Photo by Melody

Article: Molasses in January--Just How Slow Is It?: Sticky Situation

Communities > Forums > Article: Molasses in January--Just How Slow Is It?
bookmark
Forum: Article: Molasses in January--Just How Slow Is It?Replies: 61, Views: 209
Add to Bookmarks
-
AuthorContent

growin

growin
Vancouver, BC
(Zone 8b)


January 15, 2013
10:20 AM

Post #9385932

My father uses the expression often, even in July. Another use for Molasses that most probably don't know about: http://www.stovebolt.com/techtips/rust/rust_molasses.htm - I tried it on my previous 1940 Chevy truck parts and it worked. Took a while and I was accused of "making a mess" despite everything in bins and "wasting sugar". Considering this incident occurred just a short time after the end of WW1 and only 2 years after the Halifax explosion http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halifax_explosion , I'm sure there was quite a bit of finger pointing.

This message was edited Jan 15, 2013 12:09 PM

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

January 15, 2013
10:28 AM

Post #9385940

That has been a long time expression in my family also ! That the subject also is sooooo!!!!! good!!!!!!!!!

carrielamont

carrielamont
Euless, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 15, 2013
11:41 AM

Post #9386035

Growin, I found the Halifax Explosion here:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halifax_Explosion But I had never heard of either of these events! My husband (a New Yorker) was the one who suggested this topic. I got totally immersed in local history, 1919 politics, anarchists, bombs and so on. You're right, the Halifax event fits right in, as do the Sacco and Venzetti case (they were from the North End too), JFK, Henry Cabot Lodge Jr and Sr (one beat Honey Fitz in a senate race, the other was Nixon's VP candidate and was beaten by his grandson). I also found it interesting that this article ended up discussing religion AND politics. :-)

Thanks for your comments. Does that rust trick work on laundry?

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

January 15, 2013
11:48 AM

Post #9386046

Hello carrielamont Bit of a thread stray , wasn't the early Mark Twain motion picture museum and similar located around there someplace.. Lots of history there , interesting

growin

growin
Vancouver, BC
(Zone 8b)


January 15, 2013
12:22 PM

Post #9386098

My grandfather was attending the Royal Naval College of Canada in Halifax at the time and was saved by a door. He was probably on his way out of the college to assist with the fire on the ship but he was hit by the door which was nailed by glass & debris, which saved him. I'm sure my father uses the term, "Slow as Molasses in January", due to my grandfather's experiences and familiarity with the Boston molasses incident.

Politics and religion often enter the picture on events that shape society, for better or worse.

I don't know about working on laundry but it did work on removing rust from truck parts fairly well, albeit "slow as molasses in Janunary".

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

January 15, 2013
12:48 PM

Post #9386126

Only proves that terrorism does not exactly confine itself to any particular generation, It has always been with us and likely always will be. My eldest parent was burned from chemicals in an explosion and fire during WW2. The man sitting next to him dissolved away unto a skeleton.
You can only comprehend what the elders recall of events attempt to convey ,Some of the ideas humanities create and demand are very frightening , Makes the history of such places interesting with more to learn about.
He referred to things burning like Molasses

This message was edited Jan 15, 2013 4:50 PM

growin

growin
Vancouver, BC
(Zone 8b)


January 15, 2013
1:09 PM

Post #9386155

It's interesting what you can learn by asking. I talked to my father about the Boston Molasses incident and asked his take on it all. It was taught in Canadian English curriculum as a writing exercise. Why was there such a large tank of molasses in Boston? "Well", he said, "molasses was used by the foundry in iron manufacturing and your grandfather was very familiar with the large foundry in Philadelphia in the manufacture of naval ship parts." Who knew!? He went on to comment on the use of molasses in foundry sand moulds as he had experienced in his tenure as a lab tech at a foundry in Owen Sound. Something about added carbon for a stronger iron, particularly important in naval ship parts. My father said the inspection, as you indicate so well, was being conducted by the accountant who was neither qualified or interested in conducting.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

January 15, 2013
1:33 PM

Post #9386216

Depending upon what the carbon is made from , the sugars in molasses can become unstable , with acids .(ETC> AS also used in explosive compounds at the time (Molasses) ,that we will pass on getting into)
My elder was personnel at the time : He use to grit his teeth still years later in my time and reply ' "educated idiots" about your last statement..
Sometimes it was not true about not being qualified , only that some of the people inspecting and reviewing did not care,( to do and get this over with attitude) Your statement about political , social, influencing events applies.
His other reply was"" they miss things looking down their nose at all of it""

carrielamont

carrielamont
Euless, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 15, 2013
1:48 PM

Post #9386248

Now I have gotten confused! (Although "saved by the door" is catchier than "saved by the bell," don't you think?)

Juhur, I have never heard of "burning like molasses" but that doesn't mean much; there are any number of things which I have never heard of. The earliest terrorism I've heard of is when one person would burn another person's olive tree down, thereby depriving him of food, fuel, lumber, light (lamp oil), etc.

Molasses was used in iron manufacturing??? I'm not even sure the folks at Wikipedia know that, but I believe your father; his report of the molasses flood, or the tank at least, is spot on. He sounds quite reliable.

I think it is ALL EXTREMELY interesting, much more so than when I was in high school and teachers were trying to cram this type of stuff into my head! They should have used more information relating to molasses and fermentation and JFK, and less stuff about the Renaissance and the Middle Ages. I mean, I saw Jackie K. and JFK Jr once, I know whom they're talking about in the list of presidents and governors and mayors. Not so much the Austro-Hungarian Empire...although if I can think of a gardening-related angle, I'd love to learn about that too!!!

Thank you all for your interesting comments.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Euless, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 15, 2013
1:52 PM

Post #9386257

Juhur,

I need to learn more about the chemistry of what you're describing. (We cross-posted.) I know that for instance, if molasses is in the recipe, you use baking SODA instead of baking POWDER--I think that's related somehow to your point about the unstable acids.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

January 15, 2013
2:15 PM

Post #9386288

History of explosives ; Sometimes after the sugar was extracted (brown sugar) either would be burnt for carbons ,
Having to do with earlier times of century past and the one before molasses was one of the compounds used in experimentation of explosive Naval jellies,and such as when tobacco acids were used also.
The acids from the sugars or something from the carbons made from that. I came across the molasses once or twice while reading about acids in explosives made from tobacco.. (older history )
Info gets harder to find .
Wonder about that Baking Powder use to be used in many of those earlier explosive formulas I had myself...

This message was edited Jan 15, 2013 6:19 PM

carrielamont

carrielamont
Euless, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 15, 2013
2:30 PM

Post #9386312

All I know is from cooking: CO2 (carbon dioxide) gas is what makes things "rise". You can get it by fermentation (yeast, sourdough) or from a chemical reaction (acid + sodium bicarbonate/ baking soda) or (liquid + sodium bicarbonate + cream of tartar). You seem to really understand this blowing stuff up!

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

January 15, 2013
2:47 PM

Post #9386335

Thank you for the complement ,, only about all I understand is the extraction of nitrates(to make Nitric acid) and similars?
That is likely how some accidents happened in earlier times, nitrates in the carbons..
I might help bake some bread or some muffins from time to time only no home brewing of explosives or rocket fuel here. Although I do have a certain fascination with explosives, Woody Guthrie songs about events past, and such..

Yes I noticed that cream of tartar was in a bunch of those formulas also.(oxidational gasses likely as you said)
Although admittedly I have made a firecracker or two previously, it has never became a fixation , only a social event indicator ...lol

growin

growin
Vancouver, BC
(Zone 8b)


January 15, 2013
3:00 PM

Post #9386349

I did find quite a bit about molasses use in foundry moulds: http://books.google.ca/books?id=NOotk64Grx0C&lpg=PA90&ots=Oc74JQKSF6&dq=iron mould molasses&pg=PA90#v=onepage&q=iron mould molasses&f=false just google search: mold molasses
I'd rather be "saved by the door" than obliterated, as much of Halifax was. My father explained the chemistry, but as often happens, it was right over my head. I think it was something about the molasses held the mould together and, maybe it was the silica that improved carbon content on the iron piece. I didn't ask him anything about acidity but he still buys the stuff for his granola.

This message was edited Jan 15, 2013 4:17 PM

carrielamont

carrielamont
Euless, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 15, 2013
3:01 PM

Post #9386350

I'm a big Woodie Guthrie fan too.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Euless, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 15, 2013
3:09 PM

Post #9386365

Growin, Did I mention that I nearly FAILED chemistry in High School? I'm considering writing an article about chemistry for gardeners, like chemistry for music majors. I like knowing the names of chemicals and how they work just a little but past the first few weeks I'm drowning. I guess I like to SOUND as though I know what I'm talking about without really understanding it very much. For instance when I said "Any liquid, honey, melted shortening, lava or even water, will move more quickly when hot and move more slowly when cold," I thought I should get Nobel prize for Physics!,

growin

growin
Vancouver, BC
(Zone 8b)


January 15, 2013
4:24 PM

Post #9386449

lol. I read that and laughed. Go for the chemistry for gardeners. DG is for gardeners by gardeners, and, like me, just attempting to comprehend garden chemistry is hard enough. Maybe a Simple Chemistry for the Gardener 101 would give the basics without going cross-eyed, in layperson terms. I failed algebra 11 x 3 which prevented further education. The only time it made sense was when I was spraying Roundup on a field to prepare for the greenhouse and had to mix x amount of concentrate to y amount of water to cover z amount of acreage. Otherwise, it was an unknown language.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

January 15, 2013
4:31 PM

Post #9386463

(Pie R "0"(round) X cornbread R (Square) Well it's an Heirloom...


Granola with molasses has always been my favorites!!!

This message was edited Jan 15, 2013 8:33 PM
Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

January 16, 2013
4:16 AM

Post #9386804

carrielamont:
Not at all what I was expecting - you tricker you !
I am also amazed how soon human beings forget - ignore small local tragedies.

Every newspaper though - some times will have a write up - reminding and amazing local readers. - saying on this day in a certian year this happened.

And it is such a weird tragedy that it lets the reader know - life in the past was really different - even though I noticed the copy of the newspaper in your article still had an ad about weight lose and shows a big busted woman and then a smaller busted woman. (Still some weight problems back then ?)

carrielamont

carrielamont
Euless, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 16, 2013
8:10 AM

Post #9387027

I was in the middle of working on THIS article when you and I had that conversation! I had just read something about different types of molasses used for different purposes. This is NOT that article! I didn't mean to be tricky.

But yeah, the paper really gives a "slice of life," doesn't it? I think that body image was just about to change--when was Twiggy? In the 19th century, wealthy people were bigger than poor people. The "too rich or too thin" was later, I think. The individual people I read about were working, hanging up laundry (no dryers) or gathering firewood (no central heating?), and I think truly f-a-t people were rare. But then again, for women, body image has ALWAYS zigzagged, from Twiggy to Marilyn Monroe (sz 14) to now, when size 12 comes from a plus size store!
Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

January 16, 2013
9:26 AM

Post #9387141

ohhhh, I bet you are right!
I have lots of pictures from the 1900s - on all sides of the family and there was not fat one in the waist anywhere to be seen.

It was the bust!

carrielamont

carrielamont
Euless, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 16, 2013
2:52 PM

Post #9387482

Corsets, my dear, corsets, which makes your middle overflow at the bust.

growin

growin
Vancouver, BC
(Zone 8b)


January 16, 2013
2:57 PM

Post #9387488

Maybe that'll be the new fad for 2013! I know I need one.
Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

January 17, 2013
3:47 PM

Post #9388501

Heee,heeee,heeee - I had to laugh at the overflow part.
And that is true.
And I should let it go at that.
I am afraid though that all of my ancestors did not need corsets to overflow.
I got some pictures of some grannies that are thin as a rail and they have big bobbles hanging down.
Well endowed.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Euless, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 17, 2013
3:58 PM

Post #9388507

no comment...THAT'S not what runs in my family!
Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

January 17, 2013
6:59 PM

Post #9388692

Maybe they in my family pictures were wearing corsets? If that was what was considered proper for the time - and I am sure all my grannies were proper women.
I am not sure what a corset is - did it just go around the waist?
I will have to look that one up - never have thought about it before.

Interesting article and horrible - to die by being drowned in sticky molasses.
.

growin

growin
Vancouver, BC
(Zone 8b)


January 17, 2013
8:53 PM

Post #9388790

Molasses disasters to corsets. DG is awesome!

carrielamont

carrielamont
Euless, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 18, 2013
7:15 AM

Post #9389037

Yes, it is.
Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

January 18, 2013
7:46 AM

Post #9389071

This molasses disaster ties into the time that women wore corsets

Corsets could have been responsible for this disaster because the guy that was inspecting the molasses tank was really looking at all the women in corsets, instead of the molasses tank..

We know that because right on the front page of the molasses disaster was an advertisment on losing weight but pictures are about the size of women's ----well bobbles. This disaster could have been avoided if women had only spent their money on bras. (no, I am not serious at all!)

There - now it is tied in ~ Sigh~ unfortunately in this day and time; there are lots of spin and reasoning like this that goes on a lot.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Euless, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 18, 2013
4:05 PM

Post #9389557

Hmmmmm were we, or they (to get right down to it) still wearing corsets in 1919?

Shortly after the United States' entry into World War I in 1917, the U.S. War Industries Board asked women to stop buying corsets to free up metal for war production. This step liberated some 28,000 tons of metal, enough to build two battleships.

...and...

After the war, more young women sought an education, and in the Western world marriage was delayed into the middle to late 20s. (I'm not sure about that. My mother got married in 1959 right out of college with a degree in child psychology. But she never wore a corset.)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_corsets#The_Edwardian_corset

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

January 18, 2013
4:21 PM

Post #9389576

Susan B Anthony ,, Women are a force ,, at least two Battleships worth ,, No more anchor chains ,,,( And no I am not being serious either)
Here comes the (""cannon"" balls) Duck!!!
Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

January 18, 2013
4:41 PM

Post #9389600

corsetts had metal in them - enough for two battleships!
Thanks for sharing that - that is about the most --amazing thing anyone has ever told me!!
Good gosh women were tough back then.

So, if they gave up corsetts in 1917 - what were they wearing?

No wonder there was an advertisment that said it could help to slender a woman up in that area.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Euless, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 18, 2013
5:02 PM

Post #9389636

They *might* have been wearing rubber girdles... they *might* have swooned and said "anything for the war effort (thank God I can breath again)"... they *might* just have said "hey, it's the newest style, big waists."
cybercrone
Toronto,, ON
(Zone 6a)

January 21, 2013
9:33 AM

Post #9392367

@ Carrie - rubber was also needed in the war effort - at least I know that in WWII women had to wear underpants with buttons instead of elastic at the waist. Which caused many an "incident" if the button came off!!
@ Liquid Amber - corsets fitted from the hip bones all the way up to just under the arms. A good corset was called an hourglass corset and was 'boned' up the length, earlier with whalebone stays, later with metal. It was laced at the back and had small fasteners up the front. Women who had help getting dressed used the laces at the back, and fashionable young ladies would hold on to the bedposts while their maids put a foot in the small of their backs so they could pull the laces tighter. And we wonder why they fainted all the time??!!

I'm not sure what they did directly after giving up their corset stays for the war effort in WWI, but by the 20s the fashion was to have as flat a chest as possible, and women bound their chests with cloth wrappers. You were not at all fashionable if your long string of beads did not hang completely straight down the front of your dress. This was the beginning of the flapper era and probably was a direct result of not being able to get corsets.

Fashion tells us so much about our political and economic situation when we examine it. It fascinates me.
Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

January 21, 2013
10:17 AM

Post #9392410

Thanks Cybercrone; Nothing like getting dressed in the morning - requiring a servant's foot in your back! I guess 1900s - there was less whaling going on because they were using Rockerfeller's "safe" lamp oil coming out of Ohio's ground. I was suprised Ohio use to be a major oil producer!

And surprised that molasses was used for other things beside being eaten!
I forgot what was it used for? I will have to reread this article.
Sorry Carrie - I forgot.

I always think of 1920s and that imagine comes to mind of a pole bean woman doing that little dance from side to side and those beads a swinging.

Sometimes a style comes around that a lot of people cannot possibly fit into.

And what may be in style in the whole of the country - is not regional.
As in my grandmother and her sisters (1900s) were all heavily courted which kept my greatgrandfather - a very strern man - very watchful and busy. Their figures were hour glass, but they also were a plump bunch too- no pole beans in their mist.

My grandmother and her sisters even in the 1980s during homecomings sat around telling each how fat and sassy they looked. If I had not been raised by my grandmother - I would have thought they were insulting one another. But they were complimenting each other.

Most times they would just grin and say, "Thank ya" ; but some times they would look real shy and say - "No, I am poorer than an snake."

My grandmother and her sisters all knew how to make the best biscuits - their husbands adored them and hung on to their every word - because----- they made such great biscuits, were considered really pretty, and were all pretty smart: but mostly those biscuits - that were the best served with butter smashed up with a little bit of sorghum molasses.

You know it is hard to believe that much molasses was in such a tank considering all the pictures taken of some pour, dirt farmer - with a really thin mule sitting under a press - and a few sorghum sticks hanging out. I guess that image is regional too?

carrielamont

carrielamont
Euless, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 21, 2013
1:06 PM

Post #9392617

Well, now, Liquid, I think sorghum molasses is not quite the same as molasses from sugar cane, but I will put that on my list for that other molasses article I'm going to write someday. I am taking notes, don't worry.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

January 21, 2013
1:36 PM

Post #9392657

I believe the Sorghum refers to Sorghastus? from he botanical of cane names , Bigger difference in Sulfur and non-Sulfur molasses..
Wonder why they say Maple syrup is Maple syrup... lol

carrielamont

carrielamont
Euless, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 21, 2013
2:32 PM

Post #9392715

Maybe I should write an article explaining maple syrup? I read today that there is updated Canadian currency with the WRONG maple leaf on it. The guy who discovered it says it is SUPPOSED to be a sugar maple leaf (Acer saccharum) and is instead a Norway maple (Acer plantanoides) which of course is not Canadian. The money-printers say they designed it to be a tyoical every-maple, any-maple, joe-the-maple, not a specific species.

http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/53976/

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

January 21, 2013
2:42 PM

Post #9392725

Did you know? aha!! something to look for .. and I would believe you do.. That is the Canadian Maple leaf is is slightly larger than those here ..Loved the old Sugar Maples !!
Black Maple leaves a little further south of me are huge !! they look almost palm like...
Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

January 21, 2013
5:16 PM

Post #9392863

Hand slap to the forehead here!
Sorghum molasses
sugar can molasses.

Of course! Got it.

Hey, and before you go to writing that article, you need to taste test - sorghum molasses vs regular sugar cane molasses, and see if you can tell the difference. Easy enough Save a Lot sells Sorghum
and Wal Mart sells molasses. I can tell the difference.
What is more---- I can tell the difference in the store bought stuff - and the stuff that a local family makes too.

I thought the maple leaf on the Canadian flag was - was Acer rubrum - red maple - because it is really red? No serrarated but details, details on something like money -or cloth might be hard to get details.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Euless, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 21, 2013
7:03 PM

Post #9392976

Well,according to the Reuters ridiculous news article DH sent me today, originally the Canadian flag = Canadian currency = sugar maple. (I don't know if the foliage color = flag color.) But now they re-did the currency and they tried to make it more generically maple instead of only Sugar Maple. I'll try to find the link.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Euless, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 21, 2013
7:03 PM

Post #9392979

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/01/18/us-maple-idUSBRE90H16S20130118
Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

January 21, 2013
8:55 PM

Post #9393188

Darn botanist causing trouble and telling them it was a Norway Maple - not even a native, unlike the sugar maple (still think it is red and that makes it a red maple).
Then on top of that there was this Asian --- White -- what?

And that is why the United Staters put pyramids/all seeing eyes and other secret stuff on ours.

If you do the Mason secret society stuff - then -- well it is made up anyway, and no body knows if it is right or not. Genius!

Learn Canadians- there is always away around the devil in the details.

growin

growin
Vancouver, BC
(Zone 8b)


January 21, 2013
9:47 PM

Post #9393219

Hmmm. I'm Canadian. Maybe I should flex my democratic rights as a plantsman & Canadian and be a squeaky wheel. It just takes a Ministerial Enquiry to the Bank of Canada. I looked at a bill in my pocket and, sure enough, it is not Acer saccharum. I'd say it was done in poor taste and disrespect to Canadian history and culture.
NecrochildK
Lafayette, LA

January 24, 2013
2:27 AM

Post #9395621

Hee, I always learned it as "Slow as molasses in winter". And this year I learned really just how slow that is. I take blackstrap molasses daily for my health and we live in an old house that has no real insulation. So when I get up and start my day with my molasses mixed in milk, the kitchen is freezing cold and so is the jar of molasses and it takes ages just to pour a single tablespoon! Very frustrating when you just want it to finish so you can retreat to a heated room. Also, I didn't think molasses was expensive at all, but then I guess it could be because I live in Louisiana where a large percentage of the US's sugar, molasses and cane syrup comes from.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

January 24, 2013
2:03 PM

Post #9396360

You might search Canadian "BIG LEAF Maple" The history books use to or do say the tree chosen for that national symbol was that. It may only resemble a Sugar Maple
I seem to remember something like that from my younger school days .
Something about a large , hardwood maple , red fall leaf , That was named "Big Leaf" All the Hardwood maples make sugar sap..
Since you are UBER you might be closer to the information , as for me, I am a foreign anyway . lol
Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

January 24, 2013
2:18 PM

Post #9396378

Necrochildk: Better keep those toes warm or you will get sick trying to take something for your health!

juhur;
Really that is what I thought - so it did not matter.
Sugar Maple, Red maple - both are red in the fall.

Norway maple is a very pretty, bright yellow in the fall.

Does that money come in anything other than green?

Growin: Give me your address, hand your money out on the tree, and I will be there this fall and see what it is? : )

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

January 24, 2013
2:39 PM

Post #9396390

Liquidambar2 Any Black Maple trees ,your way , that is a pretty one also . Yellow in the fall though.. still pretty, Gigantic green leaves..

carrielamont

carrielamont
Euless, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 28, 2013
3:37 PM

Post #9400526

I was comparing molasses prices to white, granulated sugar prices. Maybe molasses is less expensive where you are, but for most of the US, molasses is more like a condiment than a sweetener.

Whoops...I never sent this! Sorry. I sure did not mean to ignore you.
Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

January 28, 2013
6:21 PM

Post #9400673

I can buy from a family that actually raises sorghum and presses their own sorgham 6 dollars a pint. Hmmm that was two years ago.

Just this year who ever supplies Save a Lot reduced the jars in half and still is charging the same. It looks to me about a pint and a 1/2 cup -- hard to tell - the neck of the jars narrows upwards. It was about a quart before. . Christmas it was 8 dollars but they still have some and they have reduced it to about five dollars.

The little container sold at Wal Mart just guessing here is 1/2 a pint for about 4 dollars.

What is sugar now??? I have not bought any for a very long time.
And how do you compare the price of a liquid to that of a solid?
Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

January 28, 2013
6:33 PM

Post #9400689

Beside comparing a liquid to a solid - something else to consider ---

Molasses is really big on flavor - yeap flavor of it's very own - so it might take a little of it as compared to sugar.

Does sugar have a flavor?

What is a flavor, anyway?

Why does Necrochild take molasses as a medicine?

Why does the color of a green leaf in fall matter to Growin, Jurhur is willing to accept that all maples are equat; they are all green leaves under it all, must we look at the color of a leaf when it is how much shade they give us in the summer that should be important?

And as we answer these questions - what is the meaning of life?

growin

growin
Vancouver, BC
(Zone 8b)


January 29, 2013
9:24 AM

Post #9401273

deep

carrielamont

carrielamont
Euless, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 29, 2013
1:46 PM

Post #9401622

Very deep, man.

But on the same topic (almost), we drink a lot of bottled water out here, and there's this marketing thing about there being yes less plastic used in the "new design." I don't know what the old design was, but it feels like they're trying to slip something past someone.

The way the "non-drowsy" allergy medicine actually causes insomnia.

I was roughly comparing prices by ounce, but you're right, it was volume of liquid vs. weight of solid. I was assuming that molasses and sugar have an equal density. What I was trying to say (without getting political or doing more research) is that the price of sugar is subsidized, or kept artificially low, like other US crops. I'm not 100% sure, and maybe LA knows more about this. Although I *think* most things are sweetened these days with HFCS, high fructose corn syrup.

Sugar used to be considered a spice or a flavor, thousands of years ago, when it had to be carried by hand from the East, before Columbus and so on. I think we've refined all the flavor out, just like with everything else. Molasses ABSOLUTELY has a flavor.

This message was edited Jan 29, 2013 4:48 PM
Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

January 29, 2013
9:36 PM

Post #9402136

Sugar cane;
Grown in the warmer regions of the world, and children were made slaves to work with it.

At the same time sugar beets were being grown in Michigan. I know - I moved to the bay area and watchen them harvest it and on certain days when the wind and weather was just right - i could smell it .

Oh, and the big trucks hauling them out of the fields in the fall would seem to take up both lanes of the roads and runus over (almost). Those big gray beets if they fell on a car could put a big dent in it too!

Sugar beets on the way to being made into refined sugar also has a by product called sugar beet molasses.
In France they spread it on sandwiches, feed it to their stock and here in the United States put it on the roads to to help in keeping them to be slick on icy days.

Surely someone can make a deep comment on cold molasses, sticky roads????

I am sure the sugar beets are subsidized in Michigan-- and sugar cane grown in Hawaii - and Puerto Rico --- Florida - maybe??
Since molasses is a by product - they would be subsidized too???

carrielamont

carrielamont
Euless, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 30, 2013
10:44 AM

Post #9402598

Dunno, and I can't write about it--that would be political. They put SB molasses on roads to keep them slick, or to keep them sticky? In New England they use salt.
Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

January 30, 2013
12:00 PM

Post #9402685

You sure have a narrow path to walk then!

aaaaa

Found this in the Baltimore Sun


Md. to test molasses on wintry roads


Beet-based Ice Bite may cut use of road salt


November 24, 2009|By Michael Dresser | michael.dresser@baltsun.com


A thick, viscous fluid that is made from sugar beets, looks and feels like motor oil and smells a bit like instant coffee is part of the State Highway Administration's plans to keep Maryland roadways free of snow and ice this winter.

The molasses-based substance, known as Ice Bite, will be used in a pilot project in Frederick and Howard counties to test its effectiveness in pre-treating highways before spraying salt


and I found this
Associated Press:

To save money on salt there have been several new de-icing products that contain de-sugared sugar beet molasses, a waste product created when sugar beets are used to make commercial grade sugar. The first U.S. patent to describe the use of de-sugared sugar beet molasses as a de-icing agent was issued in 2000:
•Bloomer, T. A. Anti-Freezing and Deicing Composition and Method. U.S. Patent 6,080,330, June 27, 2000.

It's not clear how de-sugared sugar beet molasses works - even whether it can melt ice as effectively as chloride salts. However, the inventor claims that compared to other de-icing agents, de-sugared sugar beet molasses is more readily available at low cost, effective at temperatures below freezing, suitable for use in conventional sprayers, non-corrosive, environmentally safe, and non-offensively smelling.



Okay if it is DE SUGARED does that mean it is then not sticky? Probably.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Euless, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 30, 2013
12:35 PM

Post #9402723

Salt is horrible for plants, cars, buildings, etc. 2000 was a while ago...I wonder if it worked!
Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

January 30, 2013
4:46 PM

Post #9403059

Honestly Carrie You are making me work - ahhh just a little
This article was written Mar 2012.

The winter is half over.

They lover this stuff

http://suite101.com/article/cities-mix-sugar-beet-juice-with-road-salt-as-highway-deicier-a404432

Toronto is using it
New Jersey every where they are mixing a little beet juice molasses in with the with salt . The mixture of salt and beet juice or molasses (they can't make up their minds which to use and both names they mix and mingle-- I am not sure if it is the same or not??? ) but either one makes a better product than just salt alone, and it takes less salt to keep the roads de iced and takes few applications.

They try to get it down before there is precipitation - by spraying.

I know this stuff - yeah, it does work.

I did notice back 200 when the Kentucky road department started a new program of spraying the roads when they heard bad weather was coming in. There were little spray trails on the roads of salt and beet juice/molasses.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Euless, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 31, 2013
11:44 AM

Post #9403876

Oh the PATENT was 2000. Sorry, I am really trying to curb my curiosity and NOT click every link. One day I ended up reading English History from 0-present, Celts, Huns, Angles, French, Romans, etc. All for a little bit of trivia that I could not find!

Does the road look gucky? Does it stick to cars and snow boots? It sounds great. When I lived up north, the thing to do was go to FL (or TX or CA, you get it) and buy a used car that hadn't driven in salt. MA cars get used up pretty fast.
Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

January 31, 2013
1:33 PM

Post #9403959

No, but you can tell it is sprayed. You can see a bunch of parallel lines about the width of a magic marker all running down the highway. They just look kind of dark like water - but it is not water or it would have evporated, and at the same time there is a sparkle white look to the outer edge of the lines, probably the salt.

Other than that noting sticky - not on tires or boots.
I have seen the trucks that spray too - One time really close up - they stopped traffic and we all waited for the truck to come. It was a tanker truck with a piece of long metal in the back where some thing was sprayed out of -- making those parallel lines.

I lived in Michigan for a while -- I know they would line up at car washes waiting to wash their cars - and it did not matter if it was still snowing and very cold out. We still washed out cars. We all appreciated someone that did not slow around but moved around and quick . Nothing like waiting in line to wash a car.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Euless, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 31, 2013
2:14 PM

Post #9404003

Still, it's very smart to wash your car after it's been in the salt. We never washed cars...just let 'em sit in the driveway forever.
Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

January 31, 2013
9:30 PM

Post #9404454

Is that because you could not find those cars for the 20 foot drifts?
That wind up north blows that snow and keeps it moving all the time, and it loves to find cars and cover them up .

The wind here in Kentucky tonight sort of reminds me of the north wind in Michigan. I heard such wind outside tonight that my husband finally got up, and said what is going on out there-- it is a blizzard - snow with that north wind tonight.

It was so windy last night that one gust pounded at my garage doors that point north and there was actually a blast that squeezed through somehow - and pushed opened the door from the garage to the house. I thought I felt air - and knew for sure when I saw the cat that we keep in the garage walk by.

Well we try to keep the cat in the garage; cats!

I am thankful tonight that my two kids neither one of them have to drive to work tomorrow - now how could I be so blessed?

You cannot post until you register and login.


Other Article: Molasses in January--Just How Slow Is It? Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Boston Molasses NSgarden 1 Jan 21, 2013 1:19 PM


We recommend Firefox
Overwhelmed? There's a lot to see here. Try starting at our homepage.

[ Home | About | Advertise | Media Kit | Mission | Featured Companies | Submit an Article | Terms of Use | Tour | Rules | Privacy Policy | Contact Us ]

Back to the top

Copyright © 2000-2014 Dave's Garden, an Internet Brands company. All Rights Reserved.
 

Hope for America