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Mid-Atlantic Gardening: Getting Hot In Here- What's spicing up your Mid-At Kitchen?

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sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 8, 2013
3:01 PM

Post #9379362

Whatcha got spicing up your kitchen for the cold ( sorta) weather?

I made a curry recipe last week, big hit with my home boys, girl and hubby!

Got a new recipe, old recipe, or just meal idea?

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sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 8, 2013
3:02 PM

Post #9379363

Indian Chicken Curry II, (allrecipes.com, Amanda Fetters)
• 3 TB olive oil
• I small onion, chopped
• 2 cloves garlic, minced
• 3 TB curry powder (I used sweet curry from Penzey’s Spice Co.)
• 1 tsp cinnamon
• 1 tsp paprika
• 1 bay leaf
• ½ tsp grated fresh gingerroot (I used ¼ tsp powdered)
• ½ tsp white sugar
• 2 chicken breast halves, cut into bite size pieces (I precooked them and cunked them)
• 1 TB tomato paste
• 1 C plain yogurt
• ¾ C coconut milk
• ½ lemon juiced (2 TB juice)
• ½ tsp cayenne
Heat skillet, add olive oil and onion, sauté onion until lightly browned. Add garlic, curry, cinnamon, paprika, bay leaf, ginger, sugar and salt to taste. Stir for two minutes. Add chicken, tomato paste, yogurt and coconut milk. Bring to boil if raw chicken, or simmer, if cooked chicken, then simmer for 20 minutes.
Remove bay leaf, stir in lemon juice and cayenne.
I served it with rice, and added another half cup or so of coconut milk to thin the sauce. I served plain cooked spinach alongside. Yummy!

Jan23
Salem Cnty, NJ
(Zone 7b)

January 8, 2013
3:39 PM

Post #9379403

Never made curry before. I did make some ham and bean soup last week and put a few pepper flakes in it. I shy away from spicy. I did make salmon this evening for dinner.

I am what is spicing up the kitchen, dear!! Heehee. Who am I kidding?

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 8, 2013
3:51 PM

Post #9379419

AH cmon, you are spicy! tee hee.

We had chili one night, and pea soup with ham another. Both were gobbled up.

Tomorrow is a work day, I think I will do Italian sausage in the slow cooker, I'll have to get set up tonight. The guys can cook the pasta. Weis had their sausage on special, just in time for me.
Jan23
Salem Cnty, NJ
(Zone 7b)

January 8, 2013
3:54 PM

Post #9379425

Takes one to know one!!! Heehee

I do like sausage and peppers and onions
coleup
annapolis, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 8, 2013
4:49 PM

Post #9379493

I love curry!

Got creative in the kitchen when my local market had ground turkey breast "Reduced for Quick Sale" Made almost six pounds of meatballs! Panko bread crumbs, minced onion(lightly browned), splash of tamari, a packet of Liptons Onion Soup Mix and mayonaise (Miracle Whip) to bind it all as I am allergic to eggs. Baked and browned in 375 degree oven on slightly oiled baking sheet. Baked two kinds of sweet potatoes while my three batches of meatballs cooked. Froze first batch and fridged second. The third was dinner and served with steam in bag "pasta and broccoli in sauce,

second batch became "white Chili" combo with canellini beans and green peas with eight cloves of thinly sliced and sauted garlic cloves ( ! ) and more onions and a can of cream of mushroom soup. Served with a salad of micro greens and thick slices of Italian Herb and Olive bread. The frozen ones will probably become spaghetti in the near future.

Can you tell that when I cook I like to have multi meals to show for my effort? I enjoyed the panko bread crumbs and hope to 'speriment more with them.

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 8, 2013
4:51 PM

Post #9379497

Home cooked food in freezer feels like money in the bank!
coleup
annapolis, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 8, 2013
5:19 PM

Post #9379523

Gives a whole new meaning to frozen assets!
Jan23
Salem Cnty, NJ
(Zone 7b)

January 8, 2013
7:28 PM

Post #9379629

I like to do that, too. When I need meat I search out the meat dep't for any packages that are reduced, then make multi meals, too. Need to use things up, now, before I buy any more meat. I like to use panko crumbs.

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 9, 2013
3:11 PM

Post #9380350

You all are "singing my song"...,.now I don't feel so weird always looking for clearanced meats...

A few days ago--I went to my Safeway and made a bea-line for the small clearanced meats section.
Picked up 3 small packages of some kind of thin sliced chuck and ribs. Looked like thick bacon.
The ribs were cross cut--so they were just little medallions...
The whole thing cost me under $2. Thought I would make a "small" pot of beef veggie soup.

Got some soup bones out of the freezer--and a slightly freezer burned flank steak and one
large tomato (frozen). diced all. (side note)--Do you know you can freeze whole tomatoes?
Just toss them in the freezer in a baggie. To use, run hot water over it and the skin sloughs right off.
Then dice it (while still frozen) and add to whatever...no mess!

Spent that evening slicing and dicing and chopping--every veggie I had. Love doing that!!!
Ran to the store to p/u some more veggies. This soup was going to have EVERYthing in it...
Got some fresh celery and a small bunch of Collard greens and a small piece of Broccoli. Chop...chop..

Next morning, I decided I wanted to add some cabbage to this soup. Went to the store
and bought the smallest one i could find. Just used 1/2 of it. Diced up a couple ot taters too.

Browned the chuck meat and the flank steak cubes in bone marrow and simmered it,
along with the marrow bones for about 2hrs.

By the time i added all the home made broths and all the veggies--my big pot was almost full.
I used the big pot thinking I would just fill it half way. i should know better...:o(

Tasted as it cooked. Added 2 cans of fire roasted, diced tomatoes and one can of tom. sauce.
Stir...stir--taste ..taste...needed some zing. Pured some vinegar in it..added some more herbs and spices..
A bit more vinegar--Lots of black pepper...and then--FINALLY--decided it was done.

Poured myself a bowl and had it for dinner...I was so surprised! What i had created was a great pot of Minestroni soup.
It was delicious!!!

Tomorrow or Friday I will do a smaller batch of Pirags. All the 300 I made for Christmas were doled out...

Thats it for now--til the next meat bargain i find at Safeway...
Gita



happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 9, 2013
3:25 PM

Post #9380363

What's spicing up my kitchen? I just made suet for the birds and put cayenne in it to ward off the squirrels. Then (apparently) I wiped my eyes. That's what's spicing up my kitchen!

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 9, 2013
7:14 PM

Post #9380579

Yum GIta!

Oh no, ha ha, happy!

donnerville

donnerville
Damascus, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 10, 2013
1:53 PM

Post #9381194

Am I the last person in the entire country to learn to bake banana bread? Only tried it for the first time recently and it was a great success. I used this recipe, but added a big handful of walnuts: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R0e8ojL0vc

Not spicy though.

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 10, 2013
4:36 PM

Post #9381392

donner--NO! You are not.
I have NEVER made banana Bread--nor a Cheesecake--nor a Lasagna--and many more common dishes.
I LOVE all of the mentioned--but, I guess my cooking tends to be different...

Mostly I do not bake anything--because I would eat it all. I have such a sweet tooth.

Wight control by omission...:o) Gita

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 10, 2013
7:25 PM

Post #9381574

I have made banana bread , and one or two cheesecakes. I consider walnuts a must in banana bread.

tonight was royal farms chicken

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 11, 2013
11:23 AM

Post #9382099

COD! It's what's for dinner. < =D

Tonight's special is Cod á la Long John Silvers and "chips"... only, I'll be making this cod at home. We have the technology, muaahaahahaahaaa! < =)

Now, please stop teasing me with all the talk about walnuts in banana bread, I can't have nuts until the braces come off. < =(
Walnutbutter anyone? < =D

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 11, 2013
12:55 PM

Post #9382186

speedie do you deep fry at home? or how do you cook that ?

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 12, 2013
2:43 PM

Post #9382986

Naaawww, I just use my cast iron skillet. Funny thing is, I also have a cast iron kettle but had comletely forgotten all about it until DH and I were having a conversation about this recipe on the way to the grocery store last weekend, LOL! I'm gonna have to dig out that kettle, will make the job much cleaner and neater.

We ended up just sitting around talking last night until it was too late to get into that dinner, so we had a frozen pizza, heh heh. I shall whip out the kettle for the cod tonight. :)
HollyAnnS
Dover, PA
(Zone 6b)

January 12, 2013
3:46 PM

Post #9383028

I just threw together a quick penne pasta and meat balls since JR and Holly just came home from the family Christmas party starving, I'm not understanding how with all that food they came home hungry unless they were worn down from chewing. LOL I'm slowing down in the kitchen a bit. One new dish I made during the holidays was a creme of crab soup with corn, finished with a drizzle of sherry and white truffle oil. It complimented the crab imperial and grilled London broil quite nicely. I'll have to get around to writing up the recipe I sorta' borrowed it from Aqua in the OBX. The staff was so proud of it they spilled the beans by detailing the ingredients and prep. Ric
coleup
annapolis, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 12, 2013
4:35 PM

Post #9383070

Ric, on NPR radio this am there was a report about testing recipes for astronauts traveling to Mars (6mos) made out of shelf stable ingredients. One of the ingredients they'll be testing is truffle oil! There is a contest for the best recipies. Hint, hint, maybe "Ric's Outta This World Truffle and Sherry Soup" will be selected!

Not quite the same as having a star named after you but certainly note worthy.
http://blogs.laweekly.com/squidink/2012/02/nasa_seeks_volunteers_for_astr.php

Sorry, deadline is already passed,
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 13, 2013
7:52 AM

Post #9383529

Coleup -- that is really cool! Were the results of the "shelf-stable" contest posted anywhere?

All -- One of my favorite cookbooks of all time is Bernard Clayton's pastry book, published back in the early 1980s. http://www.amazon.com/Complete-Book-Pastry-Bernard-Clayton/dp/0671530747/ref=la_B001HCVFI6_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1358092141&sr=1-3 My paperback copy had been a pieces for a long time and is held together by a rubber band; I finally bought a hardback copy and transferred all my notes over. I hate to toss the paperback because I love it so much. Would anyone like it? I could bring it to the swap. If you like to make pies, turnover, etc., he is fabulous.

This message was edited Jan 13, 2013 10:52 AM

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 13, 2013
7:58 AM

Post #9383534

not me thanks. I threw out Joy of Cooking, 1987, cause it was all unglued. I didn't use it all that much, and considered that throwing it out (throwing out any book) was a matter of personal development.

I have Peg Bracken "I Hate to Cook" cookbook, amusing , but the recipes are pretty 'dated' to the seventies. I have not used that one for ages , that should go! but the title is cute.
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 13, 2013
8:08 AM

Post #9383543

We have the I Hate to Cook cookbook too! It was in my Mom's library. It think there are some good recipes in that one.
HollyAnnS
Dover, PA
(Zone 6b)

January 13, 2013
8:18 AM

Post #9383552

Anymore I don't bother with a book, I'll look up 3-4 good recipes on line and take the parts I like the best. That's the way I developed my Balti. style crab imperial, and it's passed with a number of natives. The one friend gave me his dad's old baking dishes, they are nearly perfect for a single portion, and I felt privileged to be gifted them. Ric

Thumbnail by HollyAnnS
Click the image for an enlarged view.

happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 13, 2013
9:49 AM

Post #9383650

Those are so cute! I can imagine the history behind them!

donnerville

donnerville
Damascus, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 13, 2013
10:04 AM

Post #9383661

I normally use recipes from http://www.foodnetwork.com, or http://www.allrecipes.com because people comment on the recipes that can be very informative.

The baking dishes are lovely, Holly.
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 13, 2013
11:21 AM

Post #9383719

I agree, Donnerville, I like sites that allow people to comment, and then that let you sort recipes by reader reviews. I usually go to http://www.epicurious.com or http://www.foodnetwork.com for that reason; I used to love http://www.recipezaar.com, but that turned into food.com and they stopped allowing people to sort recipes by reader reviews.

We had one of those dinners last night where we tried really hard but were not very happy with the outcome: We made beef teriyaki from a Cooks Illustrated recipe but it was a bit mushy (maybe we over-marinated it -- but I actually don't like marinades on steak -- this was to please my 18-year old who requested it), and sautéed baby bok choy from a Sam Sifton New York Times recipe (but it was nothing special -- we had such high hopes) and sautéed polenta (that was the best).

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 13, 2013
12:47 PM

Post #9383790

aw happy, it sounds like a good menu.

Cooks Illust. is usually a good source. My sister just sent some; she subscribes.
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 13, 2013
12:49 PM

Post #9383794

It may just be that DH and I are not especially fond of sweetening meat -- DD thought it was good.

donnerville

donnerville
Damascus, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 13, 2013
6:52 PM

Post #9384067

I have eaten Brussels sprouts only twice in my life. The first time I ate one and decided not to eat them ever again. Read an article about this veggie recently and thought I would give it another shot. I looked at some recipes online and cooked them this way:

Clean the sprouts and score a 1/2" deep cross in the stems but keep the sprouts whole.
Blanch them in boiling water for about 1 minute.
Mix with salt, pepper, a generous amount of olive oil, and several cloves of garlic.
Bake in 375F for 30 - 40 minutes.

I am now totally converted, and will cook them again. Because I was experimenting with only about a dozen sprouts, I used a small toaster oven. If you try it in a regular kitchen oven, just adjust cooking time and temperature as needed. The finished sprouts should have a lot of browning on the outside. The garlic is delicious too.

YUM!

happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 13, 2013
7:19 PM

Post #9384092

We love Brussels sprouts. Eat them all the time.

donnerville

donnerville
Damascus, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 13, 2013
7:30 PM

Post #9384099

Yes, Happy. They are good vegetables. I was quite encouraged by the result and will definitely eat them regularly. It may be a while before I try them boiled or steamed though ;-).

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 13, 2013
7:54 PM

Post #9384108

OHHH! But the smell when one is cooking Brussels Sprouts--or cabbage, for that matter...UGH..

I have yet to try to cook the Sprouts in some delicious way. Cut out a recipe from the paper--
of "Roasted Brussesl Sprouts and Winter Squash ". Sounds good. I may try it.

Took a picture for you.

Thumbnail by Gitagal   Thumbnail by Gitagal         
Click an image for an enlarged view.

coleup
annapolis, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 13, 2013
8:04 PM

Post #9384113

When I grew them in my garden, the pplants kept producing almost thru the whole winter! Yummy roasted veggies.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 14, 2013
3:18 AM

Post #9384212

Happy, that cookbook you mentioned.. maybe you could bring it to the seed swap for the "goodies table"? I bet you'd get some takers for sure!! =)

I did this dinner the other night, sorta by the seat of my pants, and MAN it turned out good!! It was a shrimp-and-linguini thing with broccoli in a spicey cream sauce, but I did the cream sauce a totally different way... with barely any "cream" at all! I started with a glop of butter and a bunch of whipped cream cheese (I don't measure anything, just eye it) and melted them together, first using a wooden spoon to stir constantly, then changing over to my whisk. When it was totally melted together and smooth, then I added about a scant quarter cup (VERY scant) of half-and-half, then the rest was fat-free low-sodium chicken broth, stirring constantly until it came to a 'moving' simmer. Turned it down, added a metric BUTT-TON of grated parmesan, and kept stirring until it was smooth. Turned it down further, then, in a skillet I heated olive oil and started sauteeing... first the chopped broccoli, then added diced chicken breast, then diced tomatoes, then diced onion, then some Cajun spice blend and a couple dashes of Cayenne, a pinch of red pepper flakes and some chopped fresh parsley. The last 2 minutes, I added bunch of minced garlic and the pre-cooked deveined chopped shrimp (jumbo shrimp cut into quarters) ... just long enough to heat through. Meanwhile the pasta was cooking. Drained the pasta, dumped it back into the pot, added the sauteed veggie/meat combo to it and stirred, then added the sauce and stirred.. served with a garden salad and warmed Italian bread. Yummmmm! =)

Note: when sauteeing; each new addition to the skillet gets cooked about HALFWAY through before the new item gets added, that way nothing is over-cooked.

This was just a random thought of a dinner and I'm really happy with how it turned out.
Jan23
Salem Cnty, NJ
(Zone 7b)

January 14, 2013
4:48 AM

Post #9384256

That does sound yummy! Also glad to know there is a new measurement out there. A metric BUTT-TON. I cracked up.

Leftovers tonight.

ROSES_R_RED

ROSES_R_RED
Mount Bethel, PA
(Zone 6a)

January 15, 2013
3:56 AM

Post #9385552

Just want to mention that I get some great recipes online also. I think that the recipes from "Cookscountry.com" are fantastic. On their TV show they talk about how they try several different versions before they finally come up with the BEST. Yesterday they had a pecan pie that was to die for!!! Hints about the perfect crust (temperature before going in, when to come out, how long to stay out before refrigerating, etc. The substitutiion of brown sugar, maple syrup and molasses instead of some of the other ordinary ingredients also seemed to work out well. I was smelling it and tasting it with them!!

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 15, 2013
4:52 AM

Post #9385580

Cooks Illustrated , Cooks Country and America's Test Kitchen, are all associated, and great for getting the details right.

Cooks Country magazine seems to focus a bit towards the everyday recipe, or maybe its just the format is more colorful and commercial looking where Cooks Illus. is black and white. I've learned a lot from both. America's Test Kitchen was on tv.

No exciting recipes from this kitchen today. Last night was burritos. Working till 5 pm means not much desire to work in the kitchen for dinner. I do not know how people work full time and eat quality food.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 15, 2013
2:30 PM

Post #9386310

We're doing a pizza for dinner... DH brought home a gift from a co-worker, a pizza from Papa Murphy's. Don't we have someone here from around the Frederick area? Anyone familiar with Papa Murphy's pizza? This will be our first time trying it, sure hope it's good! The good news is, after painting that gol'derned bathroom today, I don't have to cook, Wheeeee!! < =D
coleup
annapolis, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 15, 2013
4:19 PM

Post #9386444

Tonight I went to Sam's Club so picked up a rotisserie chicken. It is huge and almost didn't fit in the container. On a lark, I weighed it when I got home. Guess how much chicken I got for $4,88? A whopping 8 pounds!

Also got 2# of organic blueberries for $5.98.

lol anyone have a recipe for chicken ala blue berry?

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 15, 2013
4:44 PM

Post #9386473

Never heard f Papa Murphy's around these parts. Jill is Frederick. THat reminds me to get my free pizza offer from Ledo's Pizza...

Wow coleup, incredible!

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 15, 2013
6:22 PM

Post #9386569

Judy--I also bought a rotisserie chicken at Costco once.
It was the best I have ever eaten! Loved the spices (or rub)...

I only had a membership last year--wanted to let my daughter have a card.
Neither of us shopped there enough to warranty another year's membership.

I usually use up the 60 free days when BJ's sends them out--twice a year.
I am lucky if I shop ONCE in those 60 days! Hard to do as a single person.

My neighbor goes there often--I can either go with her--or ask her to pick up a chicken for me.

G.
coleup
annapolis, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 15, 2013
7:15 PM

Post #9386619

Last night my daughter and dp attended a cooking class at their food coop store. They learned to prepare Vegetarian Pate, Orange Glazed Spicy Tempeh and Massaged Kale Salad with Currants, Cost $5 a piece.
for members.

Sample classes coming up

A Mosaic of Flavor: Recipes from the Himalayas of Nepal and Bhutan
All over the world, people enjoy fermented foods as part of a healthy diet that preserves and enhances a population’s nutrition, in particular during the winter when fresh food is scarce. Umesh Acarya was born in Bhutan, raised in Nepal, and is now a resident of Winooski. He will prepare gundruk, the national dish of Nepal, which is most commonly made from leafy greens that have been fermented. Umesh will also make a variation of ema datsi, the yak cheese and chili national dish of Bhutan, which he will make with yogurt and chilies. Umesh is active in the Nepali community and an eloquent spokesperson for the cultural and historical forces that continue to shape the fates of Himalayan peoples. The Mosaic of Flavor is a series of classes coordinated in collaboration with the Vermont Refugee Resettlement Program.

This one on indoor gardening looks interesting, too.


Indoor Gardening Grow_Your_Own

This workshop will focus on growing a steady supply of fresh greens with only a cupboard and a windowsill. Ready to harvest in just 7-10 days, these greens are good in fresh salads, stir fries, and more! Peter Burke will demonstrate how to grow the bulk of your salad greens through the winter with sunflower, radish, buckwheat, pea and broccoli shoots used as examples. Everyone will take a planted tray home from class. Peter Burke writes and teaches about organic gardening at The Daily Gardener.

Any of you have a cooking class story?


speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 16, 2013
3:57 AM

Post #9386787

I don't exactly have a cooking class story,.. exactly, but I remember when I learned what French Onion Soup is (was in High School)... decided I just HAD to make it at home. I remember coming to a part where I had to, for some reason, pour out the broth, while straining the onions from the broth.. and FORGOT TO PUT A BOWL UNDER THE COLANDER!!! Alllll that lovely broth, right down the drain!! My goodness, what a Polish Moment that was!! < =/
Forever more, I am SUPER diligent about triple-checking everything I strain: Do I need to capture the liquids to save them!?!? Do I have a collection vessel under the colander for collecting the liquid!?!?!?!? AM I SURE!?!?!?!!?

ROSES_R_RED

ROSES_R_RED
Mount Bethel, PA
(Zone 6a)

January 16, 2013
4:25 AM

Post #9386812

Sometimes, when I've been cooking for an event all day and I'm tired, I do something like that, Speedie. That's when I know it's time to quit.

Tonight we'll have crab cakes, roasted asparagus, julienne carrots, mashed potatoes and salad. I'll be picking up my friend Millie as soon as some of the ice melts and she will be staying with me for a while. She gets tired early (chemo) so we decided that we'll go out for lunches instead of dinner.
coleup
annapolis, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 16, 2013
5:08 AM

Post #9386830

Oh Roses, You are the best. Enjoy your lunches out and your good friend in! Milli you are in my thoughts and prayers. Hoping you'll be on the mendenough to come with Roses to Jan's Plant Swap in May!

Speedie, my favorite oops food related story is also from high school. I read in a teen magazine that a raw egg was excellent for a hair treatment and left ones locks long, shiny and manageable. So I tried it, breaking it on my head and working in well all the way to the ends!When I went to rinse it out however, the water was so hot that it cooked the egg in my hair. Needless to say, no egg has come near my tresses since!

Leftover chicken for lunch and pork chops, green beans and sweet potato fries for din. Big pots of soup and stew for the weekend and the cold weather ahead.

donnerville

donnerville
Damascus, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 16, 2013
5:59 AM

Post #9386873

LOL! Hilarious story about the egg, Judy! As a matter of fact, I have just started to use eggs in my hair, although I do not break them directly on my head. Mix an egg yoke with enough olive oil to cover my hair. A drop of lavender is nice, but optional. Leave the oil mixture in the hair for at least 30 minutes or for as long as I don't have to go out.

My oops cooking experience was my first attempt at baking cookies. Most American girls start to bake cookies with moms at an early age, or if they don't do it at least they see how their moms do it. That wasn't the case with me though. Chinese people do not bake at home. Although cookies are sold in stores, people have no idea how cookies become cookies. I never saw an oven before coming to the US. I bought Pillsbury cookie dough from Safeway and followed the instructions on baking time and oven temperature etc. The only problem was that the instructions didn't say that I actually could NOT shape the cookies like cookies before baking. You can imagine how surprised I was when I open the oven and saw one big sheet of cookies. So cookie dough could expand during baking. Who knew! Of course I have since discovered cooking channels on TV :-).



This message was edited Jan 16, 2013 11:25 PM

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 16, 2013
6:28 AM

Post #9386895

OK!~ I will ask...

What is the benefit of egg in your hair? I imagine if you have dry hair it would "oil" it a bit??
What else?
My hair is fine and has no natural body. One reason I have always kept it short.
I use "volumizing" shampoos and good hair sprays to hold my "do's" in place.
Gita

donnerville

donnerville
Damascus, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 16, 2013
6:58 AM

Post #9386939

Gita, it makes my hair soft and shiny especially during the hot summer days. I am not sure if it helps the volume of fine hair, although the article below says it makes hair thicker.

http://www.livestrong.com/article/204020-olive-oil-egg-hair-treatment/


This message was edited Jan 16, 2013 11:27 PM

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 16, 2013
11:59 AM

Post #9387290

Yum Roses~~~!!! Hope Millie can fully enjoy that treat.

gee donner I never realized baking was as foreign to Chinese, as stir fry cooking is to me.

I can't think of my oops. It has GOT to be selective memory!

in highschool I watched my sister make biscotti from scratch- out of a book ,not something we had ever seen mom do. For a gift for a boyfriend's mom. She worked hard, make dough, bake loaves, slice, rebake...All was fine till the tray slipped and slices of toasting biscotti dumped all over the place. She laughed, and I still admire this quality in her and try to do the same with my new oopses. (My natural reaction is cussing a blue streak.)

Yeah there has to be some kind of soup in the works...in this chill.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 16, 2013
1:09 PM

Post #9387381

Ooooh, I forgot to mention (sorry about the subject change real quick here).. that Papa Murphy's pizza last night was soooooooooooo good!!! 5 thumbs-up! REAL fresh ingredients, crust not too thin, not too thick, really really scrumptious!!

OK, we now return you to your regularly scheduled programming...

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 16, 2013
7:22 PM

Post #9387718

Food- it's all good!

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 17, 2013
3:51 AM

Post #9387874

Mmmmm foooooood... I think I'll have cod for breakfast. =)

donnerville

donnerville
Damascus, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 17, 2013
8:30 PM

Post #9388778

Speaking of cooking, can anybody tell me the best way to preserve store-bought garlic? I wrap them in paper towels inside a zip bag and keep the bag in the refrigerator. They always end up getting moldy and sprouting at the same time. Maybe the answer is use them quickly? I cook only once a week. Maybe that is the problem :-(

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 18, 2013
7:10 AM

Post #9389032

Sally--

I keep mine right where I keep my onions--in a square wicker container that IKEA sells.
I have 2 of them. One for onions and one for potatoes. I know...I know...You are NOT supposed
to keep onions and potatoes near each other...the old ethylene gas thing--I presume.

They also sell "garlic keepers". Little clay pots with a lid and holes in the sides...
I do not know what the benefit of these is--but I suppose, clay being porous, it allows the container to "breathe'..

Or----are these containers to bake Garlic in???? Anyone???

http://www.amazon.com/Progressive-International-GARLIC-KEEPER--Terracotta/dp/B000JHKKP4/ref=sr_1_8?ie=UTF8&qid=1358521800&sr=8-8&keywords=garlic saver

donnerville

donnerville
Damascus, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 18, 2013
12:51 PM

Post #9389348

Gita, thanks for the link. I will experiment with a container with holes in it (http://reviews.crateandbarrel.com/7258/23232/pancake-warmer-reviews/reviews.htm) just to see if it can keep garlic longer.

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 18, 2013
3:15 PM

Post #9389523

My garlic has been in a basket atop the fridge. Dry and warm. The dry seems important but cool temp may be ok.
After all we planted them in cool damp dirt in the fall hoping they would sprout.

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 18, 2013
3:21 PM

Post #9389528

veegetable soup
bread and crackers
cheeses
Jan23
Salem Cnty, NJ
(Zone 7b)

January 18, 2013
4:18 PM

Post #9389571

Roasted butternut squash, sweet potatoes and pork tenderloin with applesauce.
coleup
annapolis, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 18, 2013
4:24 PM

Post #9389579

I'm going to post this link on 6 ways to store garlic over here and on the Garlic Lovers thread.

Garlic keeps best at 60 -65 degrees and moderate humidity. Darkness eliminates 'sprouting' Fresh garlic bulbs newly harvested will sprout more readily than properly dried and cured. An overturned clay pot inside a cool cupboard will work as a keeper/humidor.

http://www.rodale.com/how-store-garlic?page=0,0

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 18, 2013
4:40 PM

Post #9389599

YUM O Jan!
I'll be over , bringing sauerkraut...

donnerville

donnerville
Damascus, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 18, 2013
4:46 PM

Post #9389609

Judy, thank you for the link. Roasted garlic sounds yum!
Jan23
Salem Cnty, NJ
(Zone 7b)

January 18, 2013
4:47 PM

Post #9389610

OH, yeah, but, ummm... There are only 2 small pieces of pork left. If only I had known sooner I could have stopped Jeff from seconds. Heehee.

Hey, I will be down in Annapolis next week. Coming down late Thursday night til late Sat. Afternoon. Is Friday available for any of you? I'm not sure of the hours I need to babysit, though. Sure would like to see any of you.

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 18, 2013
8:00 PM

Post #9389781

hot DANG Friday is available some how someway!!! I never work Fridays.
Jan23
Salem Cnty, NJ
(Zone 7b)

January 19, 2013
5:52 AM

Post #9389936

Woot, woot!!
coleup
annapolis, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 19, 2013
6:53 AM

Post #9389974

I'm available before 2 on Fri. let me know where and i'll meet up...will be fun. Sat possible, too. Let us know what your sitting duties will be!
Jan23
Salem Cnty, NJ
(Zone 7b)

January 19, 2013
7:58 AM

Post #9390027

Yippee!! My guess is that I will be taking the girls to school whichnis up toward Sally's. Then the kindergartener will need to be picked up at noon. Guess I better ask them what is on my plate before I continue guessing. Heehee. Saturday is birthday celebration day. My other son's family will be coming down bringing my DH.

Pizza tonight with the grandies.

ROSES_R_RED

ROSES_R_RED
Mount Bethel, PA
(Zone 6a)

January 19, 2013
8:31 AM

Post #9390042

You sure are busy with family, Jan! Keeps you young, even though it knocks you out sometimes.

We will have breaded pork chops, home made apple sauce, broccoli rape, sweet potatoes and salad tonight. Millie goes home tomorrow and she said she misses us already. If she didn't have another chemo appt on Monday, she could stay longer. We'll be sure to bring her back when she feels up to it.
Jan23
Salem Cnty, NJ
(Zone 7b)

January 19, 2013
9:14 AM

Post #9390070

I hear you, roses, but I wouldn't have it any other way. Thankful I can help them out.
You, yourself are also one busy lady! Bless your friend, Millie. Will be praying for her on Monday.

ROSES_R_RED

ROSES_R_RED
Mount Bethel, PA
(Zone 6a)

January 19, 2013
9:32 AM

Post #9390088

Thanks so much, Jan. Prayers are really appreciated.

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 19, 2013
3:48 PM

Post #9390458

My son goes to school at 8 15 and Mark can take him that day. So I am free all morning.

Will be thinking of Millie, Monday, Teri. Winston Churchill said " When you're going through hell, keep going!"

aspenhill

aspenhill
Lucketts, VA
(Zone 7a)

January 19, 2013
8:53 PM

Post #9390827

I've been cooking a lot more lately than I have in the past. Tomorrow is grocery shopping day, so there wasn't much left in the fridge. I ended up making an onion, bacon, and cheddar cheese quiche with a pillsbury pie crust that was near the "best if used by" date. It was pretty tasty. In fact, I think I'll go heat up a leftover piece for a midnight snack. All this food talk has made me hungry - with the exception of brussel sprouts UGH, LOL! Only about half way thru reading all the new threads. Napped off and on today, so now I'm wide awake.

ROSES_R_RED

ROSES_R_RED
Mount Bethel, PA
(Zone 6a)

January 20, 2013
4:45 AM

Post #9390923

Neighbors came over to help fix the car, so I breaded and fried the huge package of pork chops that I had in the freezer. We had brussel sprouts that were sauteed with bacon and chopped onions. The men enjoyed the sprouts!!

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 20, 2013
8:01 AM

Post #9391065

Yum! Bacon and onions is a winner with about anything savory!

Made that chicken curry again- if it ain't broke...plus the 16yo assists and feels quite the chef at this one.

Nothing exciting and new here today. Blueberry muffins from Betty Crocker, Later= Burritos. Maybe make sausage sauce too, get a head start on the week.
coleup
annapolis, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 20, 2013
9:26 AM

Post #9391175

Ahhh. Just finished my third big bowl of Chicken Soup from the big pot I made yesterday.

Gosh I make good chicken soup! Or, perhaps it is impossible to make 'bad' chicken soup?

Onions (2), chicken on the bone, simmer and skim if foamy, add chunks of carrots and celery (1 bag, 1 bunch). Throw in as much celery leaf as possible and chopped garlic towards the end, I also usually add a big can of green beans. 8 - 10 cups water. We add salt to individual bowls. The second day I remove as much solidified fat as I can before reheating.
The big chunks of organic carrots were so flavorful. If I grew carrots, I would definitely grow what ever variety they were,

And, because they needed to be used, 7 cloves of gourmet garlic I didn't plant. (Remove any green growth as it is bitter) There is a bit of heat in the after taste. Nice.

When I make this in a pressure cooker, all oof the flavors stay so bright. that it doesn't really become leftovers for four or five days and I do not tire of eating it, and can't wait to make the next big pot in a week or two. Same with my big pots of chili, I don't tire of the taste meal after meal. They please me (but not necessarily every one ) Guess they are like my 'bacon'! always a good taste to look forward to having.

Terri, once you have good brusel sprouts you won't say ugh, but yum!

aspenhill

aspenhill
Lucketts, VA
(Zone 7a)

January 20, 2013
10:08 AM

Post #9391240

MMMM chicken soup, chili, chicken curry, breaded pork chops, muffins - all sounds great. I'm cooking good 'ol fashioned meat loaf and scalloped potatoes for tonight. I don't think anyone will ever convince me on brussel sprouts LOL...

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 20, 2013
10:39 AM

Post #9391282

mmmm meatloaf!

The chicken soup sounds awesome. I add some turmeric to mine.

We're finishing a quick veg soup which was greatly aided by good beef soup base. Beef chunks barely simmered with canned tomato, then two bags of frozen soup mix veg, plenty of base, some dehydrated minced onion, garlic powder, some tomato paste more water , ditalini pasta... labor saving.

ROSES_R_RED

ROSES_R_RED
Mount Bethel, PA
(Zone 6a)

January 20, 2013
1:51 PM

Post #9391494

Don't like steamed or boiled Brussel Sprouts much, but the ones sauteed in butter and bacon fat are a whole other story. Watching the football games today, so just boiling some ravioli (lobster ravioli from BJ's) and a nice big salad with some semolina bread to dip in everything.
Jan23
Salem Cnty, NJ
(Zone 7b)

January 20, 2013
2:12 PM

Post #9391510

Okay, Sally. I'll let you and coleup know as soon as I find out what is happening.

Made a bean bake in the crockpot this morning before church. Ground beef, some bacon, onions all sautéed and into the pool cans of whatever beans you like(garbanzos, kidney beans, black beans, white beans and baked beans ) drain the juices except for the baked beans. A can of diced tomatoes, and then salsa or whatever to season. Made rice when I got home and served the bean stuff over it with some shredded cheese.

I could do leftovers for days. Sometimes things are even better a day later.

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 20, 2013
5:54 PM

Post #9391749

Jan Judy et al--I'm happy to hostess for the morning (no eggs Judy) if thats what fits our schedules best. (between Jan's AM kid duties)


I'm practically THRILLED when the bulk of dinner is reheating home cooked food! Less to wash up too! You would think I could get better at planning for that...



Jan23
Salem Cnty, NJ
(Zone 7b)

January 21, 2013
6:04 AM

Post #9392116

Thanks, Sally. I'll contact the kids today and firm up plans.


Oh, fewer pots to wash is wonderful. Going out for dinner tonight. Hibachi Grill Buffet. Friends picking us up at 4

ROSES_R_RED

ROSES_R_RED
Mount Bethel, PA
(Zone 6a)

January 21, 2013
9:44 AM

Post #9392374

We went to a Hibachi Grill Buffet a few weeks ago. Friends introduced us to it and it was really good.
coleup
annapolis, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 21, 2013
10:53 AM

Post #9392458

Gracious offer for gathering sallyg. Thanks.

Chicken soup as equally compelling today. Three more bowls consumed with gusto. Is my pot of soup now half full or half empty?

Not too late for a New Year's wish that all of our food and meals be deeply nourishing to body and soul and shared when ever possible, in humble joy, with family, friends, and strangers not yet become friends or family by birth or choice.

Breaking bread together is a good thing.
Jan23
Salem Cnty, NJ
(Zone 7b)

January 21, 2013
12:13 PM

Post #9392538

Well said, coleup!!

I would say your pot is never-ending!

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 21, 2013
1:04 PM

Post #9392612

coleup--

I love chicken soup as well. My problem, when I make it, or any other soup, I put too many things in it.
I DO believe that chicken soup needs to be "pure"...clear yellow and full of flavor.
That doesn't mean mine always is...
What i do usually add is some Poultry Seasoning just to flesh out the flavor. Maybe some basil.
If I can't get the flavor 'just so"--I may also add a few Chicken cubes.

Some questions for you, Judy--about your chicken soup: It is so great you are excited about how your soup tastes.

--Do you use a whole chicken? You said "chicken on the bone"...Or--Do you use chicken parts? Which?
--Do you add, on purpose, chicken "junk" (necks, wings, etc) pieces for the collagen content?
-How big a pot do you make this in? You said you add 8-10 cups of water. No home-made broth?
That is not a very big pot. But--I bet your soup is very concentrated and therefore so delicious.
My pot is 21 qt. I usually make it to at least 3/4 full. Maybe that is too much quantity and all the flavors are diluted?
--What herbs and spices and seasonings do you use?
--You said "one bag of carrots"--is that a 1lb. bag? and a whole pack of celery!!!! Really??????!!!!!
--Do you think canned green beans are better than fresh? Justmore convenient? I try to stay away from canned stuff!...
--Do you add egg noodles or rice to your soup at he end?

Thanks...

Hey, you all--
I read this every day but have very little to contribute--as i do not cook a dinner very often.
I usually grab this or that--whatever is in the fridge that needs to be eaten.
Well--actually--I seldom eat a dinner----I eat breakfast and then graze the rest of the day.
Munch along--all day long...Not necessarily junk food--just stuff I have.

Of course--I have that freezer full of cooked stuff. Whenever I can I try to grab something out of it--thaw it and cook it
and eat that. Lately, I am trying to eat up whatever kind of soups from my freezer for breakfast w/ a piece of bread.

Gita


sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 21, 2013
1:21 PM

Post #9392639

Frozen cut green beans have that sort of rubbery texture. I never noticed until Paula Deen pointed it out. So I use canned for cut, but french style for frozen to distract from that rubbery thing.
None comes close to fresh though. And the sauteed beans at Chef Lin- could eat a whole plateful and probably will.

I figure this thread is as much about ideas on what to eat, as it is any given recipe or dinner. Or any other food related talk. Grazing and snacking is much more like how humans have eaten for thousands of years, I think. Dang, making me hungry for a snack...
coleup
annapolis, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 21, 2013
5:54 PM

Post #9392891

Gita asks about chicken soup and coleup responds:

I use a whole chicken which I have roasted and eaten several meals from. ( In this case it started as a Sam's club rotisserie almost 8 pounder! My preference is a free range bird or one without all those antibioics/hormones added and then I do use all of the 'junk' as that and the bones is where all of the flavor and goodness is. I remove the meat that is left and and chunk it and add after I cook the bones and onions down. This takes about twelve minutes in my pressure cooker and most of the bones literally fall apart and dissolve. Those that don't are usually soft enough to be relished by my cats.

Next, I add meat, carrot chunks, celery chunks and water, and bring back up to pressure. I do a quick cool down, open lid and add garlic and all the celery leaves, stir and it is ready to eat. Add a can of green beans, too. A full pound of carrots and 1/2 to full bunch of celery seems right for me.

That's it, I do not add any seasoning or salt. (My Dad always used poultry seasoning!) However, when I roast a bird, I use a single packet of Lipton Onion soup as a rub so I am sure that is seasoning enough.

Canned green beans are fine by me as I but the lined cans without added salt. I usually don't add rice or noodles but on third or forth day if I have leftover oven fried potatoes or sweet potatoes, I will add those. Potatoes thicken and change texture of soup. Sometimes I enjoy a can of Niblets corn, too, I do both skin and no skin and am fairly meticulous about skimming off fat.

Not easy to be a food writer! Note that the first electric stove our family had had one back burner which was called a deepwell cooker which was like a stock pot/slow cooker built in to the surface of the stove.
Wood and coal cookstoves were always on in winter so there was always a pot of something working on them and this was electrics nod to that. We put our vegetable scraps, peelings, and leftovers in along with bones and meat scraps, etc and with the addition of water, out came "soup". Kinda like Jan's "endless pot" idea! Each day, the "soup" like life, was different.

We didn't really make soup as soup was one of the inevitable stages or forms of the food in our family.

Thumbnail by coleup
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 21, 2013
6:53 PM

Post #9392965

Judy--

AHHH---You have a pressure cooker! makes things cook fast--doesn't it.
I just simmer away for 203 hours in a pot.

How old is the stove in the picture? What is under the right side--as it has no burners?
Is that the oven?

Is this what you still use? Gita
coleup
annapolis, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 21, 2013
8:11 PM

Post #9393063

Simmering works, too. Yes, pressure cooker is fast, but for me the best difference is that the veggies don't go limp and soggy. I don't know about any of you all, but getting my stove to "simmer" is very difficult and in addition to stirring more often than I'd like, I have to keep adjusting the burner setting, too. Of course could just be me, too.

The pic above of the stove with the deepwell cooker is from late 40s early 50s. and served our family well for 30 plus years. What appears to be a double oven on ours was storage space. although on pricier models there were double ovens and bottom drawers for broiling or warming.

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 25, 2013
5:14 AM

Post #9396935

bean soup today
coleup
annapolis, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 25, 2013
5:40 AM

Post #9396982

Last bowl of chicken soup today. Planing to bake a ham which will become split pea soup.

What is your favorite bean (or beans) for soup?

PS How's your tiling coming Sally?

This message was edited Jan 25, 2013 8:41 AM

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 25, 2013
6:40 AM

Post #9397061

Judy--
I LOVE both Bean soup and Split Pea soup and I make both (about once a year) and they are excellent.
I don't make it more often as I would not have the space in my freezer for 12 new bowls of soup to freeze.
I just use plain kidney beans--but also a hefty ham bone--some smoked Hocks and also diced ham.

For Pea soup--pretty much the same. For my 21qt. pot--I use 3 packages of split peas (makes a really thick soup)
and I also add some grated carrots. The usual spices and diced potatoes at the end.

JUDY! You have to make my Sour Kraut Soup!!! A soup made in heaven for cold weather...
Many people on DG, over the years, have gotten addicted to this soup once they made it.

My quantity is pretty large--but you can cut back on the amounts. In soups--who measures?
I guarantee you will love it!
Don't mind the length of all the instructions--it is just to help out first-timers.
***********************************

Gita’s Latvian Sauerkraut Soup

Note: This is delicious, full-bodied, cool weather soup. No actual
measurements are given. Only guidelines. Good soups are not based on a
prescribed formulas. If it seems right to you….go for it!
(this recipe is for a pot of approx. 21 qts. capacity)

In a large stockpot put:
A big, meaty ham bone (smoked is best), a 2 lb (plus or minus) piece of fresh pork of some kind (picnic, country spare ribs, fresh ham, thick pork chops etc.) and, for extra flavor, some smoked ham hocks.
These have a lot of fat (which can be removed once Soup is cold) but also add a lot of flavor.
Anything with bone-in is good. It adds body to the soup.

Cover meat with cold water and bring to a boil. Turn down fire and simmer, skimming off foam as it surfaces.
Let simmer for about an hour.
**Do not add any of the seasonings until all the “foaming” has stopped, or you will be skimming off the seasonings as well.

Next:
add 1 deli-pack (or 1 lg. Can—32oz) of Sauerkraut, 1 med. head of green cabbage, cut with a knife in a coarse shred, 2-3 ribs of celery (sliced), 2-3 med. onions (coarsely chopped), 1Tbs. Caraway seed, about a tsp. full of whole peppercorns, (or fresh ground black pepper to taste), 2-3 Bay leaves, fresh chopped parsley (1/2c. or so), fresh chopped dill (stems and all-maybe a 1/3 cup), and 1-2 coarsely shredded carrots.

Note:
This soup can have either barley (a ½ cup or so dry) or diced potatoes (3 or 4 med.—thick-diced) added for a fuller body. If you choose barley, add it now, as barley takes long while to cook until it is tender! If you choose potatoes, add them in the last half hour of cooking the soup, or they will turn to “mush”.

Add enough water (or saved broths—see note below) to almost fill the pot. Bring all back to a boil. Lower fire way down, and simmer the soup for a good 2 hours, stirring occasionally. Meat needs to be “falling off the bones” done.

At this point, using a slotted spoon, fish out ALL meats and bones to a large platter. Keep soup simmering ….(you can now add the potatoes).
Cut away all edible meat in bite-sized pieces. scrape off all underlying fat from the Hocks and discard, along with all other unnecessary fat. Sliver smoked skin from the hocks in thin strips—if you want to…or toss it! ***(Save bones for your favorite dog!).

Return cut-up meat to the soup and stir well to distribute all. Simmer another 15-20 minutes, or so.
The soup is now basically done. Let it rest a bit and skim off any obvious fat layer--then serve it with GOOD buttered bread of your choice—Rye bread and butter really complement this Soup.
Gets better and better when reheated…as all soups do!

Can be frozen in serving size bowls or containers, such as a margarine bowls. Microwave to re-heat and serve.
***This, and all soups, freeze VERY WELL and last for a very long time in the freezer without losing flavor. Years! Literally!!!

Frugality note:
You can save (and freeze) any liquids/broths from other “cookings” of veggies, potatoes, and meats and then add them to the soup. Why pour it down the drain???

Lots of success with this! You will love this soup! Everyone has-- that has tasted it. I can almost guarantee it!!!

Gita (410-256-2709) –in case you run into problems……just call!


coleup
annapolis, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 25, 2013
7:13 AM

Post #9397095

Thanks Gita!
Putting a few more items on my shopping list just in case I feel creative with my ham bone and leftovers. I would have forgotten caraway seed (yum) without your nudge. Wasn't it Paul who was going to make this last year?

Are you sure you want your number out there in cyberspace for all to see? I suppose if someone did steal your idntity we'd still know who you are!

Judy

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 25, 2013
7:56 AM

Post #9397127

Well--Good point, Judy. I may just remove my phone # from the recipe.
I think, initially, I meant it to go to all my local pals here.
So far--no one from any states has called me anyway.

There is someone far away who tried this soup and is now so hooked on it that
she makes it every year. I believe some people have used smoked Turkey legs
instead of the smoked ham--less fat--BUT--also less flavor...maybe???
Fat=flavor to me. You can always skim it off if you don't want it.

Let me know if you like it!
BTW--shop for your spices at target--they have an amazing selection, in big bottles under their own name.
I could not believe the prices--compared to McCormics or Spice Islands!
Target--like $5.99 and $6.99 for most. Some higher.
What blew me away was a bottle of Cardamom for $6.99!!!!
Under the brand names--you would pay $16-$18 for a container half that size.

Gita

tapla

tapla
Bay City, MI
(Zone 6a)

January 25, 2013
11:04 AM

Post #9397254

We serve these often for family gatherings and our monthly charades/card parties. For about $10-12, you can buy a big box of (50) Nacho Cheese Doritos (or Fritos) in around a 1 oz pkg. They're perfect for this. You could prolly skip the spices & add a taco seasoning mix, but ... ;-)

Walkabout Tacos

2 lbs lean ground beef
1 pint salsa
2 med onions, chopped (baseball sized)
2 toes minced garlic
3 tbs ground no/low chilies
1 tsp ground cumin
1 tsp black pepper
1/3 tsp oregano or Mexican oregano
salt to taste and something for some heat if you like

20 small bags of Doritos
cheese
sour cream
refried beans (warm)
hot sauce

Garnishes - any/all of:
chopped tomato
chopped g onion
chopped g pepper
sliced black olives
whatever you like

In a heavy sauce pan over high heat, start meat to browning. When it's lost most of it's pink, add onion, garlic, and spices. Cook on high until most of the liquid has evaporated (If you hold the salt, there will be less liquid to evaporate). Add the salsa & bring to a simmer for about 20 minutes to drive some of the salsa liquid off. Allow to cool enough that you can hold a hand on side of pan.

Cut a thin strip off 1 side off each bag of Doritos (not the top). Squeeze bag to crush. Ladle a scoop of the meat mixture over the Doritos, then add what you choose of the remaining ingredients & enjoy.

At Halloween we called these body bag tacos. They're always a big hit - surprisingly good.

Al




tapla

tapla
Bay City, MI
(Zone 6a)

January 25, 2013
11:15 AM

Post #9397266

The bananas for this recipe should be VERY ripe & soft - dark streaks on the skins

So Easy Banana Nut Muffins

2 boxes Jiffy Banana Nut Muffin Mix
1-2 cups chopped walnuts
3 very ripe bananas (medium size), mashed thoroughly
3 medium eggs, beaten
1 tbsp brown sugar (packed)
1 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp vanilla extract

Preheat to 375*
Combine/mix bananas, eggs, sugar, and vanilla. Add remaining ingredients & mix lightly until nuts are evenly dispersed - a few lumps are ok. Ladle into 12 muffin cups & bake about 22 minutes. Serve warm or at room temp - frost if you like after they cool.

Al

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 25, 2013
1:31 PM

Post #9397450

Yum and yum!
Around here its called taco in a bag- the side cut is a design advancement !

ALDI has Great Northern so thats what my bean soup has. Sometimes I buy other pretty beans. Black beans make the soup black (duh) so be forewarned.

Once you have your spice jars, and need several at once refilled, try Penzey's. mail order/ website. THey sell amounts in bags and great prices. Normal quantities or bigger quantities. Also sell in little jars and bottle s like the store. Curry powder for example, uses couple TB per meal so good to get that in bigger quantity.

tapla

tapla
Bay City, MI
(Zone 6a)

January 25, 2013
2:47 PM

Post #9397495

I get all my spices from Penzy's. Great quality and a small fraction of the price of store bought, even after you add shipping in. I wouldn't be w/o their premium cinnamons, double vanilla extract, and their Cajun seasoning. Oink! I do wish though, that they still sold powdered bay leaf. I have to buy that from The Spice House. Itsa lot more convenient than the leaves, and more potent, too.

Lol - I usually buy more than I need because the added amount is so cheap, then go to my brother's and sister's and dump out their 10 year old stuff and replace it with fresh. ;-)

Al

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 25, 2013
8:02 PM

Post #9397791

ha ha good move Al!

Had cornbread with our bean soup
Recipe: Buy Jiffy mix and make it.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 26, 2013
5:40 AM

Post #9397935

I love those Jiffy mixes!! Hmmmm, those banana nut muffins sound really yummy, I'm going to have to try those, thanks! (Sans nuts, of course) ;)
VA_Wild_Rose
Fredericksburg, VA
(Zone 7a)

January 26, 2013
5:34 PM

Post #9398548

Mexican Chicken

We use this for nachos, tacos, burritos, and rice bowls.

2 large packages of skinless boneless chicken thighs (usually 8-10 thighs per pkg)
1 sweet onion, sliced
1 green pepper, sliced
1 can diced tomatoes with green chilies
1 jar chunky salsa
1 envelope taco seasoning

Place sliced onion in bottom of a large crockpot. Layer one package of the chicken thighs on the sliced onions. I sprinkle with garlic powder and pepper. Sprinkle half of the envelope of taco seasoning on the chicken. Pour the can of diced tomatoes on top. Layer the other package of chicken thighs next. Sprinkle with garlic powder, pepper, and other half of taco seasoning. Pour the jar of salsa on top. Place the sliced green peppers on last. Cover and cook on high for six hours.

Yum, and easy!
Karen

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 26, 2013
6:47 PM

Post #9398612

Thank you Karen! So glad to have a good crockpot chicken recipe!

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 27, 2013
4:49 AM

Post #9398829

Karen, that looks wonderful, thank you for sharing it! Mexican food is my all-time favourite food, I can eat it 3 meals a day every day... Americanized, Authentic, doesn't matter, I LOVE it!!!

Hmmmm... that reminds me... I've got "Some sort of Cod" on the menu for tonight; maybe I'll make fish tacos! < =D

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 27, 2013
7:55 AM

Post #9398980

I had some sort of whiting last week. Not familiar whiting, but it was wild caught in Canada so I bought it for the price and safety. It was a mild white fish shaped in long thin filets. Tasted fine but I tried to fry it and most of the breading came off in the skillet. Any help on oven frying filets?

tapla

tapla
Bay City, MI
(Zone 6a)

January 27, 2013
10:52 AM

Post #9399135

Pizzaghetti


1 lb angel hair pasta

2 15 oz cans pizza sauce (or make your own)

1 can black beans, drained/rinsed (optional)

2 cups milk

1 cup grated Parmesan cheese

2-4 cups grated mozzarella

3 eggs

1 tsp Italian seasoning

1 tsp basil

1/2 tsp garlic salt or to taste

3 bay leaves or 1/2 tsp powdered bay leaf

pepperoni + favorite pizza toppings (mushrooms, onions, g pepper, olives for me)


Bring 6 qts lightly salted water + bay leaf to rolling boil. Add pasta & return to boil, cook 2/3 the time suggested while oven preheats to 350*, stirring pasta occasionally. Drain pasta & rinse with cold water/drain well/remove leaves. Beat eggs & milk together, then add Parmesan and seasonings. Add beans, mix into the pasta, pour mixture into a greased 10x14 baking dish. Arrange so pasta mixture is flat. Pour sauce evenly over the pasta - don't mix it in. Top with mozzarella, then pepperoni, then the pizza toppings. Cover with aluminum foil and bake until the pasta is set (45 - 60 minutes). Let it rest 5 minutes covered with the original foil, then cut in squares & serve with a spatula. I usually uncover for the last 15-20 minutes baking time. Oink!

Al

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 27, 2013
10:57 AM

Post #9399140

sounds great!

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 27, 2013
2:18 PM

Post #9399293

That's a really cool recipe idea Al. I'm often wondering "what ELSE could I do with pasta other than the same ol' boring white sauce or red sauce?". COOL!!

Sally, I keep breading on my cod pretty well this way: (this is the only white fillet fish I use, by the way, so I'm not sure how well it would work on any others). First, when I pull it out of the freezer, I pour milk into the bag for it to soak in while defrosting. (the milk "eases" the fishy smell and taste a bit). I use a Pyrex baking pan to oven fry it. I prepare the Pyrex pan by pouring olive oil into the pan AND putting a few pats of butter into it, then put it into the pre-heated oven for a few minutes until the butter is JUST melted. Meanwhile, I dry the fish on paper towels and season and pat bread crumbs to one side. Lay the breaded side down on the pan, then season and lightly sprinkle the other side (while it's lying in the pan). I sit a few more pats of butter on top of the breading, then squeeze some lemon juice on top of that (depending on what seasoning I'm using), then bake it at 360* for about 20-25 minutes. I never lose my breading this way.

And yes, I just about always bake it the same way, because we always get our cod from the same place, and they are just about ALWAYS the same hugeness and thickness. =)

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 27, 2013
4:25 PM

Post #9399410

thanks speedie!!!!!

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 28, 2013
3:04 AM

Post #9399760

You're very welcome! =)

All that being said, I did my cod last night for "tacos"... it was not a hit. =( I guess DH does not see Cod + Mexican seasonings + Tortillas as = yummy. =/ Oh well, live and learn.

Me? I'll eat cod ANY way other than raw and looking at me asking me why I want to eat it.

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 28, 2013
6:47 AM

Post #9399911

I had fish tacos once, I loved em, the whole crunchy exterior, soft inside, crispy lettuce, crunchy shell... But I don't recall that they were taco seasoned. I love good batter fried fish filets and fish sandwiches.

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 28, 2013
12:04 PM

Post #9400317

Catfish is the best--battered and fried! Love the taste and the nice, fatty meat.
I often buy the Catfish Nuggets--odds and ends. Easier to fry.

I usually dip it in seasoned flour and then in egg and then fry it on some OO and butter
with a squirt of lemon over all. Yummm...

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 28, 2013
1:12 PM

Post #9400387

Mmmmmmm we love catfish too!! Darn that sounds good!! Gita, what is OO? Olive Oil?

Sally, we didn't have the regular hard crunchy taco shells, we had soft flour tortillas... I could have (and probably should have) at least made those type for DH, but I can't eat the hard crunchy ones with my braces.

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 28, 2013
1:21 PM

Post #9400395

catfish is good!
Jan23
Salem Cnty, NJ
(Zone 7b)

January 28, 2013
3:31 PM

Post #9400517

Ditto!!!

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 28, 2013
3:38 PM

Post #9400528

Speedie--

Yes! OO =Olive Oil.
Rachel Ray may have started this abbreviation--she always said...add some EVOO...(extra virgin).

I also love Flounder--fried the same way...but Rockfish rules. WHO can even get fresh Rockfish?
Unless you go fishing.

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 28, 2013
3:40 PM

Post #9400530

I think you can get rockfish at specialty places. THeres a seafood, carry out and fresh, place in Severna Park, but oh my $$$$$
coleup
annapolis, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 28, 2013
4:25 PM

Post #9400564

One of my paper route customers is an avid fisher and he tips me with fresh caught rockfish several times a season!

I like to bake them stuffed with mashed potatoes. Good thing I remember how to clean fish! Could use a little refresher on fileting though.

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 28, 2013
4:46 PM

Post #9400584

Judy--NOT crab meat????

That is one dish I would order in a blink of an eye--Rockfish stuffer with crab imperial.

Mashed taters on the side--NOT inside...:o) G.

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 28, 2013
5:00 PM

Post #9400594

ooh coleup- good going there!! Fish and potatos is classic.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 29, 2013
2:23 AM

Post #9400926

Oh Judy, that customer of yours is a GEM!!!!!! Wow, what a wonderful "tip"!!! Yummm, that sounds delicious too... now I'm hungry. < =/

(of course, I wouldn't say 'no' to having it Gita's way either). heeheeheee

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 29, 2013
7:03 AM

Post #9401123

Hey, ALL!

In this past Sunday's "Parade" newspaper insert Emerill Lagasse (he's on the cover) has a killer recipe for
Oriental Chicken Wings--based on 5lbs. of wings. Gumbo as well...It is all about Superbowl food.
If you haven't tossed it yet--cut these recipes out. I will.

Next time my Safeway clearance meat section has 4.5lb. trays of chicken wings for $3 plus or minus--
I a am getting two of them and cooking these up.
Stopped in yesterday--and there were piles of steaks. 2 packs of boneless, 1" thick steaks for $5-$6.
I did not buy any this time..Have NO room in my freezers!!!!
Love my Safeway--but I have to stop buying steaks--I now have enough in my freezer to feed an army.
And--I don't even grill...Always take them to my daughter's. Her hubby lives to grill.
Of course--they have to first invite me to dinner...come warmer weather...and there i will come with all the steaks,
the Shrimp (also plenty in my freezer) and a bottle of wine.

Not sure id all Safeways are so good at clearancing their almost "sell-by-date" meats. Always something great at mine.

Gita

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 29, 2013
12:20 PM

Post #9401432

Hmmm, I think I'll pack up my barbecue and head over to Gita's to raid her freezer. =) Heck, I've been known to shovel a path through the snow to my barbecue out on the deck, I'll cook out in ANY weather, don't matter to me. :) (the fire still gets just as hot if the lid is closed, right?) heeheeheee

At this ol' house tonight, there'll be some white chilli spicin' up the kitchen, with corn bread muffins on the side. A couple cans of Great Northern beans will be thrown into the pot, along with those chicken thighs.. Mmmmm, my tummy is rumbling just thinking about it. =)
Jan23
Salem Cnty, NJ
(Zone 7b)

January 29, 2013
1:40 PM

Post #9401612

Sautéed up some veggies, cut up some leftover chicken, mixed in some spag. Sauce served over pasta.

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 29, 2013
3:35 PM

Post #9401744

Turkey tenderloins (similar to how you've seen the small pork tenderloins in shrink wrap) baked, stove top stuffing, cauliflower, coleslaw, applesauce. Work next two nights so I don't cook.

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 29, 2013
4:06 PM

Post #9401795

Well--I can, actually, say I grubbed something up and had dinner.

Small potato thinly diced, fried up with some onion in some bacon fat.
Added to same pan 2 Natty Boh sausages (sale at Safeway clearance --69 cents a pack)-
and pickled beets on the side.

Well--I like this kind of food!!!! Gita

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 29, 2013
4:22 PM

Post #9401830

Question- when I make bacon, can I save the bacon fat drippings in a container in the refrigerator, INDEFINITELY like lard, or does it go bad ?

If I skim off extra chicken fat from making broth- same question. Does it last? And what would you use it on?

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 29, 2013
6:05 PM

Post #9401940

Sally--

I can tell you that bacon fat lasts "forever" in the fridge. So does rendered marrow.

Funny--we think alike-----I also skimmed the congealed fat off the top of my Chicken broth I made--
BUT--I have it in my freezer...Just being safe! Being that broth is seasoned with veggies and herbs--
this kind of Chicken fat adds flavor to many things.

I have also rendered beef marrow and have that in my fridge as well--lasts just like bacon fat.
Also---I have rendered all the lumps of Chicken fat you find near the rear end...ahem...and keep that in my freezer,
even though it is pure fat and will hold up just in your fridge.

Great to fry taters, Lima beans, fried eggs (bacon)...beef strips or cubes (marrow)...Veggies, pasta,green beans...(chicken).
Whatever floats your boat.

There is NO limit to us frugal folks. Gita

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 29, 2013
7:53 PM

Post #9402080

thanks Gita!
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 30, 2013
1:35 PM

Post #9402802

There's a Penzey's near me if anyone wants me to pick up fresh spices for them before a swap...

tapla

tapla
Bay City, MI
(Zone 6a)

January 30, 2013
3:27 PM

Post #9402954

Reminds me of a childhood memory. My grandparents (FOB from Germany) used to leave a cup of lard or bacon grease on the range top. They spread it on toast and added it to their coffee!

I keep a small tub of bacon grease around & use it occasionally for some Mexican dishes that don't require high frying temps. It keeps indefinitely.

Al

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 30, 2013
3:34 PM

Post #9402963

Al,

I too have a similar memory.
We used to dice up pork fat/bacon/pork belly (whatever) and fry it up.
Then let the whole thing cool--and spread it on rye bread. Delish!

Of course--times were tough--and everyone made the best of anything they had.
Gita
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 30, 2013
5:16 PM

Post #9403099

Dinner for me tonight? 6 rice cakes and 2 bananas. Our fridge is pretty bare. There are salad makings but I have a lot of office work to do, and don't have time (but note how I am stalling by writing these words!)

It's funny how things change. My mother had a fridge, but nonetheless there were lots of things she didn't refrigerate. Roasted meat was seldom put in the fridge overnight, for example. In hindsight, it makes me cringe a bit to think of it.

I didn't know that bacon grease would keep a long time. Uncooked bacon doesn't, so I always tossed the bacon grease after a week or so...

I try to remember to freeze it, but don't always.

We don't cook bacon as much any more because of the nitrates.

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 30, 2013
5:51 PM

Post #9403165

Happy--

I like the 'dry", bulk bacon much better. You can buy it by the pound at your deli counter (where all the lunch meats are)
It is out in the open--bulk. The places that carry "Applewood Bacon"-----I like that the best.
I know Safeway does.

SO? Is the bulk bacon also preserved--or is it "natural"...It does not have that slimy fluid on it.
I always think of that stuff as proof of nitrates..silly, maybe. Anyone know?

And--YES! bacon fat will keep in the fridge forever. No need to freeze it. Keep it covered, of course.

G.

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 30, 2013
7:06 PM

Post #9403258

I'd think bacon is bacon, the flavor comes from salt and nitrates.

My mom had a penchant/ fixation for keeping things cool on the screened porch, even after the kids moved out and she had plenty of room in the fridge, Not meat or anything perishable, but cans of juice or soda.

I have teen boy and a young man- Bacon is a food group and must be honored as such.

tapla

tapla
Bay City, MI
(Zone 6a)

January 30, 2013
7:35 PM

Post #9403307

... and smoke - don't forget the smoke.

We have a meat processing facility/butcher shop near us that makes their own hams and bacon - dozens of awards and prizes for both hanging on the walls. The bacon is nothing like store-bought, even the bulk stuff you get from the butcher shop. It's an entirely different product - and naturally smoked. They make a 'cottage bacon', too, that comes in strips about 3-4" wide and about 8" long. It's made from the same cut as pork steak, and mostly lean - puts any BLT it's on in an entirely different class.

They make a baby ham from the eye of the ham, too. It's almost like Canadian bacon, but more tender and moist. Oink!

Al
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 30, 2013
10:01 PM

Post #9403375

You're making me hungry! Our fridge is so boring!

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 31, 2013
5:08 AM

Post #9403482

Ya know, one of these days I'm going to HAVE to visit one of the numerous Amish places right up the street from me... talk about fresh meats!! Fresh chickens, eggs, pork of any kind, butter... Hmmm, not sure about beef. I guess this year I will make it my goal: move past the street-side produce stands and onto the FARMS for more goodies!

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

January 31, 2013
6:15 AM

Post #9403554

My favorite show on TV is Andrew Zimmern's "Bizaare Foods".
Talk about fresh of everything! Even all the weird foods he eats look good to me.
Sometimes I wish I could be right there and see if I will survive sucking an eyeball out...
or eating a plate-full of BQ intestines, or fried up "mountain oysters"...

I bring this up because of the talk about fresh pork. I have not had a farm fresh, recently butchered,
cut of pork since i was about 11. All the hype on these shows about Pork belly...It is like a 3"
thick piece of pure fat with the skin on it. Probably 3000 CALORIES a bite!

Last week, because of curiosity, I bought a small package of "bacon" made from the jowls of a pig at Target.
It is mostly all fat--not much lean to it. I have had it a couple times for breakfast--and the taste is really different.
I keep thinking--is this what fresh bacon would taste like??? Or--does the jowl taste different anyway?
Not much left after I fry it--as all the fat melts away. Hey! brainstorm!!! I need to add this fat to my bowl of
bacon grease I keep in the fridge!!!! Better flavor!

I have an Amish Market just 6 miles from my house. need to go there sometimes...

http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/images/20090129sandwich_ingredients.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2009/01/eat-for-eight-bucks-chinese-pork-belly-sandwiches-recipe.html&h=462&w=500&sz=201&tbnid=dflkBVm59EG9BM:&tbnh=101&tbnw=109&zoom=1&usg=__YEWATJPBJN5qed7lOqCcU0yt7Tw=&docid=UNi_tBb1GKjgMM&sa=X&ei=EHwKUa2bKsSt0AHRh4CQBw&ved=0CDwQ9QEwAA&dur=130

Gita
I

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 31, 2013
6:22 AM

Post #9403560

I have eaten plenty of bacon from the grocery store.. the "slimy" stuff that's cut really thin, packaged in all that liquid. Different flavours from hickory to maple. I'm real familiar with those. But I have NEVER had farm-fresh pork. Well... maybe once, when my Aunt Connie used to have a farm, but that was so long ago I'm not sure I remember it clearly. Anyway, I WILL get some this year; ham, chops, and bacon. I will let ya know what I think when I get it.

Meanwhile, I saw a cooking show once about pork belly. In my humble little opinion, it looked disgusting. I'm not anti-pork by any means, but I am not 'into' eating fat like that.
coleup
annapolis, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 31, 2013
7:52 AM

Post #9403648

my dilemma with bacon, fat, and grocery store factory farmed/processed meats runs something like this...
Isn't fat where the body of animals store what the body can't use for future use? And doesn't some of the toxins and additives that the liver can't eliminate go there, too? So, when I eat today's modern fat from say a pig, I am getting not only fat, but all the concentrated doses of hormones, antibiotics and who knows what else that the pig was raised on to produce meats as a product , plus any chemicals (remember 'pink slime'?) and presevatives and additives added to keep it fresh and appealing longer.

When I weigh that with the 'taste of childhood bacon or pork chop fat', which I relished, I simply do not want all the extras to chase a taste. It has become for me like the store bought tomato versus home grown, no contest!

I'm no purist just a relatively 'conscious' consumer making do with what is available in my price range until I can create better alternatives (healthier) and grow/ raise/process/prepare/cook/gather/ and eat my own . Wouldn't it be wonderful if everything in our stores and markets and kitchens gave abundant health?

Yep, a dilemma and too many convenient compromises vying for my attention and food dollar. Eeeek

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 31, 2013
2:29 PM

Post #9404009

Judy, you really worded that wonderfully:
Quoting: I'm no purist just a relatively 'conscious' consumer making do with what is available in my price range until I can create better alternatives (healthier) and grow/ raise/process/prepare/cook/gather/ and eat my own .


That pretty much sums it up for me as well.
Jan23
Salem Cnty, NJ
(Zone 7b)

January 31, 2013
3:51 PM

Post #9404095

I love how you express your feelings, which usually expresses mine as well, Judy. Thank you.

Leftovers again. The frig is now empty.
coleup
annapolis, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 31, 2013
6:40 PM

Post #9404283

Several times a week I tell myself that I am not the only one that feels or thinks a particular way. It is nice to have that externally confirmed sometimes...that "fellow feeling" is much appreciated, keeps me going in between face to face or heart to hearts!

My Mom and I had a ritual of sorts...the first ripe tomato from our garden became the best ever BLT, on toasted white WonderBread with iceberg lettuce and Miracle Whip mayo. Nothing like it. Here's to you Mom! I think love is a purifying and health promoting 'organ' too.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 1, 2013
4:28 AM

Post #9404558

Jan23 wrote:

Leftovers again. The frig is now empty.


My fridge is empty too, so I think we'll just have lots of HUGS for dinner tonight. I mean, literally, the fridge is EMPTY. It started making an awful sound last night, so DH moved it away from the wall and found that the compressor has been leaking some 'stuff'. Not good. =( Thank God we have the second fridge downstairs, so I transferred everything down to it earlier this morning. I'll get this upstairs one scrubbed out, then meet him after work to shop for a new one. < =/ NOT in the budget!!!!

HUGS AND SMOOCHES FOR DINNER!!!!!!! < =D
Jan23
Salem Cnty, NJ
(Zone 7b)

February 1, 2013
6:12 AM

Post #9404641

Heehee. Mine's not THAT empty!!! Hugs sound good!! Good luck finding a new frig.



Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

February 1, 2013
8:06 AM

Post #9404752

Well--speedie---come on over! My fridge, just at THIS moment--is also pretty empty.
That statement is relative, though. Sometimes I have NO idea what lurks in the depths of this huge fridge.
It is so deep that my arms cannot reach in there. Of course--not being able to kneel explains this.
Mostly jars of stuff from prehistoric times...BUT--jams and Jellies NEVER go bad. Too high in sugar content...
They may crystallize--but you can always re-heat them.

Anyway--yesterday I had to unload 3/4 of my big freezer to, once again, go through the process of de-icing
the 1/2" little drain hole where all the condensation drips down from the coils into the "pan" underneath.
About twice a year--I have to unload everything in big crates and cover them in heavy towels or rugs.
I also have to drape a heavy plastic around the door so all the stuff there will stay cold.
Then--get my hair dryer, some VERY hot water, some rags, and then----unscrew the back panel that is inside
the back of the freezer and proceed to thaw out the littl, iced up, 1/2' hole. I Have to do this twice a year.
The first time I called out a tech--and it cost me $135. I watched what he did--and now i do it myself...

The only good thing about this procedure is I get to really see what i have in there.
Threw out a bag of pre-made meatballs that were 3 years old. Some old chicken junk and a package of Italian sausage.
BUT--I took out a 4lb. package of a nice chuck roast which I am going to fix today for dinner.
Will share 1/2 of it with my daughter. How old was this roast? 2009. Well wrapped in freezer paper--
good as new--honestly! NO sign of freezer burn! The secret is to wrap well...First in plastic wrap--then tightly in freezer paper.

It is sitting all seasoned awaiting a hot searing on all sides and then about 1hr in the oven.

Sorry this was so long...again...enough time to sit here and have breakfast while I typed all this. ;o(
Gita

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 1, 2013
8:18 AM

Post #9404761

My sympathy Speedie!!!! My previous maun fridge was less than 5 yrs old and had its second major problem--Was a GE.

PLEASE see them in the store and see how the shelves feel. I would have been very unhappy with some of the flimsy shelves I saw/ felt.

Old 20 yr fridge in basement still works fine Kitchenaid. New fridge- Kitchenaid. We only moved the old one down when the nkids started eating more and needed a bigger one- and to get ice thru the door.
coleup
annapolis, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 1, 2013
9:07 AM

Post #9404816

lol Gita your description of the meat in your freezer and its age made me think of a report I heard once of people in "siberia" eating frozen Wooly Mammoth meat as the receeding icesheet /glacier exposed it!

Double ham bone broth: half for bean or sour kraut soup and other for split pea. Smells so good.

As I've said before, the first fridge my family bought is still running fine after 60 plus years!

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 1, 2013
9:51 AM

Post #9404855

Judy, ya know what Gita's description made me think of? George Carlin! "What's this? Could be meat, could be cake... MeatCake!!" Haahaahahaaa!!!

Well, I've learned something cool today. (combining food and math here).. I learned how to figure out the cubic feet of the inside of my fridge! < =D (yeah, for those of you proficient in math, don't laugh at me, this was a real accomplishment for me here!) So, when DH and I meet up later to shop for that new fridge, I now have an idea of what cubic feet size'ish we should aim for.

For those of you wondering: So, how did you do it!?!? WxDxH divided by 1728. (1728 is 1 cubic foot in inches... 12 x 12 x 12). < =)

aspenhill

aspenhill
Lucketts, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 1, 2013
10:05 AM

Post #9404874

When my parents bought their first house in 1963, the family they bought the house from gifted them their old chest type freezer. Dad figured it was probably 20 years old already. It is now 2013, and the freezer is still going. It has been through three moves too. They keep it in the garage. Speedie, do you want to take the math challenge and figure out how old that is, he he he...? My college major was mathematics, but after 30 years I don't remember anything about the complicated stuff LOL.

Do I dare even admit that I bought a small fridge from WalMart a few months ago (one of the square ones about 2' x 2' x 2') and put it in the bedroom by the bed - just so I don't have to get up and go downstairs when I'm thirsty and want a cold drink in the middle of the night. Head hung in shame...

ROSES_R_RED

ROSES_R_RED
Mount Bethel, PA
(Zone 6a)

February 1, 2013
11:22 AM

Post #9404941

Good idea, Terri. My bedroom is on the first floor and I still consider it an inconvenience to go the kitchen for a cold drink. A frig in the bedroom would also be good to keep a nice cold bottle of Chardonnay since we have a sitting area in the room. How lazy can I get??

There was a problem with our kitchen fridge also. First the freezer became packed solid with ice and then it totally defrosted and would not go back to normal. I felt terrible that I hadn't taken a neighbors advice to pull it out and dust off the coils. The fridge is actually JAMMED into the spot by the people who delivered it while we were not at home. (neighbor let them in while lots of other deliveries going on during our move) When the repair man came, he said that after a while the tubes get clogged and need to be cleaned. I do this with my large downstairs freezer, but this fridge needed to be taken apart. I was also relieved to know that the back is closed with no exposed coils and needed only to be vacuumed at the bottom (which I do). I dread the day when that big fridge needs to come out of that spot!!

Dinner tonight will be boneless chicken thighs stuffed and rolled with one of the stuffings I just saw on TV...spinach and feta cheese. There were so many different fillings shown!!
HollyAnnS
Dover, PA
(Zone 6b)

February 1, 2013
11:45 AM

Post #9404972

I hope you have a HHGreg near you speedie, they have good deals and you may take advantage of 12 months no interest credit plan, also consider a bottom freezer, I love mine. I don't lose things to the back and bottom. I also just replaced my old 22cu' freezer with a 12cu', the old one still runs fine but the top leaked so badly, it was as bad as Gitas'. I had to defrost it every year.
I got a couple of good deals at the Karns market, pot roast @ $2.99 and I could not pass on their fresh chicken, feta, and spinach sausage, it's just too yummy. Ric

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 1, 2013
11:54 AM

Post #9404984

We inherited a huge old chest freezer too, with this house. We plugged it in a few times and used it but the cost of electricity to run it- I assumed-- was not worth it to me. I am out of the house almost daily, and within five minutes of a half dozen food stores, so keeping huge amounts of frozen food is not my modus operandi.

I am glad for the spare kitchen fridge/ freezer, cuz the side by side freezer, in a 30 inch wide unit, is really tight.
And I can buy ahead a little on cool food like half and half and milk, and not cram the main fridge so much. I don't like a crammed fridge with everything having to be shuffled around all the time.

aspenhill

aspenhill
Lucketts, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 1, 2013
1:13 PM

Post #9405082

Teri - Someone (maybe Ric) at one of the swaps told me that you are a fantastic cook and often make elaborate meals for large family gatherings. Everything you post about what you are making sounds fabulous (and time consuming LOL). Do you cook like that every day? I also love hearing about the soups from homemade stock and all the other stuff thrown in that Gita and Judy come up with. Inspiring, and I keep thinking I'll get motivated to do the same - never quite works out... Another quirk is that I am addicted to cook books, and pick them up whenever one catches my eye - great deals at garage sales and Amazon, but I also pick up specialty ones from vacation spots and such. I spend more time reading them, than I ever do actually cooking LOL.

I'm not very hungry tonight, so I'm making a "snack" vs a full dinner. I randomly put this together a few weeks ago, and it was really tasty - crescent rolls with deli ham, provolone cheese, and honeybell marmalade rolled up inside. My friend Cheryl introduced me to honeybells, and the taste is sweeter than the average orange marmalade. Check it out http://www.wisegeek.com/what-are-honeybell-oranges.htm
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

February 1, 2013
3:18 PM

Post #9405229

coleup -- we switch over to buying meats pretty much exclusively at Whole Foods to avoid all the hormones, etc.

Al -- back to something you mentioned a while back about good meat-curing stores -- we were visiting Canmore in Alberta, Canada more than a few years back (it's near Lake Louise and Banff) and found a wonderful place that made superb beef jerky -- I never realized how fabulous it can taste -- not like anything I have had before or since (although I've tried making my own) - intensely favorable, chewy without being so tough as to be unpleasant. Everything there was delicious. I haven't found a local substitute.

I love Michigan -- my husband originated in Holly (a small Michigan town). Every now and then we think of retiring there. Beautiful lakes. I love the Upper Peninsula. We are deterred by the distance, though -- not so much the distance but the travel time -- I don't know if we'd see much of our kids -- and the long cold winters and the mosquitoes. (We have retirement on the brain these days; we'd love to decide on a place to retire so we could buy property, but we are indecisive.)

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 2, 2013
4:36 AM

Post #9405666

Aspen, is that freezer really 69 years old!?!? (my math: I was born in '64 so I'm 48, plus the one year since they found it in '63, plus the 20 years old it was when they got it = 69) TAH DAH!! =) Hahahaaa!

Ric, you'll be glad to know that HH Gregg is exactly where we went and we hit the jackpot!! They not only have that -% financing for 2 years, but they also do bundle-deals.. so we sorta got ALL the stuff we're gonna need out of the way. Got everything Samsung; side-by-side fridge (with a 6'9" DH, a bottom freezer is out of the question!), flat-top range (ceramic) with matching microwave/convection oven to go above it, dishwasher, and washer & dryer. All stainless steel. Everything will be delivered tomorrow. WOW!!!!!!! I have never owned a fridge with water/ice dispenser in the door before, so I'm sorta excited about that, heeheehee. Heck, I'm excited about ALL of it!! GREAT GOOGLEY MOOGLEY, 1/3 of the kitchen renovation is going on this weekend without even planning for it. 0_o

Sooo many new things to learn about now. Never had a side-by-side before, never used a convection oven, never had a ceramic-top range, the dishwasher is one of the new-fangled ones, and we're told DO NOT rinse your dishes before we put them in it. REALLY?!!? Washing machine; one of the new energy-efficient ones that requires special low-sudsing LIQUID detergent. (I have always been a fan of powdered detergents, in washing machine and dishwasher).

Here's the BIGGIE though. We were sure the little space where the fridge fits in was at least 36" wide. It's only 35. The fridge is 36. We'll be ripping out cabinets today. It was bound to happen sooner or later anyway, but... sheeeesh!! Gonna have to get some smaller sized cabinets to replace them soon, and meanwhile do without, or just set them in the dining room in the interim. Got some 'before' pics but they're on DH's iPod, so I'll share later.

Meanwhile, just sneaking in this post real quick while he's still asleep, heehee. Need to head out grocery shopping, 7-11 for coffee, and the bank for tip $$ (can't let the delivery guys go empty-handed!!), then it is time for señor Manuel Labor. =) I'll try to get back in here this weekend, but if not, say prayers for our backs and knees please!? < =D

aspenhill

aspenhill
Lucketts, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 2, 2013
5:22 AM

Post #9405700

Speedie, your math and logic are perfect - you get an A+++, and yes, the freezer really is that old. Exciting about all the new appliances. First the bathroom reno and now the kitchen reno - you go girl... You and senor Manuel Labor sound very motivated to get in there, tackle the job, and get it done. My senor Miguel is hard to motivate these days, and my kitchen reno just keeps dragging on and on and on - at least it is functional for the most part, just a lot of cosmetic stuff to finish.

Funny how people prefer one kind of fridge to another. For years, my preference has just been the basic freezer over fridge. My sister has a side by side with the water dispenser and loves it, but I've never been a fan about how skinny and deep each of the sides are - I know they come in different widths, maybe hers is one of the narrower ones. My mother replaced her fridge with the fridge over freezer when they came out - at first I thought it was weird, but then the more I used it, the more I liked it. For my kitchen reno, I went with a french door fridge over bottom freezer, and am really liking it.

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

February 2, 2013
6:51 AM

Post #9405796

speedie--

When you two are done renovating your kitchen--come over here...Pleeeese!

I hate my aging kitchen--I hate that i don't wash and clean any of the cabinets---I hate
my floor which is pitted and cracking and perennially dirty...I still have Formica counter tops...old walnut cabinets...
You get the idea.
However--looking at some 15-20K for a makeover--not in my lifetime...No handy DH here..
he went somewhere else to work his magic.

I have started a savings acct. at my Bank and put in it extra money that can accumulate in my Ch. Acct.
I call it my "Home Improvement Fund". It will be a long time when there is enough $$ in it to do anything.
My home, and everything that came with it, is now 44 years old.

Your DH is 6'9'!!!!!!! Wow--you do not need any stepping stools--do you?
He can wipe clean the ceiling standing flat-footed--right? Assuming your ceilings are the common 8' high.
If you have the high ceilings (now so common)--he may have to stand on his tippy-toes...:o)

We sell all kinds of fridges at the HD. I think I could easily live with a freezer on the bottom and the 2-door top.
I would be able to see much better what I have in the fridge.
Right now--I cannot see what is in the depths of my bottom 2 shelves. Honest! I go by feel...
Because both my knees are replaced--I cannot kneel (not allowed) and have never gone into a full squat.
It kind of hurts...IF I sat down on the floor--it would take me 5 minutes to get up... Just my reality!

How do I garden--you may wonder? The "old lady way", a-- in the air...Haaaa...Haaaa...Gita

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 2, 2013
9:19 AM

Post #9405923

wow speedie, thay musta all quit and gone to lunch by the time you got done buying at hhgregg!!!

the wide side by side should be great.

You will really have fun using all the new stuff. The Appliances or Home Reno forum here in DG has some great threads about appliances. "Cathy' really knows her stuff. Example: do NOT fill the soap cup all the way on dishwasher.

Gita if you can get to 15K you can do it. Use Lowes or HD, do not do granite..it could be done. THe design guys are probably getting busy about now as people seem to like their renovation in the spring. It takes a good hour or more to sit with them for a design so you don't want to spend they time right now knowing you won't be buying. Yeah, it $ucks that you lost your help on this...

ROSES_R_RED

ROSES_R_RED
Mount Bethel, PA
(Zone 6a)

February 2, 2013
9:46 AM

Post #9405943

Terri, I get sleep over guests very often. We also have Thanksgiving and Easter and a huge family and friends celebration (usually the weekend before the Labor Day weekend.
I have extended invitations to my DG friends every year. My family is comprised of "Foodies" of all ages, who visit often are expecting to see their favorites on the table. I try to cook something every other day with enough leftovers for the next day. We dine out with friends locally at least twice a week. There are some really good little restaurants here that have fantastic prices.

Speaking of old refrigerators, I remember that when the little "Norge" went (it finally stopped its humming and shaking), the guys who delivered the new fridge put it in the kitchen, and the one that was in the kitchen would go in the basement to replace the "Norge". They whipped those 2 large newer refrigerators around and thought they were superman UNTIL they tried to get the LITTLE "Norge" out of the basement. Lots of sweating, grunting and mumbling went along with the move.

Just made a meatloaf for the freezer, cooked a pot of chicken soup with savoy cabbage chopped in it. Lots of celery, carrots, onion, parmagiano cheese and egg drop at the end.
Jan23
Salem Cnty, NJ
(Zone 7b)

February 2, 2013
12:33 PM

Post #9406105

I love my fresh door frig. I could have done without the water and ice in the door, but DH wanted it, so... I do like the freezer on the bottom. I would always lose things on the bottom shelves of the frig. I figured since I am tall I wanted the things I used the most at the top, hence freezer is now on bottom.

Pork tenderloin, sweets, apple salad, corn bread and another veg tonight. Company is coming over. Table all set. I am just waiting a little longer before I get started

ROSES_R_RED

ROSES_R_RED
Mount Bethel, PA
(Zone 6a)

February 2, 2013
1:19 PM

Post #9406144

For some reason, DH talked my out of the bottom freezer because of Consumers Report. Am I sorry!! Most of my friends and relatives now have the bottom freezer without having any problems.

Boneless chicken thighs stuffed with asiago cheese and arrugula, rice pilaf and salad

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 2, 2013
1:59 PM

Post #9406191

Thought I made a big pot of chicken soup yesterday but it all went in one meal.

I rememebr ConsRep didn't like the bottom freezer but forget why. THis house has several huge fans of ice/ filtered water dispensing. Maybe when kids have moved out we would go to bottom freezer.

aspenhill

aspenhill
Lucketts, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 2, 2013
2:31 PM

Post #9406249

From the posts, the bottom freezer wouldn't work well for Speedie because her husband is so tall, and Jan likes the bottom freezer because she is so tall LOL. I guess it really comes down to how you use it most - getting things out of the fridge or getting things out of the freezer. Wonder what ConsRep didn't like about the bottom freezer?

I have the opposite problem of being really short - 5'0" if I'm standing up straight, 4'11" if not... I tend to get a lot of drinks and ice throughout the day. With the bottom freezer, the ice bin is at a perfect height for me, and it rolls out with the door making it even more convenient. But, if you have the ice dispenser in the door that probably works even better for people of all heights.

I'd love some homemade soup tonight, but I don't have the ingredients on hand and don't feel like taking the drive into Leesburg to go shopping. Nice and cozy here with the fire going (and Mike snoring in the recliner behind me, just lovely). Anybody making snacks for the super bowl? I'm making little smokies wrapped in bacon and baked in brown sugar - easy peasy recipe from my friend Cheryl, and perfect to take to the super bowl gathering Mike and I are going to tomorrow.

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 2, 2013
2:55 PM

Post #9406261

Lasagne for dinner tonight. TOmorrrow??

I saw football brownies yesterday- Cut brownies in diamond shape, then use white icing to write little stitches on it, just one line long ways and three little crossways. Cute!
Jan23
Salem Cnty, NJ
(Zone 7b)

February 2, 2013
7:37 PM

Post #9406477

Heehee. Since I'm the one going in for things the most, the choice was whatever pleased me. Good choice!!!

We are having a Soup-er bowl party at church. Soups and chili, a time of worship before the game then games during commercials and half-time. Never done this before. Lots of prizes.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 3, 2013
1:48 AM

Post #9406587

What's heating up my kitchen? Sweaty people! =)

It's funny, DH and I had long discussions about the refrigerator/freezer... and it's only funny because we both have had the same viewpoint from the beginning: No Bottom Freezer. Yeah, with his height it would be a big pain, literally. The work he does is hard enough on his back and knees as it is (up and down ladders, on his knees on the floor and back up again repetitively, constantly, all day long, "switching and plugging")... anything else to make him have to bend or kneel while at home is just out of the question. We found a super nice side-by-side with a HUGE freezer section which could easily fit probably 6 or 7 of those jumbo sized frozen pizzas on one shelf if they're standing on their sides... and still have 4 large shelf spaces for everything else, plus 2 door racks. It's really deep, but if I remember correctly, the shelves slide out half-way, making it a LOT easier to reach the stuff in the back, even on the top shelf. Aspen, I'm like you; SHORT. =) 5'1" here. Being able to reach stuff on the back of a top shelf (because the shelves slide out) was a BIG selling point to us. It's a 30 cubic foot unit by the way, not sure I mentioned that.

Anyway, DH and I huffed and puffed and sweated our buns off yesterday. Got the basement well organized and neatened so the guys could just roll the new stuff in and the old stuff out with no problem. We also moved the old washer/dryer out to near the door so they can remove it easily. AND got the wall/floor behind the old units cleaned and vacuumed. < =D Moved out the fridge, scrubbed ALL behind it (floor and walls), and removed those 3 cabinets, one above the fridge, one wall cabinet beside the fridge, and one base cabinet beside the fridge. Home Depot, here we come for 3 new cabinets! < =D

Oh, and to answer your question Gita, our ceilings are normal ceiling height, and yes, he changes the bulbs in our recessed lights and cleans the ceiling fans while standing flat-footed. < =D

Sally, thank you for the tips (on the appliances and home-reno forum), I will head on over there to find Cathy! =) I never knew that about not filling the soap dispenser cup of the dishwasher all the way full!!

aspenhill

aspenhill
Lucketts, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 3, 2013
2:26 AM

Post #9406596

Speedie, that was quite a day! I was thinking of you and your hubby hard at work in total contrast to my lazy day. I really need to find a way to get Mike and I motivated to finish up the many in-work projects. I didn't even make much of a dinner - just cooked up a container of that refrigerated pasta and jarred spaghetti sauce.

Sunday morning breakfast with my neighbor friends has been a tradition for years. We meet up with Mark and his 3 year son, and when his mother (my friend Cheryl) and her DH Jack are home from FL (Apr - Nov) they join us too. A few weeks ago I switched over from a stack of pancakes and bacon to sausage gravy and biscuits. I was always afraid to try sausage gravy because of the texture (yes, I've been childish picky about vegetables and texture since I was a child - immature I know, but my preconceived notions of yuck have been pretty hard to put aside all these years). Anyway, I finally decided to try a bite of Mike's and it was delish... as long as I get the gravy on the side and can take charge of just how much of that creamy consistency goes on my biscuit LOL.

ROSES_R_RED

ROSES_R_RED
Mount Bethel, PA
(Zone 6a)

February 3, 2013
3:05 AM

Post #9406609

Sally, I remember that one of the objections to the bottom freezer refrigerators was "too noisy". ?????

Speedie, first time I've learned about not overfilling the dishwasher cup. Boy, am I guilty of that! Need to break the habit.

Terri, you're making me want to try the gravy even though I've always been a little turned off by it.


speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 3, 2013
4:42 AM

Post #9406654

Oh Terri, sausage gravy and biscuits.. YUMMMMYYYYY!!!!! Now I am hungry, and it's all your fault! < =P But I don't think it's childish to have a 'thing' about textures in food... texture is one of the main parts of what makes food good or not. It is also the main reason I hate canned peas, the texture is YEUUCCHH!!! Fresh ones are great, canned ones are icky-and-a-half! < =D

... and don't get me started on my preference of the texture of my oatmeal... ;)

ROSES_R_RED

ROSES_R_RED
Mount Bethel, PA
(Zone 6a)

February 3, 2013
6:44 AM

Post #9406742

Aside from their disgusting texture, canned peas don't even taste like peas. The worst yet is canned spinach, which came onto my plate at a friends house. OMG!!
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

February 3, 2013
8:02 AM

Post #9406807

Just lurking here but memories of my mother and one sister sharing that horrid can of spinach is terrible! It bears no resemblance to the real thing!

aspenhill

aspenhill
Lucketts, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 3, 2013
8:09 AM

Post #9406820

Hi pirl!

Sausage gravy and biscuits this morning were great. I only used a small portion of the gravy on my biscuits and packed up the rest for Mark to bring home to his chocolate lab Reece.

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 3, 2013
8:17 AM

Post #9406833

haha, every time I see canned spinach in the store I just think why bother??? Never tried and knew it would be horrible.
I've never been a big fan of sweet peas in any form, really. When I grew them we'd eat them right from the pod- but partly because I never grew enough at once.

I luv sausage gravy!

Eventually I figured out that oatmeal being too thick was my problem there- eeeccchhh so gluey. Today we had 'steel cut oats' they get sort of creamy but the grains are chewy and kind of pop, really different from rolled oats.

Going to look up a recipe for red beans over rice- and try out a new rice cooker.
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

February 3, 2013
9:13 AM

Post #9406894

aspen -- how do you make your little smokies wrapped in bacon?

aspenhill

aspenhill
Lucketts, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 3, 2013
10:12 AM

Post #9406968

Very very simple - 1 pkg little smokies, 1 pkg bacon cut in thirds, 1 cup of brown sugar. Wrap each little smokie with a piece of bacon, place in a baking dish, cover with brown sugar, refridgerate for a while (Cheryl does overnight, but I just put them together this morning for cooking later this afternoon). Bake at 400 degrees for 15-20 minutes.
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

February 3, 2013
12:14 PM

Post #9407102

Sigh -- what is a "little smokie?"

aspenhill

aspenhill
Lucketts, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 3, 2013
12:31 PM

Post #9407120

They are in the hotdog section - Hillshire Farms brand name, and they are small little hog dog look alikes - labeled Lit'l smokies smoked sausage, beef, etc...

This message was edited Feb 3, 2013 3:34 PM
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

February 3, 2013
1:02 PM

Post #9407149

Catching up, here... so many tasty recipes!

Rose, I'm glad to have that Mex. Chicken recipe... I managed to buy an extra pack of thighs at Wegman's, thinking I was "out." (Their boneless thighs are a good deal, and I like them for things like curry where I want to cook the chicken a little longer without cooking all the chicken flavor out of it.)

Al, I've never come across the "body bag tacos" before, and I think that idea is genius! My brother and sister-in-law are both scout leaders, and they're going to love it too. It would be great food for a campout, as long as they didn't get grief for serving chips (hey, all the rest of it is nutritious!). I'm going to try it at our next get-together... almost nobody RSVPs any more, so sometimes I don't know if I'm going to have 10 people or 40. This is a very flexible recipe -- extra taco (or chili-seasoned) meat can be frozen, extra "fixin's" can be next week's salad.

Penzey's -- YES! I'm so spoiled with their cinnamon & vanilla... I bring them along when I go to visit my in-laws, because I know I'll be baking! (My MIL doesn't do much in the kitchen any more, or I'd make sure she had a supply also.) I've also switched to King Arthur Flour, especially for a couple of cookie recipes (like Jim's favorite chocolate chip cookies) that tend to be a little persnickity.. with the KA, I find I don't end up trying to adjust the amount of flour to get the texture just right.

Happy, thanks for the offer to pick up from Penzey's... seems like I'm out of something, too, will have to check to see what!

I think The Spice House was started by Bill's parents and is still run by one of his brothers, while he split off to create Penzey's. I don't know that there was any animosity in it, just different business models maybe.

We got a new fridge about a year ago, and I "won" the style argument, got one with the freezer on the bottom and a central "snack drawer" that Joyanna and I love for yogurt, cheese, lunch meat, etc. It has "french doors" on top, and it still does ice & water through the door. (That's the one thing I know Jim wouldn't give up!)

Any fridge or freezer that's older than 10 years (maybe 12 now since the new-ish energy use regs went into effect) is costing you a lot to run compared to the new ones. I wanted an old fridge for the garage, and Jim said a new one (basic model) would pay for itself within a couple of years.

Sally, if your new rice cooker is a "cooker" and not a "steamer," I've got a good thing to try! I've been trying to shift my carb/protein ratio (more protein, fewer carbs), so I've been experimenting with barley. Our rice cooker does a perfect job with it if I use the "brown rice" setting! I use about 1 1/4 cups water to 1 cup pearl barley (either the regular size or another that I found that's these huge pea-sized kernels). Sometimes I add quinoa, 1/4 cup with 1 3/4 cup barley. The red quinoa from Trader Joe's is visually appealing, also, and adds a nutty flavor. A couple of broken-up dried shiitake mushrooms are a good addition. You can mix barley with brown rice, also.

Jan23
Salem Cnty, NJ
(Zone 7b)

February 3, 2013
1:24 PM

Post #9407171

Hi, Pirl!!

I LOVE steel cut oats

Canned peas are horrible. Frozen much better, but fresh is the bestest!!

Will have to try those bagged tacos. Great idea!!
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

February 3, 2013
1:56 PM

Post #9407205

Hi, Jan! Another frozen or canned (OMG) product I won't eat is asparagus. Only fresh from our own garden and it's worth the wait.

If we're served limp/gray broccoli I have no problem not eating it - tastes like punishment for a sin I didn't commit.

No bouncing ball store bought winter tomatoes either.
Jan23
Salem Cnty, NJ
(Zone 7b)

February 3, 2013
6:28 PM

Post #9407465

Hahaha

Awesome soup-ER bowl at church tonight. There were about 8 crockpots of soup or chili plus some things on the side and desserts. During commercials there were 'minute to win it games'. Kids had choir then a praise time during halftime. It was great. Most people left after that. We used cups for the soup, so you could walk around. I think I tried about 6 of the soups. Just a taste each time added up. Someone made root beer float cupcakes. They were awesome!!!

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 3, 2013
7:58 PM

Post #9407530

Sounds great Jan.
I watched some of Minute to win it one night, and that looked like great 'teen group' stuff to play.

Made red beans and rice. Love the rice cooker! First time. Rice and water in, push button, go play till done, comes out perfect and automatically goes on stay warm when the rice is done. $30 at Target.
My recipe for Red Beans needs tweaking. But we ate plenty anyway.
Then Krusteaez pumkin bars mix, that was good too.
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

February 3, 2013
8:13 PM

Post #9407534

We've been loving our rice cooker, too... replaced a steamer-type one about a year ago... that one was also pretty "set it up & walk away," but this one is easier yet, plus it makes great barley, steel-cut oatmeal, etc.

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 4, 2013
6:29 AM

Post #9407865

Here's a recipe for bean soup seasoning. Got this from am magazine ages ago. It would make a good seasoning base for almost anything though. It turns out 'savory" not just chickeny or beefy.
You might put a ham bone in with this too. Maybe cut down the bouillons if you do.


Bean soup seasoning for one large pot

3 TB minced onion flakes
2 tsp beef bouillon granules or 2 cubes
2 tsp chicken " " " " "
Bay leaf
1/2 tsp garlic powder
1/2 tsp chili powder
1/2 tsp basil
1 tsp parsley flakes

One pound or 1 1/2 to 2 cups of beans (or less beans and some small pasta)
One can diced tomatoes
Water

You can throw it all together and simmer until beans are done. Or presoak your beans and add seasoning and tomatoes later. If using pasta, add it later so it doesn't get too soft.
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

February 4, 2013
12:49 PM

Post #9408297

Critter -- we have a 25-year old subzero -- the cost of replacing it is fantastically high, plus we keep hoping to "re-do" our kitchen so I don't want to replace the appliances piece-meal. We have had it repaired so many times... I didn't realize there had been such huge gains in energy efficiency, though. It does stand to reason...

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 4, 2013
2:20 PM

Post #9408390

Yum Sally, that bean soup (seasoning) looks great!! I saved the recipe and will try it soon.

Tonight the kitchen will be heating up with our Traditional Chicken dinner: roast chicken, mashed taters and gravy, and corn. Simple 'meat and taters' comfort food. And it'll all be cooked in/on my new range! < =D I've only tried the oven so far, so this evening will be the first time to use the cooktop... and I'm a little nervous, to be honest. Heeheeheee. I was told emphatically by the delivery guy that, no matter WHAT anyone tells me, do NOT use my cast iron on the ceramic cooktop. OK. =( Maybe I can save it for oven use though!? < =)

There was a HUGE fiasco with all the deliveries yesterday. I won't bore y'all with the details, but the only thing running and functional yesterday evening were the dryer and the range... and the dryer ran ONLY because DH hooked it up.

Today all was made right and the MONSTER of a fridge arrived. WOW that thing is huge! DH and I transferred EVERYTHING from BOTH the fridge/freezer and the stand-up freezer, and there is room to spare in both compartments! Great googley moogley!!

Man, it sure will be nice to have a 'real' meal tonight... last few nights have been quickies or pizza, too big a pain to carry it all up from the downstairs fridge, then back again when I'm done with it. =/ Well, it's all... and I do mean ALL, up here now! =)

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 4, 2013
3:22 PM

Post #9408486

Yay Suze!
Now go unplug that spare freezer/fridge/ thing, if you have not already.

Wait till you see that new washer wash. . I bet you stand there and watch it spin. Its like a jet taking off...

Are you on a well or city water? Have to watch your water pressure if a well.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 4, 2013
3:47 PM

Post #9408514

Heeheee, yes Ma'am, we unplugged the stand-up freezer immediately! =) The other fridge will stay running (better go catch it!) for 'extras', our usual routine, but that's ok.

Oh heck yeah, we both stood there and watched how it works, watching all the little lights blink and go on and off, Hahahahaaa!! We're on city water, so I think it will be OK pressure-wise. I've already crawled around on the floor with a flashlight looking underneath for leaks too, LOL! All dry, thank GOD! < =D

Now I've actually got 3 pots on my new stove top (bites fingernails). I think I really like this range a lot better than the old one. Even the boring ol' frozen pizza we had last night was better than they had been before. Heeheeheee. Wheeee, new toys!! < =D
HollyAnnS
Dover, PA
(Zone 6b)

February 4, 2013
4:02 PM

Post #9408522

Sally good catch on the well, but I believe most people have adequate pressure any more. I think the minimum was only 15psi. The front load washer saves water for sure and mine spins the clothes so dry, my normal dry cycle starts at 38min.
I got my pot roast done for dinner, with carrots and potatoes, just as Holly likes it. I want to get my bacon bean soup started so I can drop stuff off at the in-laws tomorrow. I know they both enjoy it, she,so she doesn't have to cook, he, 'cause he likes more country style meals. LOL Ric

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 4, 2013
4:02 PM

Post #9408523

chuckle!!
My washer goes beBeep beBEEP be BEEP when its done, sings a little song. I skip gaily out to the laundry room when I hear it, LOL, it just has way more personality than a buzz.


Really tasty cole slaw today made with "Korean cabbage" from the 'world food store". Mayo, vinegar, sugar, salt.
Jan23
Salem Cnty, NJ
(Zone 7b)

February 4, 2013
4:03 PM

Post #9408525

How fun!!!!!

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 4, 2013
4:06 PM

Post #9408527

Yum Ric!
Well most people don't have our well; we discovered that if someone is showering while the washer runs, the washer senses low pressure and quits halfway, and makes us go "Wha?????" and call the repair guy...we used ta think we were smart but we didn't guess that our pressure was the problem. Thank heavens for minimum warranty periods!
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

February 4, 2013
4:30 PM

Post #9408553

Way to go with the new range et al, Speedie!

I'm not sure of the "why not?" with the cast iron, unless maybe the bottom of the pots/pans might not be smooth and could scratch the surface. We've got a ceramic top on our stove, and I've even rolled the dice and used my canning pot & pressure canner on the big burner. I've never used a cast iron pan on it, though. One burner (back one, thankfully) is pitted, but that's because I thought it would protect the burner if I put down aluminum foil before heating a metal skewer on it (for putting holes in planting trays, nach)... not! The aluminum foil burned up, and the glass/ceramic stove surface under it was damaged a little. The burner still works fine, though, and I don't need to have everything look flawless, so we're good.

Zio's pizza tonight, because Jim had to go into Rockville for meetings this afternoon.
coleup
annapolis, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 4, 2013
4:42 PM

Post #9408569

Speedie,
Just a quick note. I fill my unused freezer and fridge space with 2 liter (or any size) bottles of water. Doubles as my "emergency supply" and I think a full freezer uses less energy than one half full.

Happy, Radio Shack sells a small device that you plug into and then into outlet that will read out the energy usage of individual appliances, lights, etc. I believe a SubZero was pretty "efficient" to run and repair for 20 + years than new models that may use less electricity to keep the same volume of food cold but are meant to be replaced in 5-10 years rather than repaired! I also don't recall huge improvements in energy efficiency..just adding more insulation. Did you know that there are magnetic panels that adhere to old appliances to give them the "stainless steel" finish or match what ever?

http://www.applianceart.com/

PS, I hate my ceramic cook top stove (got it "free" another story) Yes, I can use my cast iron on it, but it does scratch and doesn't perform like on an old coil burner because it is not perfectly flat on the bottom and heats unevenly. Any pot or pan that rocks even slightly on the burners will heat unevenly on my stove. Also, can't make popcorn by the jiggle the pot method! There is a whole thread on ceramic cooktops in the Clean and Clutter forum. Mine is one that is harder to keep fresh and shiny looking. Many really love them, so I bet you are in that crowd!

This message was edited Feb 4, 2013 8:03 PM

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

February 4, 2013
5:37 PM

Post #9408637

Jill---

You can use "Bar Keepers Friend" cleanser and polish on your ceramic cooktop--without scratching it.
Says so right on the can. There are different formulas. so make sure you get the right one.
I got mine at "Bed bath and Beyond' on their clearance rack.
Home depot carries it as well, in a bit smaller can. I have used it on stubborn burnt on cruddy stuff, and with some
rubbing, this stuff cleans it off. Same for bottoms and insides of pots, my SS sink, etc...

http://www.target.com/p/bar-keepers-friend-multipurpose-household-cleanser-polish-21-oz/-/A-13304297
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

February 4, 2013
5:40 PM

Post #9408640

I think the Subzero freezers are in a league of their own! Jim (DH) says the "energy star complient" fridge/freezers are far more efficient, but you're right... with "modern" appliances lasting 10 years rather than 25, you end up with more environmental costs in manufacturing/resources as well as landfill space or recycling cost.
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

February 4, 2013
5:43 PM

Post #9408643

You're right, Gita... and I've been using special ceramic stovetop cleaner, meaning to pick up some Barkeeper's Friend next time I run out of the other stuff. Seems every time I turn around I'm reading about something else I could clean with it! It won't fix the actual damage I did to the cooktop with the aluminum foil, though.

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 4, 2013
6:21 PM

Post #9408684

hm thanks Gita, I have some Barkeepers Friend around here somewhere,,,need to try it on my regular enameled stove top with brown crispy crud around some of the burners.

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

February 4, 2013
6:53 PM

Post #9408736

The one HD sells is the size of a can of "Commet'. Regular size...

The one I got at BB and B is really big---21 oz.!
I have noticed on the one i am using up right now (quite seldom), that it seems to
clump a little due to moisture in the surroundings. If you can--try to find a lid that fits over it.
Something you can recycle---small container of Yogurt lid???

I have an older gas stove--(Sears) maybe 22 years? It does not have sealed burners--and the pans that
cover the openings are Steel--or some kind of metal??-- and can get beyond cruddy.
I have scrubbed and scrubbed--even with Bartenders. It did help--but not completely.
But this is years and years of spilled and burned on stuff. Maybe Oven Cleaner may help?
The grids above the pans, that the pots sit on, are cast iron--I think. They don't show any dirt--
as they are black, but I am sure it is all there.

I once looked (on-line) for replacing the pans only (4) for this stove--and it was close to $60.
Yeah right? I can live with what I have.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 5, 2013
3:37 AM

Post #9408912

Well, I actually USED my stove-top last evening (3 of the 4 burners!) to cook dinner, and it was SWEET!! How awesome to NOT have the pots tilting this way and that due to uneven coils!! All my pots have flat bottoms so that is not a concern, thank God! If I remember correctly, one of the "problems" with cast iron that the salesman mentioned was, cast iron retains a LOT more heat than other types of pots/pans, and that added heat may end up cracking the glass of the cooktop. I don't know how true that is, but it's what he said.

Anyway... another thing that I found to be super cool... I don't need a large burner size for the dinner I made last night, and with this range, I don't have to use the large burner! The 2 "larger" burners up front are actually dual-sized, so I can pick which size I want to use. That is AWESOME to me!!

Bar Keeper's Friend, ... never heard of it but I'll sure give it a try! DH and I will be at Home Depot this coming weekend, so I'll write it down so we can remember to check it out. He's got to stop by HH Gregg on Thursday to swap out the incorrect microwave, and he plans to buy the cleaner stuff that they sell while he's there, but it will be nice to have a second option in case we don't like that stuff.

I had the "full vs empty" refrigerator/freezer energy efficiency discussion with DH the other night 'cause I had always tried to keep my freezer full.. of something. After much discussion about wattage/amperage/voltage, KWH etc, it turns out that the savings (both in electricity and time) with a full fridge/freezer is so miniscule that it nearly makes no difference at all. In one year, the 'savings' in the electric bill is probably about $20 or so, is what the calculations came out to. I'd never realized that before, I always thought it made a much bigger difference.

Hmm, after reading Judy's post, I think I'll either pass my cast iron along to someone or save it JUST for the oven. < =/

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 5, 2013
5:56 AM

Post #9408994

wonderful speedy.
Save the cast iron- I've always felt deprived doing cornbread in simple cake pans.

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

February 5, 2013
6:01 AM

Post #9409000

Speedie--

I don't know if all HD's keep the same merchandise in the same numbered aisles.
I would think so--as "planograms" are sent to all stores and seem the same.

In that case--tell your DH to head for Aisle #3 where all the cleaning supplies are located.

I have also heard that a full freezer runs more efficiently. Makes sense--everything is already frozen--
so the freezer does not have to work so hard keeping just a few things frozen.

Gita

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 5, 2013
6:15 AM

Post #9409014

Thank you Gita, I know just where that aisle is at Home Despot. Been there LOTS! =) It is actually one of my favourite aisles, right after power tools and lumber... in that order. ;)
We will be heading over there this weekend for cabinets, so I'll be with DH for that. I'll grab his hand and drag him over there. < =D

Yeah, as it turns out, the full freezer will run more efficiently, but not by much. I always thought it made a huge difference, but if what DH tells me is right (and if his calculations are right), then it's just a teeny tiny difference. What the heck do I know, I just fill the things, I don't build 'em! < =D (oh yeah, and I raid them in the middle of the night too). ;)
coleup
annapolis, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 5, 2013
6:32 AM

Post #9409038

Lol Speedie, I'm so relieved that my post didn't dampen your enthusiasm.

It is so cool to have brand new things, especially like new appliances! Sleek, smooth, clean, bright, big, every thing working...totally fitting for the domestic goddess in all of us. Enjoy! Seems there should be some special music or at least a ritual kind of launch or christening, maiden voyage sort of thing...I remember the old TV show where women cried when they were chosen "Queen For A Day" and their prize was a new washing machine. My first fridge ( a beautiful little coppertone model) was filled by me with a single vase of flowers for its first day of repeated door openings and pleased as punch sighs before I began to slowly fill it with those items that I rarely enjoyed in my days of liveaboard life with no fridge.

Hey, if new appliances and kitchen redos get us eating more at home and as a family, why that's a 'good thing'.

PS, I'm with sally, if I could have only one pot or pan it would be my cast iron fry pan 'cause I litterally can cook anything in it.

PPS My freezer has emergency ice bottles in it cause after last power outage was short, I've been too lazy to needlessly re prep.

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 5, 2013
7:10 AM

Post #9409072

Now- keeping extra water in the extra space in the frIdge or freezer- that is VERY smart. Water runs out fast at the store after a major event. Ice, too! And why pay a dollar for a gallon of water if you can pay 2 cents and its already there helping keep your unit cold?
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

February 5, 2013
7:32 AM

Post #9409093

We love cast iron. It never dies. I have pots I inherited from my mom, plus our own -- a huge stack.

Coleup -- I have one of those gizmos for measuring wattage, but the subzero is hardwired so I can't use it on the subzero.
HollyAnnS
Dover, PA
(Zone 6b)

February 5, 2013
7:57 AM

Post #9409116

I ended up giving all my cast iron to Jamie. They were just too heavy for me. They were all handed down from my Grandmother. They ranged from 5-6" up to 16 or 20", there was also a 14" griddle with a smoke ring. I'm not sure I've made really good homefries since. LOL
A good trick for filling up a lot of chest freezer space is to keep a number of the foam florist or pharmacy shipping boxes handy, easy to move and very effective, they also come in handy as emergency coolers and are nearly indestructible. Ric

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 5, 2013
2:41 PM

Post #9409527

...And bags of frozen peas. NOT for eating, mind you, but they're great as ice packs when you get boo-boos. (which I do, frequently). ;)

I had my first YIKES moment with the range today. I was thinking I could get 'smart' and store my skillets in the bottom drawer of it, like I did before. THEY DON'T ALL FIT!! I found that out the hard way, getting one handle stuck in there trying to re-open the drawer.. good Lord! Speaking of boo-boos, the backs of my hands are now swollen and bruised trying to get that sucker out of there. HA!! ...now where's that bag o' frozen peas??...

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 5, 2013
3:30 PM

Post #9409581

Premade burger patties from Weis market, chuknkedup sweet potatos cooked in skillet with butter salt squirt of maple syrup, coleslaw
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

February 5, 2013
3:30 PM

Post #9409582

I think another really big advantage to a full freezer is that it will hold its temperature longer in the event of a power outage.

Speedy, I can hear your delight and imagine your grin as you survey your new kitchen... empowering your inner domestic goddess!! Sorry about your bruised knuckles.

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

February 5, 2013
3:52 PM

Post #9409608

Speedie--

Frozen corn is cheaper than peas--and works just as good.
HollyAnnS
Dover, PA
(Zone 6b)

February 5, 2013
9:31 PM

Post #9409859

Probably they don't get as mushy. LOL Ric

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 6, 2013
3:34 AM

Post #9409914

If keeping a full freezer is that good, maybe I should just pop myself into it... no wait, never mind, forget I said that! < =D (but, I could fit!!!)

Oh yes Gita, frozen corn is GREAT, but in this household, that is for eating, frozen peas are not. ;) Like Ric said, frozen peas get mushy, eewww!!! =)

aspenhill

aspenhill
Lucketts, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 6, 2013
2:01 PM

Post #9410467

Another really simple meal tonight - boneless pork chops smothered with stuffing, baked in the oven in a casserole dish.
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

February 6, 2013
4:07 PM

Post #9410587

Yum.

ROSES_R_RED

ROSES_R_RED
Mount Bethel, PA
(Zone 6a)

February 9, 2013
4:50 AM

Post #9412818

We were supposed to go to a dinner show tonight with neighbors. Don't think it's gonna happen. Taking out a leg of lamb and looking around for sides to go with it. Neighbors will walk here today and we'll cook, bake, get computer lessons, take care of the babies starting under lights and put out more winter sow. Haven't shopped in 2 weeks because of nagging sinus infection which is practically gone now. Shopping in the freezers is always fun. Can't find any usable salad greens in there though!

aspenhill

aspenhill
Lucketts, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 9, 2013
7:48 AM

Post #9412987

Roses, sounds like you are getting quite a bit of snow? Just a dusting here. Glad your sinus infection is almost gone. I'm still feeling the effects of the flue, but am much better today than yesterday. Not much motivation to cook, so Mike brought home Chinese take-out last night. Hot and Sour soup and steamed dumplings for me. He had kung pao chicken. If I feel better, I think I'll make jambalaya and cornbread for dinner tonight. I want to try a jalapeno cornbread recipe, the jambalaya is one of my reliable go to recipes.

ROSES_R_RED

ROSES_R_RED
Mount Bethel, PA
(Zone 6a)

February 9, 2013
8:26 AM

Post #9413010

Glad you're feeling better, Terri. Looks like we're still on for the dinner show, so I'll put my leg of lamb back into the freezer.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 9, 2013
3:32 PM

Post #9413420

This flu crud that's going around is THE PITS! Terri, I'm so glad you're feeling better!! I bet that soup was a big help on a miserable throat too. =(

Today my kitchen wasn't heating up... 'cause I used my new convection/microwave to make sweet rolls for breakfast, and then had to test out how it does with 2 cookie sheets full of .. well... cookies! =) I'm gonna have to learn more about all that, 'cause the ones in the center of the sheets seemed less 'done' than the ones around the perimeter of the baking sheets.

Tonight we will be enjoying a recipe that Gita shared with me today, a Garlic Lime Chicken recipe originally shared (here?) by Marylyn__TX of DG. Marylyn, if you're still around, THANK YOU! =) Gonna doctor up some plain long-grain rice to go with it. This chicken recipe looks really yummy, I can't wait to try it. =)

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 9, 2013
3:55 PM

Post #9413444

We heated up somebody else's kitchen today , early dinner-
Los Portales on Aviation Blvd.
Yum.
And we have a designated driver too- tee hee. Mr Learners Permit had soda we got a Doz Equis and a margarita... now feeling too stuffed and lazy to tile...
Jan23
Salem Cnty, NJ
(Zone 7b)

February 9, 2013
4:22 PM

Post #9413474

Hahaha. Glad you enjoyed your dinner and driver.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 10, 2013
4:36 AM

Post #9413873

Sally, how SWEET, to heat up (and MESS up) someone else's kitchen, **and** to get a dd for the ride home! < =D

We thoroughly enjoyed that chicken last night, and the rice came out pretty ok too. Finely diced up carrots, celery, garlic, onion, and a small handful of frozen corn, sauteed in olive oil and butter with salt, pepper, lemon pepper, and coriander, to which was added the rice and chicken broth (instead of water). A nice flavorful rice to go with that delectable chicken! :)
And Brookies for dessert, Yumm!! =)
HollyAnnS
Dover, PA
(Zone 6b)

February 14, 2013
2:17 PM

Post #9419142

Hi guys, Not entirely sure what Ric has going on in the kitchen. I can tell you that he is making me a Valentine Diner. I do know that there will be Asparagus Soup (very, very yummy) and one of my favs Brussels Sprouts, he asked baked or scolloped and I said scolloped (potatoes I think) there is some kind of desert on the front pouch and all I know about that is maraschino cherries are involved and maybe pineapple? No idea on the main course. In honor of all his hard work I actually took off my PJ's, took a shower, washed my hair, shaved my legs and put on a dress. Set the table with the good silver and all. There is a lovely Orchid centerpiece I received yesterday, appropriate love songs playing in the background. Going to look for candles now. I am sure that he will post his whole menu later.

Hope you all have a lovely Valentines Day Diner.

This message was edited Feb 14, 2013 7:34 PM
HollyAnnS
Dover, PA
(Zone 6b)

February 14, 2013
4:18 PM

Post #9419245

I made her Asparagus soup, broiled lobster tail, with scallops and shrimp scampi. Scalloped potatoes, roasted Brussels sprouts and cashews. For dessert I made a 2 layer yellow cake with fresh pineapple, stuffed with maraschino cherries, and butter cream icing with coconut. Ric

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

February 14, 2013
5:48 PM

Post #9419305

WOW!
I bet you had TWO deserts for Valentines D...;o)

You are an amazing husband. Bet God broke the mold when he made YOU!

Please share how you prepare a Lobster tail. I have never made one--can't afford it.
The 4oz. ones are not worth it. 8-10oz? Now we're talking...

Happy Valentines Day to you both! Love--Gita

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 14, 2013
6:39 PM

Post #9419349

You go Ric and Holly!! Taking notes here for next year ...lol!

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 15, 2013
5:49 AM

Post #9419663

I think it'll be chili today...something slow cooker for sure. I'm working on kitchen tile and that will keep that area clear.

Thumbnail by sallyg
Click the image for an enlarged view.

HollyAnnS
Dover, PA
(Zone 6b)

February 15, 2013
7:34 AM

Post #9419781

Gita, 8oz. It was my first try at the tail, I got it a little undercooked and had to pop it into the broiler an additional 5 min. The butter mix I used was awesome.
Sally, That tile job is looking great. Ric

This message was edited Feb 15, 2013 11:37 AM
Jan23
Salem Cnty, NJ
(Zone 7b)

February 15, 2013
10:48 AM

Post #9419943

Sounds wonderful!!

That tile job is looking great, Sally!! What color grout are you going to use? I've always liked subway tile.

DH is having leftovers tonight since I am babysitting til tomorrow evening.

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 15, 2013
11:19 AM

Post #9419961

THanks Ric and Jan.

THe grout is a taupe color. It went on today. Guess what= I think I waited too long to wipe off and spent two hours..wiping scraping rubbing... egads... I think I took the grout seems down too narrow too, but, hey, it is done now and when I step back it looks fine. I want to let it dry before the next 'reveal' LOL
Jan23
Salem Cnty, NJ
(Zone 7b)

February 15, 2013
1:51 PM

Post #9420108

Yikes!!
HollyAnnS
Dover, PA
(Zone 6b)

February 15, 2013
3:51 PM

Post #9420225

Sally, be glad it wasn't a textured tile, Josh did a bathroom floor for someone and bored to tears trying to get it clean and polished. Everytime he thought it was done it dried with a muddy haze. He does not have the patience of Job by any means, as a bridge builder his idea of finished concrete is with a coarse broom. When we did the greenhouse he was amazed that you can make it look like polished stone. LOL Ric

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 16, 2013
1:33 PM

Post #9421116

Oh my goodness Sally, your tile job looks Great!! Very professional! (heeheee, been married to an electrician for too long, while looking was wondering what your plates look like that will go on your plugs, LOL!)

Gosh Ric, you get an A+ for that beautiful dinner and dessert! ... now I'm hungry. < =/

White chili with Great Northern beans and corn muffins will be heating up this kitchen tonight. Nice warm comfort foods for a dreary snainy evening. ("Snainy": that's a new word. Snowy/rainy.) =)
Jan23
Salem Cnty, NJ
(Zone 7b)

February 16, 2013
4:55 PM

Post #9421317

Snainy. Love that word!!

Stopped at a Chik FIL a on the way home from babysitting.
coleup
annapolis, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 22, 2013
9:59 AM

Post #9427860

According to todays Daves Article, tomorrow is National Banana Bread Day! Who knew. And me with only two ripe bananas and none in the store.

This message was edited Feb 22, 2013 1:26 PM

Catbird423

Catbird423
Odenton, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 22, 2013
11:08 AM

Post #9427924

I prefer today--It is National Margarita Day today!!

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

February 22, 2013
11:39 AM

Post #9427964

I'll be right over--Robin! My favorite drink too...

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 22, 2013
2:59 PM

Post #9428167

OOH! we're on our way, me and 'Mark-arita' LOL he likes them too.

Shopped today, have a chicken to roast. I read a recipe that says, coat in greek yogurt and let marinate overnight.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 22, 2013
4:01 PM

Post #9428252

Any particular flavor, or plain yogurt? I bet lemon would be really yummy! =)

aspenhill

aspenhill
Lucketts, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 22, 2013
4:24 PM

Post #9428282

Just got back to the hotel after one of the best dinners that I have had at a restaurant in a long time. Mike and I drove down to Clarksville this afternoon for the annual Hellebores festival at Pine Knot Farms. I've been wanting to come down for years, but a 5 hour trip just never worked out before. Mike the non gardener is less than thrilled about the event, but he is being a good sport and I know despite his good natured grumbling that he will enjoy it. The weather is supposed to be cruddy, but so far it's ok. It was an enjoyable drive and we had a few laughs along the way.

Clarksville is a small town, but there is a small town flavor of a nice restaurant across the street from the hotel. For an appetizer, we had bacon wrapped shrimp stuffed with jalapeno peppers and cheese. On Friday and Saturday, they offer slow cooked prime rib. I had that along with a twice baked potato and a side salad with homemade raspberry vinaigrette. Everything was delicious.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 22, 2013
4:29 PM

Post #9428290

... Oh no, now that song "Last Train to Clarksville" is going through my head...

Ooooh, a Hellebore Festival!!??!?!? How cool!!! Looking forward to LOTS of pictures!!!! < =D

aspenhill

aspenhill
Lucketts, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 22, 2013
4:41 PM

Post #9428297

Too sympatico - that song was going through my head too, and while you were posting I was googling the Monkey's song factoids to see if it was about this town. Nope, but interesting story anyway.
Jan23
Salem Cnty, NJ
(Zone 7b)

February 22, 2013
5:46 PM

Post #9428353

Loved the Monkees. That dinner sounds Yummy!

critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

February 22, 2013
5:47 PM

Post #9428355

I'm glad you had a great dinner to top off a spectacular day! Happy Birthday, Aspenhill / Terri ! ! !
Jan23
Salem Cnty, NJ
(Zone 7b)

February 22, 2013
6:03 PM

Post #9428370

Happy Birthday, dear Aspen

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 22, 2013
6:05 PM

Post #9428371

Mmm mm mm Terri...yum

All kinds of yogurt chicken roasting going on out there , from the looks of my last recipe search. Kind o like this
http://www.thewednesdaychef.com/the_wednesday_chef/2008/05/liz-pearsons-yo.html
I saw lemon yogurt before plain so yes speedy I got lemon.

And big bunches of kale, though kale does not sound like the right veg for a Greek recipe...I'll pretend it is spinach. Mark doesn't like eggplant. There's a good Greek restaurant between Catonsville and Ellicott City, on Frederick Road.

CLarksville WV?
We went to a park/ resort way down in WV one year, called Pipestem. There was very little nearby but did have a fantastic BBQ place near there, out in nowhere.

aspenhill

aspenhill
Lucketts, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 22, 2013
7:55 PM

Post #9428441

Clarksville, VA on the VA/NC border - about 1 hour east of Danville.
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

February 22, 2013
10:00 PM

Post #9428565

I hope you're getting some good rest tonight, Terri, so you can tip toe through the hellebores tomorrow! I'm so excited for you! I know you'll come home with something really special for your garden, too. I saw something about a NJ nursery visiting with witch hazels... sniff them for us, OK? I always hear how fragrant they are, but mine isn't, and the ones DPF had last weekend aren't either.

Oh, we're supposed to be talking about food... I was sorting out the freezer, trying to organize it, getting rid of UFO's (unidentified frozen objects)... and I realized I still had a turkey from Thanksgiving. A 22 pounder. How did I not know that? LOL I threw it in a cooler with some water to keep the surface temperature even, and it's been slowly thawing on the back deck.

We're all under the weather, so nobody really wanted turkey for dinner... I figured it would end up in stir fry or curry dishes, so I tried to get creative with it. I took several tablespoons of citrus/pepper/curry seasoning, plus garlic and ginger, and added it to half a cup of applesauce. It got a shot of soy sauce for salt and a couple spoons of honey to smooth out the taste. (I usually mix my seasoning into applesauce... easy to spread around, and it helps moisten & tenderize the meat.)

I loosened the skin and rubbed the seasoning all over the turkey (under the skin, so the flavor gets into the meat). Then I mixed up a little Sunny D, soy, and chinese vinegar to baste with. (Hey, you use what's on hand.) It turned out pretty tasty, and nowhere near as spicy as I thought it would be with all that black pepper. I'll boil up the bones and scraps for a bit tomorrow with the pan juices to get some stock to use with the meat.

So... turkey... it's not just for Thanksgiving!

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 23, 2013
5:15 AM

Post #9428686

Oh my Critt, that sounds delicious!! What did you serve on the side with that delectable turkey!? I make a typical "Sunday Roast Chicken Dinner" every Sunday evening, and quite frankly, I'm getting a little bored with it. I may just 'borrow' some of your ideas, if'n ya don't mind? =) I've got egg noodles, I've got rices... I've got a few different sorts of beans... what else?... I dunno. HA! I've got LOADS of garlic, that should help! < =D
Jan23
Salem Cnty, NJ
(Zone 7b)

February 23, 2013
7:02 AM

Post #9428782

I SOOOOO hear you about UFOs. There are some in my freezer too.

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 23, 2013
7:53 AM

Post #9428818

Orange- ginger- garlic, asian inspired,...sounds good! Whole turkey is such a good buy at Thanksgiving.

Yesterdays freezer find for me was bean soup. Heated with some chicken broth (poured off from baked chicken this week) and leftover sweet potatoes, and some sauce from sausage and peppers. - point being, it's real cooking that you scrounge, choose from what's there and make something tasty, hopefully.


UFOs is why I am not tempted by a large extra freezer. I Hate wasting food. I live within five miles of a dozen food stores, and am on the road almost daily. In my mind I can't save enough money on food bargains to pay for the electric.


(Bowing, getting off soapbox, walking away, ducking the year old hunks of frozen soup...)
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

February 23, 2013
7:56 AM

Post #9428820

UFO's are really only "old" when you have birthday parties for them.

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 23, 2013
8:04 AM

Post #9428831

LOL!

I have a foil wrapped snowball from 2006. Or else a ball of foil, dated 2006 which has long since freeze dried!
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

February 23, 2013
8:29 AM

Post #9428852

Funny! I love trying to figure out what the item was originally.
coleup
annapolis, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 23, 2013
8:47 AM

Post #9428867

lol Pirl!
Forensic Freezology!

Next stop ice cores from Antarctica! Or "from freeze to tableau" in under 30 minutes, Let frozen "dogs" lie.

I'm not looking til it's Spring or the living is easy, which ever comes first.

This message was edited Feb 23, 2013 10:15 PM
HollyAnnS
Dover, PA
(Zone 6b)

February 23, 2013
10:09 AM

Post #9428932

I found a few UFOs when I swapped our old 20 something cubic foot freezer for our new energy star 12.8'cu. Our electric co. actually gave us 2 rebates, 1 for purchasing energy star, and one for turning in the old one, totaling either $125 or $150. I find we do save quite a bit of money having a bulk freezer, often I buy whole sirloins, whole pork loins and such, as well as venison. We like frozen veggies from our garden too, it's so much easier to freeze rather than canning. The one thing I do like to can is red beets because I add pickling spice to them.
I am so looking forward to March 17th. Just thinking about corned beef brisket, cabbage,'taters,and Irish soda bread w/ European butter. Just thinking about it has me salivating like one of Pavlovs dogs. LOL Ric
Jan23
Salem Cnty, NJ
(Zone 7b)

February 23, 2013
10:15 AM

Post #9428936

Heehee. I need to empty out the freezer downstairs and clean it out and unplug it.

Spaghetti tonight with a sauce I'll make up soon. It will have sausage and onions and a red pepper. Maybe some carrots and celery, too. Then there will be some to freeze for Jeff when I'm gone. I couldn't help but chuckle when I typed the word freeze though.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

February 23, 2013
10:18 AM

Post #9428938

Sounds so good, Ric. I could send over some frozen raspberry turnovers that are probably around the legal age for drinking.
HollyAnnS
Dover, PA
(Zone 6b)

February 23, 2013
4:07 PM

Post #9429233

I may just add pickles to my canning this year if I can find my Grandmothers recipe. She made a lime pickle to die for. Lightly spiced with a crunch and the fruitful flavor of lime, it made a tuna salad sandwich taste like a Waldorf salad.
Memories pressed between the pages of my mind. It appears this may have been first performed by the "King", Songwriters: CRAWFORD, DAVID JUSTIN / OGBOURNE, DELANO / VERGER DE DIOS, NICOLE . But I really loved Streisand version from "The way we were" . Ric

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

February 23, 2013
4:16 PM

Post #9429239

Ric--
Here is my Pickle recipe--always a winner. Yummy and crunchy...

See what you could finagle to add lime. May be good like your G-Mothers?
***************************************************

Gita’s Refrigerator Garlic-Dill Pickles


Need: 3 wide-mouthed jars (pickle type), or Mayo. Jars
One BIG bunch of fresh Dill
5-6 cloves Garlic (or to taste)—diced or thinly sliced.
10-12 pickling cucumbers--(such as Kirby). Fresh is best!
Store cucumbers are WAXED, and no way you can remove it! If you
must use store cukes, score them through the skin with a fork
and slice them thickly. They also have more seeds! But…it will
work if no others are available.
Lately—I have been using the long, English, seedless cucumbers.
They work very well.

To Do: Stuff jars ¼ full of fresh dill, stems and leaves! Sprinkle a gene-
rous amount of the chopped garlic on top. Mix up a bit.

Stuff jars as full as you can with speared/sliced cucumbers, inter-
spersing them with some more Dill and a bit of garlic.
For MY taste---I usually have too much garlic in these.
Some love it!


Prepare the Broth: In a 2Qt. saucepan, combine the following:
2 and a half cups water….3/4cup white vinegar (can be part
Apple Cider vinegar)…1 rounded, regular Tbs. KOSHER, or
Pickling salt (DO NOT use regular, iodized salt!!!).
1 regTbs. Sugar, 1tsp mustard seed, 1tsp. Pickling
Spice….or--1-2 Bay leaves…6-8 pcs. Whole Allspice,
And about 1/2tsp. Hot pepper flakes.

Bring broth to a boil. Lower heat and simmer all, stirring often,
For about 10-15 minutes. Keep VERY hot until ready to use!

,b>Filling Jars:
Stirring constantly, to distribute spices, ladle hot broth
evenly into jars until all contents are covered. Seal jars. Invert
each jar a couple of times to mix contents.
Let jars cool to room temperature, and then refrigerate.

Pickles are ready to eat in 2-3 days! They will be delicious and
crunchy! Use them up in about 2-3 weeks, as they will soften
with time, but will still be good.

Enjoy! Gita
HollyAnnS
Dover, PA
(Zone 6b)

February 23, 2013
4:39 PM

Post #9429256

Thank You Gita, you're the tops! Ric
coleup
annapolis, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 23, 2013
4:55 PM

Post #9429270

...I don't think that I can take it, cause it took so long to make it and I'll never have that recipe again...

Fret not over 'lost recipies' there is help. Public Radio has a feature whereby they help people recreate foods they remember tasting but no longer know how to make. The team keeps adjusting until it is just right. Interviews I heard were very much like being back at Grandma's kitchen and the finale results "just like grandma used to make"!

The Lost Recipe Project
NPR
http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2012/09/13/161078540/a-little-patience-a-lot-of-salt-are-keys-to-a-lost-pickle-recipe
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

February 23, 2013
6:40 PM

Post #9429390

Hey, not only is the upstairs freezer cleaned & sorted, but I even put a whiteboard on the door with a list of what's inside, saving me from the "what's available?" recitation every time I say the dinner plan is to have something from the freezer.

The turkey turned out moist and flavorful, not terribly exotic (it really takes a lot of spice rub to make more than a subtle impact on a turkey, I think). We had some tonight with rice and/or leftover pasta. I boiled up the drippings and the bones (super easy to do by throwing everything into the roasting pan, add enough water to mostly cover, then into the oven for a few hours at 250'). With that and the meat (which I've pulled/cut off the bones but haven't cut into bite sized pieces yet), we'll be set for quite a few meals. I'm thinking stir-fry, mostly... simple seasoning, garlic and ginger and 5-spice. It's a little too sweet for most curry dishes. The turkey could be served "straight up," also, and the stock could be used to make a nice sauce on something like carrots as a side.

Last weekend, we made spaghetti sauce in the Nesco roaster (14 quarts) and froze 5 meals' worth of mini-meatloaves. Together with the usual complement of leftover stir fry, red-eye chicken, soup, etc, we've got a pretty full freezer... so I'm thinking I don't have to do much cooking for a while. :-)

Does anybody else use Ann Landers' meatloaf recipe? We love it. It's the one I grew up with. The only change I've made is to (usually) use my home-made chili sauce instead of ketchup in the meat mixture. (That worked so well the first time we tried it that I've made a couple of chili sauce batches with extra cloves and other seasonings that I think will work especially well with the ground beef.)

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 24, 2013
2:23 AM

Post #9429546

Not knowing just what Ms. Landers' recipe was, I had to look it up... and I'm sorry to say, "no", I have never made it just like that, but I have done some variations of it. Never thought of using water in a meatloaf... wonder what that does. (??) I also use chilli sauce in mine though, rather than ketchup or plain tomato sauce, it just seems to give it a 'zingier' flavour.

Last night was left-overs, I was just too tired to cook a 'real' meal. DH and I spent 11 hours cleaning up and organizing the basement, so all my body parts were ready to fall off when we were done. Had some left-over BBQ pork in the fridge; defrosted some sub rolls and had fries with BBQ pulled pork subs.

Today, I think it's marinara-making day. =)

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

February 24, 2013
2:34 AM

Post #9429549

Good Morning speedie----

Off to the meeting...we will, probably, be served doughnuts and juices and coffee.
They usually have something...Not much appetite this early. G.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 24, 2013
3:19 AM

Post #9429560

Gooood morning!! Probably out the door already, but BOY have you got a BIG D-mail waiting for you when you get home! < =D
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

February 24, 2013
1:00 PM

Post #9430073

I think the hot water in the Ann Landers recipe hydrates the onion soup mix and the bread crumbs. It works, so I'm not messing with it. Her recipe freezes very well, but only *after* it's baked. I tried freezing it "raw" one time, and it wasn't very satisfactory.

I do double the amount of "sauce" for topping the meatloaf (usually some mix of tomato sauce, ketchup, chili sauce). I have a pan that makes 8 rectangular "muffins" (like a muffin & a half, or a mini bread)... Instead of doing one big meatloaf, I make 8 mini loaves from a recipe, then poke a big dent down the center of each one so I can really add a lot of tomato topping before baking.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 24, 2013
3:18 PM

Post #9430241

Mmmmm that sounds really yummy! Now I want to make a meatloaf again. =) Where did you get that interesting baking pan? ... not that I have room anywhere for any new baking items... but that's beside the point. =)

Made that marinara today and it sure smelled up the house nicely! For dinner... the ol' Sunday stand-by, Roast chicken... didn't have the oomph to do any thinking about how to do it differently... OTHER THAN.. I brined it first. I have never brined a chicken before roasting, but I've brined parts for other recipes, so I figured why not? It's roasting now, so we'll see how it turns out.

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

February 24, 2013
4:11 PM

Post #9430279

speedie---
A rotisserie Chicken from Costco is the world's best!!! The yummiest I have ever had!
And--only $4.88. OH! The flavor!! And--all the fat has dripped off...Why bother cooking?

I am not a member--but was last year. Got a big one--ate it for a week!
Have the 60 day free at BJ's. It will expite on 2/28. Gotta make a trip to get a few things.
Will check out their rotisserie chicken...G.



sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 24, 2013
5:08 PM

Post #9430333

I brine the Thanksgiving turkey. Usually my chicken goes rinse and season and into the oven, no brine.

My yogurt marinated chicken was good, can't say much different, and I will say that smearing a handful of yogurt on a raw chicken is quite a slimy experience. Made a big pot of kale and turnip greens today, lots of lutein for good eye health.

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

February 24, 2013
5:55 PM

Post #9430369

Sally--

buttermilk is also a good marinade for chicken. You can leave it overnight.
Then wipe off the B-Milk and cook as you wish. it is supposed to make the meat more tender.

When i roast chicken--I season it inside and out with: S&P; lots of onion powder; a bit of garlic Powder;
and, sometimes, a bit of Poultry Seasoning.
Chunk up some carrots and celery and put some inside--and all around the chicken.
Some whole Allspice and a bay leaf or two.
Do 400* for about 1/2 hr. to brown--and then 375* till done.
I baste with the juices as often as i can. Always good!
G.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 25, 2013
4:01 AM

Post #9430630

The chicken turned out really yummy, and the gravy (from the drippings) was... I'm not sure how to describe it other than "more flavorful" than usual. Not salty, but really rich!! I make up my own "house-seasoning blend", which I keep handy at all times. It's a conglomeration of : Onion powder, garlic powder, basil, parsley, Rosemary, Thyme, ground black pepper, paprika, coriander, ... and whatever else grabs my attention at the time. Oh, and about 1/4 tsp of Kosher salt... all in a 6-ounce sized shaker bottle. I use my coffee grinder to grind up the leafy herbs super fine. LOTS of paprika!! =) That blend is what I use on my chicken ALWAYS, over and under the skin. Massaged all in.. I feel like a Swedish masseuse, HA!

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

February 25, 2013
5:12 AM

Post #9430672

Speedie--

Just once! Promise me you will do this when making gravy. OK? Everyone else too...

When your gravy is all done--no matter how you do it--and you have removed it from the heat,
mix in a glob (~2 full Tbs.) of SOUR CREAM. YES! You will not believe how it changes the taste to awesome!
This goes for ALL gravies you make...I would not make a gravy without it!

Let the gravy cool a tiny bit before you do this. Take a half a cup of it out and
mix the Sour Cream into that--then mix it into the hot gravy. Makes it come out
smoother. If you just put the SC into the hot gravy--it will clump up and it is harder to
smooth it out.

If you are not sure you want to do this--take a small amt. of the gravy and mix into that
a very small amt. of SC and taste it--then taste the plain gravy. See which one tastes better...
Gita
HollyAnnS
Dover, PA
(Zone 6b)

February 25, 2013
6:35 AM

Post #9430793

That sound yummy Gita. Ric

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

February 25, 2013
6:58 AM

Post #9430831

Ric--Thanks--
Sour cream has many uses--not just in dips...Like in a lot of cakes...
EX: Craving something sweet and "decadent"?
Take some reg. SC on a spoon and dip it in sugar. YES! It is amazing!!!
Try it! You'll like it!!!!

Something else you may like--Ric-the-cook...
This Casserole is VERY good--feeds a crowd--can be frozen and re-heated,
Great for pot-lucks, etc...Easy to make too.

****************************************************

MACARONI, HAM, AND CHEESE CASSEROLE
From: Gita Veskimets

6-8oz. (dry) elbow, bow knot, or any other small macaroni
(cooked per directions and drained) I use elbow..
4-6 Tbsp. Butter or Margarine
4 eggs
1 ¾ cup light cream or 1/2 and 1/2
½ tsp. Salt and ¼ tsp. Pepper—or to taste for both
1 tsp. Dry Mustard
½ tsp. Paprika
3 cups good, cooked ham in ¼” dice (One lg. ham steak will do)
1 ½ cups shredded, sharp Cheddar Cheese (more is yummy)
1 med. onion—minced
1—10oz. Pkg. Frozen peas (optional) for color

Cheese Crumb topping (recipe at the end)

DIRECTIONS:
***Have all dicing done ahead of time!***
In a 9x11x3 casserole dish (or similar)—(half a disposable foil pan works great):

--Put drained, hot macaroni into the casserole pan.
--Toss cooked, hot macaroni with the butter/margarine.
--Lightly beat eggs with a small amt. of the cream. Add all seasonings and whisk
until well incorporated. Add remaining cream.
--Mix the ham, onion and cheese into the macaroni and pour cream mixture over
the top.

--Sprinkle top with cheese crumb topping. (Can be frozen at this stage).

--Bake in a 375degree oven for 45min.-1 hour until firm and bubbly.
--Serves 8-10.

CHEESE CRUMB TOPPING:
Combine ½ cup shredded, sharp Cheddar Cheese with 2-3 Tbsp. of fine, dry bread crumbs and 2-3 Tbsp. of melted butter/margarine. Sprinkle over casserole. I tend to increase all these amounts. Never too much good stuff!

Note: Do not fill pan to the top. This may bubble over as it bakes.
This makes a great potluck dish. It makes a ½ aluminum foil pan full
**This freezes VERY well. To use, thaw out in the fridge and bake as usual.
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

February 25, 2013
9:21 AM

Post #9431027

Mmm, I love sour cream. "Blue Box" or even house brands of mac 'n cheese are so much better if you skip the butter & milk... instead, stir in the cheese powder with a generous amount (1/4 cup at least) of sour cream. Add salmon, peas, and basil, and it's positively "gourmet." Add salsa, corn, and a couple of cut-up hot dogs, and it's something totally different.

My mom used to make a simple "dressing" for fruit salad with just sour cream & sugar. I hadn't thought of it in a long time, until Gita mentioned eating it on a spoon on a treat.
HollyAnnS
Dover, PA
(Zone 6b)

February 25, 2013
9:32 AM

Post #9431045

I threw one of my UFOs, no date, from the old freezer in the crock pot to see how or what becomes of it. I think it may be a sirloin tip. Threw in generous portions of caraway, cumin, and celery seed, as well as cracked pepper and onion. By 3-4pm I should know if I have supper or fox food. LOL Ric
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

February 25, 2013
9:34 AM

Post #9431049

LOL... well, if you've been clearing out your freezer, you probably have a backup dinner you could heat & serve!
HollyAnnS
Dover, PA
(Zone 6b)

February 25, 2013
9:47 AM

Post #9431076

Yes, Olive Garden or Subway? LOL As I sit here chatting I have 2 beautiful Pileated Woodpeckers feeding on the suet feeders a couple of hours ago. They really have an appetite, between them and all the others we go through a suet cake a day. Ric

Gitagal

Gitagal
Baltimore, MD
(Zone 7a)

February 25, 2013
1:16 PM

Post #9431330

I had a swarm of all kinds of blackbirds descend on my suet cakes yesterday.
Saw a lot of Grackles.
I banged on the window real hard with a clothes hanger--and they all flew away.
Came back once--I made noise again--and they went for good.

OK! I know this belongs on the bird-watching thread,,, sorry...
Ric started it----G.

Now i am going to pig out on the Rotisserie Chicken i got at BJ's. drooooooll...
HollyAnnS
Dover, PA
(Zone 6b)

February 25, 2013
2:00 PM

Post #9431390

The NOID meat was beef, smelled great, so I added carrots and potatoes. Now it smells even better, I'm not sure it will have a lot of nutritional value left, but its not as though with my waist line I'm malnourished. LOL Ric

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 25, 2013
2:12 PM

Post #9431404

yum Gita!

hey good idea with the box mac Jill!

yum Ric protein is protein how much could it have lost?

Tonight- Leftover sausage and peppers sauce not enough for a pasta topping but somehow in a skillet pasta dish it 'goes' farther, with salad..
HollyAnnS
Dover, PA
(Zone 6b)

February 25, 2013
2:41 PM

Post #9431427

Sally, Would you like to add some new spice to this thread, this one is getting a little loooooong. Ha,Ha Ric
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

February 25, 2013
4:35 PM

Post #9431568

Spaghetti tonight, with sauce (sort of bolognese style marinara with plenty of ground beef) from the new batch... One reason we need the freezer space; a new batch of sauce takes up most of a shelf, since we started making it in the Nesco turkey roaster! (hey, prep takes only a little longer than for a pan or a crockpot batch... and it's one of our favorites)

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 25, 2013
4:44 PM

Post #9431581

I'll start a new thread

Please continue
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1300163/

This message was edited Feb 25, 2013 7:57 PM

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