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Plant Identification: Large leafed water plant

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Forum: Plant IdentificationReplies: 15, Views: 133
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RosinaBloom

RosinaBloom
Waihi
New Zealand

January 14, 2013
3:49 PM

Post #9385030

Large leafed water plant ID, please

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vngarden
Seattle, WA

January 14, 2013
4:02 PM

Post #9385050

I saw a couple of two white flowers underneath the leaves. If so, it could be a species of Nymphaea, water lily.

Domehomedee

Domehomedee
Arroyo Grande, CA
(Zone 9a)

January 14, 2013
6:20 PM

Post #9385193

It looks like a water lily to me too.

RosinaBloom

RosinaBloom
Waihi
New Zealand

January 14, 2013
7:16 PM

Post #9385297

vngarden, homedomedee,

Thank you.
'White Water Lily'( Nymphaea alba)
Not a good year for some water lilies here. Perhaps too hot a summer?
altagardener
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3b)

January 14, 2013
7:29 PM

Post #9385324

Yes, it appears to be a white-flowered water lily, but I'm not sure enough info has been presented to really be sure it's the species Nymphaea alba (as opposed to a number of other white-flowered species/cultivars), although perhaps you have other info that confirms it.
Nymphaea alba is said to have leaf margins tinged red, orbicular leaves (these don't look exactly orbicular but it's hard to judge with them standing out of the water) with V-shaped sinuses (could be but also much easier to see when leaves are floating).
It does look like a hardy water lily (and Nymphaea alba is a hardy water lily).

Odd how all the leaves are standing out of the water, as though it was confined in a very small pond, though clearly it's not.



This message was edited Jan 14, 2013 8:38 PM
vngarden
Seattle, WA

January 14, 2013
7:29 PM

Post #9385326

I'm not authoritative in botany. I'm just an amateur flower photographer. I hope someone gives you better explanations to your question.

I replied to too many queries to make me feel like I am such a mouthpiece. I apologize to anyone offended to that.

altagardener
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3b)

January 14, 2013
7:36 PM

Post #9385339

Good heavens, I would hope no one would be offended by anything said here! :-)
Since it's supposed to be a plant ID forum, I'm just providing some of the characteristics of Nymphaea alba for comparison.
vngarden
Seattle, WA

January 14, 2013
7:43 PM

Post #9385353

I was meant to say we need more participants to make it more lively, even we cordially disagreed sometimes.

RosinaBloom

RosinaBloom
Waihi
New Zealand

January 14, 2013
10:47 PM

Post #9385484

Water lily (Nymphaea alba), Woodfry's Farm for ST8720
The two common wild water lilies are easily identified when in flower: Nymphaea alba bears white flowers in July and August and has rounded leaves, while Nuphar lutea, from June to August, bears yellow flowers which are much smaller, and has oval leaves. Both have massive underground stems or rhizomes by which they are anchored to the bottom of the lakes, ponds or slow-moving rivers in which they grow. Leaves and flowers grow up from the bottom and float on the surface, because their stems are spongy and full of air spaces. Although the leaves are large, they do not shut out enough sunlight to harm other pond life. At night the petals collapse and the flower may sink below the surface of the water to emerge again next morning. The rooting stems are sometimes eaten in northern Europe, and in the past were used as a cure for baldness.http://www.geograph.org.uk/reuse.php?id=1408002

Copyright Miss Steel and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

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sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

January 14, 2013
10:49 PM

Post #9385485

hi vngarden, I've enjoyed your participation, I like to play 'guess and check' and learn on this forum, I try not to guess unless I feel pretty confident, since I am "uneducated" as well. I can't imagine anyone has been annoyed at your contributions .
; ^)

RosinaBloom

RosinaBloom
Waihi
New Zealand

January 14, 2013
11:01 PM

Post #9385486

PLEASE NOTE:

The single photo above of the white water lily which is with the article Woodfry's Farm is a copyright to Miss Steel and not to myself RosinaBloom.
My computer skills are perhaps not as good as my photography! Hope this has not caused a problem.

vngarden
Seattle, WA

January 14, 2013
11:03 PM

Post #9385487

if you don't mind, may I ask what camera do you use for your photography? I am guessing a DSLR and what macro lens you use for your camera?

RosinaBloom

RosinaBloom
Waihi
New Zealand

January 14, 2013
11:24 PM

Post #9385489

vngarden,

You have been a treasure in helping me ID so many of my plants in the last couple of days. For this I am truly grateful.
By the sounds of it, like you I am more of a hobby photographer - but we're all willing to learn.
I am using a Finepix HS20EXR at the moment - the macro lens is part of the camera, so I don't have to get too clever! The latest version out is a little lighter, and does not have AA batteries to recharge up. (A friend has just returned from the States with the next version up).

RosinaBloom

RosinaBloom
Waihi
New Zealand

January 14, 2013
11:27 PM

Post #9385491

Domehomedee,

I notice above that I misspelt your name - it's a day on my knees today!
altagardener
Calgary, AB
(Zone 3b)

January 15, 2013
5:30 AM

Post #9385605

RosinaBloom wrote:Water lily (Nymphaea alba), Woodfry's Farm for ST8720
The two common wild water lilies are easily identified when in flower: Nymphaea alba bears white flowers in July and August and has rounded leaves, while Nuphar lutea, from June to August, bears yellow flowers which are much smaller, and has oval leaves.


Yes, they'd be very easily distinguished if the plants were in the wild and observed in a place where they are native; given that is not the case (the plant appears to be in cultivation where those two species are not native), it opens up the possibility that it is some other white-flowered, probably hardy water lily. (Actually, Nuphar lutea would be very easily distinguished in any case.)
It may be Nymphaea alba. Could you get close-up photos of the flowers and undersides of the leaves with a small ruler in the photo for scale?

Without being able to make out some details, it could also be Nymphaea odorata, or various hybrids, e.g. 'Marliaceae Albida', 'White Sultan', etc..

This message was edited Jan 15, 2013 7:28 AM
vngarden
Seattle, WA

January 15, 2013
6:35 AM

Post #9385667

up-close of water lily photographed in Seattle, Wa around June, 2012.

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