Photo by Melody

Perennials: Adenophora tashiroi

Communities > Forums > Perennials
bookmark
Forum: PerennialsReplies: 59, Views: 506
Add to Bookmarks
-
AuthorContent
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

December 26, 2012
2:36 PM

Post #9367766

Bluestone Perennials says "It does not spread or run aggressively". I like the looks of this plant, but I am leery. Does anyone have any experience with this particular plant?
altagardener
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3b)

December 29, 2012
9:47 AM

Post #9369832

I've grown it for many years and have not found it to be spreading at all.

Thumbnail by altagardener
Click the image for an enlarged view.

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

December 29, 2012
8:06 PM

Post #9370231

Ooooh, alta, how tall is it? 12"? And just Love your geraiums, how pretty! I have Adenophora lilfolia, love it, but yes it spreads, so am also curious about this one.

Thumbnail by warriorswisdomkathy
Click the image for an enlarged view.

altagardener
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3b)

December 29, 2012
9:00 PM

Post #9370255

Yes, Adenophora tashiroi gets to about a foot tall for me. I've found some other Adenophora species to be quite invasive.
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

December 30, 2012
10:56 AM

Post #9370582

Thanks, alta. It's quite pretty. Is that geranium 'Biokovo'? I bought a couple of "roots" last year. They were misplaced, and I found them quite crispy in the garage about two months later. I am thinking about ordering them again. They look very happy in your garden. It looks like you have this pretty combo in quite a bit of shade?
Thanks for showing the picture.
altagardener
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3b)

December 30, 2012
11:11 AM

Post #9370594

Yes, birder, that is Geranium x cantabrigiense 'Biokovo'. That area is part shade due to surrounding trees. Having said that, most geraniums are not too fussy about light at all here. This is not a hot area though (we only get a few >80 degree F days during the brief summer), probably unlike your area.
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

December 30, 2012
11:21 AM

Post #9370604

Thanks, again. Oh yes, we usually have temps in top 90's with humidity. However, this year was unusual. We had temps in the low 100's with a breeze and not much humidity.
I think I am going to get that geranium and the Adenorpha t..
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

December 30, 2012
4:01 PM

Post #9370811

Oh, I have only one Biokovo. I only have one, which I moved from the feet of Zeph in my old garden to the feet of Marchesa in my new one. Here it is with Zeph last year.

I found it a bit fragile, but I adore it. Does it just clump, or does it spread? Yours look wonderful.

Thumbnail by DonnaMack
Click the image for an enlarged view.

birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

December 30, 2012
4:07 PM

Post #9370815

Donna, I don't have this plant, but the research indicates it's a rhysomatous spreader. Reports say it's not aggressive and easy to pull out. I hope someone that has this plant will reply.
altagardener
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3b)

December 30, 2012
4:14 PM

Post #9370820

Geranium x cantabrigiense 'Biokovo' does spread by rhizomes (a habit which all Geranium x cantabrigiense cultivars get from the parent G. macrorrhizum) but slowly and, yes, it is easy to control. It doesn't root deeply and any unwanted advances can be cut off and discarded or rooted for planting elsewhere.
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

December 30, 2012
5:40 PM

Post #9370871

I have a few different geranium cantabrigiense and they are a good spreader here. The leaves turn reddish in fall, and they have a pine scent. I highly recommend them. Definitely not invasive here. Leaves are pretty all season, and they bloom for a long time.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

December 30, 2012
6:28 PM

Post #9370907

Thank you all.

Yes, yes, please spread, please spread!!!!!
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

January 3, 2013
9:56 AM

Post #9374160

I bought my Biokovo in the early 80's for a house in Southampton, LI. I've moved and shared it ever since. For me it has always filled in quickly but never exceeded its territory. One friend has it under a Japanese Maple, and never has to weed there any more. At this house in CT I brought 1 plant 3 years ago from my Mom's house on LI. Last fall I moved it into 3 new areas.
Pic 1 is from last spring, tucked in under the Rhodie. I had moved and spread it out the previous fall, and it already made a pretty good display. I decided it was too pink for all those silvers and blues, and planned to move it again in the fall. By then it was twice the size.
Pics 2 & 3 in September I put it around some baby Brandywine Viburnums and along a ledge under a box hedge just opposite, dividing it quite small. The last few went under some white Hydrangeas.

The funny thing is, I originally bought it from Spring Hill as AT Johnson, and for years that's what I called it. Only recently I discovered the ATJ re-blooms, and mine does not. And mine in bloom look exactly like every picture I've ever seen of Biokovo. Another nice feature of this plant is that the leaves stay fresh and pretty all summer, and take on a reddish tinge in the fall.

Thumbnail by Pfg   Thumbnail by Pfg   Thumbnail by Pfg      
Click an image for an enlarged view.

DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

January 3, 2013
4:40 PM

Post #9374551

Thank you all for the good news. I was given several geraniums by a king DGer because I gave him some lilies and he insisted on reciprocating. I had never had any before and fell in love. And then the light really came on when I found what I believe to be a geranium maculatum in the yard of my new house (celebrating one year). Its delicacy blew me away. It was next to the neighbor's chain link fence. I recognized it as looking at the ones growing wild on the trails. But there was only one. Don't they spread?

I also inherited a huge hydrangea macrophylla that the owner said had never bloomed in 20 years. It bloomed blue, pink and purple. Since it had never bloomed it had been dumped next to the neighbor's chain link fence. I moved it too.

The other surprise was a quite large dicentra, which worked really well with my new oakleaf hydrangea and athyrium nipponicum 'Ursula's Red'.

It almost made me forget the billion wild strawberries, ditch lilies, and the relentless march of the lily of the valley, the latter of which if left alone destroys every other plant in its path.

Thumbnail by DonnaMack   Thumbnail by DonnaMack   Thumbnail by DonnaMack      
Click an image for an enlarged view.

pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

January 3, 2013
4:54 PM

Post #9374577

If you like Biokovo, Karmina is the same, but a brighter pink, and St. Ola, almost a white. I think there are a few more, but I don't know the names.

http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/showimage/113865/

http://www.ditoplant.nl/?p=fotos&id=367&lang=en

And expensive, yes, but I love this website


http://geraniaceae.com/cgi-bin/welcome.py
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

January 3, 2013
9:10 PM

Post #9374794

Love the pictures and good info on the Geranium cantabrigiense 'Biokova'.
I was looking at Swallowtail Seeds this evening. They have a Geranium sanguineum 'Vision Light Pink'.
How does this one compare to Biokova? Does anyone have any experience growing this one?
altagardener
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3b)

January 3, 2013
9:30 PM

Post #9374806

I have several Geranium sanguineum (self-seeded) in the yard - it's an excellent plant with showy flowers and brilliant fall colour... possibly my favourite geranium. It does not spread by rhizomes (it's tap-rooted), so differs from G. X cantabrigiense in that respect.

This message was edited Jan 3, 2013 10:33 PM
rouge21

(Zone 4b)

January 4, 2013
6:27 AM

Post #9375008

'altagardener', funny you mention "fall colour" as I have always been impressed with the geranium MAX FREI. I know this is a very common, often used hardy geranium plant but it has so much going for it:

- tons of flowers in the spring (a little rebloom in the fall)
- so very compact and tight
- nice fall colour

This message was edited Jan 5, 2013 6:43 PM
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

January 4, 2013
7:31 AM

Post #9375070

polly, I forgot to mention I looked at the G. Karmina and G. St. Ola. Both are very nice. It looks like all three would blend nicely.
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

January 4, 2013
9:24 AM

Post #9375186

The Visions are really pretty. I think they would be taller and more sprawling than the Biokovo.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

January 4, 2013
2:53 PM

Post #9375561

I have one G St Ola. I didn't realize it would behave the same as Biokovo. I bought a few white geraniums in 2011, and that's the only one that survived. I was so happy to see it grow and bloom last year that I didn't want to risk it. It's tucked under a long established, low growing box hedge and has done well with nearly no attention after that first summer, surprising as box roots are so greedy. I'll be sure to spread it around more next year now that I know...

Thumbnail by Pfg
Click the image for an enlarged view.

altagardener
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3b)

January 4, 2013
3:23 PM

Post #9375595

Given the interest here in G. x cantabrigiense cultivars, here's another... 'Cambridge'. It's also indestructible.
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 4, 2013
4:54 PM

Post #9375670

Indestructible is a word I love.

I (love) mildly stoloniferous plants. I have a lot of yard to fill, so I'm really happy when plants fill in. Of course, I don't mean the way bamboo can fill in...
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

January 4, 2013
5:30 PM

Post #9375700

So pretty, Pfg!

I'll have to look up Cambridge, thanks.
altagardener
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3b)

January 4, 2013
7:01 PM

Post #9375794

altagardener wrote:Given the interest here in G. x cantabrigiense cultivars, here's another... 'Cambridge'. It's also indestructible.


Oops, looks like the picture didn't post. Here it is:

Thumbnail by altagardener
Click the image for an enlarged view.

pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

January 4, 2013
7:13 PM

Post #9375809

I like it! Almost violet? It seems it would be a fine addition to the others. Nice pic, too!
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

January 4, 2013
7:27 PM

Post #9375825

So pretty!
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

January 5, 2013
9:25 AM

Post #9376130

I really like these Geraniums c. They are so quietly beautiful. Thanks to all for sharing their pics and their info. I did not about these Geranium cantabrigiense that they would slowly spread-what a neat characteristic and their blooms are upright and perky. I will be getting some of these this year!
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

January 5, 2013
10:33 AM

Post #9376181

They don't really spread terrifically, so I would plant them a foot apart or so.
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

January 6, 2013
8:48 AM

Post #9377096

Here's a picture of some fall color on my sanguineum.
I think it's an underappreciated feature of this great plant.
I also have a smaller version, g. sanguineum nanum
- blooms great, nice fall color, just a couple inches tall.
Cute, cute, cute!

Thumbnail by Weerobin   Thumbnail by Weerobin         
Click an image for an enlarged view.

pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

January 7, 2013
4:00 PM

Post #9378490

Like that one!
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

January 9, 2013
7:40 PM

Post #9380596

The fall color on the Geranium sanguineum is striking. How does the fall color compare between Geranium cantabrigiense vs. Geranium sanquineum? I like the idea of the spreading capability, but I also like the tap root as I think it would not require as much water after it is once established. They are all pretty.
altagardener
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3b)

January 9, 2013
9:01 PM

Post #9380648

We get annual total precipitation of about 16 inches (including snow). Geranium sanguineum is very drought hardy (have never, ever even seen one wilt); G. X cantabrigiense is a little less so but still very tough.
rouge21

(Zone 4b)

January 10, 2013
4:20 AM

Post #9380731

altagardener wrote:We get annual total precipitation of about 16 inches (including snow).
And from what I have heard this winter, much of Alberta has had lots of snow...more than usual?

DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

January 10, 2013
7:07 AM

Post #9380844

We are working on a record of 321 days with no snow in excess of 1.3 inches. It is going to be 45 today and 60 tomorrow.

January!!!!!
rouge21

(Zone 4b)

January 10, 2013
7:46 AM

Post #9380885

Same here Donna ie to be in excess of 50 F on the weekend...this will take away any snow we had accumulated up to this point. It isnt normal or maybe it is the new normal.
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

January 10, 2013
9:22 AM

Post #9380961

So, which of the geraniums we have mentioned are most true pink? I think I would like a mix of a pink one and a white with the pink centers. I am finding it a little hard to discern the colors on the computer.

Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

January 10, 2013
9:35 AM

Post #9380976

What about G Endressi Wargrave Pink? I don't have it now, but used to, and it's a lovely color. It's also quite well behaved, as I remember. Google has lots of info on it... And I'm sure people here know it.

[HYPERLINK@www.google.com]
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

January 10, 2013
3:56 PM

Post #9381347

Of the ones I have Karmina is the brightest pink. It goes very well with the white and pink of Biokovo.
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

January 11, 2013
10:23 PM

Post #9382498

I believe the G e. Wargrave Pink spreads slowly like Biokova? It's really a true pink.

The Karmina looks orchid in some pictures. Thanks.

I see B. Stone P. has the Biokovo. I haven't looked much yet for the Geraniums. The're so pretty.
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

January 12, 2013
7:12 AM

Post #9382638

I have Karmina and it's a true pink.
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

January 12, 2013
8:51 PM

Post #9383274

Thaks Polly.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

January 12, 2013
9:28 PM

Post #9383296

I seem to remember that Wargrave was reliably hardy, and very pretty. It didn't fluff out as much as Biokovo, but wasn't skimpy either.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

January 13, 2013
10:25 AM

Post #9383670

Hi everyone. I did a lot of research on hardy geraniums, and the data on this thread was really helpful. I kept doing research and ended up putting some thoughts on the "Your Planned Purchases for 2013" thread started by Rogue, including my hardy geranium info. But since many of my best ideas came from you lovely people, I thought, if you don't mind, that I would post my opinions, and those of others, here:

Forest Farm has very nice geraniums in tubes that you can get for $5.95 or so. After tons of research, I am seriously considering the cantabrigienses Cambridge, St. Ola and Westray. Cambridge and St. Ola I think are musts. They also have the striatum sanguinium dwarf pink and Sweet Heidi. I will make my final choices soon.

Dave's Garden has been invaluable for choosing, as well as other sites visited by gardeners. Providers want you to buy. I'm trying to avoid what people characterize as floppy or as having other issues. These are just opinions, mind you. Let me share my notes, in case this is helpful. These are the opinions I gathered:

Brookside has to be cut back not terribly floriferous
Geranium Blushing Turtle nice but zone 6 according to Forest Farm
Geranium Orkney Cherry long flowering, low maintenance, zone 5 but I didn't think it pretty enough
Geranium Patricia long flowering but not pretty enough?
Geranium Rozanne very mixed reviews

And the pluses I am choosing from: these are all only my opinions. I wanted zone 5 hardiness and tubes. They are all available at Forest Farm:
Geranium Sweet Heidi. Forest Farm
Geranium cantabrigiense St. Ola - absolutely yes, stunning, Forest Farm
Geranium endressii Wargrave Pink. Really good, gets really big. Forest Farm tube 5.95
Geranium cantabrigiense Cambridge - spreading, Forest Farm tube 5.95 blue
Geranium renardii gorgeous, and Forest Farm
Geranium sanguinium. striatum (lancastriense) - Dwf Pnk Hardy Geranium very nice Forest Farm

I hope you don't think I'm presumptuous, but I spent so much time putting together the data that I thought that I should share it if anyone else wants to use it.

Donna
altagardener
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3b)

January 13, 2013
10:38 AM

Post #9383685

You really shouldn't believe the majority of the zone ratings in DG (or elsewhere for that matter)... inaccurate zone ratings are the major bug-a-boo of this site, IMO. It's unfortunate that once they are entered, the entry is "locked down" and to make further entries, you actually have to write to an administrator. In general, the hardiness of a great many perennials is underestimated in written accounts, sales literature (which typically gets copied into sites like this), etc..

'Patricia' is an absolutely magnificent hybrid geranium (one of my favourites) that blooms heavily throughout the season here... however, it's huge and depending what one is looking for, not exactly interchangeable for G. x cantabrigiense cultivars which are quite small and therefore good for the front of the border.
Here's 'Patricia':

Thumbnail by altagardener
Click the image for an enlarged view.

happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 13, 2013
11:29 AM

Post #9383723

Donna: Presumptuous? On the contrary, that's incredibly helpful. BTW, the June 2012 Fine Gardening reported on 180 geraniums.

Alta -- I've heard Patricia is lovely. Curiously, Fine Gardening only gave it one star and said the flower coverage was "fair." LazyS has it -- and American Meadows has it for about half that $6.48). I suppose it isn't worth the gamble to order from American Meadows...
altagardener
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3b)

January 13, 2013
1:57 PM

Post #9383864

There's a lot to be said too for just growing plants oneself, and forming an opinion from that, rather than following the crowd or assuming someone else's opinion will be the same as yours. ;-)
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

January 13, 2013
2:46 PM

Post #9383901

Aaawww, Donna, thank you for sharing your research. Of course, each of us will make our final choices, but thanks for taking the time to write your info.

I really must make my order/s for seeds and plants. I keep doing research. Rehearsing what I already have in my gardens, and what needs to be moved or added to. I have a huge list...that Will Be shortened! Even if I could afford all these plants, I simply don't have the room. I keep thinking I will get to this list and order, but something else always seems to come up.

I haven't checked out the 2013 Purchases by Rogue yet. I assume it's in the perennial forum. There's always so many good ideas DG members share.

Alta: You have been great to share all of your pictures and information about Geraniums. Again, I thank you and the others for sharing their pics and information.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

January 13, 2013
2:47 PM

Post #9383903

I read the Fine Gardening article - it's what got me started.

Alta, wow, what a putdown, wink aside! "Following the crowd or assuming someone else's opinion will be the same as yours!"


altagardener
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3b)

January 13, 2013
3:17 PM

Post #9383934

I didn't mean it as a putdown. I meant it as encouragement to branch out and try to grow the plants that interest you, and see how they do in your conditions and then be the judge yourself of their attractiveness, usefulness, hardiness, etc.. You may well be pleasantly surprised and your info may help to inform others.
If I followed the advice in Fine Gardening (which, among gardening mags, I consider to be a good one) or in the majority of gardening books I've read or own, the selection of perennials I'd be growing here would be incredibly small. Instead, I'm growing many hundreds of species simply because I disregarded the published info and tried them myself.
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

January 13, 2013
4:08 PM

Post #9383980

I think I am going to try to push my zone hardiness a little this year. Salvia farinacea 'Victoria Blue' is described as an annual. It is perennial here.

I have glads that have come back for 15 years, and they are not suppose to be hardy in my area either.

I also have a dahlia that has come back for 15 years also. They're suppose to be hardy to zone 8 I think. I am zone 6.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

January 13, 2013
4:22 PM

Post #9383987

Beth, it really sounds like your microclimate is warmer than typical for your 'zone.' Even in my old zone 6 garden, which is now supposedly 7, Victoria never ever survived the winter for me. And Dahlias? And glads?! Lucky you!
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

January 13, 2013
7:20 PM

Post #9384094

I wish I were in zone 7. It seems a lot more plants make it in zone 7 and yet, you can have the spring bulbs.

My glads multiply like crazy. I dug a bunch of them up this past season. They are cleaned up and in a nylon bag.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

January 14, 2013
7:32 AM

Post #9384488

Birder,

That's exactly what I do. I overwintered salvia farinacea outside. I actually overwintered four different kinds: Gruppenblau, Reference, Strata and Victoria White. Since I grew them from seed, it was worth the experimentation (cheap!)

Alta,

As for Fine Gardening, I thought it was a good starting point, but I find that a lot of books on certain kinds of plants (particularly hydrangeas and geraniums) are written by British authors. While very nice, the "Brit Books" are not helpful, although the pictures are wonderful. Nor are books, for me, by Colorado based writers. It was a long time before I could find books written for midwest soil. There are a lot of $15.00 geraniums out there. I used to subscribe to Fine Gardening and Garden Design, but now I look at them in the library because they tend to recommend the very new and expensive, which can be unreliable.

I was simply sharing my research and my reactions to it. I have a very large number of plants that I have never seen in anyone else's yard, because I push microclimates and do a lot of overwintering in my garage. I don't need encouragement, especially when phrased as you wrote it, the effect of which perhaps you did not forsee. I have found, though, that getting it wrong can be quite expensive. I had five viburnum plicatum tomantosum Lanarths that worked for 5 years in their supposed zone 5a yard (which I had) only to all die in one year. $250 plus shipping.

Evidently you thought I was quite unsophisticated. I gave some thought to simply deleting what I wrote, but perhaps it is helpful to someone. I spent quite some time researching them, and by providing the links, I was trying to let people have a look. My reactions were my reactions, not my recommendations.



happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 14, 2013
10:05 AM

Post #9384660

Donna: What you wrote was exactly on point for me, and is really the reason I love to follow these threads. I completely agree regarding the location of writers -- I used to follow British writers and west coast writers, but what works for them doesn't work at all for me. I'm in 7a, but I find many many 7a plants just don't make it here because of winter wet. I'm trying to amend my soil to make it less clay-ey, but on the other hand, I'm trying to get plants that like my soil so I'm not constantly in an uphill battle.

I do love geraniums. My first favorite was Johnson's Blue, but I not longer am in love with it: it winds around too much, rather than filling in. I don't mind if plants are not floriferous, but I do like them to be dense.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

January 14, 2013
12:27 PM

Post #9384828

Donna, I'm glad you posted the results of your research. When I become interested in a new-to-me cultivar or type of plant, I often like to look around at what other people say, both here and via Google, before deciding whether or not to take the plunge.

Although I enjoy looking at gardening magazines for inspration, I agree that they are vehicles for publicity for the industry. Even with the best intentions of the writer, the usually cheaper tried-and-true versions are not given the space of new entries, some of which don't fulfill their early promise over time and disappear from the market after a season or two.

For me, DG has been a wonderful source of reams of horticultural knowledge, including the introduction to many classic and newer plants -and their quirks- that I might never have known about otherwise. I must admit that sometimes I have to resist the urge to get one-of-this and one-of-that because so-and-so has it, not always successfully. But for me, gardening is trial and error until I get the effect I want with plant material that likes where I put it, which I guess is the whole point of trying in the first place.

So ultimately, yes, I make up my own mind, based on what I can learn about a plant and what my garden tells me about its probability of success.

When I'm looking at my garden I see what I expect to happen, in addition to what's actually there. When reality differs too far from the dream picture, I change something...and isn't there always something?! And that, I think, is what keeps it interesting!



happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 14, 2013
1:57 PM

Post #9384913

I so agree with your point about "tried and true" plants. It is sometimes very hard to find out about them. Plus, with the push for ever biggest blooms, often the plant itself becomes less handsome or tough. I'd much rather have a plant for the ages, than one that will just "wow" for one season...
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

January 14, 2013
3:21 PM

Post #9384996

Please guys, let's not beat up on alta. I really don't think she meant to say anything mean. It just came out not quite right which can happen sooo easily when we are all chatting on a website. She's offered valuable information on Geraniums and lovely pictures. I think she was sincerely trying to help all of us.
Again, alta, I thank you for your information and pictures.

And, Donna, I thank you for all of your research and sharing it with us.

Both of you are wonderful gardeners and invaluable to this website.

I too believe buying newly introduced plants is risky not to mention expensive. Sometimes the simplest plants and old stand bys can really fit the bill.

I have looked for years for a good Garden Book for Midwest Americana. Donna, if you have found one, please give the Title. And, I will hope it's still in print!

I bought packets of seed today for a nickel ea.! I bought some Calendula and others. It is suppose to be a good companion plant to Many plants. I mostly use it with my vegetable plants. It also attracts beneficial insects.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

January 14, 2013
3:57 PM

Post #9385044

Sorry, Alta, my comments were strictly personal, not meant as critical. I have seen your posts many times in many places and have tremendous respect for your knowledge and expertise. I hope you didn't take offense, none was meant.

I was interested in the questions raised by different points of view, and trying to explain what goes into my opinions and decisions based on my own experience. I agree it's silly to follow blindly, one man's zone 6 is another's 5 (like mine!).
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 14, 2013
5:09 PM

Post #9385131

Alta -- me too -- didn't mean to sound critical at all. I can't begin to tell all of you how much I value all your input. I really enjoy these threads.

You cannot post until you register, login and subscribe.


Other Perennials Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Campanula Wonder Bells Blue Gloriaglolms 37 Apr 11, 2009 4:28 PM
Oriental Poppy Pops! Weezingreens 34 Jun 27, 2010 6:36 AM
BLUE FLOWERS Lori_Illinois 62 May 4, 2010 4:09 PM
Triple Roadside/Ditch lily OhioBreezy 21 Jul 9, 2011 6:56 PM
what are you sorry you planted.. thehumblebumble 279 Aug 12, 2012 4:28 AM


We recommend Firefox
Overwhelmed? There's a lot to see here. Try starting at our homepage.

[ Home | About | Advertise | Media Kit | Mission | Featured Companies | Submit an Article | Terms of Use | Tour | Rules | Privacy Policy | Contact Us ]

Back to the top

Copyright © 2000-2014 Dave's Garden, an Internet Brands company. All Rights Reserved.
 

Hope for America