fund. I always say sure. And then she asks me. The boys/men don't ask for that kind of stuff. I don't think I could say no to them either.

The hostage thing--I don't think there IS any peaceful resolution of that type of situation. There's no way you can tell the little boy "everything's okay, that bad man will be in jail forever but you should have no trouble sleeping for the rest of your life." Ugh. Once he's the hostage,things are pretty bad for him for a long time. But at least the healing can start and he's safe.

BEAUTIFUL day here, today. Like April in Boston.
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

February 11, 2013
3:35 AM

Post #9414990

The mother will have a hard time getting over this too. It'll be hard to let him out of her sight for awhile.
Jim, saw you had some rough weather for awhile this afternoon.
Wait untill you're still calling daughters, the girls when they're 50 LOL
Carrie, daughters and grandsons both seem to come to mamaws for most stuff. sometimes the answer is no.
I think the times we had no or little money were the happiest for us too. We could always have a little garden and were good at gathering wild things from animals to plants. Even the girls remember this as good times,like playing in mud puddles,picking berrys,looking for fishbait,fishing in a little pond.churning milk. Vonn remembers a big ole bull...except it was a cow from which we got milk, but it had horns thus it was a bull.LOL
I fell a couple days ago and banged my neck up(don't know why my neck and not much else) DD came up and stayed the night with me. Am doing fine.
Have got all I need to start some seeds,maybe tomorrow.
My SIL is going to put up a long shelf in my hall for the cats to play on.That should be fun to watch...The cats not the SIL.
Take care all

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

February 11, 2013
3:06 PM

Post #9415830

Heh heh heh, the cats not the sil!

Golfer's elbow is getting worse--now I'm typing left-handed. S-l-o-w!
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

February 13, 2013
6:23 AM

Post #9417523

Carrie, You sure thats not writers elbow? Do you really play golf? Have you tried a heating pad on it?
Did'nt plant seeds. It snowed...Somehow it did'nt seem right to plant seeds when it was snowing,but we've got a beautiful white world.
Am so-o-o-o mad at my car insurance company. They are going up on my insurance. Have never had a ticket or an accident. Its just my age.That just seems like discrimination. gr-r-r-r

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

February 13, 2013
9:03 AM

Post #9417693

It's CALLED golfer's elbow. (To distinguish it from tennis elbow, which is the opposite.) It's actually called medial epicondylitis, and tennis elbow is lateral epicondylitis. It comes from hyper-extending my elbow, like a strong forehand and then back-hand in Wii ping-pong. It's mostly, I think, from transferring and using my upper body too much in ways it wasn't designed for. It hurts when I shift gears in the car, or when I use the mousepad in the laptop, and most of all when I prop myself up on my straight arms, like doing a push up, and straighten my elbows. The cure is to stop stressing the tendon for a LONG time. I can't stop transferring!
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

February 14, 2013
12:52 PM

Post #9419073

I learn something new all the time on this forum. I thought golferís elbow was just another name for tennis elbow. Hope your neck, Vickie, and your elbow, Carrie, are better today. Happy Valentineís Day. Itís the traditional day for planting potatoes in our area, but we arenít planting white potatoes this year. Kay is planting seeds despite the rain and cooler temps. I donít think anything short of snowfall could stop her.
lol. I think a shelf full of cats sounds like hours of entertainmentÖand better than most of what is on TV. But, I wouldnít get my hopes up that the cats having a shelf of their own will keep them off your shelves. We had a cat named Catherine who push anything we put on the mantle off onto the floor. Finally, I just gave up and cleared the mantle and made it her space. Her response was to start pushing things off the coffee table. I started putting her toys on the mantle for the express purpose of being pushed off. That seemed to satisfy her. Your feline fur-buddies are probably better behaved. Catherine spent most of her life as a barn cat. She didnít dain to come inside the house until she was very old. She was a great outside cat, but she was the house cat from Hell.
An amazing amount of rain came down in a very short period of time. There has been some flooding. Iíve seen worse here though. Fixing the lower drive is going to take a bite out of my travel budget. Not too big of one I hope. I would rather have the freak rains than the massive snowfall that hit New England.
What work Iíve done has been in the kitchen lately. We Canned an excess of mandarin oranges in a light syrup and froze four bags of whole strawberries. I picked up a gallon from a nearby strawberry farm, but we couldnít eat that many fresh. My eyes were bigger than our stomachs. Lunched on a chicken/sweet potato pot pie. Sweet potatoes grow so much easier in our area than white potatoes, we will focus on them this growing season. Kay and Nadi have been showing me how versatile sweet potatoes are. A few more dishes like sweet potato pot pie and I donít think I will miss Irish potatoes TOO much. Growing up in PA, we ate sweet potatoes around the winter holidays and that was about it. I wasnít a big fan of candied sweet potatoes.
It seems like prices are going up dramatically on everything. I had to pay double what I normally do for my Cymbalta this month. I need the neuropathy relief that comes with Cymbalta so I canít just go to a different anti-depressant. Ouch! My back and my wallet are under assault. (Jim)

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

February 15, 2013
10:43 AM

Post #9419936

Yeah, my husband was on Cymbalta, just came off it! 2 Cymbalta stories: first, with OUR plan, a refill of Cymbalta was one price, whether you took 1 a day or 3 a day. Clearly cheaper to get the md to write for more per day. Two, dh decided to come off them. He was allegedly ONLY taking them for pain, not as anti-depressants. All the same, he was strangely morose coming off them. He did it when the rx ran out--not the right way! Be careful, that's all. He never got pain relief. I think he would like gabepentin, but it made him sleepy. I think that wore off for me.
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

February 20, 2013
3:36 AM

Post #9425159

Thanks, My neck is much better. Now if the depression would lift abit,Id be able to do the jitterbug. LOL
I'm still looking for the Butterscotch pie receipe. I don't trust my memory for someone else.I wrote it in a cookbook ...but which one?
I've tried other anti depressents but always come back to Prozac.
We're under an icestorm watch tonight, so our electricity might go down for a few days. I am prepared, tho I might run into town to get another bag of catfood and beleive it or not an icechest for milk and butter. I think the last icestorm took down all the weak trees so should be safe from those.
some of our lines go thru forest which am not sure about. Fun to live in exciting times LOL Everyone up here stays prepared for outages,at least the oldtimers do.Most today have generators. I hate the sound of them tho and tough it out,just pretend I'm camping out.
It'll soon be daylight so better go get dressed.
Vickie

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

February 20, 2013
1:05 PM

Post #9425685

Butterscotch pie...do you remember if it was a traditional format (pie crust + butterscotch pudding) or was it anything that's non-standard, like Boston cream pie (which is really cakke) or key lime pie (which is pie but with a graham cracker crust)?

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

February 20, 2013
1:13 PM

Post #9425692

Vickie, did it have a meringue topping? Check out some of these recipes.
https://www.google.com/search?q=butterscotch+pie&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a

Looks like egg yolks + brown sugar + flour/cornstarch + butter filling and egg white meringue on top, with or without more sugar.
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

February 20, 2013
2:29 PM

Post #9425776

Yummy!!! Now I want butterscotch pie
We have a generator, but I don't like the sound of it either or the routine cleaning and maintenance I have to do on a machine that is used once in a blue moon. We never bother to crank it up unless an outage last so long that food in the freezer might melt
We are having just the opposite problem with trees and the power lines. The workers who keep the lines clear are over-zealous and cut down trees that did not pose a reasonable threat to the lines. The company seems to be trying to extend the right of way it receives from property holders. Why do they shave off one side of a tree anyway? That practice makes absolutely no sense to me. It's like torturing a tree to death instead of simply cutting it down. The workers are heavy-handed with the herbicides also. That is a concern when your property and many waterways are downhill from a major run of high voltage lines. I know the power companies face more than the usual challenges from nature in this area. (Just to name a few: Fire ants getting into electronic equipment. Kudzu and half a dozen more vines with enough vigor to damage structures. Frequent hurricanes, tornadoes and flooding.) It is like the power company has declared war on nature and that is a war we can't possibly win. There have got to be better methods.
The windows are stuffed with pots of seeds from tomatoes to hollyhocks. We will harvest some kohlrabi today. If it tastes as well as it grows, we have a new easy winter crop to join the kale, mustard, collards and turnips.
Photo: Not exactly sure what this is, but it was a sunny surprise on the shadiest side of my deck rail planters and a nice contract to the blue wood anemones that are starting to pop up.
(Jim)

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Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

February 23, 2013
11:16 AM

Post #9428972

Did the recent storms hit your mountain, Vickie? Did you lose electricity? It's been rain, rain and more rain for us. Early morning temps in the 70's. The frogs are partying like college students on spring break. I've never seen so many happy frogs. The 'Goldilocks' crocus have appeared like amphibian party decorations. What little cuties!
Well, I can always make a rainy, dreary morning better with hot chocolate. Good article, Carrie. I've been learning a lot about chocolate lately. Only a few days ago I was listening in to one of Kay's audio books called "Chocolate: A Bittersweet Saga of Dark and Light. When I commented that the idea of drinking cocoa made without milk or sugar sounded terrible, she made me a foamy brew using water instead of milk and flavored with cinnamon and hot chili sauce. I'm not going to stop buying Hershey, but the cup she gave me sweetened with honey wasn't bad. My chocolate taste will never be very sophisticated. I spent too many happy days roaming Hershey Park as a child. Besides, I don't think we can afford another person in the house who is into Verona chocolate. lol. (Jim)

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carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

February 23, 2013
10:01 PM

Post #9429493

Thank you, Jim. Before I wrote that one, I was vaguely aware that chocolate was from the Americas, but that research was eye-opening! Like about the Columbian Exchange and spices...plus the style, with the sidebar...that was a pivotal article for me. I'm glad to see it run again!
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

February 26, 2013
8:56 AM

Post #9432333

I injoyed the article beyond words. I always have been and always will be a totally unrependent chocoholic. My motto could be "Don't make war... give chocolates." I learned somethings about chocolate too.But...What is Verona Chocolate.
We were without electricity for a few hours. They cleared the trees and stuff several years ago. but in a forest,one can clear just so much.Tho I think the lines went down in town. There was ice building up on the lines.


Butterscotch Pie Receipe

2 cups sugar
1 stick butter
1 cup evaporated milk
Brown in skillet till good and brown,not yellow. stir as it browns.
meanwhile
In a large bowl beat
2 cups milk
4 large egg yolks
1 tsp vanilla
1/2 cup flour
gradually add to contents of skillet stirring constantly,cook till thick, add to 2 baked pieshells
This is an old receipe and very rich.
You can make maringue but my family preferred coolwhip or whipped cream.
Vickie

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

February 26, 2013
5:09 PM

Post #9432918

Thank you, Vickie! The mystery has ended. Now we can all make it--actually, DH and I just gave ourselves a talking-to about our weight. Not until I'm down a few pounds.
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

February 27, 2013
3:27 PM

Post #9433976

Vickie, I've added that recipe to our files. Thanks. Nadine is always looking for new dishes to fix for the churches 5th Sunday lunches and she is currently on the lookout for a good dish for the potluck planned for the local RU.
Going to our local RU is almost a necessity this year. We have so many excess plants that we really need to give some away. Kay is into the PROCESS of propagation. It doesn't seem to matter to her that we don't have room for another 30 lilies. The idea of propagating them on mass from bulb scales fascinated her. I have to say though that the S.A.D. didn't hit her so hard this year and I think all her plant winter propagation played a part in that. Those projects are everywhere in the house, however. I've got to get the lady a GH built. (Jim)
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

March 1, 2013
12:34 PM

Post #9435607

I can relate to needing to lose weight, Carrie. I haven't braved the scales, but I'm afraid I've gained a few pounds. Many mornings DD#1 brings home the pastries that she feels aren't up to gourmet pastry beauty standards. Unfortunately, a pear and brie en croutte that is a little lop-sided or white chocolate macadamia nut cookies that don't have the perfect degree of roundness taste just as good and have just as many calories as those beauty contest winners that end up on the bakery's shelves. My will and resolve to lose weight fly out the van window around dawn when DD#1 climbs in accompanied by all those wonderful fresh baked good aromas. Losing weight will be next to impossible as long as she needs a ride home from work.
We had to take Fenrira to the animal hospital today. One of her paws is giving her trouble. The vet drained the infection and put her on antibiotics for a week. He will decide next week if she needs surgery. The doc said she is one of the most calm and best behaved patients he has ever treated. Away from home, when she doesn't feel compelled to defend her territory, she exhibits a markedly different personality. Quiet and easy going. Not the least bit aggressive. She seemed more amused than anything by the barkers and growlers she encountered at the hospital and was friendly toward the other friendly dogs.
Kay is spending the day potting up excess plants for the RU and making sure what has been seeded and transplanted stays warm. Winter is going out like a lion this year. I hope this will be our last cold snap. (Jim)
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

March 2, 2013
5:17 AM

Post #9436263

I'm so glad Kay had less depression this year.It does help to stay focused on something else.
We've got a dusting of snow on the ground this morning.
Yesterday I went to town and renewed my car insurance.bought most of my monthly grocerys and spent three hours looking around the Dollar Tree and Wally World.bought a purple and white varigated African Violet. stocked up on snack food(at 72,I refuse to watch my weight.)LOL
Glad you liked the pie receipe. I've been hungry for SOS. I know Jim knows what it is. Hamburger gravy over bread.
Cricket and Dillen are good in a Vets office too.My cats are not. I've got to get Foxy fixed soon.
When are you having your plant reunion? We want all the details of what you give and get.
I just found out the Ark, Okla garden show is today and tomorrow at the Fort Smith Convention center. I've gone a couple of times and injoyed every second. Since I did'nt know about it. Have spent all my monthly splurge money. A total bummer!!!!
Am gathering up all my what nots and other stuff and hope to have a yard sale somewhere in town next month. Have decided I am almost a hoarder. You've given me an idea to start some plants growing to sell. I've already started some annuals for myself.
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

March 2, 2013
1:33 PM

Post #9436703

Well, it's not so cold here that linemen have to worry about power lines icing over. Bur-r-r. When does Spring arrive in earnest in your part of the world, Vickie?
I found pots on sale at Dollar General yesterday. Just in time. Kay used up all the ones we had on hand. The lilies she propagated were Easter lilies someone gave us a few Easters ago. They are perfectly hardy in gardens here, but bloom around Independence Day, not Easter, left to their natural timing. Those are all potted up and she has moved on to Regal lilies. I suspect quite a few of the regal lilies will stay because they have a nice scent. But, I think I'll try to find homes for all the little Easter lilies. Tara, melinda, Nadi and I all have some in our respective gardens already and they are so lightly scented Kay would rather save her personal garden space for something else with scent. She says her sense of smell is growing less acute as she ages.
I'm making a list of the plants we will be bringing to the RU. Hope to have it posted on the FL/ALA RU trade list thread in a day or two and will be adding more plants as the time for the RU grows closer. Let me know if any of you here see something you would like. I will sit it aside for you.
Crazy day yesterday. DD#1 had to be rushed to the hospital too. (The people one in her case. lol.) They pumped her full of potassium via IV and she insisted she felt well enough to go to work this morning. (She works a day shift on weekends.) I didn't realize running low on potassium was that dangerous.
Fenny is feeling well enough to grumble about the twice a day footbath (paw bath?) and having to wear a sort of shoe so I guess she is better. (Jim)
P.S.: I forgot, Vickie. Verona is a brand of chocolate beloved by dark chocolate fiends. It lives up in the lofty heights of chocolate land with neighbors like Godiva and Ghirardelli
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

March 2, 2013
9:44 PM

Post #9437058

Oh Jim, Think Potassium has to be in every cell in your body for your body to work right. Bless her heart Hope she's all well now. You guys take care of yourselves. We'd like to keep you around awhile. We kinda like you. Fenny too. Think you're right about losing your sense of smell,for me, the bad thing is you kinda lose your sense of taste also. Know I love hot pepper taste now and use to ,the hot taste stayed around half the day.
I looked thru Geurneys catalog today and wistfully wished i could make a big garden. even wondered how long I'd last on shovel duty. I need to grab hold of myself and give up those negatve toughts.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

March 3, 2013
9:20 AM

Post #9437462

Yes, folks, Potassium is crucial! They believe the mechanism of MS damage comes from damage to the potassium channels that transmit the signals from cell to cell in the nervous system. Ka + is potassium. Eat more bananas.

Jim, I would have a tough time resisting those treats myself! Our last night, we both had flan, just flan, for supper!
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

March 6, 2013
9:17 AM

Post #9440700

Vickie, the local spring swap isn't until the 20th of April, but we have quite a few things to pot up and find new homes for.
I was teasing Kay this morning about her lily mania. (Today, she is potting up the excess Star Gazer lilies that she also grew from bulb scales.) She came back with comments about my recent fascination with amaranth. I thought I had shown great restraint limiting myself to buying seeds from only three classic varieties. I had even paused to consider how I would work the new plants into our existing landscape. The similar color, but different leaf shape made Hopi Red Dye a natural companion for the red leaf cannas. I planned to put the Love Lies Bleeding in Travis's tropical, snake-themed garden where its unusual form would look great with the other plant oddities. Also, paired with other old fashion, cottage plants I thought it would also look good in Tara's cottage style garden. I even had a vague idea where I would put the 7' golden giant variety. What I hadn't considered...what Kay pointed out...was the seed count on the amaranth packages. Approximately 1,500 seeds of each variety! Uh-oh. I ordered them online and the price was what I expected to pay for an average size packet so I didn't check the seed count. I may have to learn to make amaranth flour.
I'm working on a simple, mini garden today. Kay wants to clear a consistently damp bed under a rain chain of its different varieties of moss to make room for some cardinal flowers. While I like the idea of the hummingbirds the cardinal flowers will draw, I also like the look of the different kinds of moss. I thought I would put it in a mini landscape to act as the grass. I noticed a bent-out-of-shape, concrete covered tuna can that will make a convincing pond. (Something Kay used to dip concrete mud out of the mixer, then tossed it aside I assume.) A shaped and root pruned yaupon holly might make a convincing apple tree. (A faux apple tree is better than none. With powdery mildew and cedar apple rust I don't think I'll ever be successful with the real deal.) Such a mini landscape would be at its peak in winter so I think it is worth a try. It won't cost anything to try. Yaupon holly grows like a weed for us.
Kay says she expects to hear mooing cows and clucking chickens when she walks outside and sniffs. We spread a truckload of mushroom compost yesterday and it was still a little hot.
The entire property will smell like a barnyard for the next week. Oh well, it will lead to wonderful smells later in the year.
(Jim)

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

March 6, 2013
11:21 AM

Post #9440823

Amaranthus is supposed to make good gluten-free flour, Jim...please let me know. Sounds like a dandy plan but aren't you supposed to use each of 1,500 seeds to grow a plant to produce 500 K more seeds?
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

March 7, 2013
4:13 AM

Post #9441558

Jim, I can't have apple trees for the same reason as you. So I planted pear trees.
Carrie, Huh? LOL
Trying to work thru depresson,decided to go thru all my paperwork and sort things out. Big Mistake. eeuuuu what a mess.Now my living room is a total mess. I am mentally challenged when it comes to organization skills. Also have decided to be brutal at throwing stuff out. Most things I have are unusable by the time i get rid of them. Sigh!

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

March 7, 2013
12:27 PM

Post #9441982

If you grow a lily from a scale, is it genetically identical to the parent?
katiebear
mulege
Mexico

March 7, 2013
2:15 PM

Post #9442119

Yes. kb

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

March 7, 2013
3:09 PM

Post #9442160

Thanks, k.b.! So anything grown vegetatively (cuttings, seed potatoes, tubers, etc.) instead of from ordinary seeds does not have the benefit of sexual reproduction to improve survival? Light bulb in brain today!
katiebear
mulege
Mexico

March 7, 2013
3:20 PM

Post #9442169

right.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

March 7, 2013
3:24 PM

Post #9442172

Hmmm. This stuff just gets interestinger and interestinger!
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

March 9, 2013
10:16 AM

Post #9443821

Vickie, I haven't tried pears. Somehow I had it stuck in my head that they were prone to all the same diseases. But, that can't be true. There was an ancient Bartlet in the middle of an open field at the top of the hill. (According to all I've read, Bartlet aren't supposed to grow here. It had been struck by lightning and looked like it was about to fall down. Kay said it had looked that way as long as she could remember and it still produced pears. (She even wrote a poem about the tree.) Pears must be tougher than apples in our conditions. I've never seen an old apple tree around here, but I have seen old pear trees, especially one with huge fruit the long-time residents call a pineapple pear. Thanks for getting me to actually think for myself, instead of going completely by what I read.
Carrie, I think of propagating from bulb scales as a tissue culture method of growing that home gardeners can do.
Buying bananas will just have to be one of the compromises we make with our locavore diet ideals. DD#1 and I both tend to run low on potassium. We grow an edible Cavendish type of banana. It will survive outside a GH in a protected area, but rarely produces fruit.
Great to see you are still hangin' in, Katie!
I checked out my amaranth seeds today. Those things are TINY! I'm going to start them out in pots...if Kay left any pots. lol. She was resorting to the recycled CoolWhip and yogurt containers when last I looked. (Jim)

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

March 10, 2013
2:34 PM

Post #9445004

Jim, potatoes have as much potassium as bananas, I think. (I'm writing about potatoes at the moment.) You can grow potatoes there without too much difficulty, right?
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

March 10, 2013
3:18 PM

Post #9445027

White potatoes don't grow as easily here as they do in more northerly climates, but it can be done using alternative methods. I recall IO1 got a good harvest of potatoes using the garbage can method. I do love white potatoes. I'm tempted to try one of the alternative methods. Sweet potatoes are delicious and can be used in ways I never imagined. But, I still miss white potatoes as one of my go-to comfort foods. (Jim)
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

March 11, 2013
1:53 AM

Post #9445428

Jim, My view on Irish potatoes is that they are a necessary staple.(must have been my French grandmother) I never had a rice dish untill I was a teenager.
Sweet potatoes was my luxury food.
Finding an old pear tree in the forest is what sent me looking for pear trees to plant. I also planted a fig tree(Right by my front door)and Blue Jays beat me to the ripe ones every year. Think I'm going to try putting a net over it this year.
Am thankful for wild blackberrys.Turkeys beat me to huckleberrys.
Jim, Have been wondering about your back. Is it still giving you a lot of pain?

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

March 11, 2013
3:30 PM

Post #9446192

Dunno abut sweets and potassium; interesting question! Vickie, use the net! Those are your figs! (Do they continue to ripen if you pick them early? Like peaches etc.?)

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

March 12, 2013
10:25 AM

Post #9446980

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/926757/

Jim/Kay, have you seen this Forum? I'd like to do an article on (other people's) scented gardens, if it hasn't been done yet.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

March 12, 2013
3:37 PM

Post #9447278

http://www.justfruitsandexotics.com/ScentGardens.pdf
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

March 14, 2013
12:10 PM

Post #9449184

Thanks for the links, Carrie. I'll put my two cents worth in on the fragrant thread. Jonquils have become my Spring blooming favorites since I came south. Mignonette is a good one also.
DD#1 is in the hospital again and she is going to stay there until the doctors figure out what is going wrong, if I have anything to say about it. Her hemoglobin is very low and the doctors aren't sure why. Nadine is with her today. Kay and I are taking the day off from the hospital to catch up on things at home.
Vickie, my back is complaining about those medieval torture devices the hospital calls waiting room chairs. I'm going in my w/c tomorrow so I can have a comfortable place to sit, if nothing else. lol.
Moving the 2nd 'Flying Dragon' today from its prime spot on the south side of the house. It is hardy to zone 7 so it doesn't really need the extra protection from the cold. Putting annuals there (sunflowers, tomatoes and peppers) until we decide on a more permanent planting. (Jim)

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

March 14, 2013
1:53 PM

Post #9449338

Oh Jim, yes, yes, yes on your "medieval torture device!" I've only ever had one WC that was comfortable; my free manual one that Medicare/Masshealth bought me in 2011. It now is already falling apart!!!

I have a new power chair scheduled but they have to get it approved by BC/BS and Medicare! So it takes 4 months instead of 4 weeks. Yeeesh.

So sorry I got all mixed up. Nadine is not the one who needs iron and potassium? My family is very complicated but for some reason I always expect other people's to be straight-forward.
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

March 16, 2013
10:33 AM

Post #9451318

We all think like that I believe, Carrie. I see where your mind was lately. Good article yesterday and very timely so close to St. Pat's. I wonder if some of the more unusual potatoes would do better in our heat and humidity. Something to experiment with. I wonder what the blue potatoes taste like. lol.
DD#1 finally stabilized physically, but the doctors decided to move her to Behavioral Medicine ward for a few days. They are trying out a new anti-depressant that will hopefully encourage her to eat more and take better care of herself. If all goes well, she should be home Monday.
Figs are best picked very ripe if it can be managed. Blue jays are our worst fig thieves also. We gave up keeping them away and planted more fig trees. The plan is that will give enough fruit for all the parties involved. lol. We might just end up with more blue jays coming for dinner.
We were all sitting around the computer doing some virtual traveling a few days ago. We paid a visit to Ozone, Vickie. Ozone has a better website than most towns that size. What a pretty place to live!

It's a quiet day here. Kay is labeling the plant pots destined for the RU and I'm sitting out the tomato, pepper and some sunflower seedlings in the newly cleared bed on the south side of the work house. I'm so happy to have the Dragon oranges out of there! (Jim)

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

March 16, 2013
3:12 PM

Post #9451552

Yay about your DD!

People always say, "what a coincidence that the article about Lady Bird Johnson appeared ON her birthday," but we plan these things in advance. Sometimes (only sometimes) I'm not stumbling around in the dark. Usually I'm running over my own feet!
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

March 17, 2013
11:09 AM

Post #9452404

I've laughed at Kay for writing Christmas related stuff in August, but she says most print mags require a six month advance to have everything in place on time. Things appear to move faster in online publishing, at least. (Jim)

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

March 18, 2013
8:42 AM

Post #9453435

Well, yes, in our inhouse online publishing, it is fast, sometimes faster than I expect. And sure, they're working on the Christmas catalog layout now for Christmas catalogs, even though they may change the prices and store hours and so on. The general themes and color schemes are in place, I believe.
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

March 20, 2013
10:15 AM

Post #9455880

DD#1 wasn't as physically stabilized as the doctor's believed. She's back in the Internal medicine ward. In Behavioral Medicine, they pump you up to the gills with whatever anti-depressant the doctor has decided on to accelerate the two week period it normally takes for an anti-depressant to fully take effect. She wasn't able to physically withstand that. Poor liver function evidently complicates things. *#~! Shouldn't the doctors have realized that ahead of time? Shouldn't they have been watching for complications more carefully? She tried to tell them something was very wrong, but the ammonia is so built up in her bloodstream, she couldn't form a coherent sentence. She still can't. Kay is furious in that cold way she gets mad these days. The botanical garden is luckily on the way to and from the hospital giving her a place to decompress and grow calm.
We are still planning to make the local RU next month. Prepping for that is helping both of us. I would like to try to travel a little further and go to a botanical garden in Theodore, AL just on the other side of Mobile. They have an azalea collection I would like to see in bloom if mid-April isn't too late in the season. We chose to give up all our azaleas to assure better health for the honeybees, but I still like visiting them in their spring glory on someone else's property. Our local azalea/dogwood festival starts this Sunday afternoon, but with the unusually cool spring we've had thus far, I'm afraid it will start out less than spectacular. That's okay. It's still fun to watch those thoroughly modern, blue jean wearing young women trying to move about gracefully in hoop skirts carrying frilly parasols. ROFL.
Nighttime lows of 37 degrees tonight. Today, I'll be covering up the tomatoes, basil and peppers I set out prematurely. .
Photo #1: Chinese lorepedilum
Photo #2: There will be some dogwoods to show off on Sunday afternoon.
Photo #3: Pests Beware "Don't look at Me" (YOU CANT SEEE MEEE).

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Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

March 23, 2013
10:14 AM

Post #9459097

Planted some wisteria in large containers today. Hope we don't live to regret that. Kay is training it around a metal post to assume a small tree form. If we can get the blue form to behave itself, I would like to try the white form on the next post over. The stuff is gorgeous and easy to grow, but it can assume massive proportions in our part of the world, if you spare the pruners.
DD#1 is back in Behavioral Medicine to get the Depression under control. I think they will keep a closer eye on her medical condition this time around. She can speak in coherent sentences again and doesn't seem confused about what is going on. She is guardedly optimistic and co-operating with the medical staff. That is a great improvement. (Jim)
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

April 1, 2013
3:39 PM

Post #9469000

Hope everyone had a happy Easter!
DD#1 is out of the hospital and things are looking up.
It looks like Spring has finally arrived. Azaleas and dogwoods are in their full glory. We missed a few azaleas when we were clearing them out for the sake of the bees, but the honeybees have so many other good nectar sources , the azalea blooms are of no interest to them. I may keep one or two of our favorite kinds.
My little kingdom is peaceable. The birds are singing. The temperature is ideal. DD#1 says she actually likes doing the mowing so I am being spared that task. The bugs haven't recovered from the unseasonably late cold. We had an excellent and fun meal yesterday with lots of tasty leftovers . Life is good!
Hope everyone is doing well. (Jim)

Photo# 1: Happy Late Easter Everybody
Photo #2: Our edible Easter meal decorations Peep trees and egg bunnies, YUM!

This message was edited Apr 1, 2013 4:41 PM

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cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

April 24, 2013
3:22 PM

Post #9495902

The bad penny has shown up again. The day after Jim called depression hit me big time. I can't afford to go into the hospital again. Medicare does'nt pay for all of it.
I went to bring DD1 (Nita) from Texas up here, She's depressed also.Maybe we can help each other!
I'll have to look up Ozone. The only thing here is the Burger Barn and a church.It's a beautiful drive up tho.
How is everyone?
I've been neglecting my flowers and my house. Have a lot of catching up to do.
Please forgive me.
Vickie
katiebear
mulege
Mexico

April 25, 2013
10:57 AM

Post #9496826

Don't apologise, Vickie. I've been struggling with depression (as usual) and got a (second) tax bill from the IRS demanding over $4,00. They seem to have misplaced the documentation that my income is not taxable. This means I may have to deal with my retirement association. Their workers are protected by Civil Service and the Retirement Board. Their "work" reflect" how concerned they are about keeping their jobs.

I'm moving from depression to rage. Am on hold with Irs and it will be at least 15 minutes before they get to me.

Tony continues to come for four hours six mornings a week. We remind each other that there are no big deals.

hugs, katie

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

April 25, 2013
11:25 AM

Post #9496841

Amazingly, I submitted our taxes on time and correctly filled out the form for it to be directly deposited. Usually I get defeated by all those numbers. May be our last refund though. I finally got DH so he withholds close to the right amount. (If you withhold too much, you get a refund, not enough and you owe.) Withhold too much is like a 0% loan to the gov't.

Good luck, Katie! I've been there with on hold for 45 min to find out what form to file, and so on. My SSDI was never taxed before, but now it is. Not sure why...I guess our family income is higher which puts me over the edge for SSDI. Darn. cost of living for disabled folks and seniors is higher than normal!!!! We should get taxed less and more frequent COL increases!!!! I mean, mom of 2 uses Walgreens or pampers baby wipes...I use some brand of sensitive adult personal cleansing wipes, not because I want to spend 3x as much or because I want to treat myself, because I have to.

Which brings me to my next point about depression--sometimes I can twist that deadening emptiness into anger or energy. If I write a Letter to the Editor about COL adjustments and SSA, that's constructive. If I let anger leak onto DH, it's horrible.
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

April 25, 2013
5:53 PM

Post #9497223

Vickie, we're just glad you are okay. When I called and discovered your number was no longer in service, I feared the worst. Hang in there!
Are you still headed for Cancun this weekend, Carrie?
Thanks for telling us about Dragon fruit, Katie. I picked up a couple plants at the RU. That, some African aloe and some yucca have led to the creation of a new garden space.
We came home from the RU with more plants than we left with. I scored some sweet little mini hostas for the deck rail planter and Kay received some fragrant varieties. Also, many people shared new fragrant and textural plants with us. Amargia will be made much more interesting by the new additions. Kay was half asleep and trying to function with only one hearing aid, but it was still a blast. We are already planning what to bring next year.
DD#1 is doing a 30-day observation stint in the hospital. She won't be a good candidate for a liver transplant until the Depression is under control. She is still learning the difference between accepting fate and just giving up.
Iris are blooming. The simple, elegant white ones are taking center stage now. After a couple of weeks with the big, bold yellow German giants dominating the landscape, the demure white ones are a nice change.
We had sweet and sour Russian cabbage soup yesterday. The 'Golden Acre' cabbage seeds you sent are heading up nicely, Vickie.
I wasn't sure how practical growing peas in containers would be, but I'm sold on the idea now. Harvested enough for a meal for all of us from only 3 plants. That doesn't include what MK rinsed with her water bottle and munched in the garden. lol.
Harvested the last of the Kohrabi. We will start more of it this fall. It is so tasty and easy to grow I think it will become one of our cool season staples.
I will be entering a pain management program upstate soon and starting some courses at the local tech school. Melissa Kay will take over the writing of Amargia's contributions to this thread. She and Nadine are always looking over my shoulder correcting my spelling and grammar anyway. One of them might as well be doing the actual writing. lol. Darn spelling and punctuation Nazis! The pain management program last about a month and the course is a simple one for small engine repair. So, like The Terminator, "I'll be back!"
Ugh. Don't get me started on taxes. We get a small amount back but I like to use it to get ahead of the game. But it never works something will inevitably break or happen to require most to all of it. LOL (Jim)
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

May 9, 2013
4:37 AM

Post #9514123

Seems like I keep bouncing up and down with this ugly depression. My counceler and doctor tried to get me into the hospital but there is a waiting list unless I attempt suicide. Suicide is against the law in Arkansas and I could also be put in jail. I honestly could'nt handle jail. Am spending as much time outdoors as I can. May even take up fishing. I do injoy workng in my big flower pots. And build a little campfire at night in my fireplace table. Bought some tomato plants (Arkansas Travelers,grape tomatoes,and a bush tomato)2 kinds of cukes,catnip,marigolds,petunias and coleus. It is supposed to rain today so may stay in and do housework.YUK!!!
I have 2 new young cats. both strays,one came here, the other came to my daughters in Texas.I named him Texas.He is the most loving gentle cat ever. The other will have kittens anyday. They will be neutered ASAP.
I have'nt decided what to do with the kittens yet. DD wants one. Do any of you guys need a cat?
Still hanging in there.
Vickie

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 9, 2013
11:08 AM

Post #9514565

DO NOT ATTEMPT SUICIDE VICKIE!!!! OK, just don't.

Thank you. No cats, thank you. I like gardening in pots too!

Right now I am having nursing, OT and kids at home. My 31 yo DSD is living with us and my 19 yo DD will be home tomorrow. Interesting dynamics. They both live in the same room, for one thing. I guess we'll have to buy a bed for DSD, which makes me mad!
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

May 11, 2013
1:28 PM

Post #9517036

Hey, Vickie! Sorry to hear the Depression has got its claws in so deep. Contact us if you want to chat or blow off some steam. I know it is hard for you to actually talk when it gets so bad. I'll leave our Email address in your Dmail. Writing is sometimes easier than talking. Don't hesitate to contact us. Hugs and prayers.
Actually, I would like a kitten, but I don't think the post office would let us send one through the mail like chicks and once again I have to cancel my trip out that way. Anyway, I wouldn't want to be the one to take a cat out of a box after such a trip even if the post office allowed it. . A hive of bees will forgive a trip via post after being sprayed with sugar water and their queen has been released from her separate shipping cage. Cats, on the other hand, hold grudges! If you make it down this way, by all means bring us a couple kittens. I've given up selling MK on getting a ferret. She doesn't like the way ferrets smell.

I've been making myself get outside and work with MK at least an hour every day to cope with the Depression and deal with the frustrations. MK is right. Weeding is a good anger management technique. I don't know if I can keep that up once real summer temps arrive, but I'm enjoying it outside in the unusually cool temps. (It got down in the 40's a few nights ago. Very strange weather for us.
I saw some ripe dewberries while I was out so Nadine has started scouting out our stands of dewberries, an early ripening, vining cousin of blackberries. (By some trick of topography, Amargia is about two weeks behind the surrounding area in blooming and ripening times.) Our attempts to domesticate the dewberries and blackberries did not work out. They were simply too rampant. I will try some of the thornless nursery variety, but Nadi will no doubt continue to forage on the edge of the woods. She is convinced the wild ones taste better.
I just put up a tall, woven wire fence across the front of the property. MK is already busy covering it with plants. Muscat grapes and dragon fruit are already there along with tomatoes to give her a season to think about what she wants there long term. Heaven forbid our fence should go naked.
I'm spending a lot of time with field guides getting myself up to speed on the native plants of the tristate area. MK can tell me the growing habits and traditional uses, but can rarely provide more than a common name. I'm shooting for as many plants as I can manage from the
Ladybird Johnson Wildflower Center's "Recommended" list for this region with an emphasis on goodies for the bees. I was surprised to discover how many things on the list we already have because MK considers them good "land rehab" plants or Nadi considers them tasty. lol.
MK's computer reading program is giving her grief so I guess I'll be around a little longer. (Jim)

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carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 11, 2013
2:45 PM

Post #9517116

We enjoy you Jim, although I miss Kay. Hugs to her and to Nadine. I am struggling with a speech-to-typing program, 'Dragon Naturally Speaking.' The IT doesn't want me typing, transferring, or basically doing any of my AD Ls with my right hand.
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

May 26, 2013
12:23 PM

Post #9534698

Daylilies are Blooming. but after they finish blooming, I will move them to form a border for my WildPower garden. they can join the riot of color there. (Jim)

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carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 28, 2013
1:37 PM

Post #9537297

Pretty wild, Jim. I like the purple!
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

May 31, 2013
1:55 AM

Post #9540339

A purple to die for! Where can I find one?
Vickie
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

June 7, 2013
11:50 AM

Post #9550023

Hi, Everyone! What's the news? It's Kay back from the unwired world. Well, it is now Melissa Kay, if you want to get technical about it. I started going by Kay because there was another Melissa in residence at the time. Now, I'm expected to respond to Melissa again because there are others around named Kay. I was complaining about always being the one who was asked to alter my name to avoid confusion. There was talk of resurrecting my childhood name of Sissy to keep things simple. I stopped complaining. No way, no how am I going back to responding to Sissy . I loathed being called Sissy even as a child. It is so-o-o stereotypically southern. As an adult, with strands of gray in my hair and wrinkles around the eyes, it would be absurd. Almost as bad as being a mature woman named Bambi

Summer has arrived in earnest. The gardenia are blooming. There are small fruit on the tomatoes and peppers. Corn is about thigh high. There are new daylily blooms to see every day. The gnats are horrible this year though. I work outside in headphones to keep the little beasties out of my ears. Listening to a book is just an added bonus. Old Creek lore claims that when gnats gather like this in almost Biblical plague concentrations, the coming hurricane season will be especially bad. The season is certainly starting early. The hurricane readiness jingle goes "June--Too soon. July--Stand by! Hurricane Andrea must not have heard that little ditty and is coming unfashionably early.

I'm missing Fenny-dog. She's been at the vet's office for several days. There was a cancerous growth in one of her paws. The vet said if he removed only the growth it would come back. They amputated one of her toes. I'm anxious to see if she will be happy to be home and have the pain in her paw gone or if she is upset over the loss of her toe. I pick her up this afternoon.



Photo #1: I hope the blooming of the lemon lily isn't a fluke of the cooler-than-usual weather. Some sources rate its heat tolerance only to Zone 7, but Debra (lovemyhouse) sent some for me to try. I would like a drift of them for fragrance impact. Fingers crossed.

Photo #2: We were given some 'Atkins' tomatoes at the April RU. They are performing beautifully! 'Atkins' looks like a keeper.

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carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

June 7, 2013
2:42 PM

Post #9550217

Wow, Kay, welcome back!!!!!

Yes, i was forced/asked to change my name a few times as a child...no fun, confusing and upsetting. Just because we're relatively more mature, should we NOT have a temper tantrum and throw ourselves to the floor, screaming?

I had been called "Carrie" from Day One, but my legal name is Carolyn. When I got to 1st grade, there was another little girl (named Kerry or Kari or Carey or something) and I was told that my real was Carolyn. I had to copy "Carol" from another girl's paper and add "YN" to the end. HUMILIATING. I got switched back to "Carrie" in 3rd grade. Horrible experience for a little kid. Plus, Kay, I know two other Melissas, so I'm afraid I'll be calling you "Kay." Sorry.

One of the Melissas I know was called "Missa" as a child. My sister used to be "Honey" I think, but that may just be a childhood memory. I liked knowing I could go as Carol or Lynn or Carola or whatever, but I didn't like being pushed into it and I didn't like getting to be 6 years old and nobody told me my "real" name.
lonejack
Longview, WA
(Zone 8b)

June 8, 2013
10:22 PM

Post #9551662

Hi all,
I use that greeting so I can include those who are lurking in the background; something I do often.
At one time there were 9, Paul Smiths, in the local phone book, so I know your pain. Even now,
when I go to the Veterans Clinic, there are 3 Paul Smiths, one with nearly the same social as mine.
So I go by Lonejack, a mountain in Idaho, where I was raised.

Today I purchased and replanted the broccoli in my wicking boxes. We had a Great harvest, so it
is time to start a new crop. Six standard plants and six Rabb broccoli.
I don't know if any of you have tried Rabb variety of broccoli in salad. It has a cilantro taste, quite
different from the standard store-bought broccoli. It also doesn't grow in a single head but, rather in
small flowers all over the plant.
My wicking boxes are doing great as well as the straw bales. Looking forward do a great tomato harvest.
Will take som pictures tomorrow and forward them.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

June 9, 2013
9:35 AM

Post #9552090

Well if it has a cilantro taste, I'm staying away, although if you hadn't said that I might have tried it.
http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/4224/
I tend to really like those strong cruciferous/broccoli-cabbage type flavors. Just not cilantro.

And welcome back, Lonejack!
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

June 9, 2013
1:15 PM

Post #9552411

Hi, LoneJack. Always good to see your post on this forum. I'm a Smith also, but I only became one seven years ago. I was thrilled at first because, for the first time in my life, no one asked me to spell my last name. I've learned the downside of being a Smith over the years. As a Jim Smith, it is even worse for DH. Melissa is unusual enough to save me from ID confusion most of the time.
I want to try broccoli rabe this fall. I've been told it is a little easier to grow than broccoli. I haven't had a lot of success with broccoli.
The summer heat means we have to get more creative with our salad fixings. We had a salad that included herb fennel and daylily blossoms Friday. It tasted great with a raspberry vinaigrette. The DL blossoms added a slight sweetness and a crunch like iceberg lettuce. The flavor is unassertive. Fennel and DL blossoms will both find their way into the summer salad bowl more often.
My attempt to grow lettuce throughout the summer indoors is going okay, but not great. My kitchen window has a westward exposure. Perhaps that is why my results haven't been what I imagined. A different lettuce variety might help also. I still like the idea. My windowsill lettuce taste better than what is available in the grocery store in summer and I don't have to be concerned about chemicals. I could live off nothing but salads during the summer. My sister tells me in Vermont lettuce will grow outside all summer long . I think she is exaggerating a little to make me jealous. Facing NE. Tongue sticking out. Thumbs in ears. Waggling fingers.
Happy Birthday, Vickie! (BTW: Is it Victoria on your birth certificate?) I'm going by memory and that is a chancy thing to do for someone on my side of the half century mark. Your b'day is in June, isn't it? You don't have to give us a year, just a month. lol. I'm keeping my secret until I become a septernarian.
I figure by then the game is up
Kb, do you know how big dragonfruit plants really get? The smallest and largest sizes I've read about are so far apart, the info isn't very helpful. I gather they survive the winters there so it will be different here, but at least I will have a ball park figure. Are there different cultivars or varieties? Is that why the height and spread figures vary so widely?
It's a rainy day. I should do some housekeeping...or maybe I'll go talk to the Google Cleverbot. I try not to think too much what it reveals about my personality that I have fun talking to Cleverbot. Have any of you spoken to him/her/it yet? If we are going to create entities like Cleverbot, we really need to create new pronouns appropriate for a non-gendered intelligence . E and em might work. Example: "I posted to Cleverbot today and asked em about creating a new pronoun. E said..." An electronic intelligence that can learn and adapt could make a real difference in the lives of deaf ,blind and elderly people. "May you live in interesting times." Isn't that an old curse in Arabia, or China...or somewhere?


This message was edited Jun 13, 2013 8:41 PM
lonejack
Longview, WA
(Zone 8b)

June 10, 2013
12:49 PM

Post #9553790

Hi All,
As I planted my broccoli, I noticed that I had been missspelling Raab broccoli. I finally read the label; typical male, when all else fails, ask directions and read the label.
For summer heat, have you tried Malibar Spinach? It isn't a true spinach but is grown in the tropics where true spinach will bolt to seed in hot weather.
I know when I was in Haiti, they grew Malibar as a peranial. It tasts the same as spinach if you pick the leaves while they are young.

Here are the pictures I promiced:
The first picture is the grow tower at the front of, "The Lyons/Smith Manor," a name chosen by the grandkids. A plaque will soon adorn the front door.
This is a clothes hamper from Big Lots, turned upside down, lined with a Hefty garbage bag and filled with garden soil. I cut the bottom of the hamper out and save it to replace as a topper sometimes.
This year I added a cup of all purpose fertilizer in a kneehigh panty hose about 4" down from the top. As the tower is watered it runs around the fertilizer, feeding the system.
Wave petunias in front, catching the sun. Impatians in back in the shade and geraniums on top. These get only morning sun so the geraniums should do great.
I have yet to poke purple bean seeds in the empty spaces. These will green up and provide little purple blossoms and well as beans.
These are drip watered each day for 1 hr with a one gal dripper in the top.

The second picture is a different grow tower by the side fence. This has about 10 or 12 different plants. I love to nack on peas, strawberries and purple beans. I have added some painted steel flowers and butterflies for color. That is a wooden snake made in a 3rd world country. The glue is not weather proof. Again, the grandkids get a kick out of it.
That is a wicking box with a crop of Raab broccoli about ready to cut. Sorry for the weeds, as you can see, weeding is not my strong suit.
Maybe tomorrow.

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carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

June 10, 2013
2:09 PM

Post #9553898

Nice--very cool "grow towers" Lonejack. We won't say a thing about the spelling thing, and speaking of things men aren't good at: I was in the grocery store with DH yesterday. The man does NOT do well in stores. I can see why it never works to send him with a list. He kept panicking that I would ram into somebody with the little freebie electric cart.
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

June 13, 2013
7:45 PM

Post #9558281

Does your DH fear you will run over other shoppers by accident or that you will experience the electric shopping cart equivalent of road rage and go on a rampage? lol. My knees are getting so bad Jim and I need a tandem electric shopping cart. I use the handles of his w/c almost like a walker. Jim is propelling and navigating himself, but it freaks other shoppers out because it looks like he is being push around by a blind woman.
Thanks for the reminder, Paul. I want to get some Malibar spinach seeds. (Hope it isn't too late in the season.) I am trying some purslane for summer greens this year also. Until someone on the Florida Gardening forum set me straight earlier this year, I thought Malibar spinach and New Zealand spinach were different common names for the same plant. I've grown and eaten New Zealand spinach.,but, I would only rank it half a step above survival food. It wasn't too bad libally spiced with soul seasoning and pepper sauce. Jim refused to try it cooked after sampling it in the garden raw. I still have NZ spinach in the garden because it grows well in damp conditions and looks good trailing over a retaining wall.
I'm not big on cilantro either, Carrie. It has a soapy flavor to me. DD#1loves the stuff though. She jokes that someone must have made a mistake in the maternity ward. Supposedly, only a genetic minority detect a soapy taste in cilantro. The weeds are really getting ahead of us. .working outside is wicked with temps in the upper 90's and humidity at 65%. It really is a jungle out there.
I harvested zucchini and yellow crook neck squash from the CanDo Garden yesterday. I turned the zucchini into bread. I used almost half the amount of sugar the recipe called for and used half whole wheat flour in place of white flour. It was a pleasant surprise when it still went over well with the others.
Photo #1: These flowers are getting comments, but I'm not sure what they are. DD#1 planted the seeds while she wasn't kicking in on all four cylinders so she can't remember what she planted. (lol. Only at Amargia.) The plants feel like okra plants. Okra is actually in the hibiscus family and the flowers are very pretty. We will watch and learn.
Photo #2: Shamrock flowers? I've never paid much attention to the shamrocks after St. Patrick's Day.

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carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

June 15, 2013
8:28 AM

Post #9559877

Btw, it's NOT only at Armagia! Article on Amaranth coming Tuesday. I'm going to the Ladybird Johnson wildflower place today, I hope. An article about that for July and I actually have one planned for eventually about having a bunch of seedlings and then finding the list of what I planted yeas later. About having stuff grow with no recollection of what I planted and trying to recognize the seedlings, and then when I found the list of what I had planted, it all made sense.
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

June 16, 2013
7:40 PM

Post #9561569

Looking forward to the amaranth article. We have 'Hopi Red', 'Giant Golden' and "love Lies Bleeding' growing, but this is our first year with amaranth. The Giant Golden variety is doing especially well for us.
It is comforting to know that we are not the only ones that have trouble keeping up with what is planted where . We did finally come to a decision in the "to label or not to label" debate. Since Amargia is a multi-user garden and we all have different areas of garden interest, labeling is a must for us. Although, if we ever get around to doing that formal garden we keep talking about, I'm sure the labeling debate will surface again. We are still looking for the perfect labeling system, but we have learned a few things.
Block letters written in paint pen work best.
If using labeling tape for print or Braille labels, we have to use a super glue sort of stuff in addition to what is on the back of the tape. The peel-off sticky isn't enough to keep the label on in a humid climate. (Man, I hate working with that glue, but I haven't come up with an alternative.
If using recycled plastics for labels, not all plastics work well for the job.
Completely ignore that interior voice that says, "I can remember." and the one that says, "I'll do the labeling later." Slowing down to do the labeling is our biggest problem.
I listened to that interior voice when it told me to keep on with what I was doing. I could get one of the others to put print labels on the pots later." As a result, I gave away some seedlings at the local RU that only had a Braille label. Luckily, Jim has picked up a rare knack for a man with normal vision. He can read Braille by sight. He was able to translate a photo of the Braille label. That had to be a first. ROFL.
There was an attempted break in at the local vet's office. The would be thief was going for the animals meds it is assumed. Most thieves know to avoid houses when there is a dog in residence. Who in their right mind would try to break into a place with dozens of dogs in residence. There is a person around 24-7 to look after the animals at our vet's office. I think that is true for all vet's offices and animal clinics.. Anyway, the dogs raised the alarm and the person looking after the animals that night called 911. Nothing was stolen. Fenny is okay and recovering well from the surgery.
I caught myself humming "Summer Breeze" several times yesterday. It got into the mid-90's, but the wind made it tolerable. Best of all it seems to have blown the gnats elsewhere. YES!!!.
Have you had a good Father's Day, Paul? Instead of making Jim the German chocolate cake this year, Nadine bought him German chocolate cake flavored ice cream. He is very happy with that.

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carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

June 17, 2013
4:40 AM

Post #9561884

Pretty day lilies! Day lilies are one of the plants we do not label. Most of the others, we onlyhave one cultivar, but day lilies we have tons and they're all anonymous. this phone won't let me make 'day lily' as one word!!! It keeps correcting me.

Armagia, don't expect great things from the amaranth article. I've never actually grown them!
lonejack
Longview, WA
(Zone 8b)

June 17, 2013
9:56 PM

Post #9562979

Hi, Special Friends!!
I have really enjoyed listening to these two links of Panflute music.
Please enjoy over 2 hours!!
Google Panflute and see what it is and who plays it.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SapQ2oswDVA
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c4fXTEh1Jjo

This message was edited Jun 17, 2013 8:57 PM

BirdieBlue

BirdieBlue
Winston Salem, NC
(Zone 7a)

June 20, 2013
12:25 PM

Post #9566438

I got A new knee, I got a knew knee!! 3 weeks post op martial left makoplasty. 1st 2 weeks ghastly, but effective pain meds. Now great and can't wait for the right one to be done!!
Lost you guys some months ago.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

June 20, 2013
2:57 PM

Post #9566683

Yay, that's fantastic, Sheri. My mother had her knee replaced a few years ago and she agreed with the statement, "it takes a year before you're really glad about the surgery." That's wonderful that you're feeling glad already. And I am very glad you're feeling better already. Hurray!

Jim and Kay did shifts. Nadine vanished. Really great to have you back--it was lonely.

BirdieBlue

BirdieBlue
Winston Salem, NC
(Zone 7a)

June 20, 2013
6:28 PM

Post #9566852

Now for the hARD part...building back some strength and endurance. I can barely walk 30 ft without sitting or nearly passing out. I'm setting bby goals so that I set myself up for success. My prayer is that by the summer 2014 I will be ready to go on a tour somewhere. I will of course have to win one as I am practically a pauper. I would so love to go with my church to Jerusalem in 2014.

Sheri
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

June 20, 2013
7:18 PM

Post #9566928

Hey, welcome back, Sheri. That trip is something to aim for. I'll say a prayer you get to make the trip.
Wonderful music, Paul. I've got lots of potential music in the garden. Maybe, this winter I'll play around with all the pieces of bamboo and wild cane I must cut in the summer. I have bundles of bamboo and wild cane drying already and the summer has only just begun. (Both make good plant supports after drying.) I spoke too soon when I wrote we had gotten rid of all the seacane. There has been more sprouting with the recent abundance of rain. When I get the stand of it on the front slope under control, I fined the stand in the far NE corner has re-sprouted. I don't think I'll ever get rid of that stuff so I might as well learn to use and enjoy it. I have it under control now at least...if I don't blink. Researchers in CA, where it is invading waterways, had an idea that Arundo donax might be a potential bio-fuel. Few other plants produce so much bio-mass. But, the research wasn't going well last I heard. Oh well, I can always build myself a bamboo hut and roof it with wild cane...and learn to play my handmade pan flute. Carrie, if you tried to grow every plant you wanted to write about, you wouldn't have time to write. ;-) I liked the article, but now I want the Joseph's Coat variety you mention in the article. I'm afraid I'm going to end up as addicted to amaranth as Jim is to daylilies. We try to keep Jim's daylilies labelled, but I have species daylilies so there are seedlings. We either have to give up labeling the DLs or make up names for the new ones.
My hearing aids are in for repair so I've been christened the "garden ghost." Actually, I am very much in this world when I'm gardening.I simply don't acknowledge the other people sharing it with me. lol. I guess I should start working in my "Deaf, Blind and...Brilliant" t-shirt. I miss hearing the bird songs, but otherwise it doesn't hinder my work.
We are finally getting a real taste of summer. Tomato sandwiches and cantaloupe for lunch today. It is enough to make me forgive summer for the bugs and the heat
BTW, Nadi says she reads over my shoulder so we had better say only nice things about here. lol.

BirdieBlue

BirdieBlue
Winston Salem, NC
(Zone 7a)

June 20, 2013
8:37 PM

Post #9567028

If you can make a flute, I would like to place my order for one.
Oh, tomatoe sandwiches...mmmm..mmmm..good!!

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

June 21, 2013
11:32 AM

Post #9567666

Yes, I would LOVE a tomato sandwich about now! if I Dmail you my address, can you send one please? Maybe by FedEx, s it's not too, too soggy.

Nadine, of course we only say wonderful things about you. (Wink, wink.)
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

June 21, 2013
3:29 PM

Post #9567894

lol. Only an heirloom tomato sandwich would rank FedEx, I think.
Photo #1: 'Giant Golden' is a grain variety of amaranth, but I love the color and stature. It is about 7' at maturity. This is a young guy.
Photo #2: Another fragrant yellow daylily. (Most scented daylilies tend to be yellow. Note the dog fennel in the background, Paul. I actually cultivate weeds. lol. I like the fine foliage of dog fennel, and the scent in autumn is incredible.
Photo #3: Yummy Red Raspberries are Tasty.

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katiebear
mulege
Mexico

June 22, 2013
3:01 PM

Post #9568895

Hi - I've been away in Ca. seeing my doctor and my ghuru. Celebrating that I am almost pain free in the knee that was replaced.

Can't be much help on the sie of dragonfruit plants. Mine are growing huge but that's our hot and humid climate I think. Many of mine began as cuttings from the dragonfruit group in So. Ca. They have an active group at Yahoo and may be able to help more. We got lots of flowers about a month ago but I don't think any fruit has set. We have some native dragonfruit plants growing locally. They are not very big but the occasional fruit is fantastic.

I have a cold. Back later.

hugs, katie

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

June 22, 2013
7:25 PM

Post #9569223

Dragonfruit? Feel better, Katie!
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

June 24, 2013
11:59 AM

Post #9571347

Thanks, Kb. Each dragon fruit has about 15' of growing space. It should be okay. I hope you are feeling better.
Poor Fenny is having it rough lately. She was bit by a snake and the vet is keeping her a few days for observation. Jim is snake hunting which, for him, means capturing it and taking it far, far away from human habitation.
Maybe, I'll join the new knees club myself this winter. I don't think I can put it off much longer.
Jim puts on the photos for me. I just noticed he sneaked in one of his raspberries. lol.

BirdieBlue

BirdieBlue
Winston Salem, NC
(Zone 7a)

June 24, 2013
2:42 PM

Post #9571590

Hi! Hi!! {{Jumping up an down waving at Katie Bear}} I am 3 1/2 weeks post-op left unicompartmental Makoplasty. Feelin better each day & grateful fOr effective pAIN MEDS. So sad that eventually we may hVE TO PART!! I am so happy to hear your reports of all progressing well, on yours. Did you have total or partial??

wing waves,
BirdieBlue
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

June 30, 2013
3:42 PM

Post #9580548

Weíve spent the last few days doing those boring but necessary garden tasks. The mystery plant from the June 13 post appears to be Hollyhock. You donít see those growing in this area very often.

Daylilies are still doing their thing.

Pix1: Brown Witch
Pix2: A unidentified one I'm looking up.
Pix3: Moma's Cherry Pie

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Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

July 4, 2013
5:43 PM

Post #9586980

I hope everyone is having a great Independence Day. Most of the celebrations have been postponed until the weekend in our area due to heavy rains and flooding. Say "Hello" to the sun for us. We haven't seen it in a while.

BirdieBlue

BirdieBlue
Winston Salem, NC
(Zone 7a)

July 4, 2013
7:14 PM

Post #9587079

I've been doing great until I fell this morning. I didn't land hard or on my new knee, but it sure does hurt. Have Dr recheck apt on thursday

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

July 5, 2013
3:47 PM

Post #9588161

We're seeing a little too much sun here in TX, although it is much more pleasant than last year at this time.
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

July 13, 2013
6:42 PM

Post #9597967

The peppers have been extremely productive this year. Tara has made pepper jelly and pepper flavored hummus so far and we still have peppers we need to do something with. Poppers for dinner and some salsa, perhaps.

The first summer pie pumpkin has ripened. I will plant more pumpkin to have around Halloween and Thanksgiving, but the summer pumpkins are always the best in this region. Late summer is bug and disease season. The pumpkins ripening now don't have to struggle through all the late season challenges.

Something here loves Loves Lies Bleeding amaranth. I haven't found the culprit, but it turned the leaves into lace work. Didn't touch the leaves of Golden Giant amaranth. After sampling the leaves of both, I'm with the bugs! LLB taste much better. GG amaranth is definitely a grain variety!

Jim has a competition going with a spider as to who can catch the most tomato horn worms. So far, the spider is 3 worms ahead. I have no doubt Jim will still make jokes about tearing down all the spider webs in the garden around Halloween so we can put up decorative faux spider webs for our Halloween party, but he has now seen for himself why we leave the spiders alone the latter part of the growing season. We wouldn't be harvesting much in the late summer or early fall if we didn't partner with the local arachnids.

Picture #1 Red Four o'clock
Picture #2 Pink resurrection lily
Picture #3 Pink Hollyhock

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carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

July 14, 2013
2:48 AM

Post #9598184

kay, do you make pies out of pumpkin or out of cushaws?

i've always wanted to grow hollyhocks! i tried once about 10 years ago but the spot was too shady. and 'sun' dowm here is a totally different concept. also, because they're biennial--you have to know where you'll be living in 2 years. but such a pretty color!

we go for a walk every day--well, DH walks and i roll. my dss actually started thinking about putting a ramp on his door! after 15 years, you'd think he'd notice that i use a chair. i guess i'm making progress, though.
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

July 14, 2013
9:22 AM

Post #9598487

Oh-h-h-h, I want cushaw seeds! The green and white stripes got ohs and ahhs from the visual crowd. I honestly don't taste much difference between sweet potato and pumpkin pie. I would love to try something called "sweet potato squash." What we are currently growing are the classic little Cinderella pie pumpkins probably not much different from what you saw growing in New England. We simply have time to get two harvest from them. I hope pumpkin pie is what the kitchen crew has planned for the pumpkin. I love pumpkin pie at any time of year.
It has been raining virtually every day for weeks. We are under flood watch. I complain about the problems of living halfway up a slope, but now I'm glad not to be in the richer bottom land.

Picture of our pumpkin.

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carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

July 14, 2013
11:07 AM

Post #9598591

I think cushaws AREN'T orange to look at, like jack'o'lantern pumpkins.
http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/1673/
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

July 22, 2013
3:59 AM

Post #9607946

Hi All, This bad penny has turned up again!!!!
Glad to see you seem to be doing well. And am so very proud of your gardens. My tomatoes were totaled by tomato worms in one night,(all 4 plants) The blooms fell off my beans. My Daylillys are doing great,hurrah!!! Decided veggies in containers are not the greatest idea in the world. I've put netting over my fig tree to at least confuse the Blue Jays and just maybe be able to get a couple of figs. Have been injoying plums. A deer came up next to the house and ate a daylilly. She will literally be dead meat this fall. Even tho I complain I still love the wild life here.
I think sweet potatoes are more moist than pumpkin. But I will eat both down to the last bite.
So glad to see KB and the bluebird back.
My memory keeps getting worse. Figure I must be doing pretty good since I can still find my way to town and back. LOL
Vickie

BirdieBlue

BirdieBlue
Winston Salem, NC
(Zone 7a)

July 22, 2013
7:35 AM

Post #9608155

Hi all, I cAn't type much due to a carpal tunnel type issue with my left hand but wanted u all to know I'm here watching. that crinum lily and the hollyhock are beautiful.

Hugs all around,
Sheri

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

July 22, 2013
10:16 AM

Post #9608331

Me and you both, Sheri, and doesn't it HURT! i heard of someone down here with figs, and she is netting them too. Yay for daylilies and boo for deer eating plants and tomato worms. My husband has sweet potatoes on the list of stuff he won't eat, so I buy them to nuke for lunch.
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

July 26, 2013
4:07 PM

Post #9612799

Photos #1 and #2: The lack of Sun for the last month Has not Stunted OUR Sun Flowers.
Photo #3 Butterfly Checking out Jim's Bouquet of todays flowers. ("Hey Those are my flowers Give `em back!")
Hi, Vickie! Welcome back. Sorry container veggies did not work for you. Don't bears eat dear. If not Elmer Fudd (Speaking through Jim) Says "SH-h-h-h-h I am hunting Cewvidae http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deer
It will be great when they have REALLY GOOD Speech to text software.
Carrie. Try sprinkling pecans on your sweet potato a match made in Heaven.

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BirdieBlue

BirdieBlue
Winston Salem, NC
(Zone 7a)

July 26, 2013
8:10 PM

Post #9612992

Brown sugar &/or cinnamon is wonderful too, on a wonderfully soft steamed or baked sweet potato

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

July 27, 2013
10:12 AM

Post #9613370

To me, almost anything with brown sugar is great, and pecans makes it even better.

I got weighed the other day. I gained about 15 lbs since we moved to Texas. Ugh. Now the long road to take it off.
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

July 27, 2013
10:38 AM

Post #9613389

SOMEONE ,or several SOMEONES, here hijacked Amargia@DG while I was busy. Gee, I wonder who. ;-) I guess they wanted to make sure you all knew they were still around.
The nice thing about bad pennies, Vickie, is they have an uncanny knack for landing heads up. That makes them lucky, good pennies. If you can still find your way to town without a hitch, you are doing better than Jim and I. We were headed up to a store only two miles away, but we got distracted by our conversation and were about five miles away before we realized we had missed our turn-off. Multi-tasking isn't as easy as it once was. I can still walk and chew gum at the same time so I have hope for myself. Jim can't chew gum so we don't have a prognosis for him.
Family stuff has me running around like the proverbial headless chicken. DD#1 is stabilized and ready to go back to CA. We plan to send her back by train instead of plane. It will be a long trip, but there is a straight shot. That will mean no having to keep up with luggage and making transfers. Despite the extra time spent on route, I think she will find that easier to manage. This is my brilliant, space cadet DD. lol. One of my sisters in TX just got a new hybrid car and is planning to visit. She is celebrating getting cancer under control. She's completely bald, but cancer free. Not a bad trade off in my opinion. My food loving brother has just discovered he is diabetic. Nadine is busy in the kitchen convincing him There is still good eats to be had. (Jim made the zinnia bouquet above for him. The butterflies are very possessive of their zinnias. lol.)
We made the jalapeno soup from Toni Leland's summer soup article a few days ago. Great stuff! I had a crowd to feed the day after making the soup and poured the leftover soup over egg noodles. That went over very well. Well, roasting peppers and putting them in the freezer today and making some pico de milo Better get to work. Hugs all around. K*

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

July 27, 2013
2:56 PM

Post #9613632

What's "pico de mila" Kay? I like to hear about your busy family but sad about your bald sister and diabetic brother.

And the sunflowers up there--do you think the lack of sunlight is making them "stretch?" Does that happen with the actual sun, or just with window sunlight?

We just had lunch, so I can hear about food without starving to death. Same response...pecans, YUM!
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

July 28, 2013
5:19 AM

Post #9614102

Kay, Tell your DD to find a good window seat and injoy the scenery. I've done it several times.The landscape is constantly changing and I've met some intresting people.Lil ole ladies are the most intresting.
I have a confession to make. I have trouble chewing gum and walking.One reason I never went out for sports. I did march in the band.Never did figure out how I managed that.I was also told I was 16 months old before I started walking.
Oh Kay, I feel for your brother.When he gets the hang of eating right. He wont feel underprivilaged. There are great sugar free candy and sugarfree icecream and such.
The hardest for me is the carbs.I do love potatoes and gravy and I find a way to eat some too. Best wishes to your bro.
I love to hear about your family too.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

July 31, 2013
5:24 PM

Post #9617795

I love to hear about families. We're in Boston for a visit and got to meet DGD#2 for only the 2nd or 3rd time. She's about 7 months old and was very smiley.

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BirdieBlue

BirdieBlue
Winston Salem, NC
(Zone 7a)

August 1, 2013
7:18 AM

Post #9618220

Wow, that flower head band is too cute on her!!
lonejack
Longview, WA
(Zone 8b)

August 1, 2013
4:29 PM

Post #9618756

And she looks like Grandma too...!!
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

August 1, 2013
4:44 PM

Post #9618780

I think children are such fun at that age because that is when you first start catching glimpses of the adult they will become...and they are just so-o-o adorable Carrie, your theory about plants growing taller than normal outside when it is overcast for long periods appears valid to me. Most plants in our garden are taller and more upright this year than I've ever seen before. A few days ago I harvested catnip leaves for tea from vertical stalks 4' tall. The growth habit was so out of character I didn't trust my nose alone for ID. I had to taste a leaf before I was confident it was catnip. I have canna 15' tall and still growing. (sigh . It is raining again! )
I like brown sugar and cinnamon on sweet potatoes, but I never liked the marshmallows that are common around the holidays. That is too sweet for my taste.
I am gradually sliding more responsibility for Amargia Farm onto Nadine's shoulders. That, of course, means changes. When you want people to take on more responsibility they need more of a personal, emotional investment in the project. She is in charge of design now. (That is an area I am weak in anyway.) She is "feng shui-ing" all our gardens and living space. I learned a little about feng shui back in the 70's as it applied to land forms, building and construction, but I'm having to educate myself about the more intuitive black hat school. It uses the same underlying principles as Chinese herbal medicine which I'm completely familiar with. Since I already understand the basic idea, it has been easy to learn so far. Jim spent time in Japan and Singapore, he is comfortable with the changes and the flowing uncluttered style is great for w/c accessibility. Letting go of Amargia's reins is a little hard. (Nadine tells me that is because I was born in the Year of the Rat and rats like being first and in control. lol.) I'm liking the changes because feng shui doesn't focus only on the visual. It works with all the senses. Also, it is a way of organizing space that Nadi can get into. I thought she was totally lacking in organizational skills, but the creative approach of feng shui appeals to her. Nadine?! Cleaning and organizing! Who says there are no such things as miracles!
Nadine tells me it is time to go "slay the clutter dragon" in Jim's work shop. ROFL. I never knew it was possible to slay dragons with a broom. k*

http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/understanding-the-principles-of-feng-shui.html

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 2, 2013
9:17 AM

Post #9619341

I like being first and in control too! But I don't think I was born in Rat Year.

Thanks for links.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 2, 2013
9:51 AM

Post #9619376

LOnejack, she is my STEP-granddaughter, so we share no genes. But she IS adorable with that thing on her head.
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

August 3, 2013
11:00 AM

Post #9620307

Whew, slaying clutter dragons is hard work. Jim can navigate his w/c around the work shop again and that makes him happy. Although, he is still constantly asking where we put some tool or piece of hardware.
Carrie, Jim said your little princess looked like she was about to give the paparazzi what for. lol. Oh, I forgot. Pico de Milo is a version of pico de gallo, fresh tomato salsa. You probably wouldn't like the classic version. It contains cilantro. But, a tasty version can be made with parsley instead.
I'm grateful this year for all the small fruited tomatoes and an heirloom variety that grows in segments sort of like oranges. The large fruited types have a tendency to split their skins because of all the rain, but the grape and cherry types are keeping us well supplied with tomatoes.
Vickie, your bears are black bears, aren't they? Nadi just told me about a disturbing new development. Grolar bears. A fertile cross between grizzly and polar bears. Evidently, because of the melting ice. polar bears are showing up more and more in grizzly territory. That's a scary development. Polar bears are the most vicious of bears and grizzlies aren't exactly pushovers. I wonder if psychologist have a name for an unreasonable fear of bears. If they have a name for fear of chickens (alektorphobia), surely they have one for bear phobia. I might have that one. Bears scare me.
Nadi has me reading a book on environmental psychology. ("Environmental psychology" is an entirely new phrase in my vocabulary.) She says since people see Amargia primarily as a place of refuge and healing, we should build more on that. Help! I've created a monster! lol. Seriously, I'm finding all of this interesting, but she just hauled off my cushy, comfortable old couch. Yes, it was too big for the space, but I loved that old couch.
Are you getting all this rain up your way, Sheri? Overcast today, but no rain so far. Yaaay! k*

lonejack
Longview, WA
(Zone 8b)

August 3, 2013
4:21 PM

Post #9620586

Hi My Friends,
Here is a link to a deliightful place where they have created a little bit of heaven, "Down Under." When I saw this video I thought of all of us who have difficulty working below our knees.
Paul.
http://youtu.be/1XCh5uaAHn0
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

August 6, 2013
12:03 PM

Post #9623155

Good grief! Those are some big veggies! I would like to grow celery in a system like that. Celery is near the top of every list I've ever seen for fruits and vegetables highest in toxins. It would be worth the effort to have organic celery.
It has been more about fauna than flora lately. Nadine wants to take some dragonfly nymph to the park. A dragonfly laid her eggs in a plastic bin full of rain water. I didn't realize until doing some reading how long dragonflies stay in their larval state. I don't think they can live that long in a plastic bin.
Jim found two more snakes in the garden. (Thankfully, he found them before Fenny dog did.) I guess the rain is running them out of the low lying areas where they normally live. Jim did not realize they were copperheads. They were so placid and went easily in to the new place of the swamp and creek.where we don't go.
Photo 1: Baby dragonfly nymph.

Photo #2: Two Copper head snakes.

Thumbnail by Amargia   Thumbnail by Amargia         
Click an image for an enlarged view.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 6, 2013
2:49 PM

Post #9623355

Yup, I used to buy hydroponic lettuce so I wouldn't have to wash it but also so it wouldn't be full of junk. I guess if you buy it, it sort of negates the good stuff because who knows what it was grown with?
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

August 10, 2013
9:05 PM

Post #9627138

Jim went to photograph and drool over his dream pond. It was pleasantly cool pond side, but he didn't last long in the tropical house. One of Amargia's heart and hearth children called me from Texas and mentioned they were experiencing triple digit temps so I'm not going to complain about 90 something.

We're going upstate Monday to visit my GSs. The plan is to spend the day in the park, Hopefully, it will be cooler there. They live near Birmingham.

Crepe myrtle and lantana rule among the flowers until it starts cooling down

Photo #1: Jim's dream pond

Photo #2: Alligator plant

Photo #3: Banana

Photo #4: Pretty mystery.

Thumbnail by Amargia   Thumbnail by Amargia   Thumbnail by Amargia   Thumbnail by Amargia   
Click an image for an enlarged view.

Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

August 22, 2013
2:38 PM

Post #9638394

Lettuce is my favorite veggie for container growing. It comes in so many different shapes and colors, it can be as beautiful as any flower display. I just wish I had a good place for growing it inside during the summer.
Nadi's dragonfly nymphs were given an excellent new home. They are now part of an educational display at Landmark Park. Hope everybody is doing well. The rains are still coming. Not so fiercely though. We have started clean-up. It is never quite dry enough to mow, but we are picking up debris and started hand weeding.
Canna, zinnias, coreopsis and two of the amaranths (Golden Giant and Hopi Red Dye) have weathered the daily storms amazingly well. Marigolds, always a big part of the August garden, don't appear to care for all the extra moisture. My elderberry produced fruit for the first time, but I'm not sure the humidity will allow the fruit to mature properly. Muscadine grapes seem unaffected. Small fruited tomatoes and peppers are still producing well. We still haven't mastered growing corn organically, but will try again next year. The birds and squirrels appreciate our attempts. Wooly bears (the caterpillars of the Virginia tiger moth have decimated the Love Lies Bleeding amaranth. Nadii finds the cats and adult moths to be so cute, I don't think she tries very hard to get rid of them. I will have to give the wooly bears some amaranth and peppers of their own on the border of the property so Nadi can move the little monsters there.
Yuk, it feels like Tater-dog took another swim in the sunken garden. lol. Well, the frogs and dogs, at least, are enjoying this weather. Better dry her off and catch you all later. k*

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 22, 2013
2:53 PM

Post #9638400

It's REALLY had to grow corn organically. I know this because in summers we would spend a lot of time at my uncle's farm near Washington DC.

They grew zillions of tomatoes and melons and squash and what-not, but their big cash crop was sweet corn. They grew nearly everything organically, not because there was certification, because there wasn't, but it just seemed like the best way to go. They could never control the corn borers (which I believe are an introduced pest anyway). My uncle used to personally be the one who handled all the toxic pesticides for the corn. He used to say it burned his feet when he walked barefoot across a field after the stuff had been applied. (Duh.) Then he mysteriously got cancer and died in his forties. (In 1983 or so.)

They stopped growing corn and stopped using pesticides! Now they are an "eco-ganic" farm.
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

August 25, 2013
9:21 PM

Post #9641447

I think corn pest and diseases that have been introduced to this country is something I haven't considered enough in my organically grown corn experiment. I kept thinking it had to be do-able because the Creek grew corn without chemicals. Pre-Columbian corn growers probably didn't have to contend with as many pest and diseases. I will try a few more varieties and techniques, but amaranth may replace corn as our primary grain.
BTW, Carrie, that was an excellent article on Monday. You made a complex subject comprehensible to just about anyone. I'm reading a book on the so-called super-organisms (a.k.a.: ants, social bees and termites.) I read and re-read the paragraphs where the authors are trying to make the point that the unusual genetics of ants explains how creatures without reason developed a complex social structure. I understood from my reading ants don't have an xx-xy genetic pattern and the authors believe the selfish gene theory explains ants seemingly altruistic and cooperative behavior, but that is all I've come away with after several reads. I still couldn't tell anyone how ants in a hill are related. Maybe, you can explain ant genetics and reproduction to me when I'm old enough to understand. lol. Learning about ants is a "Know Thy Enemy" sort of thing for us. The ground is so saturated the ants are homeless and looking to re-build on higher ground meaning Amargia's ground. It is said the bio-mass of ants is equal to the bio-mass of humans worldwide. I believe it! When so many are up out of the ground and visible, it isn't hard to believe at all. Jim is my weeding partner until it dries out. I can't see the little beasties. Taterdog, my usual weeding buddy, is good about giving me snake alerts, but she doesn't do ant alerts.
Jim has gotten very serious lately about losing weight and getting back as much mobility as possible. He walked an amazing 1/2 miles across country today and he is the one who asked me if I wanted to take a walk. It was not so long ago that I was cajoling and ever so slightly bullying him to get him to walk around the property. We made it to the first of the north side ponds and he says his long term goal is to be able to walk all the way to the river. I would estimate that is another 1/2 mile. We found some very productive wild grapes, collected seeds from hairy yucca, the native yucca, and found a variety of moss we weren't familiar with. Mosses and ferns are unsurprisingly thriving. We glimpsed a crane and hope to get a photo on a future walk.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 26, 2013
8:17 AM

Post #9641730

That's lovely that you can walk that far without leaving your own property! All we have to do is walk out the front door and on to the sidewalk before we meet the neighbors.

And thanks for the compliment about the article! It was literally a question someone had posted on the Ask A Gardener Forum, and I was trying to explain why you can't expect coleus SEEDS to look like the parent plant, and I had been meaning to do an article sabot Mendel anyway. You notice Mendel didn't even survive one of the edits! But I'm very glad you thought it was easy to understand, because that was my goal. As usual, I learned a lot while writing it, too.

And if you ever have an idea for an article you would like to see, just let me know. Maybe I can figure out your ants! That's gardening-related, or at least nature-related, The mass of existing ants is equal to the mass of existing humans? wow.

I think it must be wonderful to find new mosses or plants on your own property. Sometimes we go to Home Depot and find plants we weren't otherwise familiar with...
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

August 28, 2013
11:36 AM

Post #9643998

Are imported fire ants and other biting ants in the Dallas area? E. O. Wilson is the best source of information on ants if you decide you want to take on the subject in an article and I'm not just saying that because he is a homeboy and a V.I.P. (visually impaired person). Lol. His book The Ants is where most of my funny ant factoids came from.
I think it was Wilson who first referred to controlling ants as pest control's Vietnam War. It is humbling to think we can't out maneuver creatures that have brains the size of a grain of sand. lol.
Jim and I were off our property within the first 10 minutes of our walk, but we have permission to take walks on the neighborís property. That particular stretch of land is reserved for wildlife and deer hunting. My family built a house on stilts near the river years ago when we owned the land, but despite being raised up, the house didn't survive the first flood. There are several ponds and the land is crisscrossed with creeks. It is a nice place to visit, but only wildlife lives there. Jim won't let me say how long it took us to walk the distance we did, but I will say if one of the turtles had decided to race us, it would have had a chance of winning. Our walk caused no problems with his back, but he says his legs are still sore. A treadmill would probably be safer PT, but having a destination and interesting things to observe keeps his mind off the pain.
It has been dry and unusually cool the last few days. It is finally dry enough to mow and the summer plants have all perked up. We are ready to start the fall planting season.
k*
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E._O._Wilson


This message was edited Aug 28, 2013 12:37 PM

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 28, 2013
12:02 PM

Post #9644017

Yes, fire ants are definitely out here, but I hardly ever leave the house! :( My articles are totally from memory and online research. Don't spread it around.

I like the image of you and Jim racing a turtle. DH always sets off as if we're in a race but eventually he rests his hand on my back (like a moving cane, not out of affection).

Some of the writers know a lot more about insects than I. T.H. White's The Once and Future King has a great boy-as-ant part, not the movie but the book.

I love that book. Lance and Jenny break Arthur's heart every time, though.

BirdieBlue

BirdieBlue
Winston Salem, NC
(Zone 7a)

August 31, 2013
6:27 AM

Post #9646583

Would those of you that pray please lift me up in prayer. Lots of pain, misplaced pain meds (probably a good thing anyway).really down...nothing specific. Mean spirited people getting t o me, plus medical stuff.
I know this will pass...so thanks and have a good day.
Sheri
katiebear
mulege
Mexico

August 31, 2013
6:41 AM

Post #9646594

Big hugs, Sheri, I am low on pain meds and know how hard it can be not to have them.

My retirement association has been misinforming/lying to me for 27 years (yes, you did not misread that number). I will be making my third trip to talk to the board it means about 1600 miles each way to the Bay Area. Mean-spirited people there, too. They think they are too important to pay attention to me. I need to remind them that they are there because of me, not vice versa. I'm hoping to finally shut up a worker who failed to send me notifications and then cancelled my medical insurance, then said casually "she fell through the cracks." I was willing to let it go and can you believe the dumbie then told me it had been my fault. Four times and counting.

I've been seriously depressed and tired and weepy. Now I'm getting mad (I recommend this; it's much less painful). I'm also working my way through to being able to present it to the Board as the farce that it is. They can dismiss you if you cry but not if you show them up as fools.

hugs, katie

BirdieBlue

BirdieBlue
Winston Salem, NC
(Zone 7a)

August 31, 2013
6:57 AM

Post #9646605

Yay Katie, you get em lady. I hate govt. Between VA disability and SSDI I may just lose it all along with a whole lot of others.
"Farce" is what it is...a farce of fools.
Is that anything like a gaggle of geese?

hugs, Sheri

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

September 1, 2013
7:13 PM

Post #9648072

Sheri, hugs your way. How can you lose SSDI? That's a scary thought. It's not a lot but I earned it!

And Katie, I hear you on the sad vs. angry. Angry is more powerful than sad. Maybe because it's scary.

BirdieBlue

BirdieBlue
Winston Salem, NC
(Zone 7a)

September 1, 2013
7:17 PM

Post #9648076

Our Govt is going to be broke in only a few years...no $'s= no SSDI, Veteran pension or disability,etc

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

September 2, 2013
9:16 AM

Post #9648524

You really think so? I read that SSA is good for many years to come; it's not "going under" as some people say. On the other hand, if the gov't truly goes broke, I bet we will see a revolution. A genuine revolution like the French or American Revolutions. When the few have all the money and the many are hungry, somebody will revolt. Not trying to start one myself; I fear disabled and sick people would die if there really were a new revolution. But clearly the current state is untenable.

I put my trust in SSA because otherwise I would have to start saving money in gold coins instead of banks and stock-piling ammo and guns. Wow, I have been reading too many dystopian fantasy books this year!

My book club is run by a Libertarian guy, and the books that get chosen end up being "if the world ended, what supplies would you want to have on hand" or "in 2050, which three world powers will dominate" or "if Germany had won WWII..." not my kind of thinking or even the books I enjoy. Sorry.
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

September 2, 2013
9:22 AM

Post #9648528

Prayers for both of you from all of us here. I know where you are coming from. Jim contacted the VA about problems with his w/c, as instructed, But it would have taken so long and was such a convoluted process to get them to do the repairs, Jim purchased the parts online and did the repair himself. You would think the overloaded VA staff would be grateful Jim took on the responsibility and expense of repairs himself, right? The official line is his w/c is government property and Jim isnít certified to do repairs. Ooookay. The government trusts Jim to repair jet aircraft worth mega-bucks with the lives of pilots and flight crews in the balance, but they don't trust him to replace the little wheels on a manual w/c??? ROFL. Anger boiled down and cooled to icy, implacable logic spiced with gallows humor, is the best way to handle situations like that in my experience.
The pink spiderlilies (Lycoris radiata) are blooming. (I'm still looking for the white variety.) The Rose of Sharon blooms are hand-sized this season.
Pineapple' tomatoes are still producing as well as ever. 'Brandywine' is starting to ripen. The 'October Fest' daylilies have decided not to wait until October to party. I was late getting my asters planted so no sign of bloom on them yet.
Nadine is in her role as Frog Queen. There are over 30 kinds of frogs and toads around here and I think each kind must have a representative in a large, rain [formed pool near her door. Even with her amphibian re-location efforts, it is still swarming. She has finally accepted she can't save them all, but she is raising the more rare types in containers on the deck and feeding those in the puddle. She's been feeding them my color enhancing, tropical fish food. I hope none of the toads end up sunshine yellow with tangerine spots. ;-)
I have a shameful confession to make, Carrie. I haven't read ďThe Once and Future King." Next time I download books I'll see if it is available. Better late than never.
Mk*
Oops! I was supposed to post these pictures on another thread. (Jim)
Wild Muscadine Grapes growing nicely at the end of our road.

This message was edited Sep 2, 2013 10:24 AM

This message was edited Sep 2, 2013 10:44 AM

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carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

September 2, 2013
11:38 AM

Post #9648656

" Be careful not to damage your crepe's shallow roots when mowing the lawn or digging near it."
http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/4377/
I think that also means "be careful with your 8,000 pound electric wheelchair." :( Remind me not to plant anything with shallow roots. Well, remind me to own property before I start planning gardens.

BirdieBlue

BirdieBlue
Winston Salem, NC
(Zone 7a)

September 2, 2013
3:22 PM

Post #9648879

I think that world events will make the US economy irrelevant

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

September 2, 2013
4:12 PM

Post #9648940

Hmmm maybe so. I think we are dangerously close to discussing politics.

Do you have any crepe myrtles?
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

September 7, 2013
9:15 AM

Post #9653195

August would be a dismal time in the garden without crepe myrtles to brighten things up. They are one of the few flowering shrubs that can take our high summer heat. The large, old pink variety has even escaped cultivation and can be found growing in the woods. I will have to remember about the dangers of wheelchairs to crepe myrtles. What kind do (did? sigh) you have?
Sheri, I found "II Corinthians 4 7-9" written in crayon on the inside cover of my first Bible. That one still gets me through difficult and scary times. Uh oh, now we are dangerously close to discussing religion. But, I do find that passage provides me peace of mind in troubled times.
Paul, are you with us on this thread? I know how concerned you are about improving the living situation in Haiti and I came across a clever program that will help some people. Jim is shopping for an all-terrain W/c and came across a deal where you buy two chairs at rock bottom price and one of these is sent to Haiti or other third world places where an all terrain w/c is a necessity to get around. Now that is socially responsible consumerism! The cost isn't much more than buying a single w/c through the normal channels. Still doing some research,but I think we will go with that option.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

September 7, 2013
7:14 PM

Post #9653679

Kay, I've had lots of wheelchairs...in fact I have 2 in the garage that just need a new battery! My newest one (thank you, Medicare) is a Permobil. It's the fanciest I've ever had. It can fully recline and also go up and down, like a horse on a merry-go-round. I've always resisted tilt-in-space, but I finally gave in, and I love it.

The ones in the garage are a Jazzy we bought used a long time ago and I never used it--it needed a battery when we bought it, and we never got around to it--and a Quantum that was NEVER comfortable, not for one minute.. The Quantum had one nice feature that I'm missing now: an attendant control, so you can drive it without being the one sitting in it. I'm thinking right now that would have been really nice on this one, because DH gets really mad and frustrated when he's waiting for me to remember where I need to back up and where go forward, or when the joystick is tilted sideways and I don't notice. He also tends to get anxious when we're in crowds because he thinks I'm going to hit someone. So I would be happy to turn over the controls on those occasions.

Jim, do you like the scooters you can borrow at the grocery store? You'll get much better garden-ability if you stay closer to a scooter than a wheelchair. In a scooter you can back up to something and then spin the seat around and be right up close to it. In a WC you have to run something over to be able to pick it up. OTOH a scooter is much worse for your back and all that spinning takes a certain amount of agility which I no longer possess.

The Quantum was the first 6 wheeled WC I ever had and I thought it was newer and all wonderful but it dug holes in the New England mud. We don't have clay in Boston, we have stones. I think if you had clay, like they have in Virginia, you wouldn't get two feet on plain dirt. And another thing: a WC can't travel on gravel, bark or mulch.

13Turtles

13Turtles
Springfield, OR
(Zone 8a)

September 8, 2013
1:27 AM

Post #9653810

Wow, Kay, what a fantastic program!

I have a really heavy duty scooter that I love because it doesn't rattle apart on the sidewalks. I was going through one a year just because the sidewalks are worse than the streets. (I don't drive.) This Afikim I've now been using for three years and it's still just fine. Also, it, like some of the others with a tiller and floorboard, can roll over almost everything, which is a blessing. I haul soil and pots into the backyard on it - the other advantage of a floorboard. The downside of this particular scooter is that it's too long to get on a bus. For which reason I miss the Boston "T." But then again, I couldn't have even a window box there!

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

September 8, 2013
10:49 AM

Post #9654148

Good point, Turtle, the floorboard of the scooter is terribly handy. Also the (optional) basket in front. Unfortunately, the "patient" ones I've seen don't have those massive baskets like the grocery store ones; still, with the WC I carry one of those little baskets.

BirdieBlue

BirdieBlue
Winston Salem, NC
(Zone 7a)

September 11, 2013
8:31 PM

Post #9657589

Jim, I find comfort in those verses also. I am not troubled, though...and who mentioned politics...Oh my Lord!!!! I can still say that can't I?? or has big brother taken over this thread. dang...who's "we" anyway? not me...that's my story & i'm sticken to it.
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

September 13, 2013
10:13 AM

Post #9658848

Naw! We would never discuss religion or politics on a gardening site. ;-)
This thread is getting long let's hop over here.
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1333066/
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

May 26, 2014
5:42 PM

Post #9850049

Gardening from a wheel chair:

if you go to the tomato forum and then down to Tomatoes: Best slicing-size tomato for container growing? you can see what this DGer did when he had to be in a wheel chair for a very long time.
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

May 29, 2014
11:39 AM

Post #9852570

(Jim) Hi, Jnette. Thanks for the link.
Join us on Physically Challenged Gardner's #18

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